XNAS:JFBI Jefferson Bancshares, Inc. Annual Report 10-K Filing - 6/30/2012

Effective Date 6/30/2012

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U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

x
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012

o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from _____________ to _____________

Commission File Number: 0-50347
 
JEFFERSON BANCSHARES, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Tennessee
 
 45-0508261
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

120 Evans Avenue, Morristown, Tennessee
 
37814
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
 (Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (423) 586-8421
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
 Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $0.01
 
The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o No x 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o No x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
Yes x No o

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large Accelerated Filer o            Accelerated Filer o
Non-accelerated Filer o              Smaller Reporting Company x
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 16b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No x

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates was $14,016,241 million, based upon the closing price ($2.31 per share) as quoted on the Nasdaq Global Market as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter (December 30, 2011).

The number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock as of September 12, 2012 was 6,629,753.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the Proxy Statement for the 2012 Annual Meeting of Shareholders
are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K.
 
 
 

 
 
INDEX
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
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Note on Forward Looking Statements:
 
This report, as well as other written communications made from time to time by Jefferson Bancshares, Inc. (the “Company”) and subsidiaries and oral communications made from time to time by authorized officers of the Company, may contain statements relating to the future results of the Company (including certain projections, such as earnings projections, necessary tax provisions, and business trends) that are considered “forward looking statements” as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “PSLRA”). Such forward-looking statements may be identified by the use of such words as “intend,” “believe,” “expect,” “should,” “planned,” “estimated,” and “potential.” For these statements, the Company claims the protection of the safe harbor for forward-looking statements contained in the PSLRA. The Company’s ability to predict future results is inherently uncertain and the Company cautions you that a number of important factors could cause actual results to differ materially from those currently anticipated in any forward-looking statement. These factors include but are not limited to:
 
 
The strength of the United States economy in general and the strength of the local economies in which the Company conducts its operations which may be less favorable than expected and may result in, among other things, a deterioration in the credit quality and value of the Company’s assets;
 
 
The economic impact of past and any future terrorist attacks, acts of war or threats thereof and the response of the United States to any such threats and attacks;
 
 
The effects of, and changes in, federal, state and local laws, regulations and policies affecting banking, securities, insurance and monetary and financial matters;
 
 
The effects of changes in interest rates (including the effects of changes in the rate of prepayments of the Company’s assets) and the policies of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System;
 
 
The ability of the Company to compete with other financial institutions as effectively as the Company currently intends due to increases in competitive pressures in the financial services sector;
 
 
The inability of the Company to obtain new customers and to retain existing customers;
 
 
The timely development and acceptance of products and services, including products and services offered through alternative delivery channels such as the Internet;
 
 
Technological changes implemented by the Company and by other parties, including third party vendors, which may be more difficult or more expensive than anticipated or which may have unforeseen consequences to the Company and its customers;
     
 
The ability of the Company to develop and maintain secure and reliable electronic systems;
 
 
The ability of the Company to retain key executives and employees and the difficulty that the Company may experience in replacing key executives and employees in an effective manner;
 
 
Consumer spending and saving habits which may change in a manner that affects the Company’s business adversely;
 
 
Business combinations and the integration of acquired businesses which may be more difficult or expensive than expected;
 
 
The costs, effects and outcomes of existing or future litigation;
 
 
Changes in accounting policies and practices, as may be adopted by state and federal regulatory agencies and the Financial Accounting Standards Board; and
 
 
The ability of the Company to manage the risks associated with the foregoing as well as anticipated.
 
Additional factors that may affect our results are discussed in this annual report on Form 10-K under “Item 1A, Risk Factors.” These risks and uncertainties should be considered in evaluating forward-looking statements and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements. The Company does not undertake and specifically disclaims any obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect the occurrence of anticipated or unanticipated events or circumstances after the date of such statements.
 
 
ii

 
 

ITEM 1.

General

Jefferson Bancshares, Inc. (also referred to herein as the “Company” or “Jefferson Bancshares”) is the holding company for Jefferson Federal Bank.

On October 31, 2008, the Company completed its acquisition of State of Franklin Bancshares, Inc. (“State of Franklin Bancshares”). The merger was consummated pursuant to the terms of an Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated as of September 4, 2008 (the “Merger Agreement”), by and between the Company and State of Franklin Bancshares. In accordance with the terms of the Merger Agreement, shares of State of Franklin Bancshares were converted into either $10.00 in cash or 1.1287 shares of Company common stock. The total merger consideration consisted of approximately $4.3 million in cash and 736,000 shares of Company common stock.

In connection with the Company’s acquisition of State of Franklin Bancshares, Jefferson Federal Bank merged with and into State of Franklin Savings Bank, the wholly owned subsidiary of State of Franklin Bancshares. The resulting institution continues to operate as a Tennessee chartered savings bank under the name “Jefferson Federal Bank” (also referred to herein as the “Bank” or “Jefferson Federal”).

Management of the Company and the Bank are substantially similar and the Company neither owns nor leases any property, but instead uses the premises, equipment and furniture of the Bank. Accordingly, the information set forth in this report, including the consolidated financial statements and related financial data, relates primarily to the Bank.

Jefferson Federal operates as a community-oriented financial institution offering traditional financial services to consumers and businesses in its market area. Jefferson Federal attracts deposits from the general public and uses those funds to originate loans, most of which it holds for investment.

Available Information

We maintain an Internet website at http://www.jeffersonfederal.com. We make available our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to such reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and other information related to us, free of charge, on this site as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file those documents with, or otherwise furnish them to, the Securities Exchange Commission. Our Internet website and the information contained therein or connected thereto are not intended to be incorporated into this annual report on Form 10-K.

Market Area

We are headquartered in Morristown, Tennessee, which is situated approximately 40 miles northeast of Knoxville, Tennessee in the northeastern section of the state. We consider our primary market areas to consist of: (i) Hamblen County, Tennessee, and its contiguous counties; (ii) Knoxville, Tennessee, and its surrounding areas; and (iii) the greater Johnson City, Tennessee, Kingsport, Tennessee, and Virginia region (the “Tri-Cities region”).

We currently operate two full-service branch offices and two limited-service drive-through facilities in Hamblen County, Tennessee. The economy of Hamblen County, which has an estimated population of 62,000, is primarily oriented to manufacturing and agriculture. Morristown and Hamblen County also serve as a hub for retail shopping and medical services for a number of surrounding rural counties. The manufacturing sector is focused on three types of products: automotive and heavy equipment components; plastics, paper and corrugated products; and furniture. According to published statistics, the unemployment rate in Hamblen County was 10.1% as of June 2012, the most recent period for which data is available, which was above the national and state unemployment rates at that time.
 
 
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We also currently operate two full-service branch offices in Knoxville, Tennessee. Knoxville’s population is approximately 183,000 and its economy is largely fueled by the location of the main campus of the University of Tennessee, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Transportation Research Center and the Tennessee Valley Authority. Additionally, Knoxville has many warehousing and distribution companies because of its central location in the eastern half of the United States. The unemployment rate for the Knoxville metropolitan statistical area was 7.0% as of June 2012, which was below the national and state unemployment rates at that time.

As a result of our acquisition of State of Franklin Bancshares in October 2008, we also currently operate six full-service branch offices in the Tri-Cities region. The population of the Tri-Cities region is approximately 500,000 and its economy is largely fueled by manufacturing and trade services. The unemployment rate for the Tri-Cities region combined statistical area was 7.9% as of June 2012, which was slightly below the national and state unemployment rates at that time.

Competition

We face significant competition for the attraction of deposits and origination of loans. Our most direct competition for deposits has historically come from the several financial institutions operating in our market area and, to a lesser extent, from other financial service companies, such as brokerage firms, credit unions and insurance companies. We also face competition for investors’ funds from money market funds and other corporate and government securities. At June 30, 2011, which is the most recent date for which data is available from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, we held: (i) 22.66% of the deposits in Hamblen County, which is the largest market share out of 10 financial institutions with offices in the county at that date; (ii) 0.32% of the deposits in the Knoxville, Tennessee, metropolitan statistical area, which is the 27th largest market share out of 44 financial institutions with offices in the metropolitan statistical area at that date; (iii) 4.96% of the deposits in the Johnson City, Tennessee metropolitan statistical area, which is the ninth largest market share out of 23 financial institutions located in the metropolitan statistical area at that date; and (iv) 1.27% of the deposits in the Kingsport, Tennessee-Bristol, Virginia metropolitan statistical area, which is the 18th largest market share out of 31 financial institutions located in the metropolitan statistical area at that date. Banks owned by SunTrust Banks, Inc., First Tennessee National Corporation and Regions Financial Corporation and other large regional bank holding companies also operate in our primary market areas. These institutions are significantly larger than us and, therefore, have significantly greater resources.

Our competition for loans comes primarily from financial institutions in our market area, and to a lesser extent from other financial service providers, such as mortgage companies and mortgage brokers. Competition for loans also comes from non-depository financial service companies, such as insurance companies, securities companies and specialty finance companies.

We expect to continue to face significant competition in the future as a result of legislative, regulatory and technological changes and the continuing trend of consolidation in the financial services industry. Technological advances, for example, have lowered barriers to entry, allowed banks to expand their geographic reach by providing services over the Internet and made it possible for non-depository institutions to offer products and services that traditionally have been provided by banks. Federal law permits affiliation among banks, securities firms and insurance companies, which promotes a competitive environment in the financial services industry. Competition for deposits and the origination of loans could limit our growth in the future.

Lending Activities

General. Our loan portfolio consists of a variety of mortgage, commercial and consumer loans. As a community-oriented financial institution, we try to meet the borrowing needs of consumers and businesses in our market area. Mortgage loans constitute a significant majority of the portfolio, and commercial mortgage loans are the largest segment in that category.
 
 
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One- to Four-Family Residential Loans. We originate mortgage loans to enable borrowers to purchase or refinance existing homes or to construct new one- to four-family homes. We offer fixed-rate mortgage loans with terms up to 30 years and adjustable-rate mortgage loans with terms up to 30 years. Borrower demand for adjustable-rate loans versus fixed-rate loans is a function of the level of interest rates, the expectations of changes in the level of interest rates, the difference between the interest rates and loan fees offered for fixed-rate mortgage loans and the first year interest rates and loan fees for adjustable-rate loans. The relative amount of fixed-rate mortgage loans and adjustable-rate mortgage loans that can be originated at any time is largely determined by the demand for each in a competitive environment and the effect each has on our interest rate risk.

The loan fees charged, interest rates and other provisions of mortgage loans are determined by us on the basis of our own pricing criteria and competitive market conditions. Interest rates and payments on our adjustable-rate loans generally are adjusted annually based on any change in the National Average Contract Mortgage Rate for the Purchase of Previously Occupied Homes by Combined Lenders as published by the Federal Housing Finance Board. Changes in this index tend to lag behind changes in market interest rates. Our adjustable-rate mortgage loans may have initial fixed-rate periods ranging from one to seven years.

