XMEX:JMB A Jamba Inc Annual Report 10-K Filing - 1/3/2012

Effective Date 1/3/2012

Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

 

 

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended January 3, 2012

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

Jamba, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   001-32552   20-2122262
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation)
  (Commission
File No.)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

6475 Christie Avenue, Suite 150,

Emeryville, California 94608

(Address of principal executive offices)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (510) 596-0100

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Common Stock, par value $.001 per share

  The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

NONE

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to the filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act (check one):

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨    Accelerated filer   x
Non-accelerated filer   ¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

The aggregate market value of the registrant’s common stock, $0.001 par value per share, held by non-affiliates as of the last day of the registrant’s second fiscal quarter ended July 12, 2011 was $131,137,867 (based upon the closing sales price of registrant’s common stock on such date). For purposes of this disclosure, shares of common stock held by persons who held more than 5% of the outstanding shares of common stock and shares held by officers and directors of the registrant have been excluded in that such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for other purposes.

The number of shares of common stock of Jamba, Inc. issued and outstanding as of March 1, 2012 was 67,292,829.

 

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the Proxy Statement for the 2012 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “Proxy Statement”), to be filed within 120 days of the end of the fiscal year ended January 3, 2012, are incorporated by reference in Part III hereof. Except with respect to information specifically incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K, the Proxy Statement is not deemed to be filed as part hereof.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

JAMBA, INC.

ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JANUARY 3, 2012

 

Form 10-K

Item No.

  

Name of Item

   Page  
   PART I   

Item 1.

  

BUSINESS

     4   

Item 1A.

  

RISK FACTORS

     17   

Item 1B.

  

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

     29   

Item 2.

  

PROPERTIES

     30   

Item 3.

  

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

     31   

Item 4.

  

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE

     31   
   PART II   

Item 5.

  

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

     32   

Item 6.

  

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

     34   

Item 7.

  

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

     37   

Item 7A.

  

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

     58   

Item 8.

  

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

     59   

Item 9.

  

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

     89   

Item 9A.

  

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

     89   

Item 9B.

  

OTHER INFORMATION

     90   
   PART III   

Item 10.

  

DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

     92   

Item 11.

  

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

     92   

Item 12.

  

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

     92   

Item 13.

  

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

     92   

Item 14.

  

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

     92   
   PART IV   

Item 15.

  

EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

     93   
  

SIGNATURES

     94   

 

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Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

We believe that some of the information in this document constitutes forward-looking statements. You can identify these statements by forward-looking words such as “may,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “contemplate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” and “continue” or words of similar meaning. Examples of such statements include references to targeted growth, new store openings, Company Store comparable sales, expense management and the like. You should read statements that contain these words carefully because they:

 

   

discuss future expectations;

 

   

contain projections of future results of operations or financial condition; or

 

   

state other “forward-looking” information.

We believe it is important to communicate our expectations to our stockholders. However, there may be events in the future that we are not able to accurately predict or over which we have no control. The risk factors and cautionary language discussed in this document outline examples of risks, uncertainties and events that may cause actual results to differ materially from the expectations described in the forward-looking statements, including among other things:

 

   

our business strategy and financial performance;

 

   

our revenue and customer volatility based upon weather and general economic conditions;

 

   

fluctuations in various food and supply costs; and

 

   

competition and other risks related to the food services business.

You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this document.

All forward-looking statements included herein are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements contained or referred to in this section. Except to the extent required by applicable laws and regulations, we undertake no obligation to update these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this document or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

You should be aware that the occurrence of the events described in the “Risk Factors” portion of this annual report, the documents incorporated herein and our other SEC filings could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition or operating results.

 

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PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Background of Jamba, Inc.

Jamba, Inc. owns and franchises, on a global basis, Jamba Juice stores through its wholly-owned subsidiary, Jamba Juice Company. Jamba Juice Company is a leading restaurant retailer of better-for-you specialty beverages and food offerings which include great tasting fruit smoothies, fresh squeezed juices, hot teas, hot oatmeal made with organic steel cut oats, fruit and veggie smoothies, Fit’n Fruitful™ smoothies with Weight Burner Boost™, Whirl’ns™ Frozen Yogurt, breakfast wraps, side salads, sandwiches, California Flatbreads™, and a variety of baked goods and snacks. Jamba Juice Company has expanded the Jamba brand by licensing its trademark to sell consumer packaged goods through retail channels such as grocery, mass, club and convenience.

Jamba, Inc. was incorporated in Delaware on January 6, 2005 as a blank check company formed to serve as a vehicle for the acquisition of a then unidentified operating business. On July 6, 2005, Jamba, Inc. consummated its initial public offering. On March 10, 2006, Jamba, Inc. entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger with Jamba Juice Company, which first began operations in 1990. The merger between Jamba, Inc. and Jamba Juice Company (the “Merger”) was completed on November 29, 2006.

Unless the context otherwise requires, Jamba, Inc., the registrant, together with Jamba Juice Company, are referred to in this Form 10-K annual report (“Form 10-K”) as the “Company”, “Jamba”, “we”, “us” and “our.” Information regarding the Company’s fiscal periods is included in Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

Narrative Description of Business

As of January 3, 2012, there were 769 Jamba Juice stores globally, consisting of 307 Company-owned and operated stores (“Company Stores”),443 franchise-operated stores (“Franchise Stores”) in the United States, and 19 international Franchise Stores (“International Stores). As of January 3, 2012, Jamba Juice had a retail consumer products program that included ten license agreements covering a variety of consumer packaged goods (“CPG”).

The BLEND Plan—Our Strategic Priorities

The BLEND Plan continues to guide the Company’s strategic plan to successfully transform the Jamba brand from a made-to-order smoothie company to a globally recognized healthy, active lifestyle brand. In January 2009, we established initiatives under BLEND Plan 1.0 targeted towards the financial and strategic turnaround of the Company. During the subsequent years through 2011, we believe we achieved all the milestones related to BLEND Plan 1.0. As a result, our strategic plan has evolved and our focus is now on accelerating the growth of the Jamba brand and expanding the business model. The key components of our plan are driving brand strength, improving store economics, accelerating store or unit development and expansion of our CPG program, and are captured in our BLEND Plan 2.0:

 

   

make Jamba a top-of-mind healthy food and beverage brand;

 

   

embody a healthy, active lifestyle at store level and broadly across the enterprise;

 

   

accelerate global retail growth through new and existing formats;

 

   

build a global CPG platform in Jamba-relevant categories; and

 

   

pursue new ways to reduce costs and drive productivity.

 

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These strategic priorities support the Company’s mission to grow and develop Jamba as a premier healthy, active lifestyle brand, by offering consumers differentiated products and experiences at Jamba Juice stores and through other retail distribution channels. One of the keys to our success is the Jamba culture, a unique set of core values and actions that manifest themselves in team members executing at the highest levels of service while expressing their passion for the brand.

Make Jamba a top-of-mind healthy food and beverage brand

We have traditionally provided a range of freshly blended beverages, baked goods and snacks in our stores. Product innovation is a high priority at the Company. Our menu items are designed to offer our customers products that are relevant to pursuing a healthy, active lifestyle. Our research and development team, composed of food scientists, quality assurance specialists and food industry experts, is continually developing and testing new and improved menu items that support not only the integrity of the Jamba Juice brand but our commitment to offering great tasting innovative products made from high quality ingredients.

We utilize premium ingredients in our menu offerings and other products. We offer a range of high-quality, packaged, good-for-you snacks. The items in our food portfolio are continually being refined and optimized. We continue to believe there is consumer demand for better-for-you on-the-go food items that is not being fulfilled by other quick service restaurants. Our menu options meet our four mandatory core standards: no trans fat, no high fructose corn syrup, no artificial preservatives, and no artificial flavors. Our goal is for Jamba Juice to be the leader in the specialty, better-for-you beverage retailer segment.

Our research and development team continually seeks to enhance the product offerings available to customers, and where possible, reduce product and labor costs. Our research and development process includes both the development of new products and the optimization of existing menu items to ensure only the most appealing products are developed and offered to customers. We are passionate about creating differentiated, healthy, active lifestyle products that meet an even greater breadth and depth of customer health and wellness needs. There is no certainty that product development efforts will lead to the introduction and success of new product offerings or a potential increase in operating margins.

We continuously seek to optimize our products and develop new ones to help create points of differentiation, optimize day-parts and operating efficiencies, encourage habitual behavior and mitigate weather and seasonality. Examples of products we introduced in 2011 are:

 

   

New product platforms:

 

   

Fruit & Veggie smoothie platform which provides at least three full servings of fruits and vegetables in a delicious smoothie and speaks to consumers’ needs for a convenient way to increase their intake of both fruits and vegetables. These smoothies, which also meet the USDA school guidelines for healthy products, offer food service directors participating in our school lunch program another solution to providing children with healthier menu offerings.

 

   

Whirl’ns™ Frozen Yogurt, a line of ten signature specialty frozen yogurt flavors found only at Jamba Juice to meet consumer needs for a better-for-you treat, particularly in the evening day-part. This line is currently available in 157 California locations.

 

   

Breakfast wraps, a line of three savory scrambled egg whites mixed with other delicious ingredients wrapped in a warm tortilla. The wraps currently available include Turkey n’Sausage, Southwestern Chicken Chorizo and Spinach n’ Cheese.

 

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Seasonally relevant limited time offerings, including:

 

   

Probiotic Fruit and Yogurt Blends, which are healthy, refreshing yogurt smoothies made with Jamba Juice’s Probiotic Boost offered in three flavors—Vibrant Blueberry™, Strawberries Alive™ and Thrivin’ Mango™. The smoothies are made with fresh nonfat yogurt, soymilk and whole fruit, with a Probiotic Boost. These Fruit Blends are an effective way to help support the immune system and digestive health. Probiotic Fruit and Yogurt Blends rolled out in early 2011 as a seasonal limited time offer across the entire system.

 

   

Fruit Refreshers made with coconut water, which are thirst quenching and hydrating fruit beverages with essential electrolytes. Refreshers are offered in three flavors—Purely Pineapple, Tropical Mango and Strawberry Lemonade. The Fruit Refreshers deliver the natural hydration benefits of coconut water and provide a convenient way to stay hydrated.

 

   

New holiday beverages including the Apple Cinnamon Cheer™ smoothie and a boosted hot drink, The Chillbuster™. The Apple Cinnamon Cheer™ smoothie continues Jamba Juice’s tradition of offering a healthier alternative to indulgent holiday treats. The Chillbuster™ is Jamba Juice’s twist on a classic hot apple cider to ward off the wintry chills, and is pre-boosted with immunity and antioxidant Power boosts, delivering a soothing beverage rich in antioxidants.

All our products are rigorously tested prior to roll-out. In 2010, we established the “iDistrict” (Innovation District), a group of Company Stores. We test all major process enhancements, promotions, and product initiatives at the iDistrict stores. The testing of new initiatives in our iDistrict stores allows us to rapidly integrate relevant store and customer feedback and to quickly make adjustments to improve the quality of products and processes we ultimately deliver to the system. During 2011, the iDistrict was used to validate several new platform ideas including our breakfast wraps, which were rolled out to the entire system during the fall. This new platform complements our already strong breakfast offering of slow-cooked oatmeal, freshly squeezed juices, Fruit & Yogurt parfaits and hot beverages.

Embody a healthy, active lifestyle at store level and broadly across the enterprise

We were founded on the belief that maintaining a balance of physical activity, good nutrition, and community involvement are critical to healthy living. Our focus is on how we communicate with consumers, and how we engage them on achieving and maintaining a healthy, active lifestyle. Our recently announced Live Fruitfully™ consumer marketing campaign, along with our Ambassadors of Wow and two Company spokespersons, tennis star Venus Williams and nutrition expert Tara Gidus, will continue to educate and inspire consumers on leading a healthy, active lifestyle. In addition, we are planning to significantly increase the nutrition education and product training provided to our team members to build their knowledge.

Our strategy of engaging customers in healthy lifestyle activities is a continuation of our focus on improving the quality and consistency of customer service at our stores. We believe our continued focus on our customers, including encouraging them to lead a healthy, active lifestyle, will lead to an enhanced brand experience, thereby heightening customer loyalty and satisfaction, and ultimately increasing frequency of visits and our market share.

Our commitment to health and wellness in schools is evidenced in the growth of our participation in school lunch programs in over 40 California school districts. Another component of our community engagement effort is the enhancement of our fundraising opportunities for non-profit organizations. We continue to work with a variety of non-profit organizations, including the National Parent-Teacher Association and the National Gardening Association, to provide fundraising opportunities for school and youth oriented programs. We also sponsor a grant program to promote nutrition education and gardening among youth organizations and schools through KidsGardening.org, a division of the National Gardening Association.

 

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During 2011, we launched a social responsibility program called Team Up for a Healthy America, with the aim of raising consumer awareness of Jamba’s focus on critical national health issues. This program gained nationwide attention as a result of our partnership with several organizations including National Geographic Kids, the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA), the U.S. Water Polo Association, the Girl Scouts of America and our Company spokesperson, Venus Williams.

Our mission to inspire and simplify healthy living extends to our Company Store team members, who enjoy access to a broad offering of benefits in support of maintaining a healthy, active lifestyle. During 2011, Jamba was named one of the San Francisco Bay Area’s healthiest employers by The Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal and the San Francisco Business Times.

Accelerate global retail growth through new and existing formats

The focus of our global retail expansion is the development of traditional and non-traditional Franchise Stores. We believe this franchise strategy will better position us for growth in market share, reduce capital outlays, provide better overall margins, allow us to open more locations at an accelerated rate, increase our brand presence to support other Company initiatives such as consumer products licensing, and increase customer frequency.

A primary goal of the Company is to grow the Jamba brand by establishing more points of distribution inherently giving us a broader brand awareness and deepening brand loyalty by making it easier for consumers to access and enjoy all the products and services Jamba has to offer. We believe we have significant market expansion opportunities globally.

Jamba Juice—Domestic

We have grown our concept and brand through Company Store and Franchise Store locations. As of January 3, 2012 there were 750 Jamba Juice store locations in the United States consisting of 307 Company Stores and 443 Franchise Stores operating in 25 states. Of the 750 locations, 394 stores are located in California, of which 292 are Company Stores and 102 are Franchise Stores. We lease the real estate for all of our Company Stores. Our market planning has shown that there is potential for at least 2,700 total Jamba Juice stores in the United States, all of which we believe can be profitable and would meet our current store opening criteria. During 2011, Franchisees opened 22 new Franchise Stores, closed eight Franchise Stores, and acquired 42 Company Stores, which are now operating as Franchise Stores. We also converted four Franchise Stores to the JambaGo format. As a result, Franchise Stores represented approximately 60% of the Jamba Juice system as of January 3, 2012.

We generally characterize our stores as either “traditional” or “non-traditional” locations. A traditional location is characterized as a business premises that exists primarily as a Jamba Juice store. Traditional stores average approximately 1,200 — 1,400 square feet in size. These stores are located either in major urban centers or in suburban strip mall centers. As of January 3, 2012, there were 583 traditional Jamba Juice store locations.

A non-traditional location is characterized as a Jamba Juice store located within another primary business in conjunction with other businesses or at institutional settings such as colleges and universities, entertainment venues, shopping malls, transportation centers, supermarkets and airports. A “captive” audience is a common characteristic of non-traditional locations. We believe one benefit of the development of non-traditional stores is to increase awareness of the Jamba Juice brand to complement the traditional stores in the area. As of January 3, 2012, there were 167 non-traditional Jamba Juice store locations.

We continue to innovate in the design of traditional and non-traditional stores as well. Our goal is to vary the size and format of our stores to allow us to locate them in or near a variety of settings. As a result, the typical costs to construct a Jamba Juice non-traditional store ranges from $185,000 to $408,000 and the typical costs to

 

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construct a traditional Jamba Juice store ranges from $264,000 to $462,000. Our flexibility in store construction enables us to develop stores in a variety of venues, broadening the visibility of the Jamba brand and giving more customers easier, more convenient access. In turn, we hope format flexibility will help us to attract qualified franchisees and to assure them of potentially achieving a higher return on their investment in capital expenditures.

In October, 2011, we announced the test of a new growth concept called JambaGo™. This growth concept is an innovative express service utilizing compact technology to make select smoothie flavors in “stations” using pre-packaged ingredients. This new concept will enable Jamba to rapidly expand brand presence. The JambaGo platform targets venues servicing captive audiences with greater demand for higher volumes where the need for high-speed service is essential and where a full-sized Jamba Juice store or kiosk would not be feasible. Such venues include schools, grocery and convenience stores, stadiums, theaters, event centers and select airport locations. As of January 3, 2012, there were 35 JambaGo locations in six states.

Through our franchising program, we offer franchisees choices in store format and number of stores they wish to operate including (i) traditional store venues such as single store franchises, (ii) nontraditional store venues such as mall, university, supermarket or transit hub locations, and (iii) multi-unit license agreements which grant the franchisee exclusive rights to develop and operate a specified number of stores within a specified period of time within a specified geographic area, which we call area development agreements.

Our current traditional store franchise agreement provides for an initial 10-year term. The agreement is renewable for two consecutive 10-year terms, subject to various conditions and state law. The royalty rate in the current franchise agreement for domestic locations is generally 5.5% — 6% of revenue, with franchisees required to contribute up to an additional 4% of revenue to a company-administered advertising fund. At the present time, in general, we are charging 2% of revenue as the marketing contribution for our traditional store franchisees. Traditional store franchisees are also expected to spend 1.5% of sales on local marketing efforts. There is typically up to a one-mile geographic radius restriction for traditional stores in non-downtown areas. The royalty rates and marketing contributions for non-traditional stores vary depending upon type (transit hub, college or university or supermarket). Franchisees typically pay an initial fee of $20,000 or $25,000 for traditional store locations, and an initial fee ranging from zero to $15,000 for non-traditional store locations. We generally do not provide any form of financing to our franchisees.

As of January 3, 2012, we had fifteen area developers with rights to develop additional Franchise Stores pursuant to development agreements. The exclusive territories covered by these agreements include selected markets in the states of Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Utah, Washington State, Washington D.C., and Wisconsin. These developers had contractual commitments to open an aggregate of 78 new Franchise Stores in their respective territories over the next several years. Eight of the fifteen development agreements were entered into in connection with refranchising transactions, where a purchaser of Company Stores also agreed to develop new Franchise Stores.

Area developers typically enter into a separate franchise agreement for each store opened. Under typical development agreements, upon execution of the multi-unit development agreement, the area developer generally pays, as a development fee, one-half of a $20,000-$25,000 initial fee, or $10,000-$12,500, for each store required to be developed. Area developers are obligated to finance their own build-out of each store location according to our specifications.

We also continue to strengthen our relationships with beverage and food concessionaires operating at non-traditional venues such as colleges, universities, airports and other transit hubs, and other retail and entertainment venues to help maximize our non-traditional franchise development. In addition to our own efforts, we are approached by sophisticated concessionaires and contract feeders whose independent research has identified us as ideal for locations such as colleges and universities, sport venues, airports, and other

non-traditional venues where they have exclusive rights from venue owners to develop. When it fits our expansion strategies, these opportunities are incorporated into our own plans.

 

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Our market planning and site selection process is integral to the successful execution of our growth strategy. We have processes for identifying, analyzing, and assigning undeveloped markets for either Company Store or Franchise Store development. Once a market is selected, we carefully screen trade areas for demand based on demographic, psychographic and Jamba Juice specific variables to assess the risk of developing a store or permitting a franchisee to do so. We review trade areas to ensure that they meet our guidelines for new store development and begin the site selection or approval process. Once a trade area is approved, we carefully screen prospective locations for visibility, traffic patterns, ease-of-use and co-tenancy for potential Company Store and Franchise Store locations. Our expansion strategy involves using this market planning and site selection process to leverage areas of demand within each market. We intend to use this approach to encourage the clustering of stores in specific geographic areas of demand, which we believe will drive brand awareness, improve operating and marketing efficiencies for Franchise Stores while leveraging the costs associated with regional supervision. Distribution efficiencies can also be realized through this strategy. In addition, we believe the ability to hire qualified team members is enhanced in markets where Jamba is a broadly recognized brand.

Under our refranchising initiative, which was announced in May 2009 and concluded in April 2011, we sold 174 Company Stores to new or existing franchisees. Such sales have helped us to accelerate growth, achieve certain operational efficiencies, and position franchisees and aspiring area developers with local or regional expertise to succeed by providing a core of established stores within their exclusive development area. In many refranchising transactions, we entered into development agreements committing buyers to build additional Franchise Stores in the regions their purchased stores occupy. In addition, as part of these refranchising transactions, buyers of mature Company Stores are obligated to refresh and refurbish these stores.

Jamba Juice—International Franchising

We have accelerated our international growth agenda, resulting in the increase of our International Store count from one store as of December 28, 2010 to 19 stores as of January 3, 2012. As of January 3, 2012, there were Jamba Juice locations in South Korea, the Philippines, Canada and the Bahamas.

In 2010, we signed a master development agreement with SPC Group, a leading specialty food company in South Korea with over 4,500 retail locations across several brands, to develop 200 Jamba Juice stores in South Korea over the next 10 years. The first Jamba Juice store opened at the Incheon airport in January 2011. By January 3, 2012, there were 16 Jamba Juice stores operating in the South Korea market.

In April 2011, Jamba announced a master development agreement with Max’s Group of Companies, a well-established restaurant and franchise operator, to develop 40 stores in the Philippines over the next 10 years. The first store opened in Manila in November 2011. In May 2011, we signed a master development agreement with Canadian Juice Corp., the principals of which are world leaders in the frozen yogurt category with over 1,200 stores in 25 countries, to develop 80 Jamba Juice stores over the next 10 years. The first Jamba Juice store opened in Toronto in October 2011. We work closely with all our international partners to build the Jamba Juice brand and implement the Jamba Juice system locally, and to maximize revenue and margin growth opportunities, recognizing commercial, cultural and dietary diversity in each market.

Our brand and products have international appeal and we continue to engage in discussions with additional potential partners regarding the expansion of Jamba Juice stores into more international markets. The success of further international expansion will depend on, among other things, local acceptance of the Jamba Juice concept and menu offerings, and our ability to attract qualified franchisees. Our agreements take the form of development and franchise agreements under which we typically receive an initial territory fee, store opening fees, and ongoing royalty revenues based on a percentage of sales.

 

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Build a global CPG platform in Jamba-relevant categories

Extending the Jamba brand into mass retail across all 50 states by continued development of CPG solutions provides significant business opportunities. As of January 3, 2012, we had license agreements in place reflecting over 30 individual products, where we receive ongoing royalties based on a percentage of wholesale product sales. These include Jamba-branded make-at-home frozen smoothie kits, frozen yogurt novelty bars, all natural energy drinks, coconut water fruit juice beverages, functional daily Brazilian super fruit shots, boosted trail mixes and functionally boosted fruit cups. Significant retail distribution gains were realized in 2011, growing to approximately 30,000 points of distribution as of January 3, 2012, up from 10,000 in the prior year. Two of our licensing partners, Inventure Foods and Oregon Ice Cream, led the growth with key retail partners across grocery, mass and club channels.

During the fourth quarter of 2011, we signed license agreements with Bare Fruit LLC to develop a line of all natural bake-dried, 100% fruit chips and with Core-Mark Holdings Company, Inc. to create wraps and sandwiches for the convenience channel. Discussions with potential licensees regarding new and complementary product categories are ongoing.

