XNYS:SPF Standard Pacific Corp Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 3/31/2012

Effective Date 3/31/2012

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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
 
 
FORM 10-Q
 
(Mark One)
[X]         QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2012
 
OR
 
[  ]         TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from N/A to
 
Commission file number 1-10959   
 
 
STANDARD PACIFIC CORP.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
 
Delaware
33-0475989
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
15360 Barranca Parkway, Irvine, CA
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
92618-2215
(Zip Code)
 
(949) 789-1600
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
 
                                                                 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      X      No        .

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes     X     No ____ 
   
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer,  a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
Large accelerated filer  ¨    
Accelerated filer  x    
Non-accelerated filer  ¨ (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company  ¨
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).Yes              No    X   .
 
Registrant's shares of common stock outstanding at April 30, 2012: 199,483,396
 
FORM 10-Q
INDEX
 
     
Page No.
   
 
 
PART I. Financial Information  
       
   
ITEM 1.
 
       
     2
       
    Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss) for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2012 and 2011  3
       
   
4
       
   
5
       
   
6
       
    ITEM 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 26
       
    ITEM 3.
37
       
    ITEM 4.
38
     
PART II. Other Information
 
       
    ITEM 1.
40
       
   
ITEM 1A.
40
       
    ITEM 2.
40
       
    ITEM 3.
40
       
    ITEM 4.
40
       
    ITEM 5. Other Information 40
       
    ITEM 6. Exhibits 40
       
 SIGNATURES  
42
 


 
ITEM 1.      FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

STANDARD PACIFIC CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES
 
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2012
     
2011
 
 
(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
 
 
(Unaudited)
 
               
Homebuilding:
             
Home sale revenues
  $ 220,317       $ 143,699  
Land sale revenues
    3,385          
Total revenues
    223,702         143,699  
Cost of home sales
    (175,595 )       (114,312 )
Cost of land sales
    (3,366 )        
Total cost of sales
    (178,961 )       (114,312 )
Gross margin
    44,741         29,387  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    (37,692 )       (32,261 )
Loss from unconsolidated joint ventures
    (1,522 )       (257 )
Interest expense
    (2,530 )       (10,515 )
Other income (expense)
    4,284         292  
Homebuilding pretax income (loss)
    7,281         (13,354 )
Financial Services:
                 
Revenues
    3,626         1,060  
Expenses
    (2,260 )       (2,418 )
Other income
    63         15  
Financial services pretax income (loss)
    1,429         (1,343 )
                   
Income (loss) before income taxes
    8,710         (14,697 )
Provision for income taxes
    (187 )       (100 )
Net income (loss)
    8,523         (14,797 )
  Less: Net (income) loss allocated to preferred shareholder
    (3,674 )       6,415  
Net income (loss) available to common stockholders
  $ 4,849       $ (8,382 )
                   
Income (Loss) Per Common Share:
                 
Basic
  $ 0.02       $ (0.04 )
Diluted
  $ 0.02       $ (0.04 )
                   
Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding:
                 
Basic
    195,109,252         193,158,727  
Diluted
    199,873,977         193,158,727  
                   
Weighted average additional common shares outstanding
                 
if preferred shares converted to common shares
    147,812,786         147,812,786  













The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated statements.


STANDARD PACIFIC CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES
 
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
 
(Dollars in thousands)
 
 
(Unaudited)
 
             
Net income (loss)
  $ 8,523     $ (14,797 )
Other comprehensive income, net of tax:
               
Unrealized gain on interest rate swaps
    1,596       1,579  
Comprehensive income (loss)
  $ 10,119     $ (13,218 )















































The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated statements.


STANDARD PACIFIC CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES
 
   
March 31,
2012
     
December 31,
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
   
(Unaudited)
         
ASSETS
             
Homebuilding:
             
Cash and equivalents
  $ 366,570       $ 406,785  
Restricted cash
    27,798         31,372  
Trade and other receivables
    18,516         11,525  
Inventories:
                 
Owned
    1,525,930         1,477,239  
Not owned
    50,160         59,840  
Investments in unconsolidated joint ventures
    82,163         81,807  
Deferred income taxes, net of valuation allowance of $507,208 and $510,621 at
                 
March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively
    4,343         5,326  
Other assets
    34,176         35,693  
Total Homebuilding Assets
    2,109,656         2,109,587  
Financial Services:
                 
Cash and equivalents
    6,095         3,737  
Restricted cash
    1,295         1,295  
Mortgage loans held for sale, net
    65,398         73,811  
Mortgage loans held for investment, net
    9,650         10,115  
Other assets
    2,536         1,838  
Total Financial Services Assets
    84,974         90,796  
Total Assets
  $ 2,194,630       $ 2,200,383  
                   
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
                 
Homebuilding:
                 
Accounts payable
  $ 19,744       $ 17,829  
Accrued liabilities
    160,081         185,890  
Secured project debt and other notes payable
    3,065         3,531  
Senior notes payable
    1,275,660         1,275,093  
Senior subordinated notes payable
    47,355         46,324  
Total Homebuilding Liabilities
    1,505,905         1,528,667  
Financial Services:
                 
Accounts payable and other liabilities
    1,284         1,154  
Mortgage credit facilities
    49,529         46,808  
Total Financial Services Liabilities
    50,813         47,962  
Total Liabilities
    1,556,718         1,576,629  
                   
Equity:
                 
Stockholders' Equity:
                 
Preferred stock, $0.01 par value; 10,000,000 shares authorized; 450,829 shares
                 
issued and outstanding at March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011
    5         5  
Common stock, $0.01 par value; 600,000,000 shares authorized; 199,423,826
                 
and 198,563,273 shares issued and outstanding at March 31, 2012 and
                 
December 31, 2011, respectively
    1,994         1,985  
Additional paid-in capital
    1,243,210         1,239,180  
Accumulated deficit
    (600,246 )       (608,769 )
Accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of tax
    (7,051 )       (8,647 )
Total Equity
    637,912         623,754  
Total Liabilities and Equity
  $ 2,194,630       $ 2,200,383  
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated balance sheets.


STANDARD PACIFIC CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES
 
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
   2012        2011  
 
(Dollars in thousands)
 
 
(Unaudited)
 
Cash Flows From Operating Activities:
   
Net income (loss)
$ 8,523       $ (14,797 )
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:
               
Loss from unconsolidated joint ventures
  1,522         257  
Cash distributions of income from unconsolidated joint ventures
          20  
Depreciation and amortization
  606         1,006  
Loss on disposal of property and equipment
          2  
Amortization of stock-based compensation
  1,074         1,922  
Deposit write-offs
  133          
Changes in cash and equivalents due to:
               
Trade and other receivables
  (6,991 )       (1,163 )
Mortgage loans held for sale
  8,533         10,294  
Inventories - owned
  (44,201 )       (105,146 )
Inventories - not owned
  (2,627 )       (2,810 )
Other assets
  1,028         3,140  
Accounts payable
  1,915         (931 )
Accrued liabilities
  (11,633 )       (1,944 )
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
  (42,118 )       (110,150 )
                 
Cash Flows From Investing Activities:
               
Investments in unconsolidated homebuilding joint ventures
  (2,867 )       (3,369 )
Distributions from unconsolidated homebuilding joint ventures
  989         49  
Other investing activities
  (468 )       (729 )
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
  (2,346 )       (4,049 )
                 
Cash Flows From Financing Activities:
               
Change in restricted cash
  3,574         (4,175 )
Principal payments on secured project debt and other notes payable
  (466 )       (405 )
Payment of debt issuance costs
          (4,575 )
Net proceeds from (payments on) mortgage credit facilities
  2,721         (9,649 )
Payment of common stock issuance costs
          (324 )
Proceeds from the exercise of stock options
  778         131  
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
  6,607         (18,997 )
                 
Net increase (decrease) in cash and equivalents
  (37,857 )       (133,196 )
Cash and equivalents at beginning of period
  410,522         731,371  
Cash and equivalents at end of period
$ 372,665       $ 598,175  
                 
Cash and equivalents at end of period
$ 372,665       $ 598,175  
Homebuilding restricted cash at end of period
  27,798         32,413  
Financial services restricted cash at end of period
  1,295         2,870  
Cash and equivalents and restricted cash at end of period
$ 401,758       $ 633,458  


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated statements.