We originate all adjustable-rate loans at the fully indexed interest rate. The maximum amount by which the interest rate may be increased or decreased is generally 2% per year and the lifetime interest rate cap is generally 5% over the initial interest rate of the loan. Our adjustable-rate residential mortgage loans generally do not provide for a decrease in the rate paid below the initial contract rate. The inability of our residential real estate loans to adjust downward below the initial contract rate can contribute to increased income in periods of declining interest rates, and also assists us in our efforts to limit the risks to earnings and equity value resulting from changes in interest rates, subject to the risk that borrowers may refinance these loans during periods of declining interest rates.

While one- to four-family residential real estate loans are normally originated with up to 30-year terms, such loans typically remain outstanding for substantially shorter periods because borrowers often prepay their loans in full upon sale of the property pledged as security or upon refinancing the original loan. In addition, substantially all of the mortgage loans in our loan portfolio contain due-on-sale clauses providing that Jefferson Federal may declare the unpaid amount due and payable upon the sale of the property securing the loan. Jefferson Federal enforces these due-­on-sale clauses to the extent permitted by law. Therefore, average loan maturity is a function of, among other factors, the level of purchase and sale activity in the real estate market, prevailing interest rates and the interest rates payable on outstanding loans.

Historically, we have not emphasized the origination of loans that conform to guidelines for sale in the secondary mortgage market. However, beginning in January 2005, we began originating loans for the secondary mortgage market. Loans are sold without recourse and on a servicing-released basis. We generally do not make conventional loans with loan-to-value ratios exceeding 85% and generally make loans with a loan-to-value ratio in excess of 85% only when secured by first liens on owner-occupied, one- to four-family residences. Loans with loan-to-value ratios in excess of 90% generally require private mortgage insurance or additional collateral. We require all properties securing mortgage loans in excess of $250,000 to be appraised by a board-approved appraiser. We require title insurance on all mortgage loans in excess of $25,000. Borrowers must obtain hazard or flood insurance (for loans on property located in a flood zone) prior to closing the loan.

Home Equity Lines of Credit. We offer home equity lines of credit on single family residential property in amounts up to 80% of the appraised value. Rates and terms vary by borrower qualifications, but are generally offered on a variable rate, open-end term basis with maturities of ten years or less.

Commercial Real Estate and Multi-Family Loans. An important segment of our loan portfolio is mortgage loans secured by commercial and multi-family real estate. Our commercial real estate loans are secured by professional office buildings, shopping centers, manufacturing facilities, hotels, vacant land, churches and, to a lesser extent, by other improved property such as restaurants and retail operations.

We originate both fixed- and adjustable-rate loans secured by commercial and multi-family real estate with terms up to 20 years. Fixed-rate loans have provisions that allow us to call the loan after five years. Adjustable-rate loans are generally based on prime and adjust monthly. Loan amounts generally do not exceed 85% of the lesser of the appraised value or the purchase price. When the borrower is a corporation, partnership or other entity, we generally require personal guarantees from significant equity holders. Currently, it is our philosophy to originate commercial real estate loans only to borrowers known to us and on properties in or near our market area.
 
 
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At June 30, 2012, loans with principal balances of $500,000 or more secured by commercial real estate totaled $79.3 million, or 63.9% of commercial real estate loans, and loans with principal balances of $500,000 or more secured by multi-family properties totaled $9.9 million, or 86.0% of multi-family loans. At June 30, 2012, 15 commercial real estate loans totaling $4.7 million were nonaccrual loans.

Construction Loans. We originate loans to finance the construction of one- to four-family homes and, to a lesser extent, multi-family and commercial real estate properties. At June 30, 2012, $230,000 of our construction loans was for the construction of one- to four-family homes and $318,000 was for the construction of commercial or multi-family real estate. Construction loans are generally made on a “pre-sold” basis; however, contractors who have sufficient financial strength and a proven track record are considered for loans for model and speculative purposes, with preference given to contractors with whom we have had successful relationships. We generally limit loans to contractors for speculative construction to a total of $350,000 per contractor. Construction loans generally provide for interest-only payments at fixed-rates of interest and have terms of six to 12 months. At the end of the construction period, the loan generally converts into a permanent loan. Construction loans to a borrower who will occupy the home, or to a builder who has pre-sold the home, will be considered for loan-to-value ratios of up to 85%. Construction loans for speculative purposes, models and commercial properties may be considered for loan-to-value ratios of up to 80%. Loan proceeds are disbursed in increments as construction progresses and as inspections warrant. We generally use in-house inspectors for construction disbursement purposes; however, we may rely on architect certifications and independent third party inspections for disbursements on larger commercial loans.

Land Loans. We originate loans secured by unimproved property, including lots for single family homes, raw land, commercial property and agricultural property. We originate both fixed- and adjustable-rate land loans with terms up to 20 years. Adjustable-rate loans are generally based on prime and adjust monthly. Loans secured by unimproved commercial property or for land development generally have five-year terms with a longer amortization schedule.

At June 30, 2012, our largest land loan had an outstanding balance of $3.9 million and was secured by vacant land. At June 30, 2012, loans with principal balances of $500,000 or more secured by unimproved property totaled $12.3 million, or 44.9% of land loans. At June 30, 2012, 15 land loans totaling $2.0 million were nonaccrual loans.

Commercial Business Loans. We extend commercial business loans on an unsecured and secured basis. Secured loans generally are collateralized by industrial/commercial machinery and equipment, livestock, farm machinery and, to a lesser extent, accounts receivable and inventory. We originate both fixed- and adjustable-rate commercial loans with terms up to 15 years. Fixed-rate loans have provisions that allow us to call the loan after five years. Adjustable-rate loans are generally based on prime and adjust monthly. Where the borrower is a corporation, partnership or other entity, we generally require personal guarantees from significant equity holders.

Consumer Loans. We offer a variety of consumer loans, including loans secured by automobiles and savings accounts. Other consumer loans include loans on recreational vehicles and boats, debt consolidation loans and personal unsecured debt.
 
The procedures for underwriting consumer loans include an assessment of the applicant’s payment history on other debts and ability to meet existing obligations and payments on the proposed loans. Although the applicant’s creditworthiness is a primary consideration, the underwriting process also includes a comparison of the value of the collateral, if any, to the proposed loan amount. We use a credit scoring system and charge borrowers with poorer credit scores higher interest rates to compensate for the additional risks associated with those loans.

Loan Underwriting Risks.

Adjustable-Rate Loans. While we anticipate that adjustable-rate loans will better offset the adverse effects of an increase in interest rates as compared to fixed-rate mortgages, the increased mortgage payments required of adjustable-rate loan borrowers in a rising interest rate environment could cause an increase in delinquencies and defaults. The marketability of the underlying property also may be adversely affected in a high interest rate environment. In addition, although adjustable-rate mortgage loans help make our asset base more responsive to changes in interest rates, the extent of this interest sensitivity is limited by the annual and lifetime interest rate adjustment limits.
 
 
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Commercial and Multi-Family Real Estate Loans. Loans secured by commercial and multi-family real estate are generally larger and involve a greater degree of risk than one- to four-family residential mortgage loans. Of primary concern in commercial and multi-family real estate lending is the borrower’s creditworthiness and the feasibility and cash flow potential of the project. Payments on loans secured by income properties are often dependent on the successful operation or management of the properties. As a result, repayment of such loans may be subject to a greater extent than residential real estate loans to adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy. In order to monitor cash flows on income properties, we require borrowers and loan guarantors, if any, to provide annual financial statements and rent rolls on multi-family loans. We also perform annual reviews on all lending relationships of $500,000 or more where the loan is secured by commercial or multi-family real estate.

Construction Loans. Construction financing is generally considered to involve a higher degree of risk of loss than long-term financing on improved, occupied real estate. Risk of loss on a construction loan is dependent largely upon the accuracy of the initial estimate of the property’s value at completion of construction or development and the estimated cost (including interest) of construction. During the construction phase, a number of factors could result in delays and cost overruns. If the estimate of construction costs proves to be inaccurate, we may be required to advance funds beyond the amount originally committed to permit completion of the development. If the estimate of value proves to be inaccurate, we may be confronted, at or prior to the maturity of the loan, with a project having a value which is insufficient to assure full repayment. As a result of the foregoing, construction lending often involves the disbursement of substantial funds with repayment dependent, in part, on the success of the ultimate project rather than the ability of the borrower or guarantor to repay principal and interest. If we are forced to foreclose on a project prior to or at completion due to a default, there can be no assurance that we will be able to recover all of the unpaid balance of, and accrued interest on, the loan as well as related foreclosure and holding costs.

Land Loans. Loans secured by undeveloped land or improved lots generally involve greater risks than residential mortgage lending because land loans are more difficult to evaluate. If the estimate of value proves to be inaccurate, in the event of default and foreclosure, we may be confronted with a property the value of which is insufficient to assure full repayment.

Commercial Loans. Commercial business lending generally involves greater risk than residential mortgage lending and involves risks that are different from those associated with commercial and multi-family real estate lending. Although the repayment of commercial and multi-family real estate loans depends primarily on the cash-flow of the property or related business, the underlying collateral generally provides a sufficient source of repayment. Although commercial business loans are often collateralized by equipment, inventory, accounts receivable or other business assets, the liquidation of collateral if a borrower defaults is often an insufficient source of repayment because accounts receivable may be uncollectible and inventories and equipment may be obsolete or of limited use, among other things. Accordingly, the repayment of a commercial business loan depends primarily on the cash-flow, character and creditworthiness of the borrower (and any guarantors), while liquidation of collateral is secondary.

Consumer Loans. Consumer loans may entail greater risk than do residential mortgage loans, particularly in the case of consumer loans that are unsecured or secured by assets that depreciate rapidly, such as automobiles, boats and recreational vehicles. In such cases, repossessed collateral for a defaulted consumer loan may not provide an adequate source of repayment for the outstanding loan and the remaining deficiency often does not warrant further substantial collection efforts against the borrower. In addition, consumer loan collections are dependent on the borrower’s continuing financial stability, and thus are more likely to be adversely affected by job loss, divorce, illness or personal bankruptcy. Furthermore, the application of various federal and state laws, including federal and state bankruptcy and insolvency laws, may limit the amount which can be recovered on such loans.
 
 
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Loan Originations. All of our portfolio loans are originated by in-house lending officers and are underwritten and processed in-house. We rely on advertising, referrals from realtors and customers, and personal contact by our staff to generate loan originations. We occasionally purchase participation interests in commercial real estate loans through other financial institutions in our market area.

Loan Approval Procedures and Authority. Loan approval authority has been granted by the Board of Directors to certain officers on an individual and combined basis for consumer (including residential mortgages) and commercial purpose loans up to a maximum of $1.0 million per transaction. All loans with aggregate exposure of $2.0 million or more require the approval of our Loan Committee or Board of Directors.

The Loan Committee meets every two weeks to review all mortgage loans made within granted lending authority of $75,000 or more and all non-mortgage loans made within granted lending authority of $50,000 or more. The committee approves all requests which exceed granted lending authority or when the request carries aggregate exposure to us of $2.0 million or more. The minutes of the committee are reported to and reviewed by the Board of Directors.