Our CPG products will help extend Jamba brand accessibility, offer additional product solutions and increase usage occasions. In addition, we believe the growth in our CPG platform will help reinforce Jamba as a healthy, active lifestyle brand with products that are better-for-you, convenient and portable. All of our agreements to date have been structured as license agreements, whereby we receive ongoing royalties based on a percentage of product sales. In the future, to support and optimize our brand extension, we may structure these relationships in other ways such as joint venture agreements, co-packing agreements and sales and distribution agreements.

Pursue new ways to reduce costs and drive productivity

This strategic priority affects all aspects of our system in our efforts to continue to drive store-level profitability and improve returns for Company Stores and Franchise Stores. Strong store-level economics are critical to the Company’s success and therefore management is diligently focused on initiatives to improve these metrics.

During 2011, we introduced innovative technologies, such as Google Wallet for point of sale efficiency. Google Wallet is a virtual wallet that stores customer payment information, enabling customers the ease and speed of paying in-store by tapping their mobile devices at the point of sale terminal.

In February 2011, we announced an alliance with SYGMA, a subsidiary of Sysco, a global leader in foodservice distribution. The alliance has allowed us to reduce costs and improve our overall service due to SYGMA’s strong national distribution network. In December 2011, we expanded our alliance to increase Jamba’s system-wide access to SYGMA’s highly efficient freight and logistics technology to ensure delivery of the right product at the right time at the right price. This alliance is expected to help us to meet our efficiency goals. We also utilize workforce management technology to help optimize work schedules, resulting in improved productivity and reduced labor costs as well as improved customer service.

We also monitor our general and administrative expenses so that we may better leverage our existing infrastructure in support of our growth strategy. We continue to look for opportunities, including the use of innovative technological solutions, for functional improvement in order to drive down expenses and improve productivity.

 

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Store Operations

Franchise Store Management

We continuously review Franchise Store operations, principally through our Regional Franchise Leaders, who are Company representatives, who make both scheduled and unannounced visits of Franchise Stores. Our Regional Franchise Leaders help us to ensure that only approved products are in use and that our prescribed operations practices and procedures are being followed in our Franchise Stores. We can terminate a franchise agreement if a franchisee does not operate and maintain a Franchise Store in accordance with our requirements. We also review the financial health of our franchisees through business and financial reviews. We maintain a Franchise Advisory Council (“FAC”). The FAC formalizes a channel of communication through a representative group of franchisees to provide advice, counsel and input to us on important issues impacting the business.

We have leveraged technology to improve communications, training and collaboration with our stores and franchisees. As of January 3, 2012, the Jamba system had approximately 60% Franchise Stores and 40% Company Stores. Our ongoing commitment to building strong relationships with our franchisees has enabled better two-way feedback that has helped us to identify best practices and to facilitate more effective and efficient launch of new products and marketing campaigns.

Company Store Management

We believe operational excellence throughout the Jamba system is vital to the Company’s success. Our Company Store field and store operations team plays a critical role in maximizing the performance of our stores across the system. We recruit and retain leaders with broad experience in management and our industry. Our field leadership consists of a combination of Regional Directors of Operations and District Managers to support our Company Store operations.

Our typical Company Store operations team consists of a combination of a General Manager at each store, two to four Shift Managers and approximately 10 to 20 team members depending on the time of year. We continually evaluate opportunities to optimize our labor planning algorithms further to achieve optimal staffing levels throughout the day, which may help us reduce staffing costs at certain stores under certain circumstances.

A major aspect of our BLEND Plan is to continue to improve the level and consistency of customer service at our stores. We are devoting significant resources to ensure that all stores across the system offer a superior customer experience, including engaging customers on healthy, active lifestyle activities. Our store excellence guide is designed to improve operational execution and performance by establishing comprehensive standards which we expect all of our stores to achieve and maintain. We also instituted a bonus program for Company Store managers that rewards customer service goal achievements. These factors have both positively impacted customer satisfaction during the year and better positioned the Company to ensure that all stores in the Jamba system are delivering against the key drivers of customer satisfaction on a consistent basis. We believe team members are the key to our success and support the development of a culture that fosters personal interaction, mutual respect, trust, empowerment, enthusiasm and commitment.

Maintaining a culture that embodies healthy, active lifestyle in an authentic, fun, friendly and efficient manner in Company Stores as well as Franchise Stores is essential as we continue to expand, and we believe that it is critical to developing our brand and ensuring our continued success.

Training

We conduct various training programs for franchisees, team members, support center staff and our leadership team. We are dedicated to providing a meaningful experience for all employees, with ample opportunity to develop leadership skills as they move up through the organization. Our training programs include

 

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formal programs such as the Manager-in-Training programs for new managers and informal one-on-one discussions held between General Managers, District Managers and Regional Directors of Operations. All of our training programs reinforce the importance of strong customer service and sales skills. We also make training materials and best practice information available to our franchisees to help create, preserve, and support a singular culture of excellence within all of the stores that comprise our system.

Recruiting and Retention

We carefully screen potential employees to ensure that they hold many of our core values and fit into our culture. By maintaining this emphasis and encouraging responsibility and accountability at every level, we believe that we have created a sense of team member loyalty and an open and interactive work environment, resulting in a highly passionate workforce. Our employees are paid competitive wages and are offered opportunities for advancement. In addition to competitive wages, store managers are eligible for performance-based bonuses. We also provide best practice information, qualifications and other information to our franchisees to assist them with hiring and retention and to preserve a singular culture within the stores that comprise our system.

Advertising and Marketing

We encourage consumers to Live Fruitfully™, by embracing healthy eating habits and engaging in an active lifestyle. In 2011, we launched an “Ambassadors of Wow” contest on Facebook where fans had the chance to become national and local Ambassadors of the Jamba brand. We have over 100 Ambassadors who are passionate, enthusiastic and live a healthy, active lifestyle.

We have many communication touch points with our consumers and are able to leverage these touch points across our entire system. Promotional events and new product campaign launches are vehicles to drive traffic and awareness. We also use social media outlets to encourage greater frequency of visits by existing customers and to drive trial and awareness among potential new customers. Currently, we have over 1.2 million fans who “like” us on Facebook and over 19,000 followers on Twitter.

We launched a social responsibility program called Team Up for a Healthy America™, with the aim of raising awareness of Jamba among consumers and informing them about our focus on critical national health issues like childhood obesity and associated health risks. This program gained nationwide attention as a result of our partnership with several organizations including National Geographic Kids, the WNBA, the U.S. Water Polo Association, the Girl Scouts of America, our Company spokesperson Venus Williams, and a number of other organizations. The promotional activity coupled with our public relations efforts enabled us to reach over eight million households with our brand message, significantly raising awareness of Jamba as a mission-based brand and socially responsible company.

In general, both Company and Franchise Stores currently contribute 2% of sales to a national marketing fund and are also expected to spend an additional 1.5% of sales on local marketing efforts. In addition, we plan to develop regional advertising initiatives to assist certain regions to meet their local marketing spending obligations. We engage in marketing campaigns to enhance national brand awareness by such means as radio, email, online and other advertising media.

We also benefit from national media attention related to our programs. We have been featured in stories appearing in nationally syndicated journal and newspapers, including Nation’s Restaurant News, Franchise World, Success Magazine, QSR Magazine, and The Wall Street Journal. We have also received product placement in television shows and feature films. Our participation in local fundraising events also helps capture a significant amount of coverage from local television and radio stations.

 

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Product Supply

We are committed to providing only the finest smoothies, juices and other food products. Smoothie and juice products depend heavily upon supplies of fresh and individually quick frozen (“IQF”) fruit. The quality of each smoothie depends to a large degree on the quality of the basic fruit ingredients from which it is made. It is essential that the supply of fruit is of the highest quality and is consistent throughout the year. To achieve these goals we purchase our projected requirements for the coming year from suppliers at the height of the season. The supply and price of fresh and IQF fruit are dependent upon the supply and demand at the time of purchase and are subject to volatility. Supply and price can be affected by multiple factors in the producing regions, including weather, natural disasters and regional political and economic conditions.

We buy certain fruits and dairy using fixed priced or to-be-fixed priced purchase commitments to secure adequate supply of quality ingredients for our products. As a result, we have purchase obligations with certain suppliers for certain fruits and dairy for various terms typically ranging from one year to five years. Also, we have one contract with a supplier for a 15 year term that ends in 2024. These contracts are commitments to purchase a minimum amount of fruit and other items used in the production of our products and the aggregate costs are estimated at $83.3 million.

Southwest Traders, Inc. is a distributor of proprietary products to our Company Stores and Franchise Stores. Southwest Traders distributed ingredients that made up approximately 94% of cost of goods for Jamba Juice Company during 2011. We have signed distributor agreements with SYGMA, a subsidiary of Sysco, and with U.S. Foods; both are leaders in selling, marketing and distributing food products to restaurants and other facilities. Our plans include leveraging the new arrangements across our entire system. Our distributors do not manufacture or negotiate pricing agreements for products sold in our stores. They serve solely in a warehousing and distribution capacity.

Our supply chain and purchasing organization is partly funded by all stores across the Jamba system. This contributes to funding procurement and management of our supplies and supports our suppliers. The program allows for a mark-up of certain products purchased by Company Stores and Franchise Stores, which is subsequently rebated back to the Company by the supplier.

Competition

The retail beverage and food industry is highly competitive and fragmented. Restaurants compete based on a number of factors, including quality, price-value relationships, customer service, name recognition, employee hiring and retention and location. We compete with a variety of purveyors of quick, convenient beverage and food products, including quick service restaurants/fast food establishments, coffee shops, donut shops, frozen yogurt shops and grocery stores. While competition in the beverage and food market is fragmented, competition is increasing, and a major competitor with substantially greater resources than the Company could enter the market at any time and compete directly against Jamba Juice stores.

We compete most directly with regional smoothie stores, most of which are franchises of other smoothie brands. The rising popularity of convenient and healthy food items may result in increased competition from non-smoothie retailers as they increase their offerings of smoothies and other juice-related products, and as we increase our food offerings we will be placing ourselves into direct competition with other quick serve food concepts with well established businesses.

In addition, we also face intense competition from both restaurants and other specialty retailers for suitable sites for new stores and qualified personnel to operate both new and existing stores. There can be no assurance that the Company or our franchisees will be able to continue to secure adequate sites at acceptable rent levels or that the Company or franchisees will be able to attract a sufficient number of qualified personnel to operate our stores.

 

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Government Regulation and Environmental Matters

Government Regulation. We are subject to extensive and varied federal, state and local government regulation, including regulations relating to public health and safety and zoning codes. We operate each of our stores in accordance with standards and procedures designed to comply with applicable codes and regulations. However, if we could not obtain or retain food or other licenses, it would adversely affect our operations. Although we have not experienced, and do not anticipate, any significant difficulties, delays or failures in obtaining required licenses, permits or approvals, any such problem could delay or prevent the opening of, or adversely impact the viability of, a particular store or group of stores.

California and other states and local jurisdictions have enacted laws, rules, regulations and ordinances which may apply to the operation of a Company Store, including those which (a) establish general standards, specifications and requirements for the construction, design and maintenance of the store premises; (b) regulate matters affecting the health, safety and welfare of our customers, such as general health and sanitation requirements for restaurants; employee practices concerning the storage, handling, cooking and preparation of food; special health, food service and licensing requirements; restrictions on smoking; exposure to tobacco smoke or other carcinogens or reproductive toxicants and saccharin; availability of and requirements for public accommodations, including restrooms; (c) set standards pertaining to employee health and safety and mandatory health insurance; (d) set standards and requirements for fire safety and general emergency preparedness; (e) regulate the proper use, storage and disposal of waste, insecticides and other hazardous materials; (f) establish general requirements or restrictions on advertising containing false or misleading claims, or health and nutrient claims on menus or otherwise, such as “low calorie”, “fat free” or “organic”; (g) establish requirements concerning withholdings and employee reporting of taxes on tips and (h) regulate or ban the use of polystyrene cups.

In order to develop and construct more stores, we or our franchisees need to comply with applicable zoning, land use and environmental regulations. Federal and state environmental regulations have not had a material effect on our operations to date, but expansion of our menu offerings or more stringent and varied requirements of local governmental bodies with respect to zoning, land use and environmental factors could delay or even prevent construction and increase development costs for new stores. We and our franchisees are also required to comply with the accessibility standards mandated by the U.S. Americans with Disabilities Act, which generally prohibits discrimination in accommodation or employment based on disability. We may, in the future, have to modify stores, for example, by adding access ramps or redesigning certain architectural fixtures, to provide service to or make reasonable accommodations for disabled persons. While these expenses could be material, our current expectation is that any such action will not require us to expend substantial funds.

We are subject to the U.S. Fair Labor Standards Act, the U.S. Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 and various federal and state laws governing various matters including minimum wages, overtime meal and rest periods, accommodations to certain employees, and other working conditions. Complying with these rules subjects us to substantial expense and can also expose us to liabilities from claims for non-compliance. In addition, we pay a significant number of our hourly staff at rates consistent with, but higher than, the applicable federal or state minimum wage. Accordingly, increases in the minimum wage would increase our labor cost. We are also subject to various laws and regulations relating to our current and any future franchise operations. See “Risk Factors—Governmental regulation may adversely affect our ability to open new stores or otherwise adversely affect our existing and future operations and results.”

We are also subject to various federal and state laws that regulate the offer and sale of franchises and aspects of the licensor-licensee relationships. Many state franchise laws impose restrictions on the franchise agreement, including the duration and scope of non-competition provisions, the ability of a franchisor to terminate or refuse to renew and the ability of a franchisor to designate sources of supply. The Federal Trade Commission, or the FTC, and some state laws also require that the franchisor furnish to prospective franchisees a franchise disclosure document that contains prescribed information and, in some instances, require the franchisor to register the franchise offering.

 

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Environmental Matters. We are subject to federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations concerning the use of polystyrene products, and several counties in which our stores are located have already banned the use of our polystyrene cups. As more state and local governments take actions to preserve the environment we may be subject to further bans on the use of polystyrene cups. A federal ban on the use of polystyrene cups would force us to eliminate the use of polystyrene products system-wide. We are actively exploring economically viable alternatives to polystyrene cups, which can provide the same quality and integrity of our frozen smoothies to ensure customer satisfaction.

During 2011, we continued to make progress on certain eco-sustainability initiatives first launched in 2009, focusing on waste reduction and increasing the use of recyclable products. Our green initiatives include the introduction of more environmentally friendly packaging for our products, the launch of several optimization programs to reduce waste, participation in recycling programs, and participation in composting programs of our food waste where it is feasible for us to do so. Among the packaging improvements to date are the introduction of new cup carriers, oatmeal cups and lids, breakfast clear cups and lids, spoons and napkins that are made from recycled material. We have also reduced the amount of corrugated cardboard used for bulk shipping, reduced labeling requirements, and reduced freight, resulting in lower fuel emissions.

Trademarks and Domain Names

The Company owns and/or has applied to register numerous trademarks and service marks in the United States and in other jurisdictions covering additional countries throughout the world. Some of the Company’s trademarks, including Jamba Juice® and the Jamba logo are of material importance to the Company. The duration of trademark registrations varies from country to country. However, trademarks are generally valid and may be renewed indefinitely as long as they are in use and/or their registrations are properly maintained. In addition, the Company has registered and maintains numerous Internet domain names, including “jamba.com” and “jambajuice.com.”

Management Information Systems

Each Company Store has computerized point-of-sale registers which collect transaction data used to generate pertinent information, including sales transactions and product mix. Additionally, the point-of-sale system is used to authorize, batch and settle credit card data. All product prices are programmed into the point-of-sale register from the Company’s corporate office. Franchise Stores generally use the same point-of-sale registers as Company Stores, but may elect to use alternative systems provided Company approval and certain information is shared with the Company. Franchisees set their own menu prices.

Company Stores use the Company’s licensed labor management software to record employee time clock information, schedule labor, and provide management reports. Company Stores and many Franchise Stores use the Company’s licensed food cost management software to improve inventory management and provide management reports.

During 2011, we completed our transition to a customer survey program to more quickly and better monitor the customer experience across the system. Our continued focus on technological and procedural enhancements, in areas such as labor and inventory management, has relieved our store managers from manual administrative tasks and enables them to better focus on delivering exceptional customer service.

Seasonality

Our business is highly subject to day-to-day volatility based on weather and varies by season. A significant portion of the Company’s revenue is realized during the second and third quarters of the fiscal year, which include the summer months. The fourth quarter of the fiscal year, which encompasses the winter months and the holiday season, has traditionally been our lowest revenue volume quarter. To help offset the seasonal nature of

 

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our business we have launched our hot beverage platform, including coffee and teas, and a hot, savory breakfast platform and have expanded the number of stores offering our hot oatmeal, sandwiches and California Flatbreads. Our business will likely continue to be subject to seasonal patterns for the foreseeable future, given that the largest portion of our sales continues to be from the sale of smoothies during the warmer parts of the year. Because of the seasonality of the business, results for an individual quarter are not necessarily indicative of the results which may be achieved for the full fiscal year.

Executive Officers

Our executive officers, their respective ages and positions as of March 8, 2012, and descriptions of their business experience are set forth below. There are no family relationships among any of the executive officers named below.

James D. White, Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, age 51

Mr. White has served as the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer since December 2008. From 2005 to 2008, Mr. White was Senior Vice President of Consumer Brands for Safeway, Inc. with responsibility for brand strategy, innovation, manufacturing and commercial sales. From 2002 to 2005, Mr. White was Senior Vice President of Business Development, North America at the Gillette Company.

Karen L. Luey, Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Administrative Officer and Secretary, age 51

Ms. Luey has served as the Company’s Chief Financial Officer since August 2008, Executive Vice President, Chief Administrative Officer since May 2011, and Secretary since February 2012. She served as the Company’s Senior Vice President from August 2008 to May 2011 and Principal Accounting Officer since April 2007. Ms. Luey joined Jamba Juice Company as Vice President and Controller in April 2007. From 2005 to 2007, Ms. Luey was Vice President, Corporate Controller, and Principal Accounting Officer of LeapFrog Enterprises.

Bruce Schroder, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, age 52

Mr. Schroder has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Jamba Juice Company since May 2011. He served as President, Store Operations of Jamba Juice Company from April 2010 to May 2011. From 2008 to 2010, Mr. Schroder was Chief Operating Officer of Adina for Life. From 2007 to 2008, Mr. Schroder served as Chief Operating Officer of Aimco Capital. From 2003 to 2007, Mr. Schroder held various positions with Peet’s Coffee & Tea, lastly serving as Vice President and General Manager, Retail.

Julie S. Washington, Senior Vice President and Chief Brand Officer, age 46

Ms. Washington has served as Senior Vice President and Chief Brand Officer of Jamba Juice Company since January 2012. Ms. Washington joined Jamba Juice Company as Vice President and General Manager, Consumer Products in 2010. During 2008 to 2010, Ms. Washington was Vice President of Marketing at Luxottica Retail. From 2005 to 2007, Ms. Washington was North America Director of Shopper Marketing at Procter and Gamble.

Employees

As of January 3, 2012, we employed approximately 4,900 persons, approximately 190 of whom were at our corporate offices or part of our field, licensing and franchise support and operations. The remainder of the employees was Company Store management and hourly store personnel. The Company also hires a significant number of seasonal employees during its peak selling season during the spring and summer. Our employees are

 

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not covered by a collective bargaining agreement. We consider our employee relations to be good. We place a priority on staffing our stores and support center positions with skilled team members who embrace our culture and invest in training programs to ensure the quality of our store operations.

Available Information

Our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to reports filed or furnished pursuant to Sections 13(a) and 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, are available on our website at http://ir.jambajuice.com, free of charge as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such reports with, or furnish those reports to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). The SEC also maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information that we file electronically with the SEC at http://www.sec.gov. The public may also read and copy any materials that we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549. Investors may obtain information on the operation of the SEC Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. Our Corporate Governance Principles and Practices, Board of Directors committee charters (including the charters of the Audit Committee, Compensation and Executive Development Committee and Nominating and Governance Committee) and our code of ethics entitled “Code of Business Conduct and Ethics” also are available at that same location on our website. Information on our website is not incorporated into this annual report. Stockholders may request free copies of these documents from:

Jamba, Inc.

c/o ICR, Inc.

825 Third Avenue, 31st Floor

New York, NY 10022

(646) 277-1212

investors@jambajuice.com

We included the certifications of the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer of Jamba, Inc. relating to the quality of our public disclosure, as required by Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and related rules, in this Annual Report on Form 10-K as Exhibits 31.1 and 31.2 hereto.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

You should carefully consider the risks described below. If any of the risks and uncertainties described below actually occurs, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. The risk factors listed below, however, are not exhaustive. Other sections of this Annual Report on Form 10-K include additional factors that could materially and adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations. Moreover, we operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New factors emerge from time to time and it is not possible to predict the impact of all of these factors on our business, financial condition or results of operation.

RISKS RELATED TO OUR BUSINESS

We may not be successful in implementing our strategic priorities, which may have a material adverse impact on our business and financial results.

In fiscal 2011 we implemented our strategic priorities under our BLEND Plan 1.0, which we believed necessary to revitalize the Company for future growth and long-term stockholder value. On January 9, 2012, we announced our strategic priorities under the BLEND Plan 2.0, which we believe accelerates Jamba’s path to a healthy, active lifestyle brand and creates long-term shareholder value, including:

 

   

make Jamba a top-of-mind healthy food and beverage brand;

 

   

embody a healthy, active lifestyle at store level and broadly across the enterprise;

 

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accelerate global retail through new and existing formats;

 

   

build a global CPG platform in Jamba-relevant categories; and

 

   

pursue new ways to reduce costs and drive productivity.

There can be no assurance that we will be able to continue to successfully implement these strategic priorities or whether these strategic priorities will be successful, and a failure of either could impede our growth and operating results.

We have a history of net losses and may incur losses in the future.

We have incurred net losses in each of the last five fiscal years. We may continue to incur net losses in the future and we cannot assure you that we will achieve or sustain profitability.

A worsening of economic conditions or a decrease in consumer spending may substantially decrease our revenues and may adversely impact our ability to implement our business strategy.

Our success depends to a significant extent on discretionary consumer spending, which is influenced by general economic conditions and the availability of discretionary income. While there are signs that conditions may be improving, there is no certainty that this trend will continue or that credit and financial markets and confidence in economic conditions will not deteriorate again. Accordingly, we may experience continuing declines in revenue during economic turmoil or during periods of uncertainty. Any material decline in the amount of discretionary spending, leading cost-conscious consumers to be more selective in restaurants visited, could have a material adverse effect on our revenue, results of operations, business and financial condition.

The challenges of competing with the many food services businesses may result in reductions in our revenue and operating margins.

We compete with many well-established companies, food service and otherwise, on the basis of taste, quality and price of product offered, customer service, atmosphere, location and overall consumer experience. Our success depends, in part, upon the popularity of our products and our ability to develop new menu items that appeal to consumers across all four day-parts. Shifts in consumer preferences away from our products, our inability to develop new menu items that appeal to consumers across all day-parts, or changes in our menu that eliminate items popular with some consumers could harm our business. We compete with other smoothie and juice bar retailers, specialty coffee retailers, yogurt and ice cream shops, bagel shops, fast-food restaurants, delicatessens, cafés, take-out food service companies, supermarkets and convenience stores. Our competitors change with each of the four day-parts, ranging from coffee bars and bakery cafés to casual dining chains. Many of our competitors or potential competitors have substantially greater financial and other resources than we do, which may allow them to react to changes in the market quicker than we can. In addition, aggressive pricing by our competitors or the entrance of new competitors into our markets, could reduce our revenue and operating margins.

