UPDATE: Weekend roundup: Valeant's earnings games | Tesla's junk | How Apple stashes cash

11/12/17 09:15 AM EST

By Philip van Doorn, MarketWatch

Here are MarketWatch articles to read this weekend

MarketWatch rounded up 10 of its most interesting topics over the past week.

1. Valeant can't stop getting cute with its numbers

Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc. (VRX.T) complied with a December 2015 request from the SEC to stop using a non-GAAP metric it was calling "cash earnings" in its news releases. But the company has been sending reporters instructions on how to calculate the same numbers (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/valeant-is-providing-the-media-with-an-earnings-metric-that-the-sec-told-it-to-stop-using-2017-11-09).

2. A lack of faith in Tesla

Tesla Inc. (TSLA) keeps burning through cash as it strives for critical mass in car production and eventual profitability. It raised cash in August with the sale of $1.8 billion in non-investment-grade bonds with a coupon of 5.30%. But the market value of those junk bonds has dropped so much that they now yield roughly 6.32%. While the company's stock has risen 42% this year, it's down 15% over the past month. A word of warning: A simultaneous loss of faith by bondholders and stock investors could make life much more expensive for Tesla and its CEO Elon Musk (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/teslas-junk-bonds-are-trading-under-water-and-it-could-spell-trouble-for-elon-musk-2017-11-10).

3. Ever wonder how Apple stashes so much cash outside the U.S.?

A major part of the tax reform proposals being discussed in Congress is the "repatriation" of profits U.S. companies, including Apple Inc. (AAPL), have parked outside the country. How does the money get to tax havens? The biggest conduits for money from Apple and other companies might surprise you (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/how-does-apples-money-get-from-california-to-bermuda-anyway-2017-11-08).

Read:Here's how much the iPhone X costs Apple to make (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/heres-how-much-the-iphone-x-costs-apple-to-make-2017-11-07)

4. Short sellers help the market

Most nonprofessional investors shouldn't short-sell stocks, because the potential for limitless losses makes the activity very dangerous. Professional short sellers are often vilified. But they provide a valuable service to other investors (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/short-sellers-are-not-evil-but-they-are-misunderstood-2017-11-08) by questioning companies' business strategies and uncovering problems buried in financial statements, as Tomi Kilgore reports.

Also see:Why you should never short-sell stocks (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/why-you-should-never-short-sell-stocks-2015-11-19)

5. How to avoid investing mistakes

Joel Tillinghast has run the Fidelity Low-priced Stock Fund for 28 years. He takes a humble approach in sharing the lessons he has learned (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/fidelity-fund-manager-investing-successfully-is-about-minimizing-regrets-2017-11-06), in an interview with Silvia Ascarelli.

6. More on the Trump tax plan: Alimony

Eliminating tax deductions for alimony could make the divorce process a lot more difficult (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/under-trumps-tax-plan-divorces-are-about-to-get-a-lot-nastier-2017-11-03), Quentin Fottrell reports.

7. Companies that would be helped under the Trump plan:

You can count on a prolonged period of negotiation before Congress passes any tax reform plan, but Jeff Reeves believes these companies will fare well under any tax legislation (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/5-stocks-that-could-win-big-from-the-gop-tax-plan-2017-11-04).

8. Bargain stocks in Russia

With U.S. media coverage of Russia centered on U.S. politics, its easy to overlook potential investments there. Russia is the lowest-price emerging market for investors (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/hate-russia-for-messing-with-our-elections-but-love-their-cheap-stocks-2017-11-07), according to Michael Brush.

9. Parents: Tell your children how much college really costs

Some college graduates who are saddled with tremendous debt are surprised at the size of the hole they must dig themselves out of. Here's how parents can help their children (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/how-honest-family-conversations-can-help-students-avoid-regretting-their-college-debt-2017-11-07) make the best decisions for their educations and their finances.

Also see:These colleges use a loophole to make billions off the GI Bill (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/these-colleges-use-a-loophole-to-make-billions-off-the-gi-bill-2017-11-09)

10. A danger sign for U.S. stocks

The prospect of tax reform is helping the stock market but there are signs that investors are becoming less willing to take risks (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/small-cap-stocks-get-tripped-up-suggesting-the-broader-stock-market-rally-is-in-danger-2017-11-08), according to Thomas Kee.

Want more from MarketWatch? Check out our Personal Finance Daily (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/weekend-roundup-retailers-pain-a-former-insurance-ceo-on-obamacare-the-wisdom-of-charlie-munger-2017-01-06) or other newsletters (https://id.marketwatch.com/access/50eb2d087826a77e5d000001/latest/login_standalone.html?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.marketwatch.com%2Fuser%2Fnewsletter), and get the latest news, personal finance and investing advice.

-Philip van Doorn; 415-439-6400; AskNewswires@dowjones.com

 

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11-12-17 0915ET

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