Loans to One Borrower. The maximum amount that we may lend to one borrower and the borrower’s related entities is limited by regulation. At June 30, 2012, our regulatory limit on loans to one borrower was $10.6 million. At that date, our largest lending relationship was $9.0 million and consisted of multiple real estate and commercial business loans. These loans were performing according to their original repayment terms at June 30, 2012.
 
Loan Commitments. We issue commitments for fixed-rate and adjustable-rate single-family residential mortgage loans conditioned upon the occurrence of certain events. Commitments to originate mortgage loans are legally binding agreements to lend to our customers and generally expire in 90 days or less.

Investment Activities

We have legal authority to invest in various types of liquid assets, including U.S. Treasury obligations, securities of various federal agencies and of state and municipal governments, deposits at the Federal Home Loan Bank of Cincinnati and certificates of deposit of federally insured institutions. Within certain regulatory limits, we also may invest a portion of our assets in corporate securities. We also are required to maintain an investment in Federal Home Loan Bank of Cincinnati stock.

At June 30, 2012, our investment portfolio consisted of U.S. agency securities, mortgage-backed securities, municipal securities and corporate securities.

Our investment objectives are to provide and maintain liquidity, to maintain a balance of high quality investments, to diversify investments to minimize risk, to provide collateral for pledging requirements, to establish an acceptable level of interest rate risk, to provide an alternate source of low-risk investments when demand for loans is weak, and to generate a favorable return. Any two of the following officers are authorized to purchase or sell investments: the President, Executive Vice President and/or Vice President. There is a limit of $2.0 million par value on any single investment purchase unless approval is obtained from the Board of Directors. For mortgage-backed securities, real estate mortgage investment conduits and collateralized mortgage obligations issued by Ginnie Mae, Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae, purchases are limited to a current par value of $2.5 million without Board approval.

Deposit Activities and Other Sources of Funds

General. Deposits and loan repayments are the major sources of our funds for lending and other investment purposes. Loan repayments are a relatively stable source of funds, while deposit inflows and outflows and loan prepayments are significantly influenced by general interest rates and money market conditions. We may use borrowings on a short-term basis to compensate for reductions in the availability of funds from other sources. Borrowings may also be used on a longer-term basis for general business purposes.
 
 
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Deposit Accounts. Substantially all of our depositors are residents of the State of Tennessee. Deposits are attracted from within our primary market area through the offering of a broad selection of deposit instruments, including NOW accounts, money market accounts, regular savings accounts, Christmas club savings accounts, certificates of deposit and retirement savings plans. We do not utilize brokered funds. Deposit account terms vary according to the minimum balance required, the time periods the funds must remain on deposit and the interest rate, among other factors. In determining the terms of our deposit accounts, we consider the rates offered by our competition, profitability to us, matching deposit and loan products and customer preferences and concerns. We generally review our deposit mix and pricing monthly. Our current strategy is to offer competitive rates, but not be the market leader in every type and maturity. In recent years, our advertising has emphasized transaction accounts, with the goal of shifting our mix of deposits towards a smaller percentage of higher cost time deposits.

Borrowings. We have relied upon advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Cincinnati to supplement our supply of lendable funds and to meet deposit withdrawal requirements. Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank are typically secured by our first mortgage loans.

The Federal Home Loan Bank functions as a central reserve bank providing credit for member financial institutions. As a member, we are required to own capital stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank and are authorized to apply for advances on the security of such stock and certain of our mortgage loans and other assets (principally securities which are obligations of, or guaranteed by, the United States), provided certain standards related to creditworthiness have been met. Advances are made pursuant to several different programs. Each credit program has its own interest rate and range of maturities. Depending on the program, limitations on the amount of advances are based either on a fixed percentage of an institution’s net worth or on the Federal Home Loan Bank’s assessment of the institution’s creditworthiness. Under its current credit policies, the Federal Home Loan Bank generally limits advances to 50% of a member’s assets. The availability of Federal Home Loan Bank advances to each borrower is based on the financial condition and the degree of security provided to collateralize borrowings.

Personnel

As of June 30, 2012, we had 123 full-time employees and 19 part-time employees, none of whom is represented by a collective bargaining unit. We believe our relationship with our employees is good.

Executive Officers

The executive officers of Jefferson Federal are elected annually by the Board of Directors and serve at the Board’s discretion. Ages presented are as of June 30, 2012. The executive officers of Jefferson Federal are:

Name
 
Age
 
Position
         
Anderson L. Smith
 
64
 
President and Chief Executive Officer
Douglas H. Rouse
 
59
 
Senior Vice President
Jane P. Hutton
 
53
 
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Eric S. McDaniel
 
41
 
Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer
Janet J. Ketner
 
59
 
Executive Vice President of Retail Banking
Anthony J. Carasso
 
53
 
President—Knoxville Region
Harvey L. Mitchell
 
62
 
President—Tri-Cities Division
John W. Beard, Jr.
 
59
 
Executive Vice President and Chief Credit Officer
Gary L. Keys
 
63
 
Executive Vice President and Manager, Special Assets

Biographical Information

Anderson L. Smith has been President and Chief Executive Officer of Jefferson Bancshares since March 2003 and President and Chief Executive Officer of Jefferson Federal since January 2002. Prior to joining Jefferson Federal, Mr. Smith was President, Consumer Financial Services - East Tennessee Metro, First Tennessee Bank National Association. Director since 2002.
 
 
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Jane P. Hutton has been Treasurer and Secretary of Jefferson Bancshares since March 2003 and Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Jefferson Federal since July 2009. From July 2002 to July 2009, Ms. Hutton served as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Jefferson Federal. Ms. Hutton was named Chief Financial Officer of Jefferson Bancshares on July 1, 2003. From June 1999 until July 2002, Ms. Hutton served as Assistant Financial Analyst.

Douglas H. Rouse has been Senior Vice President of Jefferson Federal since January 2002. From March 1994 until January 2002, Mr. Rouse served as Vice President.

Eric S. McDaniel has been Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer of Jefferson Federal since July 2009. From July 2002 to July 2009, Mr. McDaniel served as Vice President and Senior Operations Officer of Jefferson Federal. From March 1996 until July 2002, Mr. McDaniel served as Director of Compliance and Internal Auditor.

Janet J. Ketner has been Executive Vice President of Retail Banking since January 2006. Prior to joining Jefferson Federal, Ms. Ketner was Executive Vice President of First Tennessee Bank for Morristown, Dandridge and Greeneville, Tennessee.

Anthony J. Carasso has been the President of Jefferson Federal’s Knoxville Region since January 2005. In 1999, Mr. Carasso was Chief Executive Officer and President of Union Planters in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Since then, he has been President of two other Union Planters Banks, one in Somerset, Kentucky as well as Harriman, Tennessee. During his tenure in Harriman, he had a dual role as an Area Sales Manager managing 22 branches in 11 communities.

Harvey L. Mitchell has been the President of Jefferson Federal’s Tri-Cities Division since May 2012. Mr. Mitchell served as Senior Vice President and Commercial Lending Officer of Jefferson Federal from October 2008 to May 2012. Prior to that time, Mr. Mitchell served as Senior Vice President and Commercial Lending Officer of State of Franklin Savings Bank from August 2007 until State of Franklin Savings Bank was acquired by Jefferson Bancshares in October 2008.

John W. Beard, Jr. has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Credit Officer of Jefferson Federal since May 2012. Mr. Beard served as the President and Chief Executive Officer of Citizens Bank, New Tazewell, Tennessee, from 2008 to May 2012. Prior to that time, Mr. Beard served as a Senior Credit Officer at First Tennessee Bank N.A. from 1992 to 2008.

Gary L. Keys has served as Executive Vice President and Manager, Special Assets of Jefferson Federal since May 2012. Mr. Keys served as Executive Vice President—Lending and Operations at Citizens Bank, New Tazewell, Tennessee, from 2008 to May 2012. Prior to that time, Mr. Keys served as Vice President and Kingsport City Executive and in various other positions at First Tennessee Bank N.A. from 1973 to 2008.

Subsidiaries

In addition to Jefferson Federal Bank, we currently have one subsidiary, State of Franklin Statutory Trust II. State of Franklin Statutory Trust II is a Delaware statutory trust. In December 2006, State of Franklin Bancshares issued subordinated debentures to State of Franklin Statutory Trust II, which purchased the debentures with the proceeds from the sale of trust preferred securities issued in a private placement. Our net consolidated principal obligation under the debentures and trust preferred securities is $10.0 million.

Regulation and Supervision of the Company

General. The Company is a bank holding company subject to regulation by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve Board”) under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended (the “BHCA”). As a result, the activities of the Company are subject to certain limitations, which are described below. In addition, as a bank holding company, the Company is required to file annual and quarterly reports with the Federal Reserve Board and to furnish such additional information as the Federal Reserve Board may require pursuant to the BHCA. The Company is also subject to regular examination by and the enforcement authority of the Federal Reserve Board.
 
 
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Activities. With certain exceptions, the BHCA prohibits a bank holding company from acquiring direct or indirect ownership or control of more than 5% of the voting shares of a company that engages directly or indirectly in activities other than those of banking, managing or controlling banks, or providing services for its subsidiaries. The principal exceptions to these prohibitions involve certain non-bank activities which, by statute or by Federal Reserve Board regulation or order, have been identified as activities closely related to the business of banking. The activities of the Company are subject to these legal and regulatory limitations under the BHCA and the related Federal Reserve Board regulations. Notwithstanding the Federal Reserve Board’s prior approval of specific nonbanking activities, the Federal Reserve Board has the power to order a holding company or its subsidiaries to terminate any activity, or to terminate its ownership or control of any subsidiary, when it has reasonable cause to believe that the continuation of such activity or such ownership or control constitutes a serious risk to the financial safety, soundness or stability of any bank subsidiary of that holding company.

Acquisitions. Under the BHCA, a bank holding company must obtain the prior approval of the Federal Reserve Board before: (1) acquiring direct or indirect ownership or control of any voting shares of any bank or bank holding company if, after such acquisition, the bank holding company would directly or indirectly own or control more than 5% of such shares; (2) acquiring all or substantially all of the assets of another bank or bank holding company; or (3) merging or consolidating with another bank holding company. Satisfactory financial condition, particularly with regard to capital adequacy, and satisfactory CRA ratings are generally prerequisites to obtaining federal regulatory approval to make acquisitions.

Under the BHCA, any company must obtain approval of the Federal Reserve Board prior to acquiring control of the Company or the Bank. For purposes of the BHCA, “control” is defined as ownership of more than 25% of any class of voting securities of the Company or the Bank, the ability to control the election of a majority of the directors, or the exercise of a controlling influence over management or policies of the Company or the Bank. In addition, the Change in Bank Control Act and the related regulations of the Federal Reserve Board require any person or persons acting in concert (except for companies required to make application under the BHCA), to file a written notice with the Federal Reserve Board before such person or persons may acquire control of the Company or the Bank. The Change in Bank Control Act defines “control” as the power, directly or indirectly, to vote 25% or more of any voting securities or to direct the management or policies of a bank holding company or an insured bank. There is a presumption of “control” where the acquiring person will own, control or hold with power to vote 10% or more of any class of voting security of a bank holding company or insured bank if, like the Company, the company involved has registered securities under Section 12 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Under Tennessee banking law, prior approval of the Tennessee Department of Financial Institutions is also required before any person may acquire control of a Tennessee bank or bank holding company. Tennessee law generally prohibits a bank holding company from acquiring control of an additional bank if, after such acquisition, the bank holding company would control more than 30% of the FDIC-insured deposits in the State of Tennessee.