We are subject to risks associated with climate change and climate change regulation.

Laws and regulations regarding climate change, energy usage and emissions controls may impact the Company directly through higher cost of goods. The potential impacts of climate change and climate change regulations are highly uncertain at this time, and the Company cannot anticipate or predict the material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows as a result of climate change and climate change regulations.

 

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Our revenue is subject to volatility based on weather and varies by season.

Seasonal factors cause our revenue to fluctuate from quarter to quarter. Because the majority of our revenue results from the sale of smoothies, our revenue is typically lower during the winter months and the holiday season and during periods of inclement weather (because fewer people choose cold beverages) and higher during the spring, summer and fall months (for the opposite reason).

Fluctuations in various food and supply costs, particularly fruit and dairy, could adversely affect our operating results.

Supplies and prices of the various products that we use to prepare our offerings can be affected by a variety of factors, such as weather, seasonal fluctuations, demand, politics and economics in the producing countries. These factors subject us to shortages or interruptions in product supplies, which could adversely affect our revenue and profits. In addition, the prices of fruit and dairy, which are the main products in our offerings, can be highly volatile. The quality of fruit we seek tends to trade on a negotiated basis, depending on supply and demand at the time of the purchase. An increase in pricing of any fruit that we use in our products could have a significant adverse effect on our profitability. In addition, higher diesel and gasoline prices may affect our supply or transportation costs and may affect our profitability. Although we attempt to mitigate the risks of volatile commodity prices and allow greater predictability in pricing by entering into fixed price or to-be-fixed priced purchase commitments for a portion of our fruit and dairy requirements, we cannot assure you that these activities will be successful or that they will not result in our paying substantially more for our fruit supply than would have been required absent such activities. Declines in sales may also adversely affect our business to the extent we have long-term purchase commitments in excess of our needs.

We are primarily dependent upon one supplier for a significant amount of our food distribution for our Company Stores.

For Company Stores, we maintain food distribution contracts primarily with one supplier. This supplier, Southwest Traders, Inc., provided approximately 94% of our cost of goods for fiscal 2011 and 75% of our cost of goods for each of fiscal years 2010 and 2009, which potentially subjects us to a concentration of business risk. If this supplier had operational problems, our operations could be adversely affected.

On December 28, 2011, we announced the signing of a distributor agreement with SYGMA to expand our supply chain distribution alliance to include our franchise markets. SYGMA now services a significant number of Jamba locations nationwide and has opened the door to accelerated Jamba system growth. Although the addition of SYGMA may help to mitigate the risk of significant reliance on one supplier, we cannot assure you that we will be successful or that we will not have to pay substantially more for distributor services should Southwest Traders, Inc. have operational problems.

We may face difficulties entering into new or modified arrangements with existing or new suppliers or new service providers.

If we expand our operations into new geographic areas through new Company Stores, Franchise Stores and/or the JambaGo platform, or introduce new products with special manufacture, storage or distribution requirements, we may have to seek new suppliers and service providers or enter into new arrangements with existing ones. We may also encounter difficulties or be unable to negotiate pricing or other terms as favorable as those we currently enjoy, which could harm our business and operating results. For example, the potential growth in smaller format stores may cause the frequency of shipments to increase and the average number of cases per shipment to decrease, thereby increasing the Company’s per case shipment costs.

 

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The Company’s success depends on the value of the Jamba Juice and Jamba brands.

The Jamba Juice brand practice is to inspire and simplify healthy living. We believe we must preserve and grow the value of the Jamba Juice brand in order to be successful in building our business and particularly in building a consumer products growth platform primarily under the Jamba brand. Brand value is based in part on consumer perceptions, and the Jamba Juice brand has been highly rated in several recent brand studies. We intend to reinforce and extend these perceptions for the Jamba brand to help support our licensing efforts. Our brand building initiatives involve increasing our product offerings, opening new Franchise Stores, expanding the JambaGo platform and entering into licensing arrangements to increase awareness of our brands and create and maintain brand loyalty. Our licensees are often authorized to use our logos and provide branded beverages, food and other products directly to customers. We provide training and support to, and monitor the operations of, these business partners, but the product quality and service they deliver may be diminished by any number of factors beyond our control, including financial pressures. We believe customers expect the same quality of products and service from our licensees as they do from us. Any shortcoming of one of our business partners, particularly an issue affecting the quality of the service experience or the safety of beverages or food, may be attributed by customers to us, thus damaging our reputation and brand value and potentially affecting our results of operations. If our brand building initiatives are unsuccessful, or if business incidents occur which erode consumer perceptions of our brand, then the value of our products may diminish and we may not be able to implement our business strategy.

We may not be able to adequately protect our intellectual property, which could harm the value of our brand and adversely affect our business.

Our intellectual property is material to the conduct of our business. Our ability to implement our business plan successfully depends in part on our ability to build further brand recognition using our trademarks, service marks, trade dress and other proprietary intellectual property, including our name and logos and the unique ambiance of our stores, both domestically and overseas. We have secured the ownership and rights to our marks in the United States and have filed or obtained registrations for restaurant services in most other significant foreign jurisdictions. We undertake similar efforts to protect our brands in other relevant consumer product categories in relevant jurisdictions. If our efforts to protect our intellectual property are inadequate, or if any third party misappropriates or infringes on our intellectual property, the value of our store brand and our consumer products brands may be harmed, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. While we have not encountered claims from prior users of intellectual property relating to restaurant services in areas where we operate or intend to conduct material operations in the near future, there can be no assurances that we will not encounter such claims. If so, this could harm our image, brands or competitive position and cause us to incur significant penalties and costs.

Our business could be adversely affected by increased labor or healthcare costs. Self-insurance plan claims could materially impact our results.

Labor is a primary component in the cost of operating our business. We compete with other employers in our markets for hourly workers and may become subject to higher labor costs as a result of such competition. We devote significant resources to recruiting and training our team members. A considerable number of the team members employed by us are paid at rates related to the federal minimum wage. In 2009, the federal minimum wage increased to $7.25. Additionally, many of our Company Store team members work in stores located in states where the minimum wage is greater than the federal minimum wage and receive compensation equal to the state’s minimum wage. The current California minimum wage is $8.00. Moreover, municipalities may set minimum wages above the applicable state standards, such as in San Francisco, which raised the minimum wage to $10.24 per hour as of January 1, 2012. Any further increases in the federal minimum wage or the enactment of additional state or local minimum wage increases where our employees may be located will increase our labor costs. Competition for employees in various markets could also result in higher required wage rates. Furthermore, the Company is self-insured for team member healthcare and dental benefits. The Company pays a

 

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substantial part of the healthcare benefits for team members at the general manager level and above and for those working at the Company’s corporate office. Liabilities associated with the risks that the Company retains are estimated in part, by considering historical claims experience, demographic factors, severity factors, and other actuarial assumptions. The estimated accruals for these liabilities are based on statistical analyses of historical industry data as well as the Company’s actual historical trends. If actual claims experience differs from the Company’s assumptions, historical trends, and estimates, changes in the Company’s insurance reserves could materially impact our results of operations.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act enacted in 2010, as well as other healthcare reform legislation being considered by Congress and state legislatures, may have a material adverse impact on our business. While we are currently evaluating the potential effects of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on our business, the impact could be extensive and will most likely increase our employee healthcare-related costs. While the significant costs of such legislation will occur after 2013 due to provisions requiring phasing-in over time, changes to our healthcare costs structure could have a significant, negative impact on our business.

We are subject to all of the risks associated with leasing space subject to long-term non-cancelable leases.

We and our franchisees compete for real estate and our or their inability to secure appropriate real estate or lease terms could impact our respective abilities to grow. Our leases generally have initial terms of between five and 15 years, and generally can be extended only in five-year increments if at all. We generally cannot cancel these leases. If an existing or new store is not profitable, and we decide to close it, as we have done in the past and may do in the future, we may nonetheless be committed to perform our obligations under the applicable lease including, among other things, paying the base rent for the balance of the lease term. Additionally, because we sublease the premises of Company Stores sold to franchisees in our refranchising program, we are still legally liable to the landlords under the prime leases, and we will need to assume obligations under the prime lease should a franchisee default on its sublease obligations. Current locations of our stores and franchised locations may become unattractive as demographic patterns change. In addition, as each of our leases expire, we may fail to negotiate renewals, either on commercially acceptable terms or at all, which could require us to close stores in desirable locations.

Our business and results may be subject to disruption from work stoppages, terrorism or natural disasters.

Our operations may be subject to disruption for a variety of reasons, including work stoppages, acts of war, terrorism, pandemics, fire, earthquake, flooding or other natural disasters. These disruptions can result in, among other things, lost sales when consumers stay home or are physically prevented from reaching our stores, property damage, lost sales when our stores are forced to close for extended periods of time and interruptions in supply when vendors suffer damages or transportation is affected. In addition, our corporate offices and support center is located in Northern California near known earthquake fault lines. If a major earthquake or other natural disaster were to occur in Northern California, our corporate offices and support center may be damaged or destroyed. Such a disruption could result in the temporary or permanent loss of critical data, suspension of operations, delays in shipments of product, and disruption of business in both the affected region and nationwide, which would adversely affect our revenue and results of operations.

The unexpected loss of one or more members of our executive management team could adversely affect our business.

Our success depends substantially on the contributions and abilities of our executive management team and other key employees. We believe that these individuals understand our operational strategies and priorities and the steps necessary to drive our long-term growth and stockholder value. Competition for personnel in our industry is strong and the ability to retain key employees during a revitalization effort can be difficult. While we have entered into employment agreements with each of our executive officers, we cannot make any assurances

 

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that we can retain these individuals for the period necessary for us to achieve and sustain profitability. Our failure to continue to recruit, retain, and motivate executive management and other key employees sufficient to maintain a competitive position within our industry and to implement our strategic priorities would adversely affect our results of operations.

We are highly dependent on the financial performance of stores concentrated in certain geographic areas.

Our financial performance is highly dependent on stores located in California. Stores located in California comprise over 90% of Company Stores and generate a significant portion of our Company Store revenue. These stores also comprise over 50% of our total system stores. In recent years, California and other states have experienced significant negative economic impact due to the current economic climate. If geographic regions in which we have a high concentration of stores continue to experience significant economic pressures, our sales and operating results could be negatively impacted. In addition, state and local laws, government regulations, weather conditions and natural disasters affecting California and other regions where we have a high concentration of stores may have a material impact upon our operating results.

Acquisitions, joint ventures and strategic investments could result in operating difficulties, dilution and other harmful consequences.

We expect to continue to evaluate and consider a wide array of potential strategic transactions, including acquisitions, joint ventures and strategic investments. At any given time, we may be engaged in discussions or negotiations with respect to one or more of these types of transactions. Any of these transactions could be material to our financial condition and results of operations. The process of integrating any acquired business may create unforeseen operating difficulties and expenditures and is itself risky. The areas where we may face difficulties include:

 

   

diversion of management time, as well as a shift of focus from operating the businesses to issues related to integration and administration;

 

   

operating losses and expenses of the businesses we acquire or in which we invest;

 

   

the potential impairment of tangible assets, intangible assets and goodwill acquired in the acquisitions;

 

   

the difficulty of incorporating an acquired business into our business and unanticipated expenses related to such integration; and

 

   

potential unknown liabilities associated with a business we acquire or in which we invest.

Moreover, we may not realize the anticipated benefits of any or all of our acquisitions, joint ventures or strategic investments, or we may not realize them in the time frame expected. Future acquisitions, joint ventures or strategic investments may require us to issue additional equity securities, spend a substantial portion of our available cash, or incur debt or liabilities, amortize expenses related to intangible assets or incur write-offs of goodwill, which could adversely affect our results of operations and dilute the economic and voting rights of our stockholders.

Governmental regulation may adversely affect our ability to open new stores or otherwise adversely affect our existing and future operations and results.

We and our franchisees are subject to various federal, state and local regulations. Each of our stores is subject to state and local licensing and regulation by health, sanitation, food and workplace safety and other agencies. We and our franchisees may experience material difficulties or failures in obtaining the necessary licenses or approvals for new stores, which could delay planned store openings. In addition, stringent and varied requirements of local regulators with respect to zoning, land use and environmental factors could delay or prevent development of new stores in particular locations.

 

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Our operations are also subject to the U.S. Fair Labor Standards Act, which governs such matters as minimum wages, overtime and other working conditions, along with the U.S. Americans with Disabilities Act, family leave mandates and a variety of similar laws enacted by the states that govern these and other employment law matters. In recent years, there has been an increased legislative, regulatory and consumer focus on nutrition and advertising practices in the food industry. Establishments operating in the quick-service and fast-casual segments have been a particular focus, and compliance with additional regulations can become costly and affect our operating results.

Our federal, state and local tax returns may, from time to time, be selected for audit by the taxing authorities, which may result in tax assessments, interest or penalties that could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations and financial position.

We are subject to federal, state and local taxes in the U.S. In making tax estimates and paying taxes, significant judgment is often required. Although we believe our tax positions and estimates are reasonable, if a taxing authority disagrees with the positions taken by the Company, we could have an additional tax liability, including interest and penalties. If material, payment of such additional amounts could have a material impact on our results of operations and financial position.

We rely heavily on information technology and a material failure of that technology could impair our ability to efficiently operate our business.

Our business operations rely heavily on information systems, including point-of-sale processing in our stores, management of our supply chain and distribution system, vendor and franchisee invoicing, and various other processes and procedures. The efficient management of our business depends significantly on the reliability and capacity of these systems, and any related failure and/or breach of security could cause delays in customer service and reduce efficiency in our operations. Significant capital investments might be required to remediate any problems.

Failure to protect the integrity and security of individually identifiable data of customers, vendors or employees could expose us to data loss, litigation and liability, and our reputation could be significantly harmed.

Our business operations might require us to process and/or maintain certain personal, business and financial information about customers, vendors and employees. The use of such information by us is regulated by federal, state and foreign laws, as well as certain third party agreements. If our security and information systems are compromised or if our employees or franchisees fail to comply with the applicable laws and regulations, and this information is obtained by unauthorized persons or used inappropriately, it could adversely affect our reputation and result in litigation and settlement costs, damage awards, or penalties and fines. As privacy and information security law and regulations change, we may incur additional costs to ensure that we remain in compliance.

RISKS RELATED TO OUR FRANCHISE BUSINESS

Our growth strategy depends on increasing franchise ownership.

Because our current growth strategy is to emphasize Franchise Store development, we receive an increasingly significant amount of our revenues in the form of royalties from our franchisees. Accordingly, the success of our business is increasingly dependent upon the operational and financial success of our franchisees. This strategy is subject to risks and uncertainties. While our franchise agreements set forth certain operational standards and guidelines, we have limited control over how our franchisees’ businesses are run, and any significant inability of our franchisees to operate successfully could adversely affect our operating results through decreased royalty payments. We may not be able to identify franchisee candidates with appropriate experience and financial resources or to negotiate mutually acceptable agreements with those that do. Our franchisee candidates may not have access to the financial or management resources that they need to open or continue operating the stores contemplated by their franchise agreements with us. In addition, franchisees may

 

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not be able to find suitable sites on which to develop new stores or negotiate acceptable lease terms for the sites, obtain the necessary permits and government approvals or meet construction schedules. If our franchisees incur too much debt or if economic or sales trends deteriorate such that they are unable to repay existing debt, it could result in financial distress or even possible insolvency or bankruptcy. If a significant number of our franchisees become financially distressed, this could harm our operating results through reduced or delayed royalty payments or increased rent obligations for leased properties on which we are contingently liable.

Expansion into new geographic markets may present increased risks.

Franchise growth is planned in new geographic areas in the United States and select international markets for fiscal 2012. Our future results, and the results of new Franchise Stores, depend on various factors, including successful selection and expansion into these new geographic markets and market acceptance of the Jamba Juice experience. Those markets may have different competitive conditions, consumer tastes and discretionary spending patterns as compared to existing markets. As a result, those new stores may be less successful than stores in our existing markets. Consumers in a new market may not be familiar with the Jamba Juice brand, and we may need to build brand awareness in that market through greater investments in advertising and promotional activity than we originally planned. Franchisees may find it more difficult in new markets to hire, motivate and keep qualified employees who can project our vision, passion and culture. Stores opened in new markets may also have lower average store revenue than stores opened in existing markets, and may have higher construction, occupancy or operating costs than stores in existing markets. Furthermore, we may have difficulty in finding reliable suppliers or distributors or ones that can provide us, either initially or over time, with adequate supplies of ingredients meeting our quality standards. Revenue at stores opened in new markets may take longer to increase and reach expected revenue levels, and may never do so, thereby affecting our overall royalty income. As with the experience of other retail food concepts that have tried to expand nationally and internationally, we may find that the Jamba Juice concept has limited or no appeal to customers in new markets or we may experience a decline in the popularity of the Jamba Juice experience. Newly opened stores may not succeed, future markets and stores may not be successful and, even if we are successful, our average store revenue, and the royalty income generated therefrom, may not increase and may even decline.

Our efforts to expand internationally may not be successful and could impair the value of our brand.

Our current strategy includes international expansion in a number of countries around the world. Expanding into international markets will expose us to new risks and uncertainties, including product supply, import/export limitations and regulations to which we are not currently bound and may not be currently set up to handle, consumer preferences, occupancy costs, operating expenses and labor and infrastructure challenges. If stores open in international markets and such stores are unable to source inventory locally, franchisees may be required to import inventory from our U.S. distributors and any resulting import duties, tariffs, transportation or other charges may disproportionately impact such stores’ cost of goods which could harm the viability of such stores. Finally, international operations have inherent risks such as foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, the application and effect of local laws and regulations and enforceability of intellectual property and contract rights. Additionally, effectively managing growth can be challenging, particularly as we continue to expand into new international markets where we must balance the need for flexibility and a degree of autonomy for local management against the need for consistency with our goals, philosophy and standards. Failure of our international expansion strategy could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations.

Termination or non-renewal of franchise agreements may disrupt store performance.

Each franchise agreement is subject to termination by us in the event of default by the franchisee after the applicable cure periods. Upon the expiration of the initial term of a franchise agreement, the franchisee generally has an option to renew for an additional term. There is no assurance that franchisees will meet the criteria for renewal or will desire or be able to renew their franchise agreements. If not renewed, a franchise agreement and payments required thereunder will terminate. We may be unable to find a new franchisee to replace such lost

 

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revenue. Furthermore, while we will be entitled to terminate franchise agreements following a default that is not cured within the applicable cure period, if any, the disruption to the performance of the stores could materially and adversely affect our business.

Our franchising strategy means we will become more dependent on franchisees for our success.

Some of our franchisees have been experiencing financial pressures during fiscal 2011. Our franchisees closed eight stores in fiscal 2011, through natural or early expiration of the term of the franchise agreements. Franchisees may close additional stores in the future. Royalty revenues are directly correlated to sales by Franchise Stores and, accordingly, Franchise Store closures have an adverse effect on our total revenue, results of operations and cash flows. Furthermore, an insolvency or bankruptcy proceeding involving a franchisee could prevent us from collecting payments or exercising any of our other rights under the related franchise agreement.

Our refranchising program may not realize the intended benefits.

As of January 3, 2012, we have refranchised 174 Company Stores as a result of our refranchising efforts, resulting in a shift to a greater percentage of Franchise Stores. The conversion of a Company Store to a Franchise Store reduces the total monthly revenue received by us from that store because we receive all of the revenue generated by a Company Store but receive only royalty payments generated by a Franchise Store. While we expect the conversion of a Company Store to a Franchise Store to reduce or eliminate the unreimbursed operating costs we incur in connection with the operation of such store, the future benefit realized from refranchising the store is uncertain and may be less than anticipated, and may not be sufficient to offset the loss of revenue from the conversion of the Company Store.

The success of each transaction and the refranchising program as a whole will depend upon a variety of factors, including, among other things, (1) the franchisees’ ability to (a) effectively operate the stores they purchased and (b) comply with their related contractual obligations to us and third parties, (2) our ability to limit our exposure to contingent liabilities in connection with the sale of our stores and the possibility of franchisee default, and (3) whether the resulting ownership mix of Company Stores and Franchise Stores will allow us to meet our financial objectives. Our existing management, infrastructure, financial, and other resources may be inadequate to absorb a significant default by a franchisee, or to support our franchise growth strategy. In addition, although some buyers in our refranchising transactions have entered into area development agreements to develop and open additional stores, there is no guarantee that the franchisees will succeed in their efforts to open additional stores.

Our franchisees could take actions that harm our reputation and reduce our royalty revenue.

Franchisees are independent contractors and are not our employees. Further, we do not exercise control over the day-to-day operations of our Franchise Stores. Any operational or development shortcomings of our Franchise Stores, including their failure to comply with applicable laws, are likely to be attributed to our system-wide operations in the eyes of consumers and could adversely affect our reputation and have a direct negative impact on the royalty revenue we receive from those stores.

We could face liability from our franchisees and from government agencies.

A franchisee or government agency may bring legal action against us based on the franchisor/franchisee relationship. Various state and federal laws govern our relationship with our franchisees and our potential sale of a franchise. If we fail to comply with these laws, we could be liable for damages to franchisees, fines or other penalties. Expensive litigation with our franchisees or government agencies may adversely affect both our profits and our important relations with our franchisees.

 

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RISKS RELATED TO THE FOOD SERVICE BUSINESS

Litigation and publicity concerning food quality, health and other issues can result in liabilities, increased expenses, distraction of management and can also cause customers to avoid our products, which could adversely affect our results of operations, business and financial condition.

Food service businesses can be adversely affected by litigation and complaints from customers or government authorities resulting from food quality, allergens, illness, injury or other health concerns or operating issues stemming from one retail location or a number of retail locations. Adverse publicity about these allegations may negatively affect us, regardless of whether the allegations are true, by discouraging customers from buying our products.

Our customers occasionally file complaints or lawsuits against us alleging that we are responsible for some illness or injury they suffered at or after a visit to our stores, or that we have problems with food quality or operations. We are also subject to a variety of other claims arising in the ordinary course of our business, including personal injury claims, contract claims and claims alleging violations of federal and state law regarding workplace and employment matters, discrimination and similar matters, and we could become subject to class action or other lawsuits related to these or different matters in the future. Regardless of whether any claims against us are valid, or whether we are ultimately held liable, claims may be expensive to defend and may divert time and money away from our operations and hurt our performance. A judgment significantly in excess of our insurance coverage, or for which we are not covered by insurance, could materially and adversely affect our financial condition or results of operations. Any adverse publicity resulting from these allegations may also materially and adversely affect our reputation or prospects, which in turn could adversely affect our results.

In addition, the food services industry has been subject to a growing number of claims based on the nutritional content of food products they sell, and disclosure and advertising practices. We may also be subject to this type of proceeding in the future and, even if not, publicity about these matters (particularly directed at the quick-service and fast-casual segments of the industry) may harm our reputation or prospects and adversely affect our results.

We are also impacted by trends in litigation, including class-action allegations brought under various consumer protection and employment laws, including wage and hour laws. Due to the inherent uncertainties of litigation and regulatory proceedings, we cannot accurately predict the ultimate outcome of any such proceedings. An unfavorable outcome could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, regardless of the outcome of any litigation or regulatory proceedings, these proceedings could result in substantial costs and may require that we devote substantial resources to defend our Company and could affect the future premiums we would be required to pay on our insurance policies. Further, changes in governmental regulations could have adverse effects on our business and subject us to additional regulatory actions.