STANDARD PACIFIC CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES
MARCH 31, 2012
 
1.        Basis of Presentation

The condensed consolidated financial statements included herein have been prepared by Standard Pacific Corp., without audit, pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) for Form 10-Q.  Certain information normally included in the annual financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) has been omitted pursuant to applicable rules and regulations.  In the opinion of management, the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements included herein reflect all adjustments, which include only normal recurring adjustments, necessary to present fairly our financial position as of March 31, 2012 and the results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented.  Pursuant to ASC Topic 855, Subsequent Events, we have evaluated subsequent events through the date that the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements were issued for the period ended March 31, 2012.
 
    Certain items in the prior period condensed consolidated financial statements have been reclassified to conform with the current period presentation.

The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements included herein should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011.  Unless the context otherwise requires, the terms “we,” “us,” “our” and “the Company” refer to Standard Pacific Corp. and its subsidiaries.  The results of operations for interim periods are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected for the full year.
 
2.        Recent Accounting Pronouncements
 
In May 2011, the FASB issued ASU No. 2011-04, Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRSs (“ASU 2011-04”).  ASU 2011-04 amends ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements (“ASC 820”), providing a consistent definition and measurement of fair value, as well as similar disclosure requirements between U.S. GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards.  ASU 2011-04 changes certain fair value measurement principles, clarifies the application of existing fair value measurement and expands the ASC 820 disclosure requirements, particularly for Level 3 fair value measurements.  Our adoption of these new provisions of ASU 2011-04 on January 1, 2012 did not have an impact on our consolidated financial statements.
 
In June 2011, the FASB issued ASU No. 2011-05, Presentation of Comprehensive Income (“ASU 2011-05”).  ASU 2011-05 requires the presentation of comprehensive income in either a continuous statement of comprehensive income or two separate but consecutive statements.  We adopted the provisions of ASU 2011-05 on January 1, 2012 and have elected to present two separate consecutive statements in our consolidated financial statements.

3.        Segment Reporting

We operate two principal businesses: homebuilding and financial services.

Our homebuilding operations construct and sell single-family attached and detached homes.  In accordance with the aggregation criteria defined in ASC Topic 280, Segment Reporting, our homebuilding operating segments have been grouped into three reportable segments: California; Southwest, consisting of our operating divisions in Arizona, Texas, Colorado and Nevada; and Southeast, consisting of our operating divisions in Florida and the Carolinas.
 
 
    Our mortgage financing operation provides mortgage financing to our homebuyers in substantially all of the markets in which we operate, and sells substantially all of the loans it originates in the secondary mortgage market.  Our title service operation provides title examinations for our homebuyers in Texas.  Our mortgage financing and title services operations are included in our financial services reportable segment, which is separately reported in our consolidated financial statements under “Financial Services.”
 
    Corporate is a non-operating segment that develops and implements strategic initiatives and supports our operating divisions by centralizing key administrative functions such as finance and treasury, information technology, insurance and risk management, litigation, marketing and human resources.  Corporate also provides the necessary administrative functions to support us as a publicly traded company.  A substantial portion of the expenses incurred by Corporate are allocated to each of the homebuilding operating divisions based on their respective percentage of revenues.
 
    Segment financial information relating to the Company’s homebuilding operations was as follows:
 
   
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
   
2012
     2011  
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
Homebuilding revenues:
           
California
  $ 115,370     $ 78,910  
Southwest
    56,119       35,779  
Southeast
    52,213       29,010  
     Total homebuilding revenues
  $ 223,702     $ 143,699  
                 
Homebuilding pretax income (loss):
               
California
  $ 8,132     $ (2,121 )
Southwest
    1,033       (3,887 )
Southeast
    (727 )     (3,719 )
Corporate
    (1,157 )     (3,627 )
     Total homebuilding pretax income (loss)
  $ 7,281     $ (13,354 )
                 
Homebuilding income (loss) from unconsolidated joint ventures:
               
California
  $ (1,493 )   $ (239 )
Southwest
    (5 )     (8 )
Southeast
    (24 )     (10 )
     Total homebuilding income (loss) from unconsolidated joint ventures
  $ (1,522 )   $ (257 )
                 
Restructuring charges:
               
California
  $     $ 424  
Southwest
          47  
Southeast
           
Corporate
          90  
     Total restructuring charges
  $     $ 561  
 
    Segment financial information relating to the Company’s homebuilding assets and investments in unconsolidated joint ventures was as follows:
 
   
March 31,
   
December 31,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
Homebuilding assets:
           
California
  $ 1,010,967     $ 985,560  
Southwest
    371,704       355,060  
Southeast
    306,583       294,996  
Corporate
    420,402       473,971  
     Total homebuilding assets
  $ 2,109,656     $ 2,109,587  
                 
Homebuilding investments in unconsolidated joint ventures:
               
California
  $ 77,529     $ 76,999  
Southwest
    2,766       2,770  
Southeast
    1,868       2,038  
     Total homebuilding investments in unconsolidated joint ventures
  $ 82,163     $ 81,807  




4.        Earnings (Loss) Per Common Share

We compute earnings (loss) per share in accordance with ASC Topic 260, Earnings per Share (“ASC 260”), which requires the presentation of both basic and diluted earnings (loss) per common share. Basic earnings (loss) per common share is computed by dividing income or loss available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding. Our Series B junior participating convertible preferred stock (“Series B Preferred Stock”), which is convertible into shares of our common stock at the holder’s option (subject to a limitation based upon voting interest), is classified as a convertible participating security in accordance with ASC 260, which requires that both net income and loss per share for each class of stock (common stock and participating preferred stock) be calculated for basic earnings per share purposes based on the contractual rights and obligations of this participating security. Net income (loss) allocated to the holders of our Series B Preferred Stock is calculated based on the preferred shareholder’s proportionate share of weighted average shares of common stock outstanding on an if-converted basis.

For purposes of determining diluted earnings (loss) per common share, basic earnings (loss) per common share is further adjusted to include the effect of potential dilutive common shares outstanding, including stock options using the treasury stock method and convertible debt using the if-converted method.  For the three months ended March 31, 2011, all dilutive securities were excluded from the calculation as they were anti-dilutive as a result of the net loss for that period.  Shares outstanding under the share lending facility are not treated as outstanding for earnings per share purposes in accordance with ASC 260, because the share borrower must return to us all borrowed shares (or identical shares) on or about October 1, 2012, or earlier in certain circumstances.  The following table sets forth the components used in the computation of basic and diluted earnings (loss) per common share.
 