Capital Requirements. The Federal Reserve Board has adopted guidelines regarding the consolidated capital adequacy of bank holding companies, which require bank holding companies to maintain specified minimum ratios of capital to total assets and to risk-weighted assets. See “Regulation and Supervision of the Bank—Capital Requirements.” The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (the “Dodd-Frank Act”), which became law on July 21, 2010, requires the Federal Reserve Board to amend its capital requirements for bank holding companies so that they are at least as stringent as those for subsidiary financial institutions themselves. Such amendments will reduce the types of capital instruments that are includable as Tier 1 capital at the holding company level compared to what is currently allowable by the Federal Reserve Board.

On June 7, 2012, the Federal Reserve Board issued a final rule substantially amending the regulatory risk-based capital rules applicable to the Company and the Bank. The FDIC and the OCC subsequently approved a similar final rule on June 13, 2012. The final rules set forth certain changes for the calculation of risk-weighted assets, which we would be required to utilize beginning January 1, 2013. The standardized approach proposed rule utilizes an increased number of credit risk exposure categories and risk weights, and also addresses: (i) a proposed alternative standard of creditworthiness consistent with Section 939A of the Dodd-Frank Act; (ii) revisions to recognition of credit risk mitigation; (iii) rules for risk weighting of equity exposures and past due loans; (iv) revised capital treatment for derivatives and repo-style transactions; and (v) disclosure requirements for top-tier banking organizations with $50 billion or more in total assets that are not subject to the “advance approach rules” that apply to banks with greater than $250 billion in consolidated assets.
 
 
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On August 30, 2012, the federal banking agencies issued proposed rules that would implement the “Basel III” regulatory capital reforms and changes required by the Dodd-Frank Act. “Basel III” refers to two consultative documents released by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision in December 2009, the rules text released in December 2010, and loss absorbency rules issued in January 2011, which include significant changes to bank capital, leverage and liquidity requirements. The proposed rules are subject to a comment period running through October 22, 2012.

The proposed rules include new risk-based capital and leverage ratios, which would be phased in from 2013 to 2019, and would revise the definition of what constitutes “capital” for purposes of calculating those ratios. The proposed new minimum capital level requirements applicable to the Company and the Bank under the proposals would be: (i) a new common equity Tier 1 capital ratio of 4.5%; (ii) a Tier 1 capital ratio of 6% (increased from 4%); (iii) a total capital ratio of 8% (unchanged from current rules); and (iv) a Tier 1 leverage ratio of 4% for all institutions. The proposed rules would also establish a “capital conservation buffer” of 2.5% above the new regulatory minimum capital requirements, which must consist entirely of common equity Tier 1 capital and would result in the following minimum ratios: (i) a common equity Tier 1 capital ratio of 7.0%, (ii) a Tier 1 capital ratio of 8.5%, and (iii) a total capital ratio of 10.5%. The new capital conservation buffer requirement would be phased in beginning in January 2016 at 0.625% of risk-weighted assets and would increase by that amount each year until fully implemented in January 2019. An institution would be subject to limitations on paying dividends, engaging in share repurchases, and paying discretionary bonuses if its capital level falls below the buffer amount. These limitations would establish a maximum percentage of eligible retained income that could be utilized for such actions.

Dividends. The Federal Reserve Board has the power to prohibit dividends by bank holding companies if their actions constitute unsafe or unsound practices. The Federal Reserve Board has issued a policy statement on the payment of cash dividends by bank holding companies, which expresses the Federal Reserve Board’s view that a bank holding company should pay cash dividends only to the extent that the company’s net income for the past year is sufficient to cover both the cash dividends and a rate of earnings retention that is consistent with the company’s capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition. The Federal Reserve Board also indicated that it would be inappropriate for a bank holding company experiencing serious financial problems to borrow funds to pay dividends. The Federal Reserve Board may prohibit a bank holding company from paying any dividends if the holding company’s bank subsidiary is classified as “undercapitalized” or worse.” See “Regulation and Supervision of the Bank—Prompt Corrective Regulatory Action.”

Stock Repurchases. Bank holding companies are required to give the Federal Reserve Board prior written notice of any purchase or redemption of its outstanding equity securities if the gross consideration for the purchase or redemption, when combined with the net consideration paid for all such purchases or redemptions during the preceding 12 months, is equal to 10% or more of the Company’s consolidated net worth. The Federal Reserve Board may disapprove such a purchase or redemption if it determines that the proposal would violate any law, regulation, Federal Reserve Board order, directive or any condition imposed by, or written agreement with, the Federal Reserve Board. This requirement does not apply to bank holding companies that are “well-capitalized,” received one of the two highest examination ratings at their last examination and are not the subject of any unresolved supervisory issues.

Regulation and Supervision of the Bank

General. The Bank is subject to extensive regulation by the Tennessee Department of Financial Institutions (the “Department”) and, as an insured state bank that is not a member of the Federal Reserve System (a “nonmember bank”), by the FDIC. The lending activities and other investments of the Bank must comply with various federal regulatory requirements. The Department and FDIC periodically examine the Bank for compliance with these regulatory requirements and the Bank must regularly file reports with the Department and the FDIC describing its activities and financial condition. The Bank is also subject to certain reserve requirements promulgated by the Federal Reserve Board. This supervision and regulation is intended primarily for the protection of depositors.
 
 
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The Dodd-Frank Act has created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (the “Bureau”) to implement federal consumer protection laws. The Bureau will assume responsibility for the existing federal consumer protection laws and regulations and has the authority to impose new requirements. The prudential regulators, however, will retain examination and enforcement authority over an institution’s compliance with such laws and regulations so long as the institution has less than $10 billion in assets.

Tennessee State Law. As a Tennessee-chartered savings bank, the Bank is subject to the applicable provisions of Tennessee law and the regulations of the Department adopted thereunder. The Bank derives its lending and investment powers from these laws, and is subject to periodic examination and reporting requirements by and of the Department. Certain powers granted under Tennessee law may be constrained by federal regulation. Banks nationwide are permitted to enter the Bank’s market area and compete for deposits and loan originations. The approval of the Department is required prior to any merger or consolidation, or the establishment or relocation of any branch office. Tennessee savings banks are also subject to the enforcement authority of the Department, which may suspend or remove directors or officers, issue cease and desist orders and appoint conservators or receivers in appropriate circumstances.

Capital Requirements. Under FDIC regulations, nonmember banks are required to maintain a minimum leverage capital requirement consisting of a ratio of Tier 1 capital to total assets of 3% if the FDIC determines that the institution is not anticipating or experiencing significant growth and has well-diversified risk, including no undue interest rate risk exposure, excellent asset quality, high liquidity, good earnings and in general a strong banking organization, rated composite 1 under the Uniform Financial Institutions Rating System (the CAMELS rating system) established by the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council. For all but the most highly rated institutions meeting the conditions set forth above, the minimum leverage capital ratio is not less than 4%. Tier 1 capital is the sum of common stockholders’ equity, noncumulative perpetual preferred stock (including any related surplus) and minority interests in consolidated subsidiaries, minus all intangible assets (other than certain mortgage servicing rights and purchased credit card relationships) minus identified losses, disallowed deferred tax assets and investments in financial subsidiaries and certain non-financial equity investments.

In addition to the leverage ratio (the ratio of Tier 1 capital to total assets), state-chartered nonmember banks must maintain a minimum ratio of qualifying total capital to risk-weighted assets of at least 8%, of which at least half must be Tier 1 capital. Qualifying total capital consists of Tier 1 capital plus Tier 2 or supplementary capital items. Tier 2 capital items include allowances for loan losses in an amount of up to 1.25% of risk-weighted assets, certain cumulative preferred stock and subordinated debentures, certain other capital instruments and up to 45% of pre-tax net unrealized holding gains on equity securities. The includable amount of Tier 2 capital cannot exceed the institution’s Tier 1 capital. Qualifying total capital is further reduced by the amount of the bank’s investments in banking and finance subsidiaries that are not consolidated for regulatory capital purposes, reciprocal cross-holdings of capital securities issued by other banks, most intangible assets and certain other deductions. Under the FDIC risk-weighted system, all of a bank’s balance sheet assets and the credit equivalent amounts of certain off-balance sheet items are assigned to one of four broad risk weight categories from 0% to 100%, based on the risks inherent in the type of assets or item. The aggregate dollar amount of each category is multiplied by risk weight assigned to that category. The sum of these weighted values equals the Bank’s risk-weighted assets.

Dividend Limitations. The Bank may not pay dividends on its capital stock if its regulatory capital would thereby be reduced below the amount then required for the liquidation account established for the benefit of certain depositors of the Bank at the time of its conversion to stock form.

Earnings of the Bank appropriated to bad debt reserves and deducted for federal income tax purposes are not available for payment of cash dividends or other distributions to stockholders without payment of taxes at the then current tax rate by the Bank on the amount of earnings removed from the reserves for such distributions. The Bank intends to make full use of this favorable tax treatment and does not contemplate use of any earnings in a manner which would limit the Bank’s bad debt deduction or create federal tax liabilities.
 
 
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Under FDIC regulations, the Bank is prohibited from making any capital distributions if, after making the distribution, the Bank would have: (i) a total risk-based capital ratio of less than 8%; (ii) a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of less than 4%; or (iii) a leverage ratio of less than 4%.

Investment Activities. Under federal law, all state-chartered FDIC-insured banks have generally been limited to activities as principal and equity investments of the type and in the amount authorized for national banks, notwithstanding state law, subject to certain exceptions. For example, the FDIC is authorized to permit institutions to engage in state authorized activities or investments that do not meet this standard (other than non-subsidiary equity investments) for institutions that meet all applicable capital requirements if it is determined that such activities or investments do not pose a significant risk to the Deposit Insurance Fund.

Insurance of Deposit Accounts. The Bank’s deposits are insured up to applicable limits by the Deposit Insurance Fund of the FDIC. The Deposit Insurance Fund is the successor to the Bank Insurance Fund and the Savings Association Insurance Fund, which were merged in 2006. Under the FDIC’s previous risk-based assessment system, insured institutions were assigned to one of four risk categories based on supervisory evaluations, regulatory capital levels and certain other factors with less risky institutions paying lower assessments. An institution’s assessment rate was then determined upon the category to which it is assigned, and certain potential adjustments established by FDIC regulations. On February 7, 2011, however, the FDIC approved a final rule that implemented changes to the deposit insurance assessment system mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act. The final rule, which took effect for the quarter beginning April 1, 2011, requires that the base on which deposit insurance assessments are charged be revised from one that is based on domestic deposits to one that is based on average consolidated total assets minus average tangible equity. Under the final rule, insured depository institutions are required to report their average consolidated total assets on a daily basis, using the regulatory accounting methodology established for reporting total assets. For purposes of the final rule, tangible equity is defined as Tier 1 capital.