Food safety concerns and instances of food-borne illnesses could harm our customers, result in negative publicity and cause the temporary closure of some stores and, in some cases, could adversely affect the price and availability of fruits and vegetables, any of which could harm our brand reputation, result in a decline in revenue or an increase in costs.

We consider food safety a top priority and dedicate substantial resources toward ensuring that our customers enjoy high-quality, safe and wholesome products. However, we cannot guarantee that our internal controls and training will be fully effective in preventing all food-borne illnesses. Furthermore, our reliance on third-party food suppliers and distributors increases the risk that food-borne illness incidents (such as e. coli, hepatitis A, salmonella or listeria) could occur outside of our control and at multiple locations. Instances of food-borne illnesses, whether real or perceived, and whether at our stores or those of our competitors, could harm customers and otherwise result in negative publicity about us or the products we serve, which could adversely affect revenue. If there is an incident involving our stores serving contaminated products, our customers may be harmed, our revenue may decrease and our brand name and reputation may be impaired. If our customers become

 

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ill from food-borne illnesses, we could be forced to temporarily close some stores. In addition, we may have different or additional competitors for our intended customers as a result of making any such changes and may not be able to compete successfully against those competitors. Food safety concerns and instances of food-borne illnesses and injuries caused by food contamination have in the past, and could in the future, adversely affect the price and availability of affected ingredients and cause customers to shift their preferences, particularly if we choose to pass any higher ingredient costs along to consumers. As a result, our costs may increase and our revenue may decline. A decrease in customer traffic as a result of these health concerns or negative publicity, or as a result of a change in our menu or dining experience or a temporary closure of any of our stores, could materially and adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Bans on the use of polystyrene products can negatively impact our operating results.

We are subject to regulations regarding the use of polystyrene products, and several counties in which our stores are located have already banned the use of our polystyrene cups. As more state and local governments take similar actions, we may be subject to further bans on the use of polystyrene cups. Although we are currently researching alternative cup materials, a national ban on the use of polystyrene cups would force us to eliminate the use of polystyrene which could potentially increase our costs and create customer satisfaction issues that could materially and adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

RISKS RELATED TO OWNERSHIP OF COMMON STOCK

Failure of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting could harm its business and financial results.

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting. Internal control over financial reporting is a process to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting for external purposes in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. Internal control over financial reporting includes: (i) maintaining reasonably detailed records that accurately and fairly reflect our transactions; and (ii) providing reasonable assurance that we (a) record transactions as necessary to prepare the financial statements, (b) make receipts and expenditures in accordance with management authorizations, and (c) would timely prevent or detect any unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements. Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting is not intended to provide absolute assurance that we would prevent or detect a misstatement of our financial statements or fraud. Any failure to maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting could limit our ability to report our financial results accurately and timely or to detect and prevent fraud. A significant financial reporting failure could cause an immediate loss of investor confidence in us and a sharp decline in the market price of our common stock.

Our anti-takeover provisions may delay or prevent a change of control of us, which may adversely affect the price of our common stock.

Certain provisions in our corporate documents and Delaware law may delay or prevent a change of control of us, which could adversely affect the price of our common stock. For example, we have adopted a stockholder rights plan, commonly known as a “poison pill,” which would make it difficult for someone to acquire the Company without the approval of the Board of Directors. Also, the Company’s amended and restated certificate of incorporation and bylaws include other anti-takeover provisions such as:

 

   

limitations on the ability of stockholders to amend our charter documents, including stockholder supermajority voting requirements;

 

   

the inability of stockholders to act by written consent or to call a special meeting absent the request of the holders of a majority of the outstanding common stock; and

 

   

advance notice requirements for nomination for election to the board of directors and for stockholder proposals.

 

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The Company is also afforded the protections of Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law which prevents it from engaging in a business combination with a person who acquires at least 15% of its common stock for a period of three years from the date such person acquired such common stock, unless board of directors or stockholder approval is obtained.

Our stock price may fluctuate significantly

The trading price of our common stock has been volatile and is likely to continue to be volatile. Our stock price could be subject to wide fluctuations in response to a variety of factors. The stock market has experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of particular companies. Broad market factors, including the effect of international political instability, armed conflict, natural disasters, financial markets, and general economic conditions, may have a material adverse effect on our stock price, regardless of our actual performance.

The holders of our Series B Preferred are entitled to receive dividends and liquidation payments in preference to the holders of our common stock.

Dividends accrue on shares of our Series B Preferred at a rate of 8% per annum and are payable quarterly in cash at the option of the Company and can increase to 10% in the event the Company fails to satisfy certain obligations. Upon a liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the affairs of the Company, whether voluntary or involuntary, the holders of shares of the Series B Preferred are entitled to receive a liquidation payment prior to the payment of any amount with respect to shares of our common stock. Because of the substantial liquidation preference to which the holders of shares of the Series B Preferred are entitled, the amount available to be distributed to the holders of shares of our common stock upon a liquidation of the Company could be substantially limited or reduced to zero and may make it more difficult to raise capital or recruit and retain key personnel in the future.

The securities purchase agreement for the sale of shares of the Series B Preferred (the “Securities Purchase Agreement”) and the certificate of designation governing the Series B Preferred (the “Series B Certificate of Designation”) contain various covenants and restrictions which may limit our ability to operate our business.

Under the Securities Purchase Agreement and the Series B Certificate of Designation, we are not permitted, without the affirmative vote or written consent of the holders of at least a majority of the shares of Series B-1 Preferred and the Series B-2 Preferred, voting together as a single class, directly or indirectly, to take or agree to take certain actions involving a broad array of corporate activities. These restrictions could limit our ability to plan for or react to market conditions or meet extraordinary capital needs or could otherwise restrict corporate activities, any of which could have a material adverse impact on our business.

The holders of shares of the Series B Preferred have substantial voting power on matters submitted to a vote of stockholders and on the composition of our board of directors.

The holders of shares of the Series B Preferred are entitled to vote on all matters on which the holders of shares of our common stock are entitled to vote, voting together with the holders of shares of our common stock as a single class. Each share of Series B Preferred is currently entitled to 100 votes per share, subject to adjustment. As a result, the shares of Series B Preferred currently represent, in the aggregate, approximately 20% of the voting power of our equity securities and therefore have considerable influence in determining the outcome of any corporate transaction or other matter submitted to our stockholders for approval.

The holders of the Series B Preferred also have significant control over the composition of our Board of Directors. Currently, the holders of Series B-1 Preferred have the right to elect two members of our Board and the holders of the Series B-2 Preferred have the right to elect one member of our Board. Under certain circumstances, the holders of Series B Preferred may be entitled to elect additional directors. Upon conversion of the Series B Preferred into common stock, assuming certain ownership thresholds continue to be met, the holders

 

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of Series B Preferred will continue to have contractual rights to nominate members to our Board. Because the holders of shares of the Series B Preferred will have the right to designate these members to our Board, they have considerable influence on the composition of our Board and, therefore, the conduct of our business.

The Series B Preferred is redeemable at the option of the holders under certain circumstances.

On or after June 16, 2016, the holders of at least a majority of the then-outstanding shares of Series B Preferred may require us to redeem all or any portion of the outstanding shares of Series B Preferred. The redemption price per share of the Series B Preferred is to be calculated in accordance with the Series B Certificate of Designation.

Depending on our cash resources at the time that this redemption right is exercised, we may or may not be able to fund the redemption from our available cash resources. If we were unable to fund the redemption from available cash resources we would need to find an alternative source of financing to do so. There can be no assurances that we would be able to raise such funds on favorable terms or at all if such funds are required.

We have agreed to give the holders of shares of the Series B Preferred the right to participate in subsequent stock issuances.

We agreed that if we issue and sell any new equity securities after June 16, 2009, subject to certain exceptions, we will give the Series B Purchasers the right to purchase a portion of those new securities so as to permit each of them to maintain their proportional ownership in our stock as long as such purchaser beneficially owns at least 25% of the shares such purchaser originally purchased on June 16, 2009.

The existence of this right may make it more difficult for us to obtain financing from third parties that do not wish to have Series B Purchasers participating in their financing.

The Series B Preferred private placement could adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

Each share of Series B Preferred Stock is convertible into that number of shares of common stock equal to the quotient determined by dividing $115 (as adjusted for any stock dividends, combinations, splits, recapitalizations and the like with respect to such shares) by the then applicable conversion price (currently $1.15 per share). Upon such conversion, the Company must pay any dividend arrearage, plus accrued but unpaid dividends up through, but excluding, the applicable date of conversion, whether or not declared. The holder of a share of Series B Preferred may elect to convert that holder’s share at any time. In addition, after June 16, 2011, we have the right to force conversion of the then outstanding shares of Series B Preferred upon certain conditions being met.

Sales in the public market of the shares of common stock acquired upon conversion of shares of the Series B Preferred or the exercise of an outstanding warrant for Series B Preferred, or the perception that such sales could occur, could adversely affect the prevailing market price of our common stock and impair our ability to raise funds in additional stock financings.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

 

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ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

The Company’s corporate headquarters is located at 6475 Christie Avenue, Emeryville, California. This facility is occupied under a lease for approximately 36,000 square feet, at a cost of approximately $1.0 million per year and has a lease term that expires on January 31, 2017.

The Company, including our franchisees, currently operates all of its stores under leases and typically signs five to 15 year leases. The Company does not intend to purchase real estate for any of its sites in the future. The Company believes that the size and flexibility of its format provide it with a competitive advantage in securing sites. At January 3, 2012, the Company served its customers primarily through a combination of Company Stores and Franchise Stores in 25 different states, South Korea, Canada, the Philippines and the Bahamas.

 

     Store Count as of January 3, 2012  
     Company
Stores
     Franchise
Stores
     Total  

United States

        

Arizona

     —           34         34   

California

     292         102         394   

Colorado

     —           21         21   

Connecticut

     —           1         1   

Florida

     —           17         17   

Hawaii

     —           33         33   

Idaho

     —           8         8   

Illinois

     —           39         39   

Indiana

     —           3         3   

Louisiana

     —           2         2   

Maryland

     —           3         3   

Massachusetts

     —           3         3   

Minnesota

     —           8         8   

North Carolina

     —           5         5   

New Jersey

     1         6         7   

Nevada

     —           12         12   

New York

     14         5         19   

Ohio

     —           1         1   

Oklahoma

     —           9         9   

Oregon

     —           24         24   

Pennsylvania

     —           2         2   

Texas

     —           45         45   

Utah

     —           21         21   

Washington

     —           37         37   

Wisconsin

     —           2         2   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total in United States

     307         443         750   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

International

        

Bahamas

     —           1         1   

Korea

     —           16         16   

Philippines

     —           1         1   

Canada

     —           1         1   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total International

     —           19         19   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Totals

     307         462         769   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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In addition, the Company had 35 JambaGo locations in six states as of January 3, 2012. There were 21 stations in California, eight stations in New York, three stations in Missouri and one station in each of Florida, Massachusetts and New Jersey.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

The Company is party to various legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of its business, but it is not currently a party to any legal proceeding that management believes would have a material adverse effect on the consolidated financial position or results of operations of the Company.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR JAMBA, INC.’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

The shares of Jamba, Inc. common stock are currently quoted on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol JMBA.

The closing price per share of Jamba, Inc. common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Global Market on March 1, 2012, was $2.03. Shares of our Series B-1 Preferred and Series B-2 Preferred are not publicly traded and there is no market for these securities.

The following table sets forth, for the fiscal quarter indicated, the quarterly high and low closing sales prices of our shares of common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Global Market, as applicable, for each quarter during the last two fiscal years.

 

     Common Stock  
     High      Low  

2010 First Quarter

     3.40         1.59   

2010 Second Quarter

     3.73         2.05   

2010 Third Quarter

     2.34         1.66   

2010 Fourth Quarter

     2.60         2.02   

2011 First Quarter

     2.55         2.02   

2011 Second Quarter

     2.48         2.05   

2011 Third Quarter

     2.20         1.29   

2011 Fourth Quarter

     1.73         1.26   

We have not historically paid any cash dividends on our common stock. We intend to continue to retain earnings, to the extent we have earnings, for use in the operation and expansion of our business, and therefore do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future.

As of March 1, 2012, there were 90 holders of record of our common stock.

 

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Performance Graph

The following graph compares our cumulative total stockholder return since January 9, 2007 with the cumulative total return of (i) the NASDAQ Composite Index, (ii) the Russell 2000 Index and (iii) Russell MicroCap Index. The graph assumes that the value of the investment in our common stock and each index (including reinvestment of dividends) was $100 on January 9, 2007 in the case of our common stock and an investment in an index.

 

LOGO

 

     1/9/07      1/1/08      12/30/08      12/29/09      12/28/10      1/3/12  

Jamba Inc.

     100.00         37.99         4.72         17.45         24.13         13.55   

NASDAQ Composite

     100.00         110.26         65.65         95.19         112.10         110.81   

Russell 2000

     100.00         98.43         65.18         82.89         105.14         100.75   

Russell MicroCap

     100.00         92.00         55.40         70.63         91.03         82.59   

 

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ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The table below summarizes the Company’s recent financial information. The historical information was derived from the consolidated financial statements of Jamba, Inc. and subsidiary for the fiscal years ended January 3, 2012, December 28, 2010, December 29, 2009, December 30, 2008, and January 1, 2008. The data set forth below should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto in Item 8 and with Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in Item 7.

(In thousands, except share data and per share amounts)

Statements of Operations Data

 

     Fiscal Year
Ended
January 3,
2012
    Fiscal Year
Ended
December 28,
2010
    Fiscal Year
Ended
December 29,
2009
    Fiscal Year
Ended
December 30,
2008
    Fiscal Year
Ended
January 1,
2008(1)
 

Revenue:

          

Company stores

     214,837      $ 254,491      $ 295,607      $ 333,784      $ 306,035   

Franchise and other revenue

     11,597        8,162        6,030        9,106        11,174   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

     226,434        262,653        301,637        342,890        317,209   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Costs and operating expenses (income):

          

Cost of sales

     49,503        61,307        72,669        89,163        84,226   

Labor

     67,868        85,189        100,589        120,251        102,661   

Occupancy

     31,092        38,561        43,888        44,868        37,458   

Store operating

     32,847        38,358        38,734        43,714        39,942   

Depreciation and amortization

     12,463        14,610        18,271        24,717        19,168   

General and administrative

     37,798        37,262        37,044        48,057        48,384   

Store pre-opening

     965        648        516        2,044        5,863   

Impairment of long-lived assets

     1,291        2,778        12,639        27,802        1,550   

Store lease termination and closure

     721        4,255        1,234        10,029        718   

Trademark and goodwill impairment

     —          —          —          84,061        200,624   

Other operating, net

     210        (4,292     (3,840     3,817        4,806   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs and operating expenses

     234,758        278,676        321,744        498,523        545,400   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from operations

     (8,324     (16,023     (20,107     (155,633     (228,191
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other (expense) income:

          

Gain (loss) on derivative liabilities

     —          —          1,597        7,895        59,424   

Interest income

     159        73        404        365        3,517   

Interest expense

     (473     (547     (6,905     (2,064     (181
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other (expense) income

     (314     (474     (4,904     6,196        62,760   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before income taxes

     (8,638     (16,497     (25,011     (149,437     (165,431

Income tax benefit (expense)

     340        (159     1,066        274        52,135   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

     (8,298     (16,656     (23,945     (149,163     (113,296

Preferred stock dividends and deemed dividends

     (2,331     (4,077     (1,860     —          —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to stockholders

   $ (10,629   $ (20,733   $ (25,805   $ (149,163   $ (113,296
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares used in the computation of loss per share:

          

Basic

     66,310,654        58,711,495        53,632,299        53,252,855        52,323,898   

Diluted

     66,310,654        58,711,495        53,632,299        53,252,855        52,323,898   

Loss per share:

          

Basic

   $ (0.16   $ (0.35   $ (0.48   $ (2.80   $ (2.17

Diluted

   $ (0.16   $ (0.35   $ (0.48   $ (2.80   $ (2.17

 

(1) 

Due to the Company’s change in fiscal year, the fiscal year ended January 1, 2008 contains the results of operations for a 51-week year.

 

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Selected Balance Sheet Data (at period end)

 

     January 3,
2012
     December 28,
2010
     December 29,
2009
     December 30,
2008
     January 1,
2008
 

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 19,607       $ 29,024       $ 28,757       $ 20,822       $ 23,016   

Total assets

     88,293         100,054         125,818         145,720         275,002   

Note payable

     —           —           —           22,829         —     

Total liabilities

     68,109         72,112         80,213         105,299         91,494   

Series B redeemable preferred stock

     17,880         20,554         31,069         —           —     

Total stockholders’ equity

     2,304         7,388         14,536         40,421         183,508   

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

     88,293         100,054         125,818         145,720         275,002   

KEY FINANCIAL METRICS

Management reviews and discusses its operations based on both financial and non-financial metrics. Among the key financial metrics upon which management focuses is reviewing its performance based on the Company’s consolidated GAAP results, including Company Store comparable sales.

Company Store comparable sales represents the change in year-over-year sales for all Company Stores opened for at least 13 full fiscal periods.

The following table sets forth operating data that do not otherwise appear in our consolidated financial statements as of and for the fiscal years ended January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010:

 

     Fiscal Year Ended  
     January 3,
2012
    December 28,
2010
 

Percentage change in Company Store comparable sales(1)

     4.0     (2.3 )% 

Total Company Stores

     307        351   

Total Franchise Stores—Domestic

     443        391   

Total International Stores

     19        1   

Total Stores

     769        743   

 

(1) 

Percentage change in Company Store comparable sales compares the sales of Company Stores during the 13 period fiscal year ended to the sales from the same Company Stores for the equivalent period in the prior year. A Company Store is included in this calculation after its 13th full fiscal period of operations. Sales from Franchise Stores are excluded in the Company Store comparable sales.

 

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The following table sets forth certain data relating to Company Stores and Franchise Stores for the periods indicated:

 

     Fiscal year ended  
     January 3,
2012
    December 28,
2010
    December 29,
2009
 

Company Stores:

      

Beginning of year

     351        478        511   

Company Stores opened

     9        1        2   

Company Stores closed

     (11     (23     (8

Company Stores sold to franchisees

     (42     (105     (27
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Company Stores

     307        351        478   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
     Fiscal year ended  
     January 3,
2012
    December 28,
2010
    December 29,
2009
 

Franchise Stores—Domestic:

      

Beginning of year

     391        260        217   

Franchise Stores opened

     22        30        23   

Franchise Stores closed(1)

     (12     (4     (7

Franchise Stores purchased from Company

     42        105        27   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Franchise Stores—Domestic

     443        391        260   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1)

Closures include four stores converted to our JambaGo format during fiscal year ended January 3, 2012.

 

Franchise Stores—International:

        

Beginning of year

     1         1         1   

Franchise Stores opened

     18         —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total Franchise Stores—International

     19         1         1   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

You should read the following discussion and analysis in conjunction with Part II, Item 6 “Selected Financial Data” and our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto included in Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” In addition to historical consolidated financial information, this discussion contains forward-looking statements that reflect our plans, estimates and beliefs. Actual results could differ from these expectations as a result of factors including those described under Item 1A, “Risk Factors,” “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and elsewhere in this Form 10-K.

JAMBA, INC. OVERVIEW

Jamba, Inc. is a holding company which owns and franchises, on a global basis, Jamba Juice stores through its wholly-owned subsidiary, Jamba Juice Company. Jamba Juice Company is a leading restaurant retailer of better-for-you specialty beverages and food offerings which include great tasting fruit smoothies, Fit’nFruitful™ smoothies with Weight Burner Boost™, fresh squeezed juices, hot teas, hot oatmeal made with organic steel cut oats, fruit and veggie smoothies, Whirl’ns™ Frozen Yogurt, breakfast wraps, salads, sandwiches, California Flatbreads™, and a variety of baked goods and snacks. Jamba, Inc. was incorporated in January 2005, and went public through an initial public offering later that year. In November 2006, the Company completed its acquisition of Jamba Juice Company, which first began operations in 1990. As of January 3, 2012, there were 769 Jamba Juice stores globally, consisting of 307 Company-owned and operated stores (“Company Stores”), 443 franchise-operated stores (“Franchise Stores”) in the United States, and 19 international Franchise Stores (“International Stores”). As of January 3, 2012, Jamba Juice had a retail consumer products program that included ten license agreements covering a variety of CPG products.

Fiscal Year

Our fiscal year ends each year on the Tuesday closest to December 31st and therefore we have a 52 or 53 week fiscal year with the first fiscal quarter being sixteen weeks, the second and third quarters being twelve weeks, and the fourth quarter being twelve or thirteen weeks. Unless otherwise stated, references to years in the report relate to fiscal years rather than to calendar years. The following fiscal periods are presented in this report.

 

Fiscal Period

  

Period Covered

   Weeks

Fiscal Year 2011

  

December 29, 2010 to January 3, 2012

   53

Fiscal Year 2010

  

December 30, 2009 to December 28, 2010

   52

Fiscal Year 2009

  

December 31, 2008 to December 29, 2009

   52

Effective January 4, 2012, the start of fiscal year 2012, our fiscal year will have four 13-week quarters.

All references to store counts, including data for new store openings, are reported net of related store closures, unless otherwise noted.

EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW

Key Overall Strategies

During 2011, we made solid progress against our BLEND Plan 1.0, which we first announced in January 2009. The key strategic priorities of our multi-year BLEND Plan have been focused on the transformation of our brand into a leading healthy, active lifestyle brand with strategically aligned initiatives aimed at ensuring a customer-first service culture, improving our menu offerings across all day-parts, accelerating the development of our franchise system, building a robust portfolio of consumer products through our licensing platform and reducing costs and expenses.

 

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Our strategic plan has evolved and our focus is now on accelerating growth of the Jamba brand and expanding the business model. As a result, for 2012, our key strategic priorities for our BLEND Plan 2.0 include:

 

   

make Jamba a top-of-mind healthy food and beverage brand;

 

   

embody a healthy, active lifestyle at store level and broadly across the enterprise;

 

   

accelerate global retail growth through new and existing formats;

 

   

build a global CPG platform in Jamba-relevant categories; and

 

   

pursue new ways to reduce costs and drive productivity.

These strategic priorities support our mission to accelerate growth and development of Jamba as a premier healthy, active lifestyle brand, offering consumers compelling and differentiated products and experiences at Jamba Juice stores and through other retail distribution channels.

During fiscal 2011, we experienced comparable store sales growth in all four quarters over our entire system and our first fiscal year of Company Store comparable sales growth since the end of fiscal 2007. Contributing to the increase in comparable store sales was the continued expansion of new menu items across all day-parts. We finalized our business model shift to a primarily franchise system by the completion of our refranchising initiative in the first quarter of 2011, when we sold 42 Company Stores in the Chicago/Minneapolis and Lake Tahoe markets to franchisees. In addition, we opened 49 stores on a global basis and launched the testing of JambaGo, a new growth concept. On the CPG front, we significantly increased the number of distribution points. We also continued our expansion of new menu offerings across all day-parts. We believe these results demonstrate the success of our efforts over the last three years to stabilize, turnaround and transform the business.