   
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
 
             
Numerator:
           
Net income (loss)
  $ 8,523     $ (14,797 )
Less: Net (income) loss allocated to preferred shareholder
    (3,674 )     6,415  
Net income (loss) available to common stockholders
  $ 4,849     $ (8,382 )
                 
Denominator:
               
Weighted average basic common shares outstanding
    195,109,252       193,158,727  
Stock options
    4,764,725        
Weighted average diluted common shares outstanding
    199,873,977       193,158,727  
                 
Income (loss) per common share:
               
Basic
  $ 0.02     $ (0.04 )
Diluted
  $ 0.02     $ (0.04 )
 
As of March 31, 2012 and 2011, we had 450,829 shares of Series B Preferred Stock outstanding, which are convertible into 147.8 million shares of our common stock.  The following table sets forth the potential weighted average diluted common shares outstanding if our Series B Preferred Stock was converted to common stock.  Please see Note 14 “Preferred Stock” for further discussion of the Series B Preferred Stock.
 
           
Three Months Ended March 31,
           
2012
 
2011
         
  
       
Weighted average diluted common shares outstanding
   
 199,873,977
   
 193,158,727
Additional weighted average common shares outstanding if the Series B
     
 
Preferred Stock converted to common shares
   
 147,812,786
   
 147,812,786
   
Total potential weighted average diluted common shares outstanding
           
     
if the Series B Preferred Stock converted to common shares
   
 347,686,763
   
 340,971,513

In accordance with ASC 260, assuming that all of the outstanding Series B Preferred Stock was converted to common stock, all net income (loss) would be allocated to common stock in the computation of earnings (loss) per share.


 5.       Stock-Based Compensation

We account for share-based awards in accordance with ASC Topic 718, Compensation-Stock Compensation, which requires the fair value of stock-based compensation awards to be amortized as an expense over the vesting period.  Stock-based compensation awards are valued at the fair value on the date of grant.

During the three months ended March 31, 2012, we issued 462,119 shares of common stock to our officers and key employees and 29,934 shares of common stock to our independent directors (excluding directors appointed by MP CA Homes LLC (“MatlinPatterson”) who did not receive any stock awards).

Total compensation expense recognized related to stock-based compensation was as follows:
 
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
 
(Dollars in thousands)
           
Stock options
$ 939     $ 1,482  
Stock grants
  135       440  
Total
$ 1,074     $ 1,922  
 
As of March 31, 2012, total unrecognized compensation expense related to stock-based compensation was $3.0 million, with a weighted average period over which the unrecognized compensation expense is expected to be recorded of approximately 1.6 years.

6.        Restricted Cash

At March 31, 2012, restricted cash included $29.1 million of cash held in cash collateral accounts primarily related to certain letters of credit that have been issued and a portion related to our financial services subsidiary mortgage credit facilities ($27.8 million of homebuilding restricted cash and $1.3 million of financial services restricted cash).
 
7.        Inventories
 
a. Inventories Owned
 
 Inventories owned consisted of the following at:
   
   
March 31, 2012
 
   
California
   
Southwest
   
Southeast
   
Total
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
                         
Land and land under development
  $ 595,358     $ 250,216     $ 198,663     $ 1,044,237  
Homes completed and under construction
    233,621       65,787       76,964       376,372  
Model homes
    74,248       13,354       17,719       105,321  
   Total inventories owned
  $ 903,227     $ 329,357     $ 293,346     $ 1,525,930  
                                 
       
   
December 31, 2011
 
   
California
   
Southwest
   
Southeast
   
Total
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
                                 
Land and land under development
  $ 614,668     $ 221,481     $ 200,680     $ 1,036,829  
Homes completed and under construction
    205,515       67,200       67,134       339,849  
Model homes
    70,117       14,005       16,439       100,561  
   Total inventories owned
  $ 890,300     $ 302,686     $ 284,253     $ 1,477,239  



In accordance with ASC Topic 360, Property, Plant, and Equipment (“ASC 360”), we record impairment losses on inventories when events and circumstances indicate that they may be impaired, and the future undiscounted cash flows estimated to be generated by those assets are less than their carrying amounts.  Inventories that are determined to be impaired are written down to their estimated fair value.  We calculate the fair value of a project under a land residual value analysis and in certain cases in conjunction with a discounted cash flow analysis.  During the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, the total number of projects included in inventories-owned and reviewed for impairment were 261 and 237, respectively.  Based on the impairment review, we did not record any inventory impairments during the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011.
 
b. Inventories Not Owned

Inventories not owned consisted of the following at:
 
   
March 31,
   
December 31,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
             
Land purchase and lot option deposits
  $ 26,561     $ 24,379  
Other lot option contracts, net of deposits
    23,599       35,461  
Total inventories not owned
  $ 50,160     $ 59,840  
 
 Under ASC Topic 810, Consolidation (“ASC 810”), a non-refundable deposit paid to an entity is deemed to be a variable interest that will absorb some or all of the entity’s expected losses if they occur.  Our land purchase and lot option deposits generally represent our maximum exposure to the land seller if we elect not to purchase the optioned property.  In some instances, we may also expend funds for due diligence, development and construction activities with respect to optioned land prior to takedown.  Such costs are classified as inventories owned, which we would have to write off should we not exercise the option.  Therefore, whenever we enter into a land option or purchase contract with an entity and make a non-refundable deposit, a variable interest entity (“VIE”) may have been created.  As of March 31, 2012, we were not required to consolidate any VIEs.  In accordance with ASC 810, we perform ongoing reassessments of whether we are the primary beneficiary of a VIE.  Other lot option contracts noted in the table above represent specific performance obligations where the land option contract contains a binding obligation requiring us to complete the lot purchases.

 We incurred pretax charges of $0.1 million related to deposit write-offs for the three months ended March 31, 2012.  These charges related to our Southeast reportable segment and were included in other income (expense) in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations.  We did not record any deposit write-offs during the three months ended March 31, 2011.We continue to evaluate the terms of open land option and purchase contracts in light of challenging housing market conditions and may write-off option deposits in the future, particularly in those instances where land sellers are unwilling to renegotiate significant contract terms.  

8.        Capitalization of Interest

 We follow the practice of capitalizing interest to inventories owned during the period of development and to investments in unconsolidated homebuilding and land development joint ventures in accordance with ASC Topic 835, Interest (“ASC 835”). Homebuilding interest capitalized as a cost of inventories owned is included in cost of sales as related units or lots are sold. Interest capitalized to investments in unconsolidated homebuilding and land development joint ventures is included as a reduction of income from unconsolidated joint ventures when the related homes or lots are sold to third parties. Interest capitalized to investments in unconsolidated land development joint ventures is transferred to inventories owned if the underlying lots are purchased by us.  To the extent our debt exceeds our qualified assets as defined in ASC 835, we expense a portion of the interest incurred by us.  Qualified assets represent projects that are actively selling or under development as well as investments in unconsolidated joint ventures
 
 
accounted for under the equity method.  For the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, we expensed $2.5 million and $10.5 million, respectively, of interest costs related primarily to the portion of real estate inventories held for development that were deemed unqualified assets in accordance with ASC 835.