Due to stress on the Deposit Insurance Fund caused by bank failures, the FDIC imposed on all insured institutions a special emergency assessment of five basis points of total assets minus Tier 1 capital, as of June 30, 2009 (capped at ten basis points of an institution’s deposit assessment base), in order to cover losses to the Deposit Insurance Fund. That special assessment was collected on September 30, 2009. The FDIC provided for similar assessments during the final two quarters of 2009, if deemed necessary. However, in lieu of further special assessments, the FDIC required insured institutions to prepay estimated quarterly risk-based assessments for the fourth quarter of 2009 through the fourth quarter of 2012. The estimated assessments, which include an assumed annual assessment base increase of 5%, were recorded as a prepaid expense asset as of December 30, 2009. As of December 31, 2009, and each quarter thereafter, a charge to earnings will be recorded for each regular assessment with an offsetting credit to the prepaid asset.

Because of the recent difficult economic conditions, deposit insurance per account owner had been raised to $250,000 for all types of accounts until January 1, 2014. That level was made permanent by the newly enacted Dodd-Frank Act. In addition, the FDIC adopted an optional Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program (“TLGP”) under which, for a fee, noninterest-bearing transaction accounts would receive unlimited insurance coverage until June 30, 2010, subsequently extended to December 31, 2010. The TLGP also included a debt component under which certain senior unsecured debt issued by institutions and their holding companies between October 13, 2008 and October 31, 2009 would be guaranteed by the FDIC through June 30, 2012, or in some cases, December 31, 2012. The Bank opted to participate in the unlimited noninterest-bearing transaction account coverage and the Bank and Company opted not to participate in the unsecured debt guarantee program. The Dodd-Frank Act extends the unlimited coverage of certain noninterest-bearing transaction accounts until December 31, 2012.

In addition to the assessment for deposit insurance, institutions are required to make payments on bonds issued in the late 1980s by the Financing Corporation to recapitalize a predecessor deposit insurance fund. This payment is established quarterly and during the four quarters ended June 30, 2012 averaged 0.67 basis points of assessable deposits.
 
 
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The FDIC has authority to increase insurance assessments. A significant increase in insurance premiums would likely have an adverse effect on the operating expenses and results of operations of the Bank. Management cannot predict what insurance assessment rates will be in the future.
 
Insurance of deposits may be terminated by the FDIC upon a finding that the institution has engaged in unsafe or unsound practices, is in an unsafe or unsound condition to continue operations or has violated any applicable law, regulation, rule, order or condition imposed by the FDIC. The management of the Bank does not know of any practice, condition or violation that might lead to termination of deposit insurance.

Prompt Corrective Regulatory Action. Federal banking regulators are required to take prompt corrective action if an insured depository institution fails to satisfy certain minimum capital requirements, including a leverage limit, a risk-based capital requirement and any other measure deemed appropriate by the federal banking regulators for measuring the capital adequacy of an insured depository institution. All institutions, regardless of their capital levels, are restricted from making any capital distribution or paying any management fees if the institution would thereafter fail to satisfy the minimum levels for any of its capital requirements. An institution that fails to meet the minimum level for any relevant capital measure (an “undercapitalized institution”) may be: (i) subject to increased monitoring by the appropriate federal banking regulator; (ii) required to submit an acceptable capital restoration plan within 45 days; (iii) subject to asset growth limits; and (iv) required to obtain prior regulatory approval for acquisitions, branching and new lines of businesses. The capital restoration plan must include a guarantee by the institution’s holding company that the institution will comply with the plan until it has been adequately capitalized on average for four consecutive quarters, under which the holding company would be liable up to the lesser of 5% of the institution’s total assets or the amount necessary to bring the institution into capital compliance as of the date it failed to comply with its capital restoration plan. A “significantly undercapitalized” institution, as well as any undercapitalized institution that did not submit an acceptable capital restoration plan, may be subject to regulatory demands for recapitalization, broader application of restrictions on transactions with affiliates, limitations on interest rates paid on deposits, asset growth and other activities, possible replacement of directors and officers, and restrictions on capital distributions by any bank holding company controlling the institution. Any company controlling the institution could also be required to divest the institution or the institution could be required to divest subsidiaries. The senior executive officers of a significantly undercapitalized institution may not receive bonuses or increases in compensation without prior approval and the institution is prohibited from making payments of principal or interest on its subordinated debt. In their discretion, the federal banking regulators may also impose the foregoing sanctions on an undercapitalized institution if the regulators determine that such actions are necessary to carry out the purposes of the prompt corrective action provisions.

Under regulations jointly adopted by the federal banking regulators, an institution’s capital adequacy is evaluated on the basis of the institution’s total risk-based capital ratio (the ratio of its total capital to risk-weighted assets), Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio (the ratio of its core capital to risk-weighted assets) and leverage ratio (the ratio of its Tier 1 or core capital to adjusted total average assets). The following table shows the capital ratio requirements for each prompt corrective action category:

     
Adequately
     
Significantly
 
Well Capitalized
 
Capitalized
 
Undercapitalized
 
Undercapitalized
 
             
Total risk-based capital ratio
 10.0% or more
 
8.0% or more
 
Less than 8.0%
 
Less than 6.0%
Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio
6.0% or more
 
4.0% or more
 
Less than 4.0%
 
Less than 3.0%
Leverage ratio
5.0% or more
 
    4.0% or more *
 
  Less than 4.0% *
 
Less than 3.0%
___________
* 3.0% if institution has a composite 1 CAMELS rating.
 
 
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If an institution’s capital falls below the “critically undercapitalized” level, the institution is subject to conservatorship or receivership within specified timeframes. A “critically undercapitalized” institution is defined as an institution that has a ratio of “tangible equity” to total assets of less than 2.0%. Tangible equity is defined as core capital plus cumulative perpetual preferred stock (and related surplus) less all intangibles other than qualifying supervisory goodwill and certain purchased mortgage servicing rights. The FDIC may reclassify a well capitalized depository institution as adequately capitalized and may require an adequately capitalized or undercapitalized institution to comply with the supervisory actions applicable to associations in the next lower capital category (but may not reclassify a significantly undercapitalized institution as critically undercapitalized) if the FDIC determines, after notice and an opportunity for a hearing, that the institution is in an unsafe or unsound condition or that the institution has received and not corrected a less-than-satisfactory rating for any CAMELS rating category.
 
Safety and Soundness Guidelines. Each federal banking agency has established safety and soundness standards for institutions under its authority. These agencies, including the FDIC, have released interagency guidelines establishing such standards and adopted rules with respect to safety and soundness compliance plans. The guidelines require savings institutions to maintain internal controls and information systems and internal audit systems that are appropriate for the size, nature and scope of the institution’s business. The guidelines also establish certain basic standards for loan documentation, credit underwriting, interest rate risk exposure, and asset growth. The guidelines further provide that savings institutions should maintain safeguards to prevent the payment of compensation, fees and benefits that are excessive or that could lead to material financial loss, and should take into account factors such as comparable compensation practices at comparable institutions. If the agency determines that a savings institution is not in compliance with the safety and soundness guidelines, it may require the institution to submit an acceptable plan to achieve compliance with the guidelines. A savings institution must submit an acceptable compliance plan to the agency within 30 days of receipt of a request for such a plan. Failure to submit or implement a compliance plan may subject the institution to regulatory sanctions. Management believes that the Bank has met substantially all the standards adopted in the interagency guidelines.

Additionally, federal banking agencies have established standards relating to asset and earnings quality. The guidelines require a bank to maintain systems, commensurate with its size and the nature and scope of its operations, to identify problem assets and prevent deterioration in those assets as well as to evaluate and monitor earnings and ensure that earnings are sufficient to maintain adequate capital and reserves.

Federal Reserve System. The Federal Reserve Board regulations require depository institutions to maintain noninterest-earning reserves against their transaction accounts (primarily NOW and regular checking accounts). The Federal Reserve Board regulations generally provide that reserves be maintained against aggregate transaction accounts as follows: a 3% reserve ratio is assessed on net transaction accounts up to and including $55.2 million; a 10% reserve ratio is applied above $55.2 million. The first $10.7 million of otherwise reservable balances (subject to adjustments by the Federal Reserve Board) are exempted from the reserve requirements. The amounts are adjusted annually. The Bank is in compliance with these requirements. At June 30, 2012, the Bank met applicable FRB reserve requirements.

Federal Home Loan Bank System. The Bank is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank System (“FHLBS”) which consists of 12 regional Federal Home Loan Banks governed and regulated by the Federal Housing Finance Board (“FHFB”) of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board. The Bank, as a member of the FHLB of Cincinnati, is required to purchase and hold shares of capital stock in the FHLB of Cincinnati. As of June 30, 2012, the Bank held stock in the FHLB of Cincinnati in the amount $4.7 million and was in compliance with the above requirement. The Federal Home Loan Banks are required to provide funds for certain purposes including contributing funds for affordable housing programs. These requirements, or financial stress caused by economic conditions, could reduce the amount of dividends that the Federal Home Loan Banks pay to their members and result in the Federal Home Loan Banks imposing a higher rate of interest on advances to their members.
 
        Loans to Executive Officers, Directors and Principal Stockholders. Under federal law, loans to directors, executive officers and principal stockholders of a state non-member bank like the Bank must be made on substantially the same terms as those prevailing for comparable transactions with persons who are not executive officers, directors, principal stockholders or employees of the Bank unless the loan is made pursuant to a compensation or benefit plan that is widely available to employees and does not favor insiders. Loans to any executive officer, director and principal stockholder, together with all other outstanding loans to such person and affiliated interests, generally may not exceed 15% of the bank’s unimpaired capital and surplus, and aggregate loans to such persons may not exceed the institution’s unimpaired capital and unimpaired surplus. Loans to directors, executive officers and principal stockholders, and their respective affiliates, in excess of the greater of $25,000 or
 
 
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5% of capital and surplus (and any loan or loans aggregating $500,000 or more) must be approved in advance by a majority of the board of directors of the bank with any “interested” director not participating in the voting. State nonmember banks are prohibited from paying the overdrafts of any of their executive officers or directors unless payment is made pursuant to a written, pre-authorized interest-bearing extension of credit plan that specifies a method of repayment or transfer of funds from another account at the bank. Loans to executive officers are further restricted as to type, amount and terms of credit. In addition, the BHCA prohibits extensions of credit to executive officers, directors and greater than 10% stockholders of a depository institution by any other institution which has a correspondent banking relationship with the institution, unless such extension of credit is on substantially the same terms as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with other persons and does not involve more than the normal risk of repayment or present other unfavorable features.