Fiscal 2011 Financial and Operational Summary

 

   

Net loss for fiscal 2011 was $(8.3) million compared to net loss of $(16.7) million for fiscal 2010. The reduction in net loss was driven primarily by the:

 

   

increase in comparable Company Stores sales of 4.0%

 

   

decrease in company store expenses as a percent of company store revenue, of approximately 340 basis points;

 

   

increase in franchise and license revenue of $3.4 million

 

   

Total revenue for fiscal 2011 decreased 13.8% to $226.4 million from $262.7 million for fiscal 2010, a decrease of $36.3 million, primarily due to a net decrease of 44 Company Stores primarily attributable to the refranchising initiative.

 

   

Diluted loss per share was $(0.16) for fiscal 2011 compared to diluted loss per share of $(0.35) for fiscal 2010.

 

   

System-wide comparable store sales increased by 3.7% for fiscal 2011, reflecting growth of 4.0 % for Company Stores and growth of 3.4% for Franchise Stores. System-wide comparable store sales, a non-GAAP financial measure, represent the change in year-over-year sales for all Company and Franchise Stores opened for at least 13 full fiscal periods.

 

   

22 new Franchise Stores and nine new Company Stores were opened in the U.S. during fiscal 2011, bringing total store count in the U.S. to 750 stores, of which 443 are Franchise Stores and 307 are Company Stores.

 

   

Jamba’s partner in South Korea opened 16 stores, and each of our partners in Canada and the Philippines opened one store.

 

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Fiscal 2011 Accomplishments

Store Sales

During fiscal 2011, sales at system-wide Jamba Juice Stores opened more than 13 full fiscal periods increased 3.7% reflecting increases of 4.0% for Company Stores and 3.4% for Franchise Stores compared to the prior year. For Company Stores, this increase represents the first full fiscal year of Company Store comparable sales growth since the end of fiscal 2007. The increase in Company Store comparable sales during fiscal 2011 was largely attributable to an average check increase, increased traffic during the fourth quarter and to more efficient marketing promotions. As part of building a customer first operationally focused culture, we instituted a customer survey program that has driven increasingly improved levels of customer satisfaction. Our store excellence guide has improved store operations by clarifying operating procedures and measuring priorities. In addition, we instituted a bonus program that rewards Company Store managers for achievement of customer service goals, and we continue to make technological as well as procedural enhancements in areas such as labor and inventory management. These enhancements have relieved our store managers from manual administrative tasks, enabling them to more diligently concentrate on delivering exceptional customer service.

We expanded our beverage and food offerings with a goal of increasing sales across all day-parts. We believe that our growing portfolio of “better-for-you” specialty beverage and food offerings, with smoothies and fresh juices as the core offering, provides us with a competitive advantage over other quick service restaurants. During 2011, we launched a series of smoothie platforms, including probiotic yogurt, fruit and veggie smoothies and coconut water refreshers. We also expanded our Whirl’ns™ Frozen Yogurt line to an additional 127 stores. As a result, the Whirl’ns™ Frozen Yogurt line was available at 157 locations in California as of January 3, 2012. We also launched our breakfast wrap platform to complement our already strong breakfast offering of slow-cooked oatmeal, freshly squeezed juices, Fruit & Yogurt parfaits and hot beverages.

We implemented various marketing promotions and consumer communications including value offerings, targeted discounts, sampling, improved messaging focusing on the better-for-you qualities of our menu offerings, and expanding our social media activities to further drive consumer awareness and customer usage frequency. We also launched a social responsibility program called Team Up for a Healthy America, with the aim of raising awareness among consumers of Jamba’s focus on critical national health issues like childhood obesity and related health risks. This program gained nationwide attention as a result of our partnership with several organizations including National Geographic Kids, the WNBA, the U.S. Water Polo Association, the Girl Scouts of America and our Company spokesperson Venus Williams. We believe our promotional activities and public relations efforts for this program enabled us to reach over eight million households with our brand message, significantly raising awareness of Jamba as a mission-based brand and socially responsible company. We believe that our focus on optimizing media and digital marketing platforms, value offerings and efficient price promotions contributed to our success in increasing sales across all day-parts. We remain focused on opportunities to develop our beverage and food portfolio in order to optimize each of the offerings across all day-parts, and to refine our promotional and communication efforts to make Jamba a top-of-mind healthy food and beverage brand that offers consumers solutions for leading a healthy, active lifestyle.

Franchising

We continue to grow our restaurant concept primarily through the development of new Franchise Stores. As a result of our refranchising initiative and the development of new Franchise Stores, Jamba Juice locations at the end of fiscal 2011 were comprised of approximately 40% Company Store locations and 60% Franchise Store locations globally, compared to approximately 47% Company Store locations and 53% Franchise Store locations at the end of fiscal 2010.

Domestically, we completed our refranchising initiative with the sale of 42 Company Stores, bringing the refranchising program total to 174 Company Stores sold. In fiscal 2011, franchisees also developed and opened 22 new Franchise Stores, including four traditional stores and 18 non-traditional stores.

 

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We believe a more heavily franchised business model requires less capital investment and reduces the volatility of cash flow performance over time. Our refranchising effort has resulted in lower revenue for fiscal 2011, as we have traded retail sales at Company Stores for royalties and franchise fees to be received from our franchisees globally.

In October 2011, we announced that we were testing a new growth concept called JambaGo™. This growth concept is an innovative express service utilizing compact technology to make select smoothie flavors in “stations” using pre-packaged ingredients. This new concept will enable us to rapidly expand the Jamba brand presence. The JambaGo platform targets venues servicing captive audiences, where there is a greater demand for higher volumes and where the need for high-speed service is essential and a full-sized Jamba Juice store or kiosk would not be feasible. Such venues include K-12 schools, grocery stores, stadiums, theaters, event centers and select airport locations. As of January 3, 2012, there were 35 JambaGo locations in six states.

The first Jamba Juice store in South Korea was opened at the Incheon airport in January 2011. By the end of fiscal 2011, there were 16 Jamba Juice stores operating in the South Korea market. We expect our master developer, SPC Group, to build 200 stores in South Korea over the next ten years. In April 2011, Jamba announced a master development agreement with Max’s Group of Companies, a well-established restaurant and franchise operator, to develop 40 stores in the Philippines over the next 10 years. The first store opened in Manila in November 2011. Also, in May 2011, we signed a master development agreement with Canadian Juice Corp., the principals of which are world leaders in the frozen yogurt category with over 1,200 stores in 25 countries, to develop 80 Jamba Juice stores over the next 10 years. The first Jamba Juice store opened in Toronto in October 2011. We believe international stores represent a significant growth opportunity.

As of January 3, 2012, we have 769 Jamba Juice stores, globally, represented by 307 Company Stores, 443 Franchise Stores in the United States, and 19 International stores. We plan to continue to accelerate global retail growth through new and existing formats to make it easier for customers to experience the Jamba brand offerings.

Consumer Packaged Goods

As of January 3, 2012, we had ten license agreements in place reflecting eight commercialized product lines. These products include Jamba-branded make-at-home frozen smoothie kits, frozen yogurt novelty bars, all natural energy drinks, coconut water fruit juice beverages, functional daily Brazilian super fruit shots, boosted trail mixes and functionally boosted fruit cups. We gained additional points of distribution for existing product lines and had over 30 individual Jamba products at approximately 30,000 points of retail distribution across all 50 states. We believe extending the Jamba brand into mass retail by continued development of CPG solutions provides significant growth opportunities.

During the fourth quarter of 2011, we signed agreements with Bare Fruit LLC to develop a line of all natural bake-dried, 100% fruit chips and with Core-Mark Holdings Company, Inc. to create wraps and sandwiches in the convenience channel. Discussions with potential licensees regarding new and complementary product categories are ongoing.

Our CPG products will help extend brand accessibility, offer additional product solutions and increase usage occasions. We plan to build a global CPG platform in Jamba-relevant categories and to reinforce Jamba as a healthy, active lifestyle brand with products that are better-for-you, convenient and portable. Although all of our agreements to date have been structured as license agreements, whereby we receive ongoing royalties based on a percentage of product sales, in future, we may structure these relationships in other ways such as joint venture agreements, co-packing agreements and sales and distribution agreements to support and optimize our brand extension.

 

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Expenses

We were able to improve Company Store financial performance by continuing to reduce labor expenses through operational efficiencies, leveraging technology, improving labor planning, and by implementing initiatives to lower costs of goods and mitigate waste. We also realized improved cost of sales and labor efficiencies as a result of our smaller, more geographically concentrated and better performing Company store base. Although we anticipate some increases in commodity prices, we continue to focus on cost savings to mitigate the cost increases.

To the extent possible, we are continuing to extend these cost saving initiatives and benefits to Franchise Stores with the goal of improving store-level economics for our franchisees, by passing through our negotiated volume rates with suppliers and vendors to our franchisees and through the utilization of best practice operating models. We strongly believe that increased sales coupled with continued cost and expense management improvements will drive better store-level economics for Company Stores and Franchise Stores alike.

We continued to manage our general and administrative expenses. Our refranchising strategy has resulted in a decrease in the number of Company Stores and a commensurate reduction in the related overhead expenses required to manage and support these Company Stores. Concurrently, we have chosen to invest in our future by strategically adding headcount to help accelerate critical growth initiatives, such as consumer products licensing, domestic and international franchise development, and product innovation. We will continue to explore new ways to reduce costs and drive productivity, for example, by strategically leveraging new technology, implementing process improvements and other means.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) requires the appropriate application of certain accounting policies, many of which require us to make estimates and assumptions about future events and their impact on amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements and related notes. Since future events and their impact cannot be determined with certainty, actual results may differ from our estimates. Such differences may be material to the consolidated financial statements.

We believe our application of accounting policies, and the estimates inherently required therein, are reasonable. These accounting policies and estimates are periodically reevaluated, and adjustments are made when facts and circumstances dictate a change.

Our accounting policies are more fully described in Note 1 “Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” in the “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements,” included elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K (“2011 Form 10-K”). We consider the following policies to be the most critical in understanding the judgments that are involved in preparing the consolidated financial statements.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

We evaluate long-lived assets for impairment when facts and circumstances indicate that the carrying values of long-lived assets may not be recoverable. The impairment evaluation is generally performed at the individual store asset group level. We first compare the carrying value of the asset to the asset’s estimated future undiscounted cash flows. If the estimated future cash flows are less than the carrying value of the asset, we measure an impairment loss based on the asset’s estimated fair value. The fair value of a store’s assets is estimated using a discounted cash flow model based on internal projections and taking into consideration the view of a market participant. The estimate of cash flows is based on, among other things, certain assumptions about expected future operating performance. Factors considered during the impairment evaluation include factors related to actual operating cash flows, the period of time since a store has been opened or remodeled, refranchising expectations and the maturity of the relevant market.

Our estimates of cash flows used to assess impairment are subject to a high degree of judgment. If our estimates of future cash flows differ from actual cash flows due to, among other things, changes in economic conditions, changes to our business model or changes in operating performance, it would result in an adjustment to results of operations.

 

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Intangible Asset Impairment

We evaluate trademarks not subject to amortization for impairment annually (at year-end), or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicated that the asset might be impaired. We perform our test for impairment on trademarks by comparing the fair value of the trademarks to their carrying amounts. An impairment loss is generally recognized when the carrying amount of the trademarks exceeds the fair value. The fair value of trademarks was estimated using the income approach, which is based on assumptions about future cash flows resulting from our franchise and license agreements.

Intangible assets subject to amortization (primarily franchise agreements, reacquired franchise rights and a favorable lease portfolio intangible asset recognized in the purchase of Jamba Juice in 2006) are tested for recoverability whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying amounts may not be recoverable. Intangible assets are amortized over their estimated useful lives using a method of amortization that reflects the pattern in which the economic benefits of the intangible assets are consumed or otherwise realized. Estimated useful lives for the franchise agreements are 13.4 years. The useful life of reacquired franchise rights is the remaining term of the respective franchise agreement. The useful life of the favorable lease portfolio intangible is based on the related lease term.

Rent Expense

Minimum rental expenses are recognized over the term of the lease. We recognize minimum rent starting when possession of the property is taken from the landlord, which normally includes a construction period prior to store opening. When a lease contains a predetermined fixed escalation of the minimum rent, we recognize the related rent expense on a straight-line basis and record the difference between the recognized rental expense and the amounts payable under the lease as deferred rent liability. We also receive tenant allowances which are included in deferred rent liability. Tenant allowances are amortized as a reduction to rent expense in the consolidated statements of operations over the term of the lease.

Certain leases provide for contingent rents that are not measurable at inception. These contingent rents are primarily based on a percentage of revenue that is in excess of a predetermined level. These amounts are excluded from minimum rent and are included in the determination of rent expense when it is probable that the expense has been incurred and the amount can be reasonably estimated. If our revenue for certain leases increases, it would result in higher contingent rent expense.

Jambacard Revenue Recognition

We sell our jambacards to our customers in our retail stores and through our website at www.jambajuice.com. Our jambacards do not have an expiration date. We recognize income from jambacards when (i) the jambacard is redeemed by the customer or (ii) the likelihood of the jambacard being redeemed by the customer is remote (also referred to as “breakage”) and we determine that we do not have a legal obligation to remit the value of unredeemed jambacards to the relevant jurisdictions. We determine the jambacard breakage amount based upon historical redemption patterns. We have concluded that after three years of inactivity the likelihood of redemption becomes remote and we recognize breakage at that time. Jambacard breakage income is included in other operating, net in the consolidated statements of operations. If the historical redemption pattern changes, our financial statements could be materially affected.

We have sold jambacards since November of 2002. The jambacard works as a reloadable gift or debit card. At the time of the initial load, in an amount between $5 and $500, we record an obligation that is reflected as jambacard liability on the consolidated balance sheets. We relieve the liability and record the related revenue at the time a customer redeems any part of the amount on the card. The card does not have any expiration provisions and is not refundable, except as otherwise required by law.

 

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Self-Insurance Reserves

We are self-insured for healthcare benefits. The estimated accruals for these liabilities are based on statistical analyses of historical industry data as well as actual historical trends. For our workers’ compensation benefits, we were self-insured for existing and prior years’ exposures through September 30, 2008. Liabilities associated with the risks that we retain for workers compensation benefits are estimated in part, by considering historical claims experience, demographic factors, severity factors, and other actuarial assumptions.

If actual claims experience differs from our assumptions, historical trends, and estimates, changes in our insurance reserves would impact the expense recorded in our consolidated statements of operations.

Income Taxes

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax basis. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted income tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. Any effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities due to a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. In establishing deferred income tax assets and liabilities, we make judgments and interpretations based on enacted tax laws and published tax guidance applicable to our operations. We record deferred tax assets and liabilities and evaluate the need for valuation allowances to reduce deferred tax assets to amounts more likely than not of being realized. Changes in our valuation of the deferred tax assets or changes in the income tax provision may affect our annual effective income tax rate.

A valuation allowance is provided for deferred tax assets when it is “more likely than not” that some portion of the deferred tax asset will not be realized. Because of our recent history of operating losses, we believe the recognition of the deferred tax assets arising from the above-mentioned future tax benefits is currently not likely to be realized and, accordingly, have maintained a full valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets as of January 3, 2012.

The benefits of uncertain tax positions are recognized as the greatest amount more than 50% likely of being sustained upon audit based on the technical merits of the position. On a quarterly basis, we review and update our inventory of tax positions as necessary to add any new uncertain tax positions taken, or to remove previously identified uncertain positions that have been adequately resolved. Additionally, uncertain positions may be re-measured as warranted by changes in facts or law. Accounting for uncertain tax positions requires significant judgments, including estimating the amount, timing and likelihood of ultimate settlement. Although we believe that these estimates are reasonable, actual results could differ from these estimates. We classify estimated interest and penalties related to the underpayment of income taxes as a component of income taxes in the consolidated statements of operations.

Share-based compensation

We account for share-based compensation based on fair value measurement guidance. The fair value of options granted is estimated at the date of grant using a Black-Scholes option-pricing model. Option valuation models, including Black-Scholes, require the input of highly subjective assumptions, and changes in the assumptions used can materially affect the grant date fair value of an award.

These assumptions include the risk-free rate of interest, expected dividend yield, expected volatility and the expected life of the award. The risk-free rate of interest is based on the zero coupon U.S. Treasury rates appropriate for the expected term of the award. Expected dividends are zero based on history of not paying cash dividends on our common stock. Expected volatility is based on a 75/25 blend of historic daily stock price observations of our common stock since our inception and historic, daily stock price observations of our peers

 

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(companies in our industry that are viewed as a “concept” and a leader in the premium, specialty growth segment) during the period immediately preceding the share-based award grant that is equal in length to the award’s expected term. We make assumptions for the number of awards that will ultimately not vest (“forfeitures”) in determining the share-based compensation expense for these awards. We use historical data to estimate expected employee behaviors related to option forfeitures. We apply the guidance provided by the SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 110 to determine expected life. Currently, there is no market-based mechanism or other practical application to verify the reliability and accuracy of the estimates stemming from these valuation models or assumptions, nor is there a means to compare and adjust the estimates to actual values, except for annual adjustments to reflect actual forfeitures.

The fair value of restricted stock units is determined based on our closing stock price on the date of grant. These restricted stock units vest and become unrestricted three years after the date of grant. Share-based compensation expense is recognized ratably over the three-year service period for restricted stock units.

 

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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The discussion that follows should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto. Our consolidated results of operations for fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009 are summarized below.

(In thousands, except share data and per share amounts)

 

    Year ended
January 3,
2012
    %(1)     Year ended
December 28,
2010
    %(1)     Year ended
December 29,
2009
    %(1)  

Revenue:

           

Company Stores

  $ 214,837        94.9   $ 254,491        96.9   $ 295,607        98.0

Franchise and other revenue

    11,597        5.1     8,162        3.1     6,030        2.0
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

    226,434        100.0     262,653        100.0     301,637        100.0
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Costs and operating expenses (income):

           

Cost of sales

    49,503        23.0     61,307        24.1     72,669        24.6

Labor

    67,868        31.6     85,189        33.5     100,589        34.0

Occupancy

    31,092        14.5     38,561        15.2     43,888        14.8

Store operating

    32,847        15.3     38,358        15.1     38,734        13.1

Depreciation and amortization

    12,463        5.5     14,610        5.6     18,271        6.1

General and administrative

    37,798        16.7     37,262        14.2     37,044        12.3

Store pre-opening

    965        0.4     648        0.2     516        0.2

Impairment of long-lived assets

    1,291        0.6     2,778        1.1     12,639        4.2

Store lease termination and closure.

    721        0.3     4,255        1.6     1,234        0.4

Other operating, net

    210        0.1     (4,292     (1.6 )%      (3,840     (1.3 )% 
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs and operating expenses

    234,758        103.7     278,676        106.1     321,744        106.7
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from operations

    (8,324     (3.7 )%      (16,023     (6.1 )%      (20,107     (6.7 )% 
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other income (expense):

           

Gain from derivative liabilities

    —          0.0     —          0.0     1,597        0.5

Interest income

    159        0.1     73        0.0     404        0.1

Interest expense

    (473     (0.2 )%      (547     (0.2 )%      (6,905     (2.3 )% 
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other expense, net

    (314     (0.1 )%      (474     (0.2 )%      (4,904     (1.7 )% 
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before income taxes

    (8,638     (3.8 )%      (16,497     (6.3 )%      (25,011     (8.4 )% 

Income tax benefit (expense)

    340        0.2     (159     (0.1 )%      1,066        0.4
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

  $ (8,298     (3.6 )%    $ (16,656     (6.4 )%    $ (23,945     (8.0 )% 

Preferred stock dividends and deemed dividends

    (2,331     (1.0 )%      (4,077     (1.5 )%      (1,860     (0.6 )% 
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to common stockholders

  $ (10,629     (4.6 )%    $ (20,733     (7.9 )%    $ (25,805     (8.6 )% 
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares used in the computation of loss per share:

           

Basic

    66,310,654          58,711,495          53,632,299     

Diluted

    66,310,654          58,711,495          53,632,299     

Loss per share:

           

Basic

  $ (0.16     $ (0.35     $ (0.48  

Diluted

  $ (0.16     $ (0.35     $ (0.48  

 

(1) 

Cost of sales, labor, occupancy and store operating expense percentages are calculated using Company Stores revenue. All other line items are calculated using Total revenue. Certain percentage amounts do not sum to total due to rounding.

 

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Revenue

(in 000s)

 

     Year Ended
January 3, 2012
     % of Total
Revenue
    Year Ended
December 28, 2010
     % of Total
Revenue
    Year Ended
December 29, 2009
     % of Total
Revenue
 

Revenue:

               

Company Stores

   $ 214,837         94.9   $ 254,491         96.9   $ 295,607         98.0

Franchise and other revenue

     11,597         5.1     8,162         3.1     6,030         2.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total revenue

   $ 226,434         100.0   $ 262,653         100.0   $ 301,637         100.0
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

    

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

Total revenue for fiscal 2011 was $226.4 million, a decrease of $36.3 million, or 13.8%, compared to $262.7 million for the prior year. Total revenue is comprised primarily of revenue from Company Stores, royalties and fees from Franchise Stores in the U.S. and at International locations, and license income from sale of Jamba-branded CPG products.

Company Store revenue

Company Store revenue in fiscal 2011 was $214.8 million, a decrease of $39.7 million, or 15.6 %, compared to Company Store revenue in fiscal 2010 of $254.5 million. The decrease in Company Store Revenue was due primarily to a net decrease of 44 Company Stores operating since the prior year period, which includes opening nine new Company Store, closing 11 Company Stores (nine through natural lease expiration and two through early termination) and refranchising, 42 Company Stores in connection with our refranchising initiative, partially offset by the increase in Company Store comparable sales and the sales effect of the 53rd week in fiscal 2011, as illustrated by the following table:

 

     Company Store
Decrease in Revenue
(in 000s)
 
     2011 vs. 2010  

Reduction in number of Company Stores, net

   $ (51,171

Company Store comparable sales increase

     7,899   

Effect of the 53rd week in FY 2011

     3,619   
  

 

 

 

Total change in Company Store Revenue

   $ (39,653
  

 

 

 

Company Store comparable sales increased $7.9 million in 2011, or 4.0%, attributable to an increase of 4.8% in average check, partially offset by a decrease of 0.8% in transaction count as compared to the prior year. The effect of the fifty third week in fiscal 2011 was additional sales of $3.6 million. Company Store comparable sales represents the change in year-over-year sales for all Company Stores opened for at least 13 full fiscal periods. At the end of fiscal 2011, approximately 97% of our Company Stores base had been open for at least 13 full fiscal periods.

Franchise and other revenue

Franchise and other revenue in fiscal 2011 was $11.6 million, an increase of $3.4 million, or 42.1%, compared to franchise and other revenue in fiscal 2010 of $8.2 million. The increase in franchise and other revenue was due primarily to a net increase in Franchise Stores since the prior year period (approximately $2.5 million), an increase in income from the sale of licensed Jamba CPG products (approximately $0.5 million) and an increase in other franchise-related revenue (approximately $0.4 million).

 

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The number of Franchise Stores as of January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010 was 462 (including 19 international stores) and 392 (including one international store), respectively.

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

Total revenue for fiscal 2010 was $262.7 million, a decrease of $38.9 million, or 12.9%, compared to $301.6 million for the prior year. Total revenue is comprised primarily of revenue from Company Stores and royalties and fees from Franchise Stores.