 The following is a summary of homebuilding interest capitalized to inventories owned and investments in unconsolidated joint ventures, amortized to cost of sales and loss from unconsolidated joint ventures and expensed as interest expense, for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011:
 
   
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
   
2012
 
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
   
  
         
Total interest incurred (1)
$
 35,315
 
$
 34,854
 
Less: Interest capitalized to inventories owned
  
 (30,992)
   
 (22,710)
 
Less: Interest capitalized to investments in unconsolidated joint ventures
  
 (1,793)
   
 (1,629)
 
Interest expense
$
 2,530
 
$
 10,515
 
   
  
         
Interest previously capitalized to inventories owned, included in cost of home sales
$
 18,556
 
$
 10,980
 
Interest previously capitalized to inventories owned, included in cost of land sales
$
 19
 
$
 ―
 
Interest previously capitalized to investments in unconsolidated joint ventures,
  
         
 
included in loss from unconsolidated joint ventures
$
 204
 
$
 137
 
Interest capitalized in ending inventories owned
$
 200,943
 
$
 159,665
 
Interest capitalized as a percentage of inventories owned
  
13.2%
   
12.4%
 
Interest capitalized in ending investments in unconsolidated joint ventures
$
 10,700
 
$
 5,969
 
Interest capitalized as a percentage of investments in unconsolidated joint ventures
  
13.0%
   
7.7%
 
 ____________________
(1)  
For the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, interest incurred included the noncash amortization of $2.6 million of interest related to the Term Loan B swap that was unwound in the 2010 fourth quarter (please see Note 15 “Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities”).
 
9.        Investments in Unconsolidated Land Development and Homebuilding Joint Ventures
 
The table set forth below summarizes the combined statements of operations for our unconsolidated land development and homebuilding joint ventures that we accounted for under the equity method:

   
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
             
Revenues
  $ 2,599     $ 12,410  
Cost of sales and expenses
    (2,699 )     (10,464 )
Income (loss) of unconsolidated joint ventures
  $ (100 )   $ 1,946  
Loss from unconsolidated joint ventures reflected in the  
               
   accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations
  $ (1,522 )   $ (257 )

Loss from unconsolidated joint ventures reflected in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations represents our share of the income (loss) of these unconsolidated land development and homebuilding joint ventures.  For the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, loss from unconsolidated joint ventures was primarily attributable to our share of losses related to one Southern California land development joint venture, which were allocated based on the provisions of the underlying joint venture operating agreement.

During each of the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, a total of six unconsolidated joint venture projects were reviewed for impairment, with certain joint ventures having multiple real estate projects.  Based on the impairment review, no joint venture projects were determined to be impaired for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011.



The table set forth below summarizes the combined balance sheets for our unconsolidated land development and homebuilding joint ventures that we accounted for under the equity method:
 
   
March 31,
   
December 31,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
Assets:
           
Cash
  $ 19,872     $ 24,155  
Inventories
    237,272       230,571  
Other assets
    9,028       11,190  
              Total assets
  $ 266,172     $ 265,916  
                 
Liabilities and Equity:
               
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
  $ 20,813     $ 21,190  
Standard Pacific equity
    75,741       77,259  
Other members' equity
    169,618       167,467  
              Total liabilities and equity
  $ 266,172     $ 265,916  
                 
Investments in unconsolidated joint ventures reflected in
               
the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets
  $ 82,163     $ 81,807  
 
In some cases our net investment in these unconsolidated joint ventures is not equal to our proportionate share of equity reflected in the table above primarily because of differences between asset impairments that we recorded against our joint venture investments and the impairments recorded by the applicable joint venture.  Our investments in unconsolidated joint ventures also included approximately $10.7 million and $9.1 million of homebuilding interest capitalized to investments in unconsolidated joint ventures as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively, which capitalized interest is not included in the combined balance sheets above.

Our investments in these unconsolidated joint ventures may represent a variable interest in a VIE depending on, among other things, the economic interests of the members of the entity and the contractual terms of the arrangement.  We analyze all of our unconsolidated joint ventures under the provisions of ASC 810 to determine whether these entities are deemed to be VIEs, and if so, whether we are the primary beneficiary.  As of March 31, 2012, with the exception of one homebuilding joint venture, all of our homebuilding and land development joint ventures with unrelated parties were determined under the provisions of ASC 810 to be unconsolidated joint ventures because they were not deemed to be VIEs.  As of March 31, 2012, we held an interest in one homebuilding joint venture in Northern California that was deemed to be a VIE.  Our investment in this joint venture was approximately $6.0 million, which represents our maximum exposure to loss if we elect to forfeit our membership interest in this entity.  As of March 31, 2012, this joint venture owns approximately $8.1 million of assets, primarily representing real estate inventories, and has no debt outstanding.  We have determined that based on the voting rights with respect to major decisions, as defined in the underlying joint venture operating agreement, both members of this joint venture share equally in the power to direct the activities that most significantly impact the entity’s economic performance.  As a result, we are not required to consolidate this joint venture as neither member is deemed to be the primary beneficiary.



10.      Warranty Costs

Estimated future direct warranty costs are accrued and charged to cost of sales in the period when the related homebuilding revenues are recognized.  Amounts accrued are based upon historical experience rates.  Indirect warranty overhead salaries and related costs are charged to cost of sales in the period incurred.  We assess the adequacy of our warranty accrual on a quarterly basis and adjust the amounts recorded if necessary.  Our warranty accrual is included in accrued liabilities in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.  Changes in our warranty accrual are detailed in the table set forth below:
 
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
 
(Dollars in thousands)
 
           
Warranty accrual, beginning of the period
$ 17,572     $ 20,866  
Warranty costs accrued during the period
  334       664  
Warranty costs paid during the period
  (938 )     (888 )
Warranty accrual, end of the period
$ 16,968     $ 20,642  
 
11.  Revolving Credit Facility and Letter of Credit Facilities

As of March 31, 2012, we were party to a $210 million unsecured revolving credit facility with a bank group (the “Revolving Facility”).  The Revolving Facility matures in February 2014 and has an accordion feature under which the aggregate commitment may be increased up to $400 million, subject to the availability of additional bank commitments and certain other conditions.  The Revolving Facility contains financial covenants, including, but not limited to, (i) a minimum consolidated tangible net worth covenant; (ii) a covenant to maintain either (a) a minimum liquidity level or (b) a minimum interest coverage ratio; (iii) a maximum net homebuilding leverage ratio and (iv) a maximum land not under development to tangible net worth ratio.  This facility also contains a borrowing base provision, which limits the amount we may borrow or keep outstanding under the facility, and also contains a limitation on our investments in joint ventures.  Interest rates charged under the Revolving Facility include LIBOR and prime rate pricing options.  As of the date hereof, we satisfied the conditions that would allow us to borrow up to $194.8 million under the facility and had no amounts outstanding.
 
As of March 31, 2012, we were party to two committed letter of credit facilities totaling $11 million, of which $7.2 million was outstanding.  In addition, as of such date, we also had a $30 million uncommitted letter of credit facility, of which $20.1 million was outstanding.  These facilities require cash collateralization and have maturity dates ranging from October 2012 to November 2013.  As of March 31, 2012 these facilities were secured by cash collateral deposits of $27.7 million.  Upon maturity, we may renew or enter into new letter of credit facilities with the same or other financial institutions.
  
12.      Secured Project Debt and Other Notes Payable

Our secured project debt and other notes payable consist of community development district and similar assessment district bond financings used to finance land development and infrastructure costs for which we are responsible.  At March 31, 2012, we had approximately $3.1 million outstanding in secured project debt and other notes payable.   