Transactions with Affiliates. A state non-member bank or its subsidiaries may not engage in “covered transactions” with any one affiliate in an amount greater than 10% of such bank’s capital stock and surplus, and for all such transactions with all affiliates a state non-member bank is limited to an amount equal to 20% of capital stock and surplus. All such transactions must also be on terms substantially the same, or at least as favorable, to the bank or subsidiary as those provided to a non-affiliate. The term “covered transaction” includes the making of loans, purchase of assets, issuance of a guarantee and similar types of transactions. Specified collateral requirements apply to covered transactions such as loans to and guarantees issued on behalf of an affiliate. An affiliate of a state non-member bank is any company or entity which controls or is under common control with the state non-member bank and, for purposes of the aggregate limit on transactions with affiliates, any subsidiary that would be deemed a financial subsidiary of a national bank. In a holding company context, the parent holding company of a state non-member bank and any companies which are controlled by such parent holding company are affiliates of the state non-member bank. Federal law further prohibits a depository institution from extending credit to or offering any other services, or fixing or varying the consideration for such extension of credit or service, on the condition that the customer obtain some additional service from the institution or certain of its affiliates or not obtain services of a competitor of the institution, subject to certain limited exceptions.

Enforcement. The FDIC has extensive enforcement authority over insured non-member banks, including the Bank. This enforcement authority includes, among other things, the ability to assess civil money penalties, issue cease and desist orders and remove directors and officers. In general, these enforcement actions may be initiated in response to violations of laws and regulations and unsafe or unsound practices.

The FDIC has authority under federal law to appoint a conservator or receiver for an insured bank under limited circumstances. The FDIC is required, with certain exceptions, to appoint a receiver or conservator for an insured state non-member bank if that bank was “critically undercapitalized” on average during the calendar quarter beginning 270 days after the date on which the institution became “critically undercapitalized.” See “Prompt Corrective Regulatory Action.” The FDIC may also appoint itself as conservator or receiver for an insured state non-member institution under specific circumstances on the basis of the institution’s financial condition or upon the occurrence of other events, including: (1) insolvency; (2) substantial dissipation of assets or earnings through violations of law or unsafe or unsound practices; (3) existence of an unsafe or unsound condition to transact business; and (4) insufficient capital, or the incurring of losses that will deplete substantially all of the institution’s capital with no reasonable prospect of replenishment without federal assistance.

Community Reinvestment Act. Under the Community Reinvestment Act, as implemented by FDIC regulations, a state non-member bank has a continuing and affirmative obligation consistent with its safe and sound operation to help meet the credit needs of its entire community, including low and moderate-income neighborhoods. The Community Reinvestment Act neither establishes specific lending requirements or programs for financial institutions nor limits an institution’s discretion to develop the types of products and services that it believes are best suited to its particular community. The Community Reinvestment Act requires the FDIC, in connection with its examination of an institution, to assess the institution’s record of meeting the credit needs of its community and to consider such record when it evaluates applications made by such institution. The Community Reinvestment Act requires public disclosure of an institution’s Community Reinvestment Act rating. The Bank’s latest Community Reinvestment Act rating received from the FDIC was “satisfactory.”
 
 
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Financial Regulatory Legislation

The previously referenced Dodd-Frank Act contains a wide variety of provisions affecting the regulation of depository institutions. Those include, but are not limited to, restrictions related to mortgage originations, risk retention requirements as to securitized loans and the noted newly created consumer protection agency. The full impact of the Dodd-Frank Act on our business and operations will not be known for years until regulations implementing the statute are written and adopted. The Dodd-Frank Act may have a material impact on our operations, particularly through increased compliance costs resulting from possible future consumer and fair lending regulations.
 
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
 
A return of recessionary conditions could result in increases in our level of non-performing loans and/or reduce demand for our products and services, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations.

Following a national home price peak in mid-2006, falling home prices and sharply reduced sales volumes, along with the collapse of the United States’ subprime mortgage industry in early 2007, significantly contributed to a recession that officially lasted until June 2009, although the effects continued thereafter. Dramatic declines in real estate values and high levels of foreclosures resulted in significant asset write-downs by financial institutions, which have caused many financial institutions to seek additional capital, to merge with other institutions and, in some cases, to fail. Concerns over the United States’ credit rating (which was recently downgraded by Standard & Poor’s), the European sovereign debt crisis, and continued high unemployment in the United States, among other economic indicators, have contributed to increased volatility in the capital markets and diminished expectations for the economy.

A return of recessionary conditions and/or continued negative developments in the domestic and international credit markets may significantly affect the markets in which we do business, the value of our loans and investments, and our ongoing operations, costs and profitability. Further declines in real estate values and sales volumes and continued high unemployment levels may result in higher than expected loan delinquencies and a decline in demand for our products and services. These negative events may cause us to incur losses and may adversely affect our capital, liquidity, and financial condition.

Our nonperforming assets expose us to increased risk of loss.
 
    Our nonperforming assets have increased from historical levels primarily as a result of the recent economic recession. At June 30, 2012, we had total nonperforming assets of $25.2 million, or 4.82% of total assets compared to $18.2 million, or 3.25% of total assets at June 30, 2011.

    Our nonperforming assets adversely affect our net income in various ways. We do not accrue interest income on non-accrual loans and no interest income is recognized until the loan is performing. Loans are returned to accrual status when future payments are reasonably assured. We must reserve for probable losses, which are established through a current period charge to income in the provision for loan losses, and from time to time, write down the value of properties in our other real estate owned portfolio to reflect changing market values. Additionally, there are legal fees associated with the resolution of problem assets as well as carrying costs such as taxes, insurance and maintenance related to our other real estate owned.
 
Changes in interest rates could reduce our net interest income and earnings.
 
        Our net interest income is the interest we earn on loans and investments less the interest we pay on our deposits and borrowings. Our net interest spread is the difference between the yield we earn on our assets and the interest rate we pay for deposits and our other sources of funding. Changes in interest rates—up or down—could adversely affect our net interest margin and, as a result, our net interest income. Although the yield we earn on our assets and our funding costs tend to move in the same direction in response to changes in interest rates, one can rise or fall faster than the other, causing our net interest margin to expand or contract. Our liabilities tend to be shorter in
 
 
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duration than our assets, so they may adjust faster in response to changes in interest rates. As a result, when interest rates rise, our funding costs may rise faster than the yield we earn on our assets, causing our net interest margin to contract until the yield catches up. This contraction could be more severe following a prolonged period of lower interest rates, as a larger proportion of our fixed rate residential loan portfolio will have been originated at those lower rates and borrowers may be more reluctant or unable to sell their homes in a higher interest rate environment. Changes in the slope of the “yield curve”—or the spread between short-term and long-term interest rates—could also reduce our net interest margin. Normally, the yield curve is upward sloping, meaning short-term rates are lower than long-term rates. Because our liabilities tend to be shorter in duration than our assets, when the yield curve flattens or even inverts, we could experience pressure on our net interest margin as our cost of funds increases relative to the yield we can earn on our assets.

Strong competition within our market area could hurt our profits and slow growth.

We face intense competition both in making loans and attracting deposits. This competition has made it more difficult for us to make new loans and at times has forced us to offer higher deposit rates. Price competition for loans and deposits might result in us earning less on our loans and paying more on our deposits, which reduces net interest income. At June 30, 2011, which is the most recent date for which data is available from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, we held: (i) 22.66% of the deposits in Hamblen County, which is the largest market share out of 10 financial institutions with offices in the county at that date; (ii) 0.32% of the deposits in the Knoxville, Tennessee, metropolitan statistical area, which is the 27th largest market share out of 44 financial institutions with offices in the metropolitan statistical area at that date; (iii) 4.96% of the deposits in the Johnson City, Tennessee metropolitan statistical area, which is the ninth largest market share out of 23 financial institutions located in the metropolitan statistical area at that date; and (iv) 1.27% of the deposits in the Kingsport, Tennessee-Bristol, Virginia metropolitan statistical area, which is the 18th largest market share out of 31 financial institutions located in the metropolitan statistical area at that date. Banks owned by SunTrust Banks, Inc., First Tennessee National Corporation and Regions Financial Corporation and other large regional bank holding companies also operate in our primary market areas. These institutions are significantly larger than us and, therefore, have significantly greater resources. We expect competition to increase in the future as a result of legislative, regulatory and technological changes and the continuing trend of consolidation in the financial services industry. Our profitability depends upon our continued ability to compete successfully in our market area.

Our commercial real estate, commercial business and multi-family real estate loans expose us to increased lending risks.

At June 30, 2012, $180.9 million, or 55.0%, of our loan portfolio consisted of commercial real estate, commercial business and multi-family real estate loans. Commercial real estate and multi-family real estate loans generally expose a lender to greater risk of non-payment and loss than one- to four-family residential mortgage loans because repayment of the loans often depends on the successful operation of the property and the income stream of the borrowers. Commercial business loans expose us to additional risks because they typically are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayments from the cash flow of the borrower’s business and are secured by collateral that may depreciate over time. All three of these types of loans typically involve larger loan balances to single borrowers or groups of related borrowers compared to one- to four-family residential mortgage loans. Because such loans generally entail greater risk than one- to four-family residential mortgage loans, we may need to increase our allowance for loan losses in the future to account for the likely increase in probable incurred credit losses associated with the growth of such loans. Also, many of our commercial borrowers have more than one loan outstanding with us. Consequently, an adverse development with respect to one loan or one credit relationship can expose us to a significantly greater risk of loss compared to an adverse development with respect to a one- to four-family residential mortgage loan.
 
 
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We may require further additions to our allowance for loan losses, which would reduce net income.

If our borrowers do not repay their loans or if the collateral securing their loans is insufficient to provide for the full repayment, we may suffer credit losses. Credit losses are inherent in the lending business and could have a material adverse effect on our operating results. We make various assumptions and judgments about the collectibility of our loan portfolio and provide an allowance for loan losses based on a number of factors. If our assumptions and judgments are wrong, our allowance for loan losses may not be sufficient to cover our losses. In addition, when real estate values decline, the potential severity of loss on a real estate-secured loan can increase significantly, especially in the case of loans with high combined loan-to-value ratios. The recent decline in the national economy and the local economies of the areas in which the loans are concentrated could result in an increase in loan delinquencies, foreclosures or repossessions resulting in increased charge-off amounts and the need for additional loan loss allowances in future periods. If we determine that our allowance for loan losses is insufficient, we would be required to take additional provisions for loan losses, which would reduce net income during the period those provisions are taken. In addition, the Tennessee Department of Financial Institutions and the FDIC periodically review our allowance for loan losses and may require us to increase our allowance for loan losses or to charge off particular loans.

We may be required to write down the value of our investment securities if we conclude that a decline in the value in any of our securities is other than temporary.

                We review our investment portfolio periodically to determine whether the fair value is below the current carrying value. If the fair value of any of our investment securities has declined below its carrying value, we are required to determine whether the decline is other than temporary. If we conclude that the decline is other than temporary, we are required to write down the value of that security through a charge to earnings.

The loss of our President and Chief Executive Officer could hurt our operations.

We rely heavily on our President and Chief Executive Officer, Anderson L. Smith. The loss of Mr. Smith could have an adverse effect on us because, as a small community bank, Mr. Smith is responsible for more aspects of our business than he might be at a larger financial institution with more employees. Moreover, as a small community bank, we have fewer management-level employees who are in a position to succeed and assume the responsibilities of Mr. Smith. We have entered into a three-year employment agreement with Mr. Smith. We do not have key-man life insurance on Mr. Smith.

We operate in a highly regulated environment and we may be adversely affected by changes in laws and regulations.