Company Store revenue

Company Store revenue in fiscal 2010 was $254.5 million, a decrease of $41.1 million, or 13.9 %, compared to Company Store revenue in fiscal 2009 of $295.6 million. The decrease in Company Store Revenue was due primarily to a net decrease of 127 Company Stores operating since the prior year period, which includes opening one new Company Store, closing 23 Company Stores (14 through natural lease expiration and nine through early termination) and refranchising, 105 Company Stores in connection with our refranchising initiative and the decrease in same-store sales as illustrated by the following table:

 

     Company Store
Decrease in Revenue
(in 000s)
 
     2010 vs. 2009  

Reduction in number of Company Stores, net

   $ (35,125

Company Store comparable sales decrease

     (5,991
  

 

 

 

Total change in Company Store Revenue

   $ (41,116
  

 

 

 

Company Store comparable sales decreased $6.0 million in 2010, or 2.3%, attributable to a decrease of 5.6% in transaction count, partially offset by an increase of 3.3% in average check as compared to the prior year. Company Store comparable sales represents the change in year-over-year sales for all Company Stores opened for at least 13 full fiscal periods. At the end of fiscal 2010, approximately 99% of our Company Stores base had been open for at least 13 full fiscal periods.

Franchise and other revenue

Franchise and other revenue in fiscal 2010 was $8.2 million, an increase of $2.2 million, or 35.4%, compared to franchise and other revenue in fiscal 2009 of $6.0 million. The increase in Franchise and other revenue was due primarily to a net increase in Franchise Stores since the prior year period.

The number of Franchise Stores as of December 28, 2010 and December 29, 2009 was 392 and 261, respectively.

Cost of sales

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

Cost of sales is mostly comprised of fruit, dairy, and other products used to make smoothies and juices, paper products, costs related to managing our procurement program, and vendor rebates. Cost of sales in fiscal 2011 was $49.5 million, a decrease of $11.8 million, or 19.3%, compared to $61.3 million for the prior year. Our refranchising initiative has resulted in a decrease in Company Stores and the related costs and expenses to operate, manage, and support these refranchised Company Stores. As a percentage of Company Store revenue, costs of sales decreased to 23.0% for fiscal 2011 compared to 24.1% for the prior year. The decrease of cost of sales as a percentage of Company Store revenue was primarily due to improved commodity management (approximately 2.4%) partially offset by product shift mix (approximately 0.8%) and increased commodity costs (approximately 0.6%).

 

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Vendor rebates offset the costs of managing our procurement program.

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

Cost of sales in fiscal 2010 was $61.3 million, a decrease of $11.4 million, or 15.6%, compared to $72.7 million for the prior year. Our refranchising initiative has resulted in a decrease in Company Stores and the related costs and expenses to operate, manage, and support these refranchised Company Stores. As a percentage of Company Store revenue, costs of sales decreased to 24.1% for fiscal 2010 compared to 24.6% for the prior year. The decrease of cost of sales as a percentage of Company Store revenue was primarily due to improved commodity management (approximately 1.2%), partially offset by unfavorable product mix shifts (approximately 0.5%). Vendor rebates offset the costs of managing our procurement program.

Labor

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

Labor costs are comprised of store management salaries and bonuses, hourly team member payroll, training costs and other associated fringe benefits. Labor costs in fiscal 2011 were $67.9 million, a decrease of $17.3 million or 20.3%, compared to $85.2 million for the prior year. Our refranchising initiative has resulted in a decrease in Company Stores and the related costs and expenses to operate, manage, and support these refranchised Company Stores. As a percentage of Company Store revenue, labor costs decreased to 31.6% for fiscal 2011 compared to 33.5% for the prior year. The decrease of labor costs as a percentage of Company Store revenue was primarily due to improvements in hourly labor from effective wage management and improved productivity (approximately 3.2%), partially offset by increased employee benefits resulting from performance based bonus payments and increased health costs (approximately 1.2%).

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

Labor costs in fiscal 2010 were $85.2 million, a decrease of $15.4 million, or 15.3%, compared to $100.6 million for the prior year. As a percentage of Company Store revenue, labor costs decreased to 33.5% for fiscal 2010 compared to 34.0% for the prior year. The decrease of labor costs as a percentage of Company Store revenue was primarily due to improvements in hourly labor from effective wage management and improved productivity (approximately 2.0%), partially offset by increased workers compensation insurance costs attributable primarily to an adjustment to reflect lower claims costs in 2009 that did not recur in 2010 (approximately 0.3%).

Occupancy

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

Occupancy costs include both fixed and variable portions of rent, common area maintenance charges, property taxes, licenses and property insurance for all Company Store locations. Occupancy costs in fiscal 2011 were $31.1 million, a decrease of $7.5 million, or 19.4%, compared to $38.6 million for the prior year. Our refranchising initiative has resulted in a decrease in Company Stores and the related costs and expenses to operate, manage, and support these refranchised Company Stores. As a percentage of Company Store revenue, occupancy costs decreased to 14.5% for fiscal 2011 compared to 15.2% for the prior year. The decrease in occupancy costs as a percentage of Company store revenue was primarily due to the impact of leverage resulting from the increase in Company Store comparable sales.

 

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Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

Occupancy costs in fiscal 2010 were $38.6 million, a decrease of $5.3 million, or 12.1%, compared to $43.9 million for the prior year. As a percentage of Company Store revenue, occupancy costs increased to 15.2% for fiscal 2010 compared to 14.8% for the prior year. The increase in occupancy costs as a percentage of Company store revenue was primarily due to the impact of deleverage as a result of the decrease in Company Store comparable sales.

Store operating

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

Store operating expenses consist primarily of various store-level costs such as utilities, marketing, repairs and maintenance, credit card fees and other store operating expenses. Total store operating expenses in fiscal 2011 were $32.8 million, a decrease of $5.6 million, or 14.4%, compared to $38.4 million for the prior year. Our refranchising initiative has resulted in a decrease in Company Stores and the related costs and expenses to operate, manage, and support these refranchised Company Stores. As a percentage of Company Store Revenue, total store operating expenses increased to 15.3% for fiscal 2011 compared to 15.1% for the prior year. The increase in total store operating expenses as a percentage of Company Store revenue was primarily due to an increase in marketing expense (approximately 0.3%) and increased credit card usage as a percentage of Company Store sales (approximately 0.2%) partially offset by reduced repair costs (approximately 0.2%).

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

Total store operating expenses in fiscal 2010 were $38.4 million, a decrease of $0.3 million, or 1.0%, compared to $38.7 million for the prior year. As a percentage of Company Store Revenue, total store operating expenses increased to 15.1% for fiscal 2010 compared to 13.1% for the prior year. The increase in total store operating expenses as a percentage of Company Store revenue was primarily due to an increase in marketing expense (approximately 1.1%), an increase in utility rates (approximately 0.2%), deleverage due to the decrease in Company Store comparable sales (approximately 0.4%), and increased credit card usage as a percentage of Company Store sales (approximately 0.2%).

Depreciation and amortization

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

Depreciation and amortization expenses include the depreciation of fixed assets and the amortization of intangible assets. Depreciation and amortization in fiscal 2011 was $12.5 million, a decrease of $2.1 million, or 14.7%, compared to $14.6 million for the prior year. Our refranchising initiative has resulted in a decrease in Company Stores and related assets, resulting in a reduction in the carrying value of Company Store fixed assets. As a percentage of total revenue, depreciation and amortization is essentially flat at 5.5% for fiscal 2011 as compared to 5.6% for the prior year. Depreciation and amortization as a percentage of total revenue reflected the impact of leverage due to the increase in Company Store comparable sales (approximately 0.3%), partially offset by investments in technology infrastructure (approximately 0.3%).

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

Depreciation and amortization in fiscal 2010 was $14.6 million, a decrease of $3.7 million, or 20.0%, compared to $18.3 million for the prior year. As a percentage of total revenue, depreciation and amortization decreased to 5.6% for fiscal 2010 as compared to 6.1% for the prior year. The decrease in depreciation and amortization as a percentage of total revenue was primarily due to store impairment charges taken in 2009 (approximately 0.4%) that resulted in a lower depreciable base.

 

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General and administrative

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

General and administrative (“G&A”) expenses include costs associated with our corporate headquarters in Emeryville, CA, field supervision, bonuses, outside and contract services, accounting and legal fees, travel and travel-related expenses, share-based compensation and other. Total G&A expenses in fiscal 2011 were $37.8 million, an increase of $0.5 million, or 1.4%, compared to $37.3 million for the prior year. As a percentage of total revenue, total G&A expenses increased to 16.7% for fiscal 2011 compared to 14.2% for the prior year, primarily due to the sales reduction from refranchising as described above. The increase of total G&A expenses was primarily due to increases in bonuses for the accomplishment and acceleration of our strategic objectives (approximately $2.3 million) and the effect of the fifty third week in fiscal 2011(approximately $0.5 million), partially offset by the decrease in legal expenses (approximately $1.4 million), reduced expense for share-based compensation (approximately $0.5 million) and reduced consulting fees (approximately $0.4 million). During fiscal 2011, we recorded a charge of $1.0 million relating to settlement of outstanding litigation and related costs compared to $2.1 million during fiscal 2010.

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

Total G&A expenses in fiscal 2010 were $37.3 million, an increase of $0.3 million, or 0.6%, compared to $37.0 million for the prior year. As a percentage of total revenue, total G&A expenses increased to 14.2% for fiscal 2010 compared to 12.3% for the prior year. The increase of total G&A expenses was primarily due to charges to settle outstanding litigation and related costs (approximately $2.1 million), increases in bonuses for the accomplishment and acceleration of our strategic objectives (approximately $1.3 million of which $0.7 million was in equity and affected non cash stock-based compensation), partially offset by the decrease in the number of Company Stores and the related overhead expenses to manage and support these Company Stores as a result of our refranchising initiative (approximately $1.5 million).

Store pre-opening

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

Store pre-opening costs are primarily expenses incurred for training new store personnel, pre-opening marketing and pre-opening rent. Store pre-opening costs in fiscal 2011 were $1.0 million, an increase of $0.4 million, or 48.9%, compared to $0.6 million for the prior year. The increase in Store pre-opening expenses was primarily due to the opening of nine new Company Stores, 22 new Franchise Stores and 18 new International Stores in fiscal 2011 as compared to the opening of one new Company Store and 30 new Franchise Stores in the prior year.

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

Store pre-opening costs in fiscal 2010 were $0.6 million, an increase of $0.1 million, or 25.6%, compared to $0.5 million for the prior year. The increase in Store pre-opening expenses was primarily due to the opening of one new Company Store and 30 new Franchise Stores in fiscal 2010 as compared to the opening of two new Company Stores and 23 new Franchise Stores in the prior year.

Impairment of long-lived assets

Long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment when indicators of impairment are present. Expected future cash flows associated with an asset, in addition to other quantitative and qualitative analyses, including certain assumptions about expected future operating performance and changes in economic conditions are the key factors in determining undiscounted future cash flows. If the sum of the undiscounted cash flows is less than the carrying value of the asset, we recognize an impairment loss equal to the amount by which carrying value

 

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exceeds the fair value of the asset. For more information, please refer to the discussion under “Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies—Impairment of Long-Lived Assets” included in Note 1 in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

Impairment of long-lived assets in fiscal 2011 was $1.3 million, a decrease of $1.5 million, or 53.5%, compared to $2.8 million for the prior year. The decrease of impairment of long-lived assets is primarily due to improved operating performance and impairment charges for refranchised stores recognized in fiscal 2010, which charges did not recur during fiscal 2011.

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

Impairment of long-lived assets in fiscal 2010 was $2.8 million, a decrease of $9.8 million, or 78.0%, compared to $12.6 million for the prior year. The decrease of impairment of long-lived assets was primarily due to a reduction in the carrying value of store fixed assets in 2009 that did not recur to the same extent in 2010.

Store lease termination and closure

Lease termination costs consist primarily of the costs of future obligations related to closed store locations. Discounted liabilities for future lease costs and the fair value of related subleases of closed locations are recorded when the stores are closed. These amounts are subject to adjustments as liabilities are settled. In assessing the discounted liabilities for future costs of obligations related to closed stores, we make assumptions regarding amounts of future subleases. If these assumptions or their related estimates change in the future, we may be required to record additional exit costs or reduce exit costs previously recorded. Exit costs recorded for each of the periods presented include the net effect of such changes in estimates (See Note 7 in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements).

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

Store lease termination and closure costs were $0.7 million in fiscal 2011, a decrease of $3.6 million, or 83.1%, compared to $4.3 million for the prior year. The decrease of store lease termination and closure costs reflected the closing of 11 Company Stores, of which only two were closed prior to their respective lease expiration dates, in fiscal 2011. During fiscal 2010, we closed 23 Company Stores, and nine were closed prior to their respective lease expiration dates. Lease obligations are payable through 2023.

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

Store lease termination and closure costs were $4.3 million in fiscal 2010, an increase of $3.1 million, or 244.8 %, compared to $1.2 million for the prior year. The increase of store lease termination and closure costs was primarily due to the closing of 23 Company Stores during fiscal 2010, of which nine were closed prior to the lease expiration date. During fiscal 2009, we closed eight Company Stores, and four were closed prior to their respective lease expiration dates. Lease obligations are payable through 2021.

Other operating, net

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

Other operating, net consists primarily of gain or loss on disposals, income from jambacard breakage, franchise related occupancy expense and jambacard-related fees. In fiscal 2011, other operating, net was $0.2 million of expense compared to other operating, net of $4.3 million of income for fiscal 2010. The increase in expense of $4.5 million is primarily due to a decrease in jambacard breakage income for fiscal 2011 (approximately $0.8 million), a

 

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reversal of breakage income recorded in prior years (approximately $0.7 million), an increase in the net loss on disposal of fixed assets resulting primarily from replacement of equipment (approximately $1.5 million), and an increase in international and other franchise-related expense (approximately $0.5 million). In addition, during fiscal 2011, we recorded jambacard-related fees and charges of approximately $1.0 million in other operating, whereas in the prior year we recorded $0.5 million for such fees in store operating expense.

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

In fiscal 2010, other operating, net was $4.3 million of income, an increase of $0.5 million, or 11.8%, compared to other operating, net of $3.8 million of income for fiscal 2009. The increase of other operating, net is primarily due to an increase in jambacard breakage income net of amortization (approximately $2.5 million), partially offset by the net loss on disposal of fixed assets (approximately $2.0 million). The jambacard breakage income includes an adjustment of $1.5 million to record the effect of escheatment status change in certain States.

Gain from derivative liabilities

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

No gain from derivative liabilities was recorded for fiscal 2011 nor in fiscal 2010.

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

No gain from derivative liabilities was recorded for fiscal 2010 compared to a gain of $1.6 million for the prior year period. No gain or loss from derivative liabilities was recorded as the warrants that were classified as derivative liabilities have expired and no gain or loss was recorded for the change in the fair value of our Put and Call Right issued in connection with the issuance of our Senior Notes because it was exercised during the second fiscal quarter of 2009.

Interest income

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

Interest income represents interest earned on cash held in our interest bearing accounts. Interest income in fiscal 2011 was $0.2 million, an increase of $0.1 million, or 117.8%, compared to $0.1 million for the prior year. The increase of interest income was primarily due to interest on notes receivable from certain franchisees.

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

Interest income represents interest earned on cash held in our interest bearing accounts. Interest income in fiscal 2010 was $0.1 million, a decrease of $0.3 million, or 81.9%, compared to $0.4 million for the prior year. The decrease of interest income was primarily due to lower interest rates in fiscal 2010 (approximately $0.3 million).

Interest expense

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

Interest expense in fiscal 2011 and 2010 was $0.5 million and relates primarily to leasing arrangements and obligations recorded as a result of early lease terminations.

During fiscal 2011 and 2010, we paid cash dividends on the Series B Preferred Stock totaling $1.6 million and $2.3 million, respectively. This amount is recorded in stockholders’ equity.

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

Interest expense in fiscal 2010 was $0.5 million, a decrease of $6.4 million compared to $6.9 million for the prior year. The decrease in interest expense was primarily due to the repayment of outstanding Senior Notes and

 

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the payment of related interest as well as prepayment penalties and wrote off the associated prepaid loan fees and transaction costs in fiscal 2009 that did not re-occur in fiscal 2010. The repayment resulted from the issuance of Series B Preferred Stock in June 2009.

During fiscal 2010 and 2009, we paid cash dividends on the Series B Preferred Stock totaling $2.3 million and $1.4 million, respectively.

Income tax (expense) benefit

Fiscal Year 2011 to Fiscal Year 2010

Income tax benefit in fiscal 2011 was $0.3 million compared to an income tax expense of $(0.2) million for the prior year. The decrease in income tax expense was primarily due to the write-off of tax goodwill and the change in liability related to uncertain tax positions in fiscal 2011.

Fiscal Year 2010 to Fiscal Year 2009

Income tax expense in fiscal 2010 was $(0.2) million compared to an income tax benefit of $1.1 million for the prior year. The decrease in income tax expense was primarily due to foreign taxes incurred in fiscal 2010.

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

Known Events, Trends or Uncertainties Impacting or Expected to Impact Comparisons of Reported or Future Results

Management reviews and discusses its operations based on both financial and non-financial metrics. Among the key financial metrics upon which management focuses is reviewing the performance based on the Company’s consolidated GAAP results, including Company Store comparable sales. Management also uses certain supplemental, non-GAAP financial metrics in evaluating financial results, including Franchise Store comparable sales and system-wide comparable sales.

Company Store comparable sales represent the change in year-over-year sales for all Company Stores opened for at least 13 full fiscal periods.

Franchise Store comparable sales, a non-GAAP financial measure, represents the change in year-over-year sales for all Franchise Stores opened for at least 13 full fiscal periods, as reported by franchisees.

System-wide comparable store sales, a non-GAAP financial measure, represents the change in year-over-year sales for all Company and Franchise Stores opened for at least 13 full fiscal periods and are based on sales by both company-owned and franchise-operated stores, as reported by franchisees, which are in the store base.

Company-owned stores that were sold in refranchising transactions are included in the store base for each accounting period of the fiscal quarter in which the store was sold to the extent the sale is consummated at least three days prior to the end of such accounting period, but only for the days such stores have been company-owned. Thereafter, such stores are excluded from the store base until such stores have been franchise-operated for at least one full fiscal period at which point such stores are included in the store base and compared to sales in the comparable period of the prior year. Comparable store sales exclude closed locations.

Management reviews the increase or decrease in Company Store comparable store sales, Franchise Store comparable sales and system-wide comparable sales compared with the same period in the prior year to assess business trends and make certain business decisions. The Company believes that Franchise Store comparable sales and system-wide comparable sales data, non-GAAP, financial measures, are useful in assessing the overall performance of the Jamba brand and, ultimately, the performance of the Company.

 

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The following table sets forth operating data that do not otherwise appear in our consolidated financial statements as of and for the 53 week period ended January 3, 2012 and the 52 week period ended December 28, 2010:

 

     53 Week
Period  Ended
    52 Week
Period  Ended
 
     January 3,
2012
    December 28,
2010
 

Percentage change in Company Store comparable sales(1)

     4.0 %     (2.3 )% 

Percentage change in Franchise Store comparable sales(2)

     3.4 %     (1.6 )% 

Percentage change in system-wide comparable sales(2)

     3.7 %     (2.1 )% 

Total Company Stores

     307        351   

Total Franchise Stores

     443        391   

Total International Stores

     19        1   

Total JambaGo Stations

     35        0   

 

(1) 

Percentage change in Company Store comparable sales compares the sales of Company Stores during fiscal year 2011 to the sales from the same Company Stores for fiscal year 2010. A Company Store is included in this calculation after its thirteenth full fiscal period of operations. Sales from Franchise Stores are not included in the Company Store comparable sales.

(2) 

Percentage change in system-wide comparable sales compares the combined sales of Company and Franchise-operated Stores during fiscal year 2011 to the combined sales from the same Company and Franchise Stores for the fiscal year 2010. A Company or Franchise Store is included in this calculation after its thirteenth full fiscal period of operations.

The following table sets forth certain data relating to Company Stores and Franchise Stores for the periods indicated:

 

     53 week period ended
January 3, 2012
     52 week period ended
December 28, 2010
 
     Domestic     International      Domestic     International  

Company Stores:

         

Beginning of period

     351                478          

Company Stores opened

     9                1          

Company Stores closed

     (11             (23       

Company Stores sold to franchisees

     (42       —         (105       —   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Company Stores

     307                351          
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Franchise Stores:

         

Beginning of period

     391        1         260        1   

Franchise Stores opened

     22        18         30          

Franchise Stores closed

     (12             (4       

Franchise Stores purchased from Company

     42                105          
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Franchise Stores

     443        19         391        1   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Refranchising Initiative

In May 2009 we announced our refranchising initiative under which we stated our intent to sell existing Company Stores to new or existing franchisees who want to operate multiple store locations. We believe our refranchising initiative helped us to accelerate growth and to achieve certain operational efficiencies. This initiative also helped to shift our business to an asset light model. We initially planned to complete the sale of up to 150 Company Stores to new or existing franchisees. By the close of fiscal 2011, we had completed the sale of 174 Company Stores, the last 42 of which were sold in the first quarter of fiscal 2011.

 

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In many refranchising transactions, we entered into development agreements committing buyers to build additional Franchise Stores in regions their purchased stores occupy. In addition, as part of these refranchising transactions, buyers of mature Company Stores are obligated to refresh and refurbish these stores.

Cash Flows Summary

The following table summarizes our cash flows for each of the past three full fiscal years (in thousands):

 

     January 3,
2012
    December 28,
2010
    December 29,
2009
 

Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities

   $ (1,080   $ (953   $ 8,464   

Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities

     (7,010     3,598        (3,127

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

     (1,327     (2,378     2,598   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

   $ (9,417   $ 267      $ 7,935   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating Activities

Net cash used in operating activities increased by $0.1 million in fiscal 2011 compared to fiscal 2010 primarily due to decreased cash flows associated with an increase in working capital (approximately $7.5 million), partially offset by the decrease in net loss adjusted for noncash items (approximately $7.4 million). Our decreased cash flows were primarily due to rent prepayments partially offset by receipts from our franchisees and licensees. In addition, our decision not to repeat, in 2010, the holiday season Jambacard program we established with Costco in 2009 contributed to the decrease in cash flows.

In the Costco jambacard program we sell jambacards to Costco who resells them to its customers. We participated in the Jambacard program in 2009 holiday season, which enabled us to record cash proceeds of approximately $6.2 million from sales of jambacards during the 52 week period ended December 28, 2010. We did not have this program in 2010. In September 2011, we resumed the Jambacard program with Costco for the holiday season of fiscal year 2011, resulting in cash inflows during fiscal 2011 and fiscal 2012. Our decreased cash flows were partially offset by increased fees from our franchisees and licensees as we expanded our franchise store base and CPG licensing program.

The amount of cash used in our operating activities during any particular quarter is highly subject to variations in the seasons, with the first and fourth quarters of the fiscal year encompassing the winter and holiday season when we traditionally generate our lowest revenue, and our second and third quarters of the fiscal year encompassing the warmer seasons where a significant portion of our revenue and cash flows are realized. For more information on seasonality, refer to the section below entitled “Seasonality and Quarterly Results.” We also expect to have increased expenditures during the first part of the fiscal year as we invest in product development and domestic expansion with the goal to have new products released and new stores open by mid-year to take advantage of the busier summer months.