 
 
13.      Senior and Senior Subordinated Notes Payable

Senior notes payable consisted of the following at:
 
   
March 31,
   
December 31,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
             
6¼% Senior Notes due April 2014
  $ 4,971     $ 4,971  
7% Senior Notes due August 2015
    29,789       29,789  
10¾% Senior Notes due September 2016, net of discount
    263,643       262,968  
8⅜% Senior Notes due May 2018, net of premium
    580,355       580,523  
8⅜% Senior Notes due January 2021, net of discount
    396,902       396,842  
    $ 1,275,660     $ 1,275,093  
 
Senior subordinated notes payable consisted of the following at:
 
 
March 31,
   
December 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
 
(Dollars in thousands)
 
           
6% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes due October 2012, net of discount
$ 37,367     $ 36,339  
9¼% Senior Subordinated Notes due April 2012, net of discount
  9,988       9,985  
  $ 47,355     $ 46,324  
 
The senior notes payable described above are all senior obligations and rank equally with our other existing senior indebtedness and are redeemable at our option, in whole or in part, pursuant to a “make whole” formula. These senior notes and our 9¼% Senior Subordinated Notes due 2012 contain various restrictive covenants, including, with respect to the 10¾% Senior Notes due 2016, a limitation on additional indebtedness and a limitation on restricted payments.  Under the limitation on additional indebtedness, we are permitted to incur specified categories of indebtedness but are prohibited, aside from those exceptions, from incurring further indebtedness if we do not satisfy either a maximum leverage condition or a minimum interest coverage condition.  Under the limitation on restricted payments, we are also prohibited from making restricted payments (which include dividends, and investments in and advances to our joint ventures and other unrestricted subsidiaries), if we do not satisfy either condition.  Our ability to make restricted payments is also subject to a basket limitation.  As of March 31, 2012, we were able to satisfy the conditions necessary to incur additional indebtedness and to make restricted payments.  In addition, if we were unable to satisfy either the leverage condition or interest coverage condition, restricted payments could be made from our unrestricted subsidiaries.  As of March 31, 2012, we had approximately $337.3 million of cash available in our unrestricted subsidiaries.  Many of our wholly owned direct and indirect subsidiaries (collectively, the “Guarantor Subsidiaries”) guaranty our outstanding senior notes and our senior subordinated notes. The guarantees are full and unconditional, and joint and several.  Please see Note 21 for supplemental financial statement information about our guarantor subsidiaries group and non-guarantor subsidiaries group.

Certain provisions of ASC Topic 470, Debt, require bifurcation of a component of convertible debt instruments, classification of that component in stockholders’ equity, and then accretion of the resulting discount on the debt to result in interest expense equal to the issuer’s nonconvertible debt borrowing rate.  Our Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes due 2012 (the “Convertible Notes”) are being accreted to their redemption value, approximately $39.6 million, over the remaining term of these notes.  The unamortized discount of the Convertible Notes, which was included in additional paid-in capital, was $2.2 million and $3.3 million at March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively.  Interest capitalized to inventories owned is included in cost of sales as related homebuilding revenues are recognized (please see Note 8 “Capitalization of Interest”).

We repaid the remaining $10.0 million principal balance of our 9¼% Senior Subordinated Notes upon maturity in April 2012.


14.      Preferred Stock

At March 31, 2012, we had 450,829 shares of Series B junior participating convertible preferred stock (“Series B Preferred Stock”) outstanding, which are convertible into 147.8 million shares of our common stock. The number of shares of common stock into which our Series B Preferred Stock is convertible is determined by dividing $1,000 by the applicable conversion price ($3.05, subject to customary anti-dilution adjustments) plus cash in lieu of fractional shares. The Series B Preferred Stock will be convertible at the holder’s option into shares of our common stock provided that no holder, with its affiliates, may beneficially own total voting power of our voting stock in excess of 49%.  The Series B Preferred Stock also mandatorily converts into our common stock upon its sale, transfer or other disposition by MatlinPatterson or its affiliates to an unaffiliated third party. The Series B Preferred Stock votes together with our common stock on all matters upon which holders of our common stock are entitled to vote. Each share of Series B Preferred Stock is entitled to such number of votes as the number of shares of our common stock into which such share of Series B Preferred Stock is convertible, provided that the aggregate votes attributable to such shares with respect to any holder of Series B Preferred Stock (including its affiliates), taking into consideration any other voting securities of the Company held by such stockholder, cannot exceed more than 49% of the total voting power of the voting stock of the Company. Shares of Series B Preferred Stock are entitled to receive only those dividends declared and paid on the common stock.  As of March 31, 2012, the outstanding shares of common stock (89.4 million shares) and Series B Preferred Stock owned by MatlinPatterson represented approximately 68% of the total number of shares of our common stock outstanding on an if-converted basis.

15.      Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities

We account for derivatives and certain hedging activities in accordance with ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging (“ASC 815”).  ASC 815 establishes the accounting and reporting standards requiring that every derivative instrument, including certain derivative instruments embedded in other contracts, be recorded as either assets or liabilities in the consolidated balance sheets and to measure these instruments at fair market value. Gains and losses resulting from changes in the fair market value of derivatives are recognized in the consolidated statement of operations or recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax, and recognized in the consolidated statement of operations when the hedged item affects earnings, depending on the purpose of the derivative and whether the derivative qualifies for hedge accounting treatment.

Our policy is to designate at a derivative’s inception the specific assets, liabilities or future commitments being hedged and monitor the derivative to determine if the derivative remains an effective hedge. The effectiveness of a derivative as a hedge is based on a high correlation between changes in the derivative’s value and changes in the value of the underlying hedged item.  We recognize gains or losses for amounts received or paid when the underlying transaction settles.  We do not enter into or hold derivatives for trading or speculative purposes.

In May 2006, we entered into two interest rate swap agreements related to our Term Loan B with an aggregate notional amount of $250 million that effectively fixed our 3-month LIBOR rates for our then outstanding term loan through its maturity date of May 2013.  The swap agreements were designated as cash flow hedges and, accordingly, were reflected at their fair market value in accrued liabilities in our consolidated balance sheets.  To the extent the swaps were deemed effective and qualified for hedge accounting treatment, the related gain or loss was deferred, net of tax, in stockholders’ equity as accumulated other comprehensive income (loss).

In December 2010, we repaid in full the remaining $225 million balance of our Term Loan B and made a $24.5 million payment to terminate the related interest rate swap agreements.  As a result, we have no payment obligation remaining related to interest rate swap agreements.  The $24.5 million cost associated with the early unwind of the interest rate swap agreements is being amortized over a period of approximately 2.3 years (or May 2013), the original maturity date of the terminated instruments.  As of March 31, 2012, the remaining unamortized balance of $7.1 million is included in accumulated other
 
 
-15-

 
comprehensive loss, net of tax, and $4.3 million is included in deferred income taxes in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.  For each of the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, we recorded after-tax other comprehensive income of $1.6 million related to the swap agreements.

16.      Mortgage Credit Facility
 
    At March 31, 2012, we had $49.5 million outstanding under our mortgage financing subsidiary’s mortgage credit facility, a $50 million repurchase facility maturing in July 2012.  This facility requires Standard Pacific Mortgage to maintain a cash collateral account, which totaled approximately $1.3 million as of March 31, 2012, and also contains financial covenants which require Standard Pacific Mortgage to, among other things, maintain a minimum level of tangible net worth, not to exceed a debt to tangible net worth ratio, maintain a minimum liquidity amount based on a measure of total assets (inclusive of the cash collateral requirement), and satisfy pretax income (loss) requirements.  As of March 31, 2012, Standard Pacific Mortgage was in compliance with the financial and other covenants contained in this facility.
 