We are subject to extensive regulation, supervision and examination by the Tennessee Department of Financial Institutions, our chartering authority, and by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as insurer of our deposits. As a bank holding company, Jefferson Bancshares is subject to regulation and supervision by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Such regulation and supervision govern the activities in which an institution and its holding company may engage, and are intended primarily for the protection of the insurance fund and depositors. Regulatory authorities have extensive discretion in their supervisory and enforcement activities, including the imposition of restrictions on our operations, the classification of our assets and determination of the level of our allowance for loan losses. Any change in such regulation and oversight, whether in the form of regulatory policy, regulations, legislation or supervisory action, may have a material impact on our operations.
 
Recent regulatory reform may have a material impact on our operations.
 
        On July 21, 2010, the President signed into law The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”). The Dodd-Frank Act contains various provisions designed to enhance the regulation of depository institutions and prevent the recurrence of a financial crisis such as occurred in 2008 and 2009. These include provisions strengthening holding company capital requirements, requiring retention of a portion of the risk of securitized loans and regulating debit card interchange fees. The Dodd-Frank Act also creates a new federal agency to administer consumer protection and fair lending laws, a function that is now performed by the
 
 
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depository institution regulators. The full impact of the Dodd-Frank Act on our business and operations will not be known for years until regulations implementing the statute are written and adopted. However, it is likely that the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act will have an adverse impact on our operations, particularly through increased regulatory burden and compliance costs. Additionally, on August 30, 2012, the federal banking regulatory agencies issued proposed rules that would implement the “Basel III” regulatory capital reforms and changes required by the Dodd-Frank Act. If adopted as proposed, Basel III and regulations proposed by the federal banking regulatory agencies will require bank holding companies and banks to undertake significant activities to demonstrate compliance with the new and higher capital standards. Compliance with these rules, which are still being analyzed, will impose additional costs on banking entities and their holding companies.

Liquidity risk could impair our ability to fund operations and jeopardize our financial condition.

Liquidity is essential to our business. An inability to raise funds through deposits, borrowings, the sale of loans and other sources could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity. Our access to funding sources in amounts adequate to finance our activities could be impaired by factors that affect us specifically or the financial services industry in general, which could significantly affect our ability to fund normal operations. In addition, our ability to acquire deposits or borrow could also be impaired by factors that are not specific to us, such as a severe disruption of the financial markets or negative views and expectations about the prospects for the financial services industry as a whole as the recent turmoil faced by banking organizations in the domestic and worldwide credit markets deteriorates. Furthermore, Jefferson Bancshares is a separate entity and apart from Jefferson Federal and must provide for its own liquidity. In addition to its operating expenses, Jefferson Bancshares is responsible for the payment of dividends declared for its shareholders, and interest and principal on outstanding debt. Substantially all of Jefferson Bancshares’ revenues are obtained from subsidiary service fees and dividends. Payment of such dividends to Jefferson Bancshares by Jefferson Federal is limited under Tennessee law. The amount that can be paid in any calendar year, without prior approval from the Tennessee Department of Financial Institutions, cannot exceed the total of Jefferson Federal’s net income for the year combined with its retained net income for the preceding two years.

We are subject to certain risks in connection with our use of technology, including risks associated with systems failures, interruptions, or breaches of security.

Communications and information systems are essential to the conduct of our business, as we use such systems to manage our customer relationships, our general ledger, our deposits, and our loans. While we have established policies and procedures to prevent or limit the impact of systems failures, interruptions, and security breaches, there can be no assurance that such events will not occur or that they will be adequately addressed if they do. Although we rely on commonly used security and processing systems to provide the security and authentication necessary to effect the secure transmission of data, these precautions may not protect our systems from compromises or breaches of security. In addition, we outsource certain of our data processing to certain third-party providers. If our third-party providers encounter difficulties, or if we have difficulty in communicating with them, our ability to adequately process and account for customer transactions could be affected, and our business operations could be adversely impacted. Threats to information security also exist in the processing of customer information through various other vendors and their personnel. The occurrence of any systems failure, interruption, or breach of security could damage our reputation and result in a loss of customers and business, could subject us to additional regulatory scrutiny, or could expose us to civil litigation and possible financial liability. Any of these occurrences could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
 
The charter and bylaws of Jefferson Bancshares may prevent or make more difficult certain transactions, including a sale or merger of Jefferson Bancshares.
 
        Provisions of the charter and bylaws of Jefferson Bancshares may make it more difficult for companies or persons to acquire control of Jefferson Bancshares. Consequently, our shareholders may not have the opportunity to participate in such a transaction and the trading price of our common stock may not rise to the level of other institutions that are more vulnerable to hostile takeovers. In addition, these provisions also make more difficult the removal of current directors or management, or the election of new directors. These provisions include:
 
 
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·
supermajority voting requirements for certain business combinations and changes to some provisions of the charter and bylaws;
     
 
·
limitation on the right to vote shares;
     
 
·
the election of directors to staggered terms of three years;
     
 
·
provisions regarding the timing and content of shareholder proposals and nominations;
     
 
·
provisions restricting the calling of special meetings of shareholders;
     
 
·
the absence of cumulative voting by shareholders in the election of directors; and
     
 
·
the removal of directors only for cause.


None.

ITEM 2.

We conduct our business through our main office, nine full-service branch offices and two limited-service drive-through facilities located in Hamblen, Knox, Sullivan and Washington Counties, Tennessee. We own all of our offices, except for a drive-through facility located in Morristown, Tennessee, the lease on which expires in April 2013. As of June 30, 2012, the total net book value of our offices was $26.4 million. We believe that our facilities are adequate to meet our present and immediately foreseeable needs.


Jefferson Bancshares is not a party to any pending legal proceedings. Periodically, there have been various claims and lawsuits involving Jefferson Federal, such as claims to enforce liens, condemnation proceedings on properties in which Jefferson Federal holds security interests, claims involving the making and servicing of real property loans and other issues incident to Jefferson Federal’s business. Jefferson Federal is not a party to any pending legal proceedings that it believes would have a material adverse effect on the financial condition or operations of the Company.


Not applicable.
 

 
Market for Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters
 
Jefferson Bancshares’ common stock is listed on the Nasdaq Global Market under the symbol “JFBI.” As of June 30, 2012, Jefferson Bancshares had approximately 646 holders of record (excluding the number of persons or entities holding stock in street name through various brokerage firms), and 6,631,989 shares issued and outstanding.
 
 
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The following table sets forth high and low sales prices for each quarter during the fiscal years ended June 30, 2012 and June 30, 2011 for Jefferson Bancshares’ common stock, and corresponding quarterly dividends period per share.

   
High
   
Low
   
Dividend Paid
Per Share
 
Year Ended June 30, 2012
                 
Fourth quarter
  $ 2.47     $ 1.84     $ 0.00  
Third quarter
    2.75       2.00       0.00  
Second quarter
    2.90       2.18       0.00  
First quarter
    3.37       2.50       0.00  
                         
Year Ended June 30, 2011
                       
Fourth quarter
  $ 3.96     $ 3.00     $ 0.00  
Third quarter
    5.02       3.00       0.00  
Second quarter
    3.71       2.75       0.00  
First quarter
    4.39       3.05       0.00  
 
The Board of Directors of Jefferson Bancshares has the authority to declare dividends on the common stock, subject to statutory and regulatory requirements. Declarations of dividends by the Board of Directors, if any, will depend upon a number of factors, including investment opportunities available to Jefferson Bancshares or Jefferson Federal, capital requirements, regulatory limitations, Jefferson Bancshares’ and Jefferson Federal’s financial condition and results of operations, tax considerations and general economic conditions. No assurances can be given, however, that any dividends will be paid or, if commenced, will continue to be paid.

Jefferson Bancshares is subject to the requirements of Tennessee law, which generally prohibits distributions to shareholders if, after giving effect to the distribution, the corporation would not be able to pay its debts as they become due in the usual course of business or the corporation’s total assets would be less than the sum of its total liabilities plus the amount that would be needed, if the corporation were to be dissolved at the time of the distribution, to satisfy the preferential rights upon dissolution of shareholders whose preferential rights are superior to those receiving the distribution.
 
 
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The following table provides certain information with regard to shares repurchased by the Company in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012.

 
Period
 
(a)
Total number of Shares (or Units) Purchased
   
(b)
Average Price Paid per Share
(or Unit)
   
(c)
Total Number of Shares (or units) Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs
   
(d)
Maximum Number (or Appropriate Dollar Value) of Shares (or units) that May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs
 
                         
April 1, 2012
through
April 30, 2012
        $ 0.00             437,802 (1)
                                 
May 1, 2012
through
May 31, 2012
    50     $ 2.15       50       437,752 (1)
                                 
June 1, 2012
through
June 30, 2012
        $ 0.00             437,752 (1)
                                 
Total
    50     $ 0.00       50       437,752  
 

(1)
On November 13, 2008, the Company announced a stock repurchase program under which the Company may repurchase up to 620,770 shares of the Company’s common stock, from time to time, subject to market conditions. The repurchase program will continue until completed or terminated by the Board of Directors.
 
 
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The selected financial information below is derived from the audited consolidated financial statements of the Company.

   
At or For the Year Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
       
Financial Condition Data:
                             
Total assets
  $ 522,930     $ 561,189     $ 630,770     $ 662,655     $ 330,265  
Loans receivable, net
    322,499       378,587       434,378       498,107       282,483  
Cash and cash equivalents,interest-bearing deposits
    56,693       40,548       69,303       44,108       17,616  
Investment securities
    83,483       74,780       62,989       36,544       3,478  
Borrowings
    45,506       38,887       85,778       91,098       33,000  
Deposits
    423,882       454,262       479,183       482,167       223,552  
Stockholders’ equity
    52,629       55,919       56,523       79,505       72,777  
                                         
Operating Data:
                                       
Interest income
  $ 22,432     $ 26,334     $ 30,043     $ 28,175     $ 20,846  
Interest expense
    4,570       8,030       11,593       11,619       9,248  
Net interest income
    17,862       18,304       18,450       16,556       11,598  
Provision for loan losses
    9,873       4,447       8,809       910       451  
Net interest income after provision for loan losses
    7,989       13,857       9,641       15,646       11,147  
Noninterest income
    2,180       3,233       4,034       3,185       1,520  
Noninterest expense
    16,693       17,411       39,657       14,683       9,889  
Earnings before income taxes
    (6,524 )     (321 )     (25,982 )     4,148       2,778  
Total income taxes
    (2,524 )     (351 )     (1,982 )     1,518       1,531  
Net earnings   $ (4,000 )   $ 30     $ (24,000 )   $ 2,630     $ 1,247  
                                         
Per Share Data:
                                       
Earnings per share, basic
  $ (0.64 )   $ 0.00     $ (3.85 )   $ 0.43     $ 0.22  
Earnings per share, diluted
  $ (0.64 )   $ 0.00     $ (3.85 )   $ 0.43     $ 0.22  
Dividends per share
  $ 0.00     $ 0.00     $ 0.03     $ 0.24     $ 0.24  

 
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At or For the Year Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
             
Performance Ratios:
                             