Net cash provided by operating activities decreased by $9.4 million in fiscal 2010 compared to fiscal 2009 primarily due to a decrease in cash flows related to our jambacard sales (approximately $13.5 million) and a decrease in refundable taxes received during fiscal 2009, (approximately $5.2 million) partially offset by an increase in cash flows relating to receivables (approximately $8.8 million). We did not continue the program we had with Costco in fiscal 2009 whereby we sold jambacards to Costco who resold them to its customers. As a result, at the end of fiscal 2010, we did not have receivables for the cards sold to Costco.

 

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Investing Activities

Net cash used in investing activities was $7.0 million in fiscal 2011 compared to net cash provided by investing activities of $3.6 million in fiscal 2010, primarily reflecting a decrease in proceeds received from the refranchising initiative (approximately $10.0 million) and a net increase in spending on company-owned store investment in nine new stores, store refreshes and technology infrastructure (approximately $0.6 million).

Net cash provided by investing activities increased $6.7 million in fiscal 2010 compared to fiscal 2009 primarily due to an increase in proceeds received from the refranchising of 105 Company Stores (approximately $9.0 million), a decrease in spending for the purchases of property and equipment (approximately $0.7 million), partially offset by a decrease in restricted cash as a result of the payoff of our Financing Agreement during 2009 (approximately $3.0 million).

In fiscal 2012, we expect capital expenditures to be approximately $6.0 million depending on our liquidity needs, including investing in improvements to our technology infrastructure and maintenance capital. We expect to open up to nine new Company Stores as we focus our growth on expanding and accelerating the development of traditional and non-traditional Franchise Stores.

Financing Activities

Net cash used in financing activities decreased by $1.1 million in fiscal 2011 compared to fiscal 2010, due to a decrease in preferred stock dividend payments (approximately $0.7 million), due to the conversion of shares of preferred stock to common stock, a reduction in capital lease payments (approximately $0.2 million) and an increase in proceeds pursuant to stock plans (approximately $0.2 million).

Net cash used in financing activities decreased by $5.0 million in fiscal 2010 compared to fiscal 2009, due to the preferred stock issuance in 2009, net of repayment of the Senior Notes and transaction costs (approximately $7.2 million), partially offset by the related put option payment (approximately $3.0 million) and an increase in preferred stock dividends payments (approximately $0.9 million).

Liquidity

As of January 3, 2012, we had cash and cash equivalents of $19.6 million compared to $29.0 million in cash and cash equivalents as of December 28, 2010. As of January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010, we had no short term or long term debt. Our primary sources of liquidity are cash flows provided by operating activities. In the future, and as permitted under the Securities Purchase Agreement for the Series B Preferred Stock, we may enter equipment leasing arrangements and incur up to $10.0 million of indebtedness as necessary. We cannot assure, however, that such financing will be available on favorable terms or at all. During September, 2011, we resumed our Costco jambacard program for the 2011 holiday season, where we sell jambacards to Costco who resells them to its customers. The receivable related to Costco of $2.7 million was subsequently collected in early 2012. As of January 3, 2012, we held $1.4 million in restricted cash, which represented cash held in money market accounts or certificates of deposit to collateralize our letters of credit and advertising fund.

While we have completed our refranchising initiative and do not anticipate further proceeds from the sale of additional Company Stores, we expect that our cash on hand and future cash flows provided by operating activities will be sufficient to fund our working capital and general corporate needs, Series B Preferred Stock dividend payments and the non-discretionary capital expenditures for the foreseeable future. Our primary liquidity and capital requirements are for working capital and general corporate needs and the planned fiscal 2012 capital expenditures are described above. The use of cash to fund discretionary capital expenditures will be based on the need to conserve our capital.

On February 14, 2012, we entered into a Credit Agreement (the “Credit Agreement”) with Wells Fargo Bank, National Association (the “Lender”) whereby the Lender is providing us with a six million dollar revolving

 

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line of credit. The outstanding balance under the credit facility bears interest at a LIBOR Market Index Rate based upon the rate for one month U.S. dollar deposits, plus 3.75% per annum. Under the terms of the Credit Agreement, we are required to maintain minimum levels of trailing annual consolidated EBITDA and liquidity and will be subject to limits on annual capital expenditures. The Credit Agreement terminates January 31, 2013 or may be terminated earlier by us or by the Lender. The credit facility is subject to customary affirmative and negative covenants for credit facilities of this type, including limitations on us with respect to liens, indebtedness, guaranties, investments, distributions, mergers and acquisitions and dispositions of assets. The credit facility is evidenced by a revolving note made by us in favor of the Lender, is guaranteed by us and is secured by substantially all of our assets including the asset of our subsidiaries and a pledge of stock of our subsidiaries. We are in compliance with all related covenants.

The adequacy of our available funds will depend on many factors, including the macroeconomic environment, the operating performance of our Company Stores, the successful expansion of our franchise and licensing programs and the successful rollout and consumer acceptance of our new beverage and food initiatives. Given these factors, our foremost priorities for the near term continue to be preserving and generating cash sufficient to fund our liquidity needs.

Contractual Obligations

The following table summarizes contractual obligations and borrowings as of January 3, 2012, and the timing and effect that such commitments are expected to have on our liquidity and capital requirements in future periods. We expect to fund these commitments primarily with operating cash flows generated in the normal course of business.

 

     Payments Due by Period (in 000s)  
     Total      Less Than
1 Year
     1-2 Years      3-4 Years      5 or More
Years
 

Operating lease obligations(1)

   $ 110,597       $ 24,805       $ 43,733       $ 25,870       $ 16,189   

Purchase obligations(2)

     83,341         70,618         5,133         5,060         2,530   

Series B redeemable preferred stock redemption

     19,365         —           —           —           19,365   

Dividends for Series B redeemable preferred stock

     8,520         1,549         3,098         3,098         775   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 221,823       $ 96,972       $ 51,964       $ 34,028       $ 38,859   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) 

Our wholly owned subsidiary, Jamba Juice Company, is a party to each Company Store lease obligation. The operating lease obligations represent future minimum lease payments under non-cancelable operating leases and lease termination fees as of January 3, 2012. The minimum lease payments do not include common area maintenance (“CAM”) charges, insurance, contingent rent obligations or real estate taxes, which are also required contractual obligations under our operating leases. In the majority of our operating leases, CAM charges are not fixed and can fluctuate from year to year. Total CAM charges, insurance, contingent rent obligations, license, permits and real estate taxes for our fiscal year ended January 3, 2012 were $7.0 million.

(2) 

We negotiate pricing and quality specifications for many of the products used in Company Stores and Franchise Stores. This allows for volume pricing and consistent quality of products that meet our standards. Although we negotiate and contract directly with manufacturers, co-packers or growers for our products, we purchase these products from third-party centralized distributors. These distributors source, warehouse and deliver specified products to both Company Stores and Franchise Stores.

As of January 3, 2012, our gross unrecognized tax benefits totaled $0.2 million and are not included in the table as a reasonably reliable estimate of the timing of future payments, if any, cannot be predicted.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

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New Accounting Standards

See the Recent Accounting Pronouncements section in Note 1 of our Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for a summary of new accounting standards.

SEASONALITY AND QUARTERLY RESULTS

Our business is highly subject to day-to-day volatility based on weather and varies by season. A significant portion of our revenue is realized during the second and third quarters of the fiscal year, which include the summer months. The fourth quarter of the fiscal year, which encompasses the winter months and the holiday season, has traditionally been our lowest revenue volume quarter. Although we have expanded the number of stores offering our hot oatmeal, hot beverages, sandwiches and California Flatbread selections, our business will likely continue to be subject to seasonal patterns for the foreseeable future, given that the largest portion of our sales continues to be from the sale of smoothies during the warmer parts of the year. Because of the seasonality of the business, results for an individual quarter are not necessarily indicative of the results which may be achieved for the full fiscal year. Furthermore, since our fiscal year will now have four 13-week quarters as compared to our previous quarters where our first fiscal quarter was sixteen weeks, the second and third quarters were twelve weeks, and the fourth quarter was twelve or thirteen weeks, our quarterly results as compared to previous quarters in 2011 or earlier may not be indicative of our performance.

INFLATION

We do not believe that inflation has had a material impact on our results of operations in recent years. However, we cannot predict what effect inflation may have on our operations in the future.

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Interest Rates

We do not enter into market risk sensitive instruments for trading purposes. We are exposed to financial market risks due primarily to changes in interest rates in our interest bearing accounts. We do not believe a change in interest rate will materially affect our financial position or results of operations. A one percent change of the interest rate would result in an annual change in the results of operations of $0.2 million.

Commodities Prices

We are exposed to the impact of commodity and utility price fluctuations related to unpredictable factors such as weather and various market conditions over which we do not have control. We purchase significant amounts of fruits and dairy products to support the needs of our Company Stores. The price and availability of these commodities directly impacts the results of operations and can be expected to impact the future results of operations.

We purchase fruit based on short-term seasonal pricing agreements. These short-term agreements generally set the price of procured frozen fruit and 100% pure fruit concentrates for less than one year based on estimated annual requirements. In order to mitigate the effects of price changes in any one commodity on our cost structure, we contract with multiple suppliers both domestically and internationally. These agreements typically set the price for some or all of our estimated annual fruit requirements, protecting us from short-term volatility. Nevertheless, these agreements typically contain a force majeure clause, which, if utilized (such as hurricanes in 2004 that destroyed the Florida orange crop and more recently with the 2007 freeze that affected California citrus), may subject us to significant price increases.

Our pricing philosophy is not to attempt to change consumer prices with every move up or down of the commodity market, but to take a longer term view of managing margins and the value perception of our products in the eyes of our customers. Our objective is to maximize our revenue through increased customer traffic.

 

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ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

     Page No.  

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

     60   

Consolidated Financial Statements:

  

Consolidated Balance Sheets at January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010

     61   

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Years Ended January 3, 2012, December  28, 2010 and December 29, 2009

     62   

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the Years Ended January 3, 2012,  December 28, 2010 and December 29, 2009

     63   

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended January 3, 2012, December  28, 2010 and December 29, 2009

     64   

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     65   

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Stockholders

Jamba, Inc.:

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Jamba, Inc. and subsidiaries (the Company) as of January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010, and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for the fiscal years ended January 3, 2012, December 28, 2010 and December 29, 2009. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Jamba, Inc. and subsidiaries as of January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for the fiscal years ended January 3, 2012, December 28, 2010 and December 29, 2009, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of January 3, 2012, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO), and our report dated March 8, 2012 expressed an unqualified opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

/s/ KPMG LLP

San Francisco, California

March 8, 2012

 

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JAMBA, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

(Dollars in thousands, except share and per share amounts)    January 3,
2012
    December 28,
2010
 

ASSETS

    

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 19,607      $ 29,024   

Restricted cash

     1,352        1,620   

Receivables, net of allowances of $294 and $200

     13,040        6,377   

Inventories

     2,228        2,486   

Prepaid and refundable taxes

     574        539   

Prepaid rent

     2,761        508   

Assets held for sale

     —          3,877   

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

     1,509        1,604   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     41,071        46,035   

Property, fixtures and equipment, net

     44,760        49,215   

Trademarks and other intangible assets, net

     1,130        1,341   

Restricted cash

     —          205   

Deferred income taxes

     —          40   

Other long-term assets

     1,332        3,218   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 88,293      $ 100,054   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

    

Current liabilities:

    

Accounts payable

   $ 4,155      $ 6,851   

Accrued compensation and benefits

     6,566        6,161   

Workers’ compensation and health insurance reserves

     1,092        1,140   

Accrued jambacard liability

     33,256        29,756   

Other current liabilities

     9,961        12,622   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     55,030        56,530   

Long-term workers’ compensation and health insurance reserves

     —          166   

Other long-term liabilities

     13,079        15,416   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     68,109        72,112   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies (Notes 9 and 15)

    

Series B redeemable preferred stock, $.001 par value, 304,348 shares authorized; 168,389 and 197,485 issued, and outstanding, respectively

     17,880        20,554   

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Common stock, $.001 par value, 150,000,000 shares authorized; 67,280,485 and 63,734,961 shares issued, and outstanding, respectively

     68        64   

Additional paid-in capital

     369,027        365,817   

Accumulated deficit

     (366,791     (358,493
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

     2,304        7,388   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 88,293      $ 100,054   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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JAMBA, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

(Dollars in thousands, except share and per share amounts)    Fiscal Year
Ended
January 3,
2012
    Fiscal Year
Ended
December 28,
2010
    Fiscal Year
Ended
December 29,
2009
 

Revenue:

      

Company stores

   $ 214,837      $ 254,491      $ 295,607   

Franchise and other revenue

     11,597        8,162        6,030   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

     226,434        262,653        301,637   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Costs and operating expenses (income):

      

Cost of sales

     49,503        61,307        72,669   

Labor

     67,868        85,189        100,589   

Occupancy

     31,092        38,561        43,888   

Store operating

     32,847        38,358        38,734   

Depreciation and amortization

     12,463        14,610        18,271   

General and administrative

     37,798        37,262        37,044   

Store pre-opening

     965        648        516   

Impairment of long-lived assets

     1,291        2,778        12,639   

Store lease termination and closure

     721        4,255        1,234   

Other operating, net

     210        (4,292     (3,840
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs and operating expenses

     234,758        278,676        321,744   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from operations

     (8,324     (16,023     (20,107
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other income (expense):

      

Gain on derivative liabilities

     —          —          1,597   

Interest income

     159        73        404   

Interest expense

     (473     (547     (6,905
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other expense, net

     (314     (474     (4,904
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before income taxes

     (8,638     (16,497     (25,011

Income tax benefit (expense)

     340        (159     1,066   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

     (8,298     (16,656     (23,945

Redeemable preferred stock dividends and deemed dividends

     (2,331     (4,077     (1,860
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to common stockholders

   $ (10,629   $ (20,733   $ (25,805
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares used in the computation of loss per share:

      

Basic

     66,310,654        58,711,495        53,632,299   

Diluted

     66,310,654        58,711,495        53,632,299   

Loss per share:

      

Basic

   $ (0.16   $ (0.35   $ (0.48

Diluted

   $ (0.16   $ (0.35   $ (0.48

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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JAMBA, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

     Common Stock     Additional
Paid-In
Capital
    Accumulated
Deficit
    Stockholders’
Equity
 
(Dollars in thousands, except share amounts)    Shares     Amount        

Balance as of December 30, 2008

     54,690,728      $ 55      $ 358,258      $ (317,892   $ 40,421   

Share-based compensation expense

     —          —          1,274        —          1,274   

Common stock repurchased pursuant to repayment of Financing Agreement

     (2,000,000     (2     (2,497     —          (2,499

Issuance of common stock pursuant to stock plans

     21,800        —          29        —          29   

Beneficial conversion feature and warrants issued related to redeemable preferred stock

     —          —          1,116        —          1,116   

Accretion of redeemable preferred stock

     —          —          (328     —          (328

Redeemable preferred stock dividends

     —          —          (1,532     —          (1,532

Net loss

     —          —          —          (23,945     (23,945
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance as of December 29, 2009

     52,712,528        53        356,320        (341,837     14,536   

Share-based compensation expense

     —          —          1,146        —          1,146   

Issuance of common stock pursuant to stock plans

     278,133        —          149        —          149   

Conversion of redeemable preferred stock

     10,686,300        11        12,279        —          12,290   

Accretion of redeemable preferred stock

     —          —          (1,775     —          (1,775

Redeemable preferred stock dividends

     —          —          (2,302     —          (2,302

Restricted shares vested

     58,000        —          —          —          —     

Net loss

     —          —          —          (16,656     (16,656
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance as of December 28, 2010

     63,734,961        64        365,817        (358,493     7,388   

Share-based compensation expense

     —          —          1,256        —          1,256   

Issuance of common stock pursuant to stock plans

     587,924        1        942        —          943   

Conversion of redeemable preferred stock

     2,909,600        3        3,343        —          3,346   

Accretion of redeemable preferred stock

     —          —          (672     —          (672

Redeemable preferred stock dividends

     —          —          (1,659     —          (1,659

Restricted shares vested

     48,000        —          —          —          —     

Net loss

     —          —          —          (8,298     (8,298
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance as of January 3, 2012

     67,280,485      $ 68      $ 369,027      $ (366,791   $ 2,304   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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JAMBA, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

(Dollars in thousands)    Fiscal Year
Ended
January 3,
2012
    Fiscal Year
Ended
December 28,
2010
    Fiscal Year
Ended
December 29,
2009
 

Cash (used in) provided by operating activities:

      

Net loss

   $ (8,298   $ (16,656   $ (23,945

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash (used in) provided by operating activities:

      

Depreciation and amortization

     12,463        14,610        18,271   

Impairment of long-lived assets

     1,291        2,778        12,639   

Lease termination, store closure costs and disposals

     1,501        (324     (1,374

Jambacard breakage income and amortization, net

     (3,685     (5,252     (2,777

Share-based compensation

     1,256        1,146        1,274   

Bad debt and purchase obligation reserves

     164        528        (178

Deferred rent

     (457     (869     793   

Deferred income taxes

     40        958        (644

Write-off of loan fees and loan discount

     —          —          2,865   

Equity (income) loss from joint ventures

     (51     (61     (7

Gain on derivative liabilities

     —          —          (1,597

Amortization of loan premium

     —          —          887   

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

      

Receivables

     (6,717     3,333        (5,441

Inventories

     148        957        (150

Prepaid and refundable taxes

     (35     (48     5,179   

Prepaid rent

     (2,253     (22     (301

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

     95        (482     206   

Other long-term assets

     1,937        838        106   

Restricted cash from operating activities

     473        898        1,995   

Accounts payable

     (2,494     1,152        (2,080

Accrued compensation and benefits

     1,005        (928     (582

Workers’ compensation and health insurance reserves

     (214     (948     (2,327

Accrued jambacard liability

     7,185        (3,247     10,268   

Other current liabilities

     (2,793     2,332        (2,326

Other long-term liabilities

     (1,643     (1,646     (2,290
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash (used in) provided by operating activities

     (1,080     (953     8,464   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash provided by (used in) investing activities:

      

Capital expenditures

     (10,744     (10,165     (10,839

Proceeds from the sale of stores

     3,734        13,763        4,712   

Decrease in restricted cash

     —          —          3,000   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash (used in) provided by investing activities

     (7,010     3,598        (3,127
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash (used in) provided by financing activities:

      

Proceeds from issuance of redeemable preferred stock

     —          —          34,115   

Payments on debt facility

     —          —          (25,000

Payments on exercise of put agreement

     —          —          (3,000

Payments of costs for issuance of redeemable preferred stock

     —          —          (1,908

Redeemable preferred stock dividends paid

     (1,621     (2,302     (1,360

Payment on capital lease obligations

     (20     (225     (282

Proceeds pursuant to stock plans

     314        149        33   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash (used in) provided by financing activities

     (1,327     (2,378     2,598   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash and equivalents

     (9,417     267        7,935   

Cash and equivalents at beginning of period

     29,024        28,757        20,822   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and equivalents at end of period

   $ 19,607      $ 29,024      $ 28,757   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Supplemental cash flow information:

      

Cash paid for interest

   $ 237      $ 293      $ 3,309   

Income taxes paid

     36        18        51   

Noncash investing and financing activities:

      

Noncash property, fixtures and equipment additions

   $ 202      $ 1,705      $ 1,396   

Accretion of redeemable preferred stock

     672        1,775        328   

Beneficial conversion feature of redeemable preferred stock

     —          —          885   

Warrants issued in connection with issuance of redeemable preferred stock

     —          —          231   

Redeemable preferred stock dividends

     38        50        172   

Conversion of redeemable preferred stock

     3,346        12,290        —     

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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JAMBA, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE FISCAL YEARS ENDED JANUARY 3, 2012, DECEMBER 28, 2010

AND DECEMBER 29, 2009

1. BUSINESS AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Business—Jamba, Inc. consummated its initial public offering in July 2005. On March 10, 2006, Jamba, Inc. entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger with Jamba Juice Company (the “Merger Agreement”). On November 29, 2006 (the “Merger Date”), the Jamba, Inc. consummated the merger with Jamba Juice Company (the “Merger”) whereby Jamba Juice Company became its wholly owned subsidiary.

Jamba, Inc. together with its wholly-owned subsidiary, Jamba Juice Company (“the Company”) owns and franchises, on a global basis, Jamba Juice stores. Jamba Juice Company is a leading restaurant retailer of better-for-you specialty beverage and food offerings which include great tasting fruit smoothies, fresh squeezed juices, hot teas, hot oatmeal made with organic steel cut oats, fruit and veggie smoothies, Fit n’Fruitful™ smoothies with Weight Burner Boost™, Whirl’ns™ Frozen Yogurt, breakfast wraps, salads, sandwiches, California Flatbreads™, and a variety of baked goods and snacks. Jamba, Inc. was incorporated in January 2005, and went public through an initial public offering later that year. In November 2006, the Company completed its acquisition of Jamba Juice Company, which first began operations in 1990. As of January 3, 2012, there were 769 Jamba Juice stores globally, consisting of 307 Company-owned and operated stores (“Company Stores”), 443 franchise-operated stores (“Franchise Stores”) in the United States, and 19 international Franchise Stores (“International Stores”). As of January 3, 2012, Jamba Juice also had a retail consumer products program that included ten license agreements covering a variety of CPG products.

Basis of Presentation—The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiary, Jamba Juice Company. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated. The equity method of accounting is used to account for the joint venture owned by Jamba Juice Company because Jamba Juice Company exercises significant influence over operating and financial policies of its partners. Accordingly, the carrying value of this investment is reported in other long-term assets, and the Company’s equity in the net income and losses of this investment is reported in other operating, net.

Fiscal Year End—On June 7, 2007, Jamba, Inc.’s board of directors approved a change to the Company’s fiscal year end from the second Tuesday following December 31 to the Tuesday closest to December 31. The Company’s most recently completed fiscal year, referred to as fiscal 2011, started on December 29, 2010 and ended on January 3, 2012 and has 53 weeks. The Company’s fiscal 2010 started on December 30, 2009 and ended on December 28, 2010, which is referred to as fiscal 2010. The Company’s fiscal 2009 started on December 31, 2008 and ended on December 29, 2009, which is referred to as fiscal 2009. Fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009 have 52 weeks.

Significant Estimates—The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements. Actual results could differ from those estimates, and such differences could affect the results of operations reported in future periods.

Reclassifications—During fiscal 2010, the Company reclassified to cost of sales certain costs of managing its procurement program, which commenced at the beginning of the year. The Company recorded $ 1.7 million, previously recorded in general and administrative expense, in cost of sales under this program. During fiscal 2009, these costs were recorded in general and administrative expense and were $1.5 million.

Concentrations of Risk—The Company maintains food distribution contracts primarily with one supplier, Southwest Traders, Inc. This supplier provided approximately 94%, 75% and 75% of foods and products sold in

 

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Company Stores, in fiscal 2011, fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009, respectively, which potentially subjects the Company to a concentration of business risk. If this supplier had operational problems or ceased making product available to the Company, operations could be adversely affected.

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents. The Company places its cash and cash equivalents with high-quality financial institutions. Balances in the Company’s cash accounts frequently exceed the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insurance limit.

Self-Insurance Reserves—The Company is self-insured for healthcare benefits, and liabilities are based on statistical analyses of historical industry data as well as actual historical trends. The estimated accruals for these liabilities could be significantly affected if future occurrences and claims differ from these assumptions and historical trends. For workers’ compensation benefits, the Company was self-insured for existing and prior years’ exposures through September 30, 2008. Liabilities associated with the risks that the Company retains for workers compensation benefits are estimated in part, by considering historical claims experience, demographic factors, severity factors, and other actuarial assumptions.