17.  Disclosures about Fair Value
 
    ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures (“ASC 820”), establishes a framework for measuring fair value, expands disclosures regarding fair value measurements and defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date.  Further, ASC 820 requires us to maximize the use of observable market inputs, minimize the use of unobservable market inputs and disclose in the form of an outlined hierarchy the details of such fair value measurements. ASC 820 specifies a hierarchy of valuation techniques based on whether the inputs to a fair value measurement are considered to be observable or unobservable in a marketplace. The three levels of the hierarchy are as follows:
 
      Level 1 – quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in active markets;
 
      Level 2 – quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active; and model-derived valuations in which significant inputs and significant value drivers are observable in active markets; and
 
      Level 3 – valuations derived from valuation techniques in which one or more significant inputs or significant value drivers are unobservable.

Mortgage loans held for sale have been measured at fair value in accordance with ASC 820 for the three months ended March 31, 2012:
 
         
Fair Value Measurements at Reporting Date Using
         
Quoted Prices in
 
Significant Other
 
Significant
       
Active Markets for
 
Observable
 
Unobservable
     
As of
 
Identical Assets
 
Inputs
 
Inputs
Description
 
March 31, 2012
 
(Level 1)
 
(Level 2)
 
(Level 3)
     
(Dollars in thousands)
 
                       
    Mortgage loans held for sale
  
$
68,406
 
$
     ―   
 
$
68,406
 
$
     ―   
 
Mortgage loans held for sale consist of FHA, VA, USDA and agency first mortgages on single-family residences which are eligible for sale to FNMA/FHLMC, GNMA or other investors, as applicable.  Fair values of these loans are based on quoted prices from third party investors when preselling loans.

   
     The following table presents the carrying values and estimated fair values of our other financial instruments for which we have not elected the fair value option in accordance with ASC Topic 825, Financial Instruments:

       
March 31, 2012
   
December 31, 2011
 
Description
 
 Fair Value
Hierarchy
 
Carrying
Amount
   
Fair Value
   
Carrying
Amount
   
Fair Value
 
       
(Dollars in thousands)
 
                             
Financial services assets:
                           
Mortgage loans held for investment, net
  Level 2    $ 9,650     $ 9,650     $ 10,115     $ 10,115  
Homebuilding liabilities:
                                   
Senior notes payable, net
  Level 2    $ 1,275,660     $ 1,386,856     $ 1,275,093     $ 1,243,209  
Senior subordinated notes payable, net
  Level 2    $ 47,355     $ 51,508     $ 46,324     $ 50,793  
  
Mortgage Loans Held for Investment – Fair value of these loans is based on the estimated market value of the underlying collateral based on market data and other factors for similar type properties as further adjusted to reflect their estimated net realizable value of carrying the loans through disposition.

Senior and Senior Subordinated Notes Payable – The senior and senior subordinated notes are traded over the counter and their fair values were estimated based upon the values of their last trade at the end of the period.

    The fair value of our cash and equivalents, restricted cash, accounts receivable, trade accounts payable, secured project debt and other notes payable, mortgage credit facilities and other liabilities approximate their carrying amounts due to the short-term nature of these assets and liabilities.
 
18.      Commitments and Contingencies
 
a.     Land Purchase and Option Agreements
 
We are subject to obligations associated with entering into contracts for the purchase of land and improved homesites. These purchase contracts typically require a cash deposit or delivery of a letter of credit, and the purchase of properties under these contracts is generally contingent upon satisfaction of certain requirements by the sellers, including obtaining applicable property and development entitlements.  We also utilize option contracts with land sellers and third-party financial entities as a method of acquiring land in staged takedowns, to help us manage the financial and market risk associated with land holdings, and to reduce the use of funds from our corporate financing sources.  Option contracts generally require a non-refundable deposit for the right to acquire lots over a specified period of time at predetermined prices.  We generally have the right at our discretion to terminate our obligations under both purchase contracts and option contracts by forfeiting our cash deposit or by repaying amounts drawn under our letter of credit with no further financial responsibility to the land seller, although in certain instances, the land seller has the right to compel us to purchase a specified number of lots at predetermined prices.  Also, in a few instances where we have entered into option contracts with third party financial entities, we have generally entered into construction agreements that do not terminate if we elect not to exercise our option.  In these instances, we are generally obligated to complete land development improvements on the optioned property at a predetermined cost (paid by the option provider) and are responsible for all cost overruns.  At March 31, 2012, we had no option contracts outstanding with third party financial entities.  In some instances, we may also expend funds for due diligence, development and construction activities with respect to our land purchase and option contracts prior to purchase, which we would have to write off should we not purchase the land.  At March 31, 2012, we had non-refundable cash deposits outstanding of approximately $23.2 million and capitalized preacquisition and other development and construction costs of approximately $7.2 million relating to land purchase and option contracts having a total remaining purchase price of approximately $208.2 million.  Approximately $23.6 million of the remaining purchase price is included in inventories not owned in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 
 
Our utilization of option contracts is dependent on, among other things, the availability of land sellers willing to enter into option takedown arrangements, the availability of capital to financial intermediaries, general housing market conditions, and geographic preferences.  Options may be more difficult to procure from land sellers in strong housing markets and are more prevalent in certain geographic regions.
 
b.     Land Development and Homebuilding Joint Ventures
 
Our joint ventures have historically obtained secured acquisition, development and construction financing designed to reduce the use of funds from corporate financing sources.  As of March 31, 2012, we held membership interests in 19 homebuilding and land development joint ventures, of which eight were active and 11 were inactive or winding down.  As of such date, our joint ventures had no project specific financing outstanding.

In addition, as of March 31, 2012, our joint ventures had $3.9 million of surety bonds outstanding subject to indemnity arrangements by us and had an estimated $0.7 million remaining in cost to complete.
 
    c.     Surety Bonds
 
We obtain surety bonds in the normal course of business to ensure completion of the infrastructure of our projects.  At March 31, 2012, we had approximately $192.7 million in surety bonds outstanding (exclusive of surety bonds related to our joint ventures), with respect to which we had an estimated $92.6 million remaining in cost to complete.
 
d.     Mortgage Loans and Commitments
 
We commit to making mortgage loans to our homebuyers through our mortgage financing subsidiary, Standard Pacific Mortgage.  Standard Pacific Mortgage sells substantially all of the loans it originates in the secondary mortgage market and finances these loans under its mortgage credit facility for a short period of time (typically for 30 to 45 days), as investors complete their administrative review of applicable loan documents.  Mortgage loans in process for which interest rates were committed to borrowers totaled approximately $39.9 million at March 31, 2012 and carried a weighted average interest rate of approximately 3.9%.  Interest rate risks related to these obligations are mitigated through the preselling of loans to investors.  As of March 31, 2012, Standard Pacific Mortgage had approximately $66.9 million in closed mortgage loans held for sale and $40.2 million of mortgage loans that we were committed to sell to investors subject to our funding of the loans and completion of the investors’ administrative review of the applicable loan documents.

Standard Pacific Mortgage sells substantially all of the loans it originates in the secondary mortgage market, with servicing rights released on a non-recourse basis.  This sale is subject to Standard Pacific Mortgage’s obligation to repay its gain on sale if the loan is prepaid by the borrower within a certain time period following such sale, or to repurchase the loan if, among other things, the purchaser’s underwriting guidelines are not met, or there is fraud in connection with the loan.  As of March 31, 2012, we had incurred an aggregate of $8.8 million in losses related to loan repurchases and make-whole payments we had been required to make on the $6.7 billion total dollar value of the loans we originated from the beginning of 2004 through the first quarter of 2012.  During the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, Standard Pacific Mortgage recorded loan loss reserves related to loans sold of $0.3 million and $1.1 million, respectively.  As of March 31, 2012, Standard Pacific Mortgage had repurchase reserves related to loans sold of approximately $3.1 million.  In addition, during the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, Standard Pacific Mortgage made make-whole payments totaling approximately $0.3 million related to one loan and $1.0 million related to seven loans, respectively.

 
 
 
-18-

 
    Mortgage loans held for investment are continually evaluated for collectability and, if appropriate, specific reserves are established based on estimates of collateral value.  As of March 31, 2012, Standard Pacific Mortgage had $14.0 million of loans held for investment that had a loan loss reserve of approximately $4.4 million.  During the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, Standard Pacific Mortgage recorded loan loss reserves related to loans held for investment of $0.1 million and $0, respectively.
 
e.     Insurance and Litigation Accruals

Insurance and litigation accruals are established with respect to estimated future claims cost.  We maintain general liability insurance designed to protect us against a portion of our risk of loss from construction-related claims.  We also generally require our subcontractors and design professionals to indemnify us for liabilities arising from their work, subject to various limitations.  However, such indemnity is significantly limited with respect to subcontractors added to our general liability insurance policy.  We record reserves to cover our estimated costs of self-insured retentions and deductible amounts under these policies and estimated costs for claims that may not be covered by applicable insurance or indemnities.  Our total insurance and litigation accruals as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 were $53.4 million and $55.8 million, respectively, which are included in accrued liabilities in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.  Estimation of these accruals include consideration of our claims history, including current claims, estimates of claims incurred but not yet reported, and potential for recovery of costs from insurance and other sources.  We utilize the services of an independent third party actuary to assist us with evaluating the level of our insurance and litigation accruals.  Because of the high degree of judgment required in determining these estimated accrual amounts, actual future claim costs could differ from our currently estimated amounts.

f.     Restructuring Costs

During 2008 we initiated a restructuring plan designed to reduce ongoing overhead costs and improve operating efficiencies through the consolidation of selected divisional offices, the disposal of related property and equipment, and a reduction in our workforce as a result of our operations having been impacted by weak housing demand in substantially all of our markets.  During the three months ended March 31, 2011, we recorded $0.6 million of homebuilding restructuring charges, which are included in selling, general and administrative expenses in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations, related to employee severance costs incurred in connection with further adjusting our workforce to align with lower sales volume. We did not incur any restructuring charges in the 2012 first quarter.  The total amount of restructuring charges incurred from January 1, 2008 through March 31, 2012 was $48.7 million, of which $30.7 million related to employee severance costs, $13.7 million related to lease termination and other exit costs and $4.3 million related to property and equipment disposals.  We believe that our restructuring activities are substantially complete as of March 31, 2012.  However, until market conditions stabilize, we may incur additional restructuring charges for employee severance, lease termination and other exit costs.
 

 
 
Our restructuring accrual is included in accrued liabilities in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.  Changes in our restructuring accrual are detailed in the table set forth below:
 
 
Three Months Ended March 31, 2012
 
 
Employee
Severance
Costs
 
Lease
Termination and
Other Costs
 
Total
 
 
(Dollars in thousands)
 
                 
Restructuring accrual, beginning of the period
$ 731     $ 1,322     $ 2,053  
Restructuring costs accrued and other adjustments during the period
               
Restructuring costs paid during the period
  (648 )     (244 )     (892 )
Restructuring accrual, end of the period
$ 83     $ 1,078     $ 1,161  
                       
                       
     
 
Three Months Ended March 31, 2011
 
 
Employee
Severance
Costs
 
Lease
Termination and
Other Costs
 
Total
 
 
(Dollars in thousands)
 
                       
Restructuring accrual, beginning of the period
$ 22     $ 2,251     $ 2,273  
Restructuring costs accrued and other adjustments during the period
  561             561  
Restructuring costs paid during the period
  (41 )     (360 )     (401 )
Restructuring accrual, end of the period
$ 542     $ 1,891     $ 2,433  
 
19.      Income Taxes

We account for income taxes in accordance with ASC Topic 740, Income Taxes (“ASC 740”).  ASC 740 requires an asset and liability approach for measuring deferred taxes based on temporary differences between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities existing at each balance sheet date using enacted tax rates for years in which taxes are expected to be paid or recovered.

The components of our net deferred income tax asset are as follows:
 
   
March 31,
   
December 31,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
                 
Inventory
  $ 177,153     $ 184,393  
Financial accruals
    51,538       52,493  
Federal net operating loss carryforwards
    213,966       210,013  
State net operating loss carryforwards
    51,400       51,003  
Goodwill impairment charges
    16,898       17,482  
Other, net
    596       563  
Total deferred tax asset
    511,551       515,947  
Less: Valuation allowance
    (507,208 )     (510,621 )
  Net deferred tax asset
  $ 4,343     $ 5,326  
 
   Each quarter we assess our deferred tax asset to determine whether all or any portion of the asset is more likely than not unrealizable under ASC 740.  We are required to establish a valuation allowance for any portion of the asset we conclude is more likely than not to be unrealizable. Our assessment considers, among other things, the nature, frequency and severity of our current and cumulative losses, forecasts of our future taxable income, the duration of statutory carryforward periods, our utilization experience with operating loss and tax credit carryforwards, and tax planning alternatives.

As of March 31, 2012, we had a deferred tax asset of $507.2 million (excluding the $4.3 million deferred tax asset related to our terminated interest rate swap).  During the three months ended March 31, 2012, we utilized $3.4 million of our deferred tax asset valuation allowance to fully offset the income tax provision related to our pretax income for the period.  As of March 31, 2012, due primarily to our current
 
 
-20-

 
and cumulative losses, the uncertainty as to the duration of the housing market's downturn and its impact on our ability to predict future taxable income, we have determined that an aggregate valuation allowance of $507.2 million against our deferred tax asset is required. If we generate taxable income in the future, subject to the potential limitations discussed below, we expect to be able to reduce our effective tax rate through a reduction in this valuation allowance.

We underwent a change in ownership for purposes of Internal Revenue Code Section 382 (“Section 382”) on June 27, 2008. As a result, a portion of our deferred tax asset became subject to the various limitations on its use that are imposed by Section 382.  At March 31, 2012, $257 million of this asset was subject to limitations, of which $112 million was subject to the unrealized built-in loss limitations and $145 million was subject to federal and state net operating loss carryforward limitations.

The limitations ultimately placed on the $112 million subject to the unrealized built-in loss limitations depends on, among other things, when, and at what price, we dispose of assets with built-in losses.  Assets with built-in losses sold prior to June 27, 2013, are subject to a $15.6 million gross annual deduction limitation for federal and state purposes.  Assets with built-in losses sold after June 27, 2013 are not subject to these limitations.  In general, to the extent that realized tax losses from these built-in loss assets exceed $15.6 million in any tax year prior to June 27, 2013, the built-in losses in excess of this amount will be permanently lost, such permanent loss reflected by identical reductions of our deferred tax asset and deferred tax asset valuation allowance for the tax effected amount of the difference.  No such reductions were recorded during the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011.  However, during the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, we recorded such reductions in the amounts of $12.2 million and $22.9 million, respectively, reflecting permanent losses of our deferred tax asset in such periods related to built-in losses realized during these periods that were in excess of the Section 382 annual limitation.