Cash and Cash Equivalents—The Company considers all highly liquid instruments with maturities of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents. As of January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010, the Company did not have any investments with maturities greater than three months.

Restricted Cash and Investments—At January 3, 2012, the Company held $1.4 million in restricted cash, representing cash held in money market accounts or certificates of deposits to collateralize the Company’s letters of credit which is required since the Company was self-insured for workers’ compensation.

At December 28, 2010, the Company held $1.8 million in restricted cash, of which $1.6 million was classified as a current asset and $0.2 million classified as a long-term asset, representing cash held in money market accounts or certificates of deposits to collateralize the Company’s letters of credit which is required since the Company was self-insured.

Receivables—Receivables primarily represent amounts due from sale of jambacards, royalty fees, advertising fees, construction allowances, amounts receivable from suppliers, jambacards issued by the franchisees and rent receivable from franchisees. The allowance for doubtful accounts is the Company’s estimate of the amount of probable credit losses in the Company’s existing accounts receivable.

Inventories—Inventories include only the purchase cost and are stated at the lower of cost or market. Cost is determined using the first-in, first-out method (FIFO). Inventories consist of food, beverages and available-for-sale promotional products.

Property, Fixtures and Equipment—Property, fixtures and equipment are recorded at cost. Expenditures for major additions and improvements are capitalized and minor replacements, maintenance and repairs are charged to expense as incurred. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life. The estimated useful life for leasehold improvements is the lesser of 10 years or the term of the underlying lease. The estimated useful life for furniture, fixtures and equipment is three to 10 years.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets—The Company evaluates long-lived assets for impairment when facts and circumstances indicate that the carrying values of long-lived assets may not be recoverable. The impairment evaluation is generally performed at the individual store asset group level. The Company first compares the carrying value of the asset to the asset’s estimated future undiscounted cash flows. If the estimated future cash flows are less than the carrying value of the asset, we measure an impairment loss based on the asset’s estimated fair value. The fair value of a store’s assets is estimated using a discounted cash flow model based on internal projections and taking into consideration the view of a market participant. The estimate of cash flows is based on,

 

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among other things, certain assumptions about expected future operating performance. Factors considered during the impairment evaluation include factors related to actual operating cash flows, the period of time since a store has been opened or remodeled, refranchising expectations and the maturity of the relevant market.

The Company announced its refranchising initiative in May 2009 and it ended in April, 2011. During the refranchising initiative, the Company classified assets as held for sale and suspended depreciation and amortization on such assets when all of the following criteria were met: (i) Board of Directors approval to refranchise (the store or group of stores) is received; (ii) the stores can be immediately removed from operations; (iii) an active program to locate a buyer is implemented; (iv) the assets are being actively marketed for sale at or near their current fair value; (v) significant changes to the plan of sale are not likely; and (vi) the sale is probable within one year. Assets held for sale were recorded at the lower of the carrying amount or fair value less cost to sell. Fair value was determined based on the purchase price in the asset purchase agreement.

Refranchising—For each refranchise transaction, the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement, and related franchise agreements, and sublease agreements. Certain franchise agreements included royalty concessions over future years and certain sublease agreements included rent concessions for some or all of the remaining terms of the leases. The royalty and rent concessions were discounted to present value and recorded as liabilities in deferred revenue and other long-term liabilities on the consolidated balance sheet. At January 3, 2012, royalty concessions and rent concessions were $0.7 million and $1.5 million, respectively. At December 28, 2010, royalty concessions and rent concessions were $0.8 million and $2.2 million, respectively. There were no rent or royalty concessions at December 29, 2009.

Trademarks and Other Intangible Asset Impairment—Trademarks are not subject to amortization and are tested for impairment annually (at year-end), or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that the asset might be impaired. The Company performed its test for impairment on trademarks by comparing the fair value of the trademarks to their carrying amounts. An impairment loss was generally recognized when the carrying amount of the trademarks is less than the fair value. The fair value of trademarks was estimated using the income approach which is based on assumptions about future cash flows resulting from franchise and license agreements.

Intangible assets subject to amortization (primarily franchise agreements, reacquired franchise rights and a favorable lease portfolio intangible asset recognized in the purchase of Jamba Juice in 2006) are tested for impairment annually (at year-end) or more frequently if changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying amounts may not be recoverable. Intangible assets are amortized over their estimated useful lives using a method of amortization that reflects the pattern in which the economic benefits of the intangible assets are consumed or otherwise realized. Useful life for the franchise agreements is 13.4 years. The useful life of reacquired franchise rights represents the remaining term of the franchise agreement. The useful life of the favorable lease portfolio intangible is based on the related lease term.

Jambacards—The Company, through its subsidiary, Jamba Juice Company, has been selling jambacards to its customers in its retail stores and through its website since November 2002. The Company’s jambacards do not have an expiration date. An obligation is recorded at the time of either an initial load or a subsequent reload in accrued jambacard liability on the Company’s consolidated balance sheets. The Company recognizes income from jambacards when (i) the jambacard is redeemed by the customer or (ii) the likelihood of the jambacard being redeemed by the customer is remote (also referred to as “jambacard breakage”) and the Company determines that it does not have a legal obligation to remit the unredeemed jambacards to the relevant jurisdictions. The Company determines the jambacard breakage amount based upon its historical redemption patterns. The Company has concluded that after three years of inactivity, the likelihood of redemption becomes remote and recognizes breakage income at that time. Jambacard breakage income is included in other operating, net in the consolidated statements of operations.

 

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As a result of the Merger, the jambacard liability was adjusted to fair value by discounting the projected cash flows to present value, which are the costs to service deferred revenue, plus an estimated operating margin. The adjustment was amortized over the expected life of the jambacard and resulted in $0, $0.2 million and $0.1 million of expense during fiscal 2011, fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009, respectively, which offset the amount recorded as jambacard breakage income. The adjustment was fully amortized as of December 28, 2010. The Company recorded $3.7 million, $5.3 million and $2.8 million of jambacard breakage income during fiscal 2011, fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009, respectively.

Rent Expense—Under the provisions of certain of our leases, there are rent holidays and/or escalations in payments over the base lease term, as well as renewal periods. The effects of rent holidays and escalations are reflected in rent costs on a straight-line basis over the expected lease term, which includes cancelable option periods when it is deemed to be reasonably assured that the Company will exercise such option periods due to the fact that the Company would incur an economic penalty for not doing so. The lease term commences on the date when the Company becomes legally obligated for the rent payments which generally coincides with the time when the landlord delivers the property for us to develop. All rent costs recognized during construction periods are classified as pre-opening expenses. Pursuant to the refranchising initiative, the Company recorded liabilities for rent concessions over the remaining term of certain store leases of refranchised stores.

Construction Allowances—The Company receives construction allowances from certain landlords, which are deferred and amortized on a straight-line basis over the lease term as a reduction of rent expense. Construction allowances are recorded in deferred rent and other long-term liabilities.

Revenue Recognition—Revenue from Company Stores is recognized when product is sold. Revenue is presented net of any taxes collected from customers and remitted to government entities. Revenue from jambacards is recognized upon redemption. Until redemption, outstanding customer balances are recorded as a liability. See “jambacards” section above for discussion on recognition of jambacard breakage.

Franchise revenue is generated from three sources; royalties, development fees, and initial franchise fees.

Royalties from Franchise Stores are determined as a percentage of revenue and are recognized in the same period as the related franchise store revenue. If collection of the franchise royalty fee is doubtful, revenue is recognized at the time of collection.

Development fees are paid to the Company as part of an agreement to open and operate a specific number of stores in a specified territory. The amount of the fee is based on the number of stores to be opened pursuant to the development agreement and secures the territory for exclusivity during the development. The nonrefundable fees collected for these services are recognized ratably as the franchise stores under these agreements open. The Company’s multi-unit development agreements specify the number of stores to be opened. Any changes to the specific number of stores would be stated in a subsequent contractual agreement (see Note 2).

The Company charges an initial franchise fee for providing operational materials, new store opening planning, and functional training courses. Initial franchise fees, if any, are due for payment at the time the franchise agreement for a particular store is executed. Franchise fees are recognized as revenue when all material services or conditions have been substantially performed or satisfied and no other material conditions or obligations related to the determination of substantial performance exist. Duties and services that are completed prior to approval include training, facilities inspection, receipt of operating license(s), and clearance from appropriate agencies. These duties and services are substantially complete prior to the approval of the opening of a store. Duties and services relating to the earning of the franchise fees are necessary for the stores to open. Revenue is recognized when the store opens.

Royalties from licensed CPG products are based on a percentage of product sales and are recognized as revenue upon the sale of the product to retail outlets.

 

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Cost of Sales—The Company includes in cost of sales, costs incurred to acquire fruit, dairy and other products used to make smoothies and juices, paper products, as well as the costs related to managing our procurement program, and payments received from vendors.

Advertising Fund—The Company participates with its franchisees in an advertising fund, established in fiscal 2010, to collect and administer funds contributed for use in advertising and promotional programs which are designed to increase sales and enhance the reputation of the Company and its franchise owners. Contributions to the advertising fund are required for Company Stores and traditional Franchise Stores and are generally based on a percent of store sales. The Company has control of the advertising fund. The fund is consolidated and the Company reports all assets and liabilities of the fund.

The advertising fund assets, consisting primarily of cash received from the Company and franchisees and accounts receivable from franchisees, can only be used for selected purposes and are considered restricted. The advertising fund liabilities represent the corresponding obligation arising from the receipts of the marketing program. In accordance with ASC Topic 952-605-25, the receipts from the franchisees are recorded as a liability against which specified advertising costs are charged. The Company does not reflect franchisee contributions to the fund in its consolidated statements of operations or consolidated statements of cash flows.

Advertising fund assets as of January 3, 2012 include $1.5 million of receivables from franchisees, which is recorded in receivables on the consolidated balance sheet. Advertising fund liabilities as of January 3, 2012, of $0.5 million are reported in other current liabilities and accounts payable on the consolidated balance sheet.

Advertising fund assets as of December 28, 2010 include $0.5 million of receivables from franchisees, which is recorded in receivables on the consolidated balance sheet. Advertising fund liabilities as of December 28, 2010 of $0.9 million are reported in other current liabilities and accounts payable on the consolidated balance sheet. There were no advertising fund assets or advertising fund liabilities as of December 29, 2009.

Advertising Costs—Advertising costs are expensed as incurred and were $7.3 million, $7.8 million and $5.9 million in fiscal 2011, fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009, respectively, and are classified as store operating expenses. The Company received advertising contributions from its franchisees, which contributions were recorded as an offset to advertising expense, and were $2.8 million, $1.9 million and $1.3 million for fiscal 2011, fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009, respectively.

Store Pre-opening Costs—Costs incurred in connection with start-up and promotion of new store openings as well as rent from possession date to store opening date are expensed as incurred.

Comprehensive Income—Comprehensive income is defined as the change in equity during a period from transactions and other events, excluding changes resulting from investments from owners and distributions to owners. Comprehensive income (loss) equals net income (loss) for all periods presented.

Income Taxes—Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax basis. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted income tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. Any effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities due to a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. In establishing deferred income tax assets and liabilities, we make judgments and interpretations based on enacted tax laws and published tax guidance applicable to our operations. We record deferred tax assets and liabilities and evaluate the need for valuation allowances to reduce deferred tax assets to amounts more likely than not of being realized. Changes in our valuation of the deferred tax assets or changes in the income tax provision may affect our annual effective income tax rate.

 

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Uncertain tax positions are recognized as the greatest amount more than 50% likely of being sustained upon audit based on the technical merits of the position. On a quarterly basis, we review and update our inventory of tax positions as necessary to add any new uncertain tax positions taken, or to remove previously identified uncertain positions that have been effectively settled. Additionally, uncertain positions may be re-measured as warranted by changes in facts or law. Accounting for uncertain tax positions requires significant judgments, including estimating the amount, timing and likelihood of ultimate settlement. Although we believe that these estimates are reasonable, actual results could differ from these estimates. The Company classifies interest and penalties related to income taxes as a component of income taxes in the consolidated statements of operations.

Earnings (Loss) Per Share—Basic earnings (loss) per share is computed based on the weighted-average of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings (loss) per share is computed based on the weighted-average number of common shares and potentially dilutive securities, which includes preferred stock outstanding from the Company’s issuance of preferred stock, outstanding warrants and outstanding options and restricted stock awards granted under the Company’s stock option plans. Anti-dilutive shares of 24.2 million, 31.3 million and 20.5 million have been excluded from diluted weighted-average shares outstanding in fiscal 2011, fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009, respectively. The Company’s basic weighted-average shares outstanding are equal to its diluted weighted-average shares outstanding since the Company experienced a net loss in each of fiscal 2011, fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009.

For purposes of determining the net loss attributable to common stock used in the computation of loss per share, the amount of the loss was increased by the preferred stock dividends and deemed dividends. The deemed dividend represents the accretion of the issuance cost and beneficial conversion feature of the Company’s preferred stock.

Share-based compensation—The Company measures and recognizes all share-based compensation under the fair value method.

Stock options for a fixed number of shares are granted to certain employees and directors with an exercise price based on the grant date fair value of the Company’s common stock. The Company also grants restricted stock with a fair value determined based on the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the date of grant (see Note 11). Stock options generally vest over a four-year period. Share-based compensation expense is recognized ratably over the service period.

The fair value of restricted stock units is determined based on the Company’s closing stock price on the date of grant. These restricted stock units vest and become unrestricted three years after the date of grant. Share-based compensation expense is recognized ratably over the three-year service period for restricted stock units.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments—The carrying value of cash and cash equivalents, notes and accounts receivable and accounts payable approximates fair value.

Segment Reporting—The Company has one reportable retail segment.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRSs (ASU No. 2011-04)

(Included in ASC 820 “Fair Value Measurement”)

ASU No. 2011-04 amends existing guidance to provide common fair value measurements and related disclosure requirements between GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”). Additional disclosure requirements in the amendment include: (1) for Level 3 fair value measurements, a description of the valuation processes used by the entity and a discussion of the sensitivity of the fair value measurements to

 

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changes in unobservable inputs; (2) discussion of the use of a nonfinancial asset that differs from the asset’s highest and best use; and (3) the level of the fair value hierarchy of financial instruments for items that are not measured at fair value but disclosure of fair value is required. ASU No. 2011-04 is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011 with early adoption not permitted. The Company will adopt ASU No. 2011-04 in fiscal 2012 and does not anticipate any material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

Presentation of Comprehensive Income (ASU No. 2011-05)

(Included in ASC 220 “Comprehensive Income”)

ASU No. 2011-05 amends existing guidance to allow only two options for presenting the components of net income and other comprehensive income: (1) in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or (2) in two separate but consecutive financial statements consisting of an income statement followed by a statement of other comprehensive income. ASU No. 2011-05 requires retrospective application, and it is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011 with early adoption permitted. The Company will adopt ASU No. 2011-05 in fiscal 2012 and does not anticipate any material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

2. DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENTS

The Company’s wholly owned subsidiary, Jamba Juice Company, has entered into multi-unit license agreements with area developers to develop stores in certain geographic regions. Under typical multi-unit license agreements, the area developer generally pays one-half of the initial nonrefundable fee multiplied by each store to be developed as a nonrefundable development fee upon execution of the multi-unit license agreement. The agreements are generally for a term of 10 years. Each time a store is opened under the multi-unit license agreement, the Company credits the franchisee one-half of the initial fee paid as part of the development fee and the franchisee is required to pay the remaining one-half of the initial fee. As of January 3, 2012, there were 32 stores operating under a current multi-unit license agreement. In addition, the Company has entered into and will continue to enter into development agreements in connection with its franchising activities in the United States and at international locations. In connection with its domestic franchising efforts through fiscal 2011, fifteen area developers have contractual commitments to open 78 Franchise Stores over the next one to ten years. In connection with our international efforts, as of January 3, 2012, three developers have contractual commitment to build 301 stores and stations over the next ten years.

The Company generally executes franchise agreements for each store that establishes the terms of its arrangement with the franchisee. The franchise agreements typically require the franchisee to pay an initial, non-refundable fee and continuing fees based upon a percentage of sales. Subject to the Company’s approval and the franchisee’s payment of a renewal fee, a franchisee may generally renew the franchise agreement upon its expiration.

Franchise revenue consists of royalties and fees from our franchisees. The Company recognizes initial fees received from a franchisee as revenue when it has performed substantially all initial services required by the franchise agreement, which is generally upon the opening of a store. The Company recognizes continuing royalties based upon a percentage of franchisee revenues as earned. The Company is not required to contribute capital as part of multi-unit license agreements or franchise agreements.

Deferred franchise revenue is included in other long-term liabilities on the consolidated balance sheets and as of January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010 and includes $0.7 million and $0.5 million, respectively, relating to non-refundable development fees and initial fees paid by franchisees whose stores have not yet opened. In addition, deferred franchise revenue as of January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010 includes $0.7 million and $0.6 million, respectively, relating to non-refundable international development fees.

 

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3. PROPERTY, FIXTURES AND EQUIPMENT

Property, fixtures, and equipment as of January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010, consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

     January 3,
2012
    December 28,
2010
 

Leasehold improvements

   $ 49,703      $ 47,848   

Furniture, fixtures and equipment

     55,199        51,407   

Construction in progress (primarily stores under construction)

     77        120   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

     104,979        99,375   

Less accumulated depreciation and amortization

     (60,219     (50,160
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

   $ 44,760      $ 49,215   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization expense related to property, fixtures and equipment for fiscal 2011, fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009 was $12.3 million, $14.6 million, and $18.3 million, respectively.

4. ASSETS HELD FOR SALE

Assets held for sale consists of Company Stores that the Company expects to refranchise. Such assets are recorded at the lower of the carrying amount or fair value, less cost to sell. Fair value is determined based on the purchase price in the asset purchase agreement. Assets are no longer depreciated once classified as held for sale. Assets held for sale at December 28, 2010 include $3.9 million of property, fixtures and equipment and are included in prepaid expenses and other current assets on the consolidated balance sheets.

5. TRADEMARKS AND OTHER INTANGIBLE ASSETS

The carrying amount and accumulated amortization of trademarks and other intangible assets as of January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010, were as follows (in thousands):

 

     Gross
Amount
     Accumulated
Amortization
    Net
Amount
 

Amortized Intangible Assets

       

As of January 3, 2012

       

Trademarks

   $ 410       $ —        $ 410   

Favorable leases

     2,051         (1,901     150   

Franchise agreements

     828         (315     513   

Reacquired franchise rights

     325         (268     57   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

   $ 3,614       $ (2,484   $ 1,130   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

As of December 28, 2010

       

Trademarks

   $ 267       $ —        $ 267   

Favorable leases

     2,273         (1,913     360   

Franchise agreements

     891         (294     597   

Reacquired franchise rights

     375         (258     117   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

   $ 3,806       $ (2,465   $ 1,341   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Intangible assets are amortized over their expected useful lives. Amortization expense for intangible assets for fiscal 2011, fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009 was $0.3 million, $1.1 million and $1.9 million, respectively. Expected annual amortization expense for intangible assets recorded as of January 3, 2011 is as follows (in thousands):

 

Fiscal Year

   Amortization
Expense
 

2012

     201   

2013

     105   

2014

     74   

2015

     69   

2016

     66   

Thereafter

     205   

Trademarks are not subject to amortization and are tested for impairment annually (at year-end), or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that the asset might be impaired. The impairment test consisted of the comparison of the fair value of the trademarks to its carrying amount. The fair value of trademarks was estimated using the income approach which is based on assumptions about future cash flows resulting from franchise and license agreements. As of January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010, the Company had trademarks of approximately $0.4 million and $0.3 million, respectively.

6. OTHER LONG-TERM ASSETS

As of January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010, other long-term assets consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

     January 3,
2012
     December 28,
2010
 

Notes receivable from franchisees

   $ —         $ 1,625   

Deposits

     848         951   

Investment in JJC Hawaii, LLC

     470         548   

Other

     15         94   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 1,333       $ 3,218   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The Company accounts for its investments in JJC Hawaii, LLC under the equity method. The Company owns a 5.0% interest in JJC Hawaii, LLC as of January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010. The equity in earnings recognized by the Company for JJC Hawaii, LLC was $54,000, $61,000 and $81,000 for fiscal 2011, fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009, respectively.

7. IMPAIRMENT, STORE LEASE TERMINATION AND CLOSURE COSTS AND WORKFORCE REDUCTION

Long-lived asset impairment

The Company evaluates long-lived assets for impairment when facts and circumstances indicate that the carrying values of long-lived assets may not be recoverable. The evaluation includes consideration of factors such as historical and current operating performance and projected future results at store level. Impairment charges include the write-down of long-lived assets at stores that were assessed for impairment because of management’s intention to close the store or because of changes in circumstances that indicate the carrying value of an asset may not be recoverable. The Company recorded impairment charges of $1.3 million, $2.8 million and $12.3 million for fiscal 2011, fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009, respectively.

 

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Store lease termination and closure costs and workforce reduction

As a result of the Company’s revitalization efforts and revised development goals, the Company evaluated the infrastructure needed to support its evolving business model and restructured its Support Center to eliminate certain administrative positions. During fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009, the Company incurred $0.7 million, $4.3 million and $1.2 million, respectively, in charges related to asset write-offs for lease termination and closure costs.

Lease termination costs consist primarily of the costs of future obligations related to closed store locations. Discounted liabilities for future lease costs and the fair value of related subleases of closed locations are recorded when the stores are closed. These amounts are subject to adjustments as liabilities are settled. In assessing the discounted liabilities for future costs of obligations related to closed stores, the Company made assumptions regarding amounts of future subleases. If these assumptions or their related estimates change in the future, the Company may be required to record additional exit costs or reduce exit costs previously recorded. Exit costs recorded for each of the periods presented include the effect of such changes in estimates. Severance accruals were paid during fiscal 2010 and 2009. Lease obligations are payable through 2019, less sublease amounts. The following is a reconciliation of the store closure and severance accrual and is included in Other current liabilities and Other long-term liabilities (in thousands):

 

Balance as of December 29, 2009

   $ 2,478   

Provision for noncancellable lease payments of closed stores

     2,443   

Severance payments

     (144

Payments on lease liabilities

     (1,889

Adjustment

     130   
  

 

 

 

Balance as of December 28, 2010

   $ 3,018   

Provision for noncancellable lease payments of closed stores

     154   

Payments on lease liability

     (2,834

Adjustments

     235   
  

 

 

 

Balance as of January 3, 2012

   $ 573   
  

 

 

 

Gain/loss on Disposal of Other Assets—The Company recognized a loss on disposal of fixed assets of $2.1 million and $0.3 million in fiscal 2011 and 2010, respectively, and a gain on disposal of assets of $2.0 million in fiscal 2009. The loss on disposal in fiscal 2011 includes a net loss of $0.3 million on sale of fixed assets of refranchised stores pursuant to our refranchising initiative which ended in April 2011. The loss on disposal in fiscal 2010 is net of a $1.5 million dollar gain on refranchising of Company Stores.

8. OTHER LONG-TERM LIABILITIES

As of January 3, 2012 and December 28, 2010, other long-term liabilities consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

     January 3,
2012
     December 28,
2010
 

Deferred revenue, long term

   $ 3,078       $ 3,101   

Construction allowance

     2,974         3,515   

Deferred rent

     6,155         6,072   

Other liabilities