As of March 31, 2012, $145 million (or approximately $353 million and $372 million, respectively, of federal and state net operating loss carryforwards on a gross basis) of our deferred tax asset related to net operating loss carryforwards is subject to the $15.6 million gross annual deduction limitation for both federal and state purposes.  The remaining $120 million (or approximately $263 million and $459 million, respectively, of federal and state net operating loss carryforwards on a gross basis) is not currently limited by Section 382.

As of March 31, 2012, our liability for gross unrecognized tax benefits was $13.5 million, all of which, if recognized, would reduce our effective tax rate.  There were no significant changes in the accrued liability related to uncertain tax positions during the three months ended March 31, 2012, nor do we anticipate significant changes during the next 12-month period.  As of March 31, 2012, we remained subject to examination by various tax jurisdictions for the tax years ended December 31, 2007 through 2011.

20.     Supplemental Disclosures to Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
 
    The following are supplemental disclosures to the condensed consolidated statements of cash flows:
 
   
Three Months Ended March 31,
   
2012
 
2011
   
(Dollars in thousands)
Supplemental Disclosures of Cash Flow Information:
 
         
Cash paid during the period for:
 
         
Interest
  $ 33,370     $ 16,199  
Income taxes
  $ 44     $  




21.      Supplemental Guarantor Information

Certain of our 100% owned direct and indirect subsidiaries guarantee our outstanding senior and senior subordinated notes payable.  The guarantees are full and unconditional and joint and several.  Presented below are the condensed consolidated financial statements for our guarantor subsidiaries and non-guarantor subsidiaries.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATING STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
 
   
Three Months Ended March 31, 2012
 
   
Standard
Pacific Corp.
   
Guarantor Subsidiaries
   
Non-
Guarantor Subsidiaries
   
Consolidating Adjustments
   
Consolidated
Standard
Pacific Corp.
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
Homebuilding:
                             
Revenues
  $ 74,255     $ 124,889     $ 24,558     $     $ 223,702  
Cost of sales
    (57,955 )     (100,303 )     (20,703 )           (178,961 )
Gross margin
    16,300       24,586       3,855             44,741  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    (17,222 )     (17,989 )     (2,481 )           (37,692 )
Loss from unconsolidated joint ventures
    (682 )     (28 )     (812 )           (1,522 )
Equity income (loss) of subsidiaries
    1,918                   (1,918 )      
Interest expense
    3,356       (4,241 )     (1,645 )           (2,530 )
Other income (expense)
    4,013       49       222             4,284  
Homebuilding pretax income (loss)
    7,683       2,377       (861 )     (1,918 )     7,281  
Financial Services:
                                       
Financial services pretax income (loss)
    (63 )     63       1,429             1,429  
Income (loss) before income taxes
    7,620       2,440       568       (1,918 )     8,710  
(Provision) benefit for income taxes
    903       (757 )     (333 )           (187 )
Net income (loss)
  $ 8,523     $ 1,683     $ 235     $ (1,918 )   $ 8,523  



 
Three Months Ended March 31, 2011
 
 
Standard
Pacific Corp.
   
Guarantor Subsidiaries
   
Non-
Guarantor Subsidiaries
   
Consolidating Adjustments
   
Consolidated
Standard
Pacific Corp.
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
Homebuilding:
                             
Revenues
  $ 62,690     $ 75,032     $ 5,977     $     $ 143,699  
Cost of sales
    (47,103 )     (63,104 )     (4,105 )           (114,312 )
Gross margin
    15,587       11,928       1,872             29,387  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    (17,610 )     (14,030 )     (621 )           (32,261 )
Loss from unconsolidated joint ventures
    (22 )     (26 )     (209 )           (257 )
Equity income (loss) of subsidiaries
    (4,986 )                 4,986        
Interest expense
    (5,128 )     (4,881 )     (506 )           (10,515 )
Other income (expense)
    (83 )     (30 )     405             292  
Homebuilding pretax income (loss)
    (12,242 )     (7,039 )     941       4,986       (13,354 )
Financial Services:
                                       
Financial services pretax income (loss)
    (15 )     15       (1,343 )           (1,343 )
Income (loss) before income taxes
    (12,257 )     (7,024 )     (402 )     4,986       (14,697 )
(Provision) benefit for income taxes
    (2,540 )     2,022       418             (100 )
Net income (loss)
  $ (14,797 )   $ (5,002 )   $ 16     $ 4,986     $ (14,797 )





21.       Supplemental Guarantor Information

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATING BALANCE SHEET

   
March 31, 2012
 
   
Standard
Pacific Corp.
   
Guarantor
Subsidiaries
   
Non-Guarantor
Subsidiaries
   
Consolidating
Adjustments
   
Consolidated
Standard
Pacific Corp.
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
ASSETS
                             
Homebuilding:
                             
Cash and equivalents
  $ 26,208     $ 175     $ 340,187     $     $ 366,570  
Restricted cash
                27,798             27,798  
Trade and other receivables
    515,626       8,617       16,653       (522,380 )     18,516  
Inventories:
                                       
Owned
    676,799       645,749       203,382             1,525,930  
Not owned
    7,009       40,568       2,583             50,160  
Investments in unconsolidated joint ventures
    23,528       2,366       56,269             82,163  
Investments in subsidiaries
    750,414                   (750,414 )      
Deferred income taxes, net
    4,195                   148       4,343  
Other assets
    30,731       3,015       430             34,176  
Total Homebuilding Assets
    2,034,510       700,490       647,302       (1,272,646 )     2,109,656  
Financial Services:
                                       
Cash and equivalents
                6,095             6,095  
Restricted cash
                1,295             1,295  
Mortgage loans held for sale, net
                65,398             65,398  
Mortgage loans held for investment, net
                9,650             9,650  
Other assets
                5,663       (3,127 )     2,536  
Total Financial Services Assets
                88,101       (3,127 )     84,974  
Total Assets
  $ 2,034,510     $ 700,490     $ 735,403     $ (1,275,773 )   $ 2,194,630  
                                         
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
                                       
Homebuilding:
                                       
Accounts payable
  $ 7,732     $ 10,242     $ 1,770     $     $ 19,744  
Accrued liabilities
    65,851       418,018       188,199       (511,987 )     160,081  
Secured project debt and other notes payable
                3,065             3,065  
Senior notes payable
    1,275,660                         1,275,660  
Senior subordinated notes payable
    47,355                         47,355  
Total Homebuilding Liabilities
    1,396,598       428,260       193,034       (511,987 )     1,505,905  
Financial Services:
                                       
Accounts payable and other liabilities
                6,656       (5,372 )     1,284  
Mortgage credit facilities
                57,529       (8,000 )     49,529  
Total Financial Services Liabilities
                64,185       (13,372 )     50,813  
Total Liabilities
    1,396,598       428,260       257,219       (525,359 )     1,556,718  
                                         
Equity:
                                       
Total Stockholders' Equity
    637,912       272,230       478,184       (750,414 )     637,912  
Total Liabilities and Equity
  $ 2,034,510     $ 700,490     $ 735,403     $ (1,275,773 )   $ 2,194,630  



21.       Supplemental Guarantor Information

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATING BALANCE SHEET
 
   
December 31, 2011
 
   
Standard
Pacific Corp.
   
Guarantor
Subsidiaries
   
Non-Guarantor
Subsidiaries
   
Consolidating
Adjustments
   
Consolidated
Standard
Pacific Corp.
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
ASSETS
            &