Return on average assets
    (0.74 %)     0.00 %     (3.65 )%     0.48 %     0.37 %
                                         
Return on average equity
    (7.37 )     0.05       (29.65 )     3.40       1.69  
                                         
Interest rate spread (1)
    3.60       3.21       3.04       3.23       3.00  
                                         
Net interest margin (2)
    3.72       3.35       3.22       3.46       3.73  
                                         
Noninterest expense to average assets (5)
    3.10       2.86       2.72       2.67       2.94  
                                         
Efficiency ratio (3) (5)
    83.38       85.71       83.93       76.57       75.38  
                                         
Average interest-earning assets to average interest-bearing liabilities
    111.99       109.61       108.76       110.52       124.75  
                                         
Dividend payout ratio (4)
    0.00       0.00       N/M       55.81       109.09  
                                         
Capital Ratios:
                                       
Tangible capital
    8.23       8.50       7.29       7.85       19.57  
                                         
Core capital
    12.17       11.74       10.35       9.57       19.57  
                                         
Risk-based capital
    13.42       13.00       11.61       10.49       24.16  
                                         
Average equity to average assets
    10.07       9.35       12.33       14.09       21.87  
                                         
Asset Quality Ratios:
                                       
Allowance for loan losses as a percent of total gross loans
    1.78       2.11       2.17       0.94       0.65  
                                         
Allowance for loan losses as a percent of nonperforming loans
    31.53       99.19       51.38       78.30       609.97  
                                         
Net charge-offs to average outstanding loans during the period
    3.36       1.42       0.83       0.14       0.20  
                                         
Nonperforming loans as a percent of total loans
    5.65       2.13       4.22       1.20       0.11  
                                         
Nonperforming assets as a percent of total assets
    4.82       3.25       4.18       1.43       0.23  


(1)
Represents the difference between the weighted average yield on average interest-earning assets and the weighted average cost of interest-bearing liabilities.
(2)
Represents net interest income as a percent of average interest-earning assets.
(3)
Represents noninterest expense divided by the sum of net interest income and noninterest income, excluding gains or losses on the sale of securities.
(4)
Reflects dividends per share declared in the period divided by earnings per share for the period.
(5)
2010 ratios exclude a goodwill impairment charge of $21.8 million.


The objective of this section is to help shareholders and potential investors understand our views on our results of operations and financial condition. You should read this discussion in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes to the consolidated financial statements that appear elsewhere in this report.
 
 
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Overview.

Income

We have two primary sources of pre-tax income. The first is net interest income. Net interest income is the difference between interest income – which is the income that we earn on our loans and investments – and interest expense – which is the interest that we pay on our deposits and borrowings.

Our second principal source of pre-tax income is fee income – the compensation we receive from providing products and services. Most of our fee income comes from service charges on NOW accounts and fees for late loan payments. We also earn fee income from ATM charges, insurance commissions, safe deposit box rentals and other fees and charges.

We occasionally recognize gains or losses as a result of sales of investment securities or foreclosed real estate. These gains and losses are not a regular part of our income.

Expenses

The expenses we incur in operating our business consist of compensation and benefits expenses, occupancy expenses, equipment and data processing expense, deposit insurance premiums, advertising expenses, expenses for foreclosed real estate and other miscellaneous expenses.

Compensation and benefits consist primarily of the salaries and wages paid to our employees, fees paid to our directors and expenses for retirement and other employee benefits.

Occupancy expenses, which are the fixed and variable costs of building and equipment, consist primarily of lease payments, real estate taxes, depreciation charges, maintenance and costs of utilities.

Equipment and data processing expense includes fees paid to our third-party data processing service and expenses and depreciation charges related to office and banking equipment.

Deposit insurance premiums are payments we make to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation for insurance of our deposit accounts.

Expenses for foreclosed real estate include maintenance and repairs on foreclosed properties prior to sale.

Other expenses include expenses for attorneys, accountants and consultants, payroll taxes, franchise taxes, charitable contributions, insurance, office supplies, postage, telephone and other miscellaneous operating expenses.

Critical Accounting Policies

We consider accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. We consider the following to be our critical accounting policies: allowance for loan losses and deferred income taxes.

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of the allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a monthly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based on the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, economic condition and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. Although we believe that we use the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future additions to the allowance may be necessary based on estimates that are susceptible to change as a result of changes in economic conditions and other factors. In addition, Tennessee Department of Financial Institutions and the FDIC, as an integral part of their examination processes, periodically review our allowance for loan losses. These agencies may require us to recognize adjustments to the allowance based on their judgments about information available to them at the time of their examination.

 
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        Deferred Income Taxes. We use the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. If current available information raises doubt as to the realization of the deferred tax assets, a valuation allowance is established. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. We exercise significant judgment in evaluating the amount and timing of recognition of the resulting tax liabilities and assets, including projections of future taxable income. These judgments and estimates are reviewed on a continual basis as regulatory and business factors change.

Results of Operations for the Years Ended June 30, 2012 and 2011

Overview.

   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands,
except per share data)
 
             
Net earnings
  $ (4,000 )   $ 30  
Net earnings per share, basic
  $ (0.64 )   $ 0.00  
Net earnings per share, diluted
  $ (0.64 )   $ 0.00  
Return on average assets
    (0.74 %)     0.00 %
Return on average equity
    (7.37 %)     0.05 %
 
For the year ended June 30, 2012, the Company reported a net loss of $4.0 million, or $0.64 per diluted share, compared to net income of $30,000, or $0.00 per diluted share, for the year ended June 30, 2011. Financial results for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012 were negatively impacted by a $9.9 million provision for loan losses compared to a provision of $4.4 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2011. The increase in the provision for loan losses was attributable to higher realized and estimated losses.
 
        Results for fiscal 2011 include impairment charges recorded on collateralized debt obligations that were acquired in connection with the acquisition of State of Franklin Bancshares in October 2008 that reduced net income approximately $515,000.
 
 
26

 
 
Net Interest Income.

The following table summarizes changes in interest income and expense for the years ended June 30, 2012 and 2011:

   
Year Ended
June 30,
   
% Change
 
   
2012
   
2011
      2012/2011  
                     
Interest income:
                   
Loans
  $ 20,271     $ 24,251       (16.4 %)
Investment securities
    1,900       1,696       12.0  
Interest-earning deposits
    62       180       (65.6 )
FHLB stock
    199       207       (3.9 )
Total interest income
    22,432       26,334       (14.8 )
                         
Interest expense:
                       
Deposits
    2,965       5,601       (47.1 )
Borrowings
    1,278       2,111       (39.5 )
Subordinated debentures
    327       318       2.8  
Total interest expense
    4,570       8,030       (43.1 )
                         
Net interest income   $ 17,862     $ 18,304       (2.4 %)

Net interest income before loan loss provision decreased $442,000 to $17.9 million for the year ended June 30, 2012. The interest rate spread and net interest margin for the year ended June 30, 2012 were 3.60% and 3.72%, respectively, compared to 3.21% and 3.35%, respectively, for the year ended June 30, 2011.

Total interest income decreased $3.9 million, or 14.8%, to $22.4 million for fiscal 2012 compared to $26.3 million for fiscal 2011 primarily due to a lower volume of interest-earning assets and lower market interest rates. The average volume of earning assets decreased $67.4 million to $481.2 million for fiscal 2012, while the average yield on interest-earning assets decreased 16 basis points to 4.66% compared to fiscal 2011.

Interest on loans decreased $4.0 million, or 16.4%, to $20.3 million for fiscal 2012 as a result of a lower average balance of loans and a lower average yield. The average balance of loans decreased $52.8 million, or 12.7%, to $363.2 million due to the combination of reduced loan demand, normal paydowns on existing loans, transfers to OREO and charge-offs. The average yield on loans was 5.57% for fiscal 2012 compared to 5.83% for fiscal 2011.

Interest on investment securities increased to $1.9 million for fiscal 2012 compared to $1.7 million for fiscal 2011. The average balance of investment securities increased $28.3 million to $83.3 million for the fiscal 2012 compared to $55.0 million for fiscal 2011 as excess liquidity has been deployed into the investment portfolio. The average yield on investments decreased to 2.36% for fiscal 2012 compared to 3.23% for fiscal 2011 due to lower market interest rates. A portion of the proceeds from called securities has been reinvested in securities with lower yields. Dividends on Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) stock were $199,000 for fiscal 2012, compared to $207,000 for fiscal 2011.

Total interest expense decreased $3.4 million to $4.6 million for the year ended June 30, 2012, compared to $8.0 million for the year ended June 30, 2011. The average volume of interest-bearing liabilities decreased $70.8 million, to $429.6 million while the average rate paid on interest-bearing liabilities decreased 54 basis points to 1.06% for fiscal 2012. Interest expense on deposits decreased $2.6 million to $3.0 million for 2012 compared to $5.6 million for fiscal 2011 as a result of lower interest rates combined with a lower average balance of deposits. The average rate paid on deposits decreased 53 basis points to 0.77% for the year ended June 30, 2012. Interest expense on FHLB advances was $1.3 million for fiscal 2012 compared to $2.1 million for fiscal 2011. The average balance of FHLB advances decreased $22.6 million to $37.9 million, as excess liquidity was used to repay FHLB advances during fiscal 2011. The average rate paid on FHLB advances decreased 13 basis points to 3.35% for fiscal 2012 compared to 3.48% for fiscal 2011.
 
 
27

 
 
Average Balances and Yields. The following table presents information regarding average balances of assets and liabilities, as well as the total dollar amounts of interest income and dividends from average interest-earning assets and interest expense on average interest-bearing liabilities and the resulting average yields and costs. The yields and costs for the periods indicated are derived by dividing income or expense by the average balances of assets or liabilities, respectively, for the periods presented. For purposes of this table nonaccrual loan balances and related accrued interest income have been included.
 
   
Year Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2010
 
   
Average
Balance
   
Interest
and
Dividends
   
Yield/
Cost
   
Average
Balance
   
Interest
and
Dividends
   
Yield/
Cost
   
Average
Balance
   
Interest
and
Dividends
   
Yield/
Cost
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
                                                       
Interest-earning assets:
                                                     
Loans(1)
  $ 363,154     $ 20,271       5.57 %   $ 415,966     $ 24,251       5.83 %   $ 468,232     $ 27,038       5.77 %
Investment securities
    83,276       1,900       2.36       55,013       1,696       3.23       52,771       2,730       5.32  
Daily interest deposits
    29,996       62       0.21       72,804       180       0.25       49,710       56       0.11  
Other earning assets
    4,735       199       4.19       4,735       207       4.37       4,735       219       4.63  
Total interest-earning assets
    481,161       22,432       4.66       548,518       26,334       4.82       575,448       30,043       5.23  
                                                                         
Noninterest-earning assets
    57,864                   59,553                   81,293              
                                                                         
Total assets
  $ 539,025                   $ 608,071                   $ 656,741                
                                                                         
Interest-bearing liabilities:
                                                                       
Passbook accounts
  $ 97,167       485       0.50       86,581       651       0.75     $ 84,063       943       1.12 %
NOW accounts
    48,312       77       0.16       49,609       145       0.29       52,364       220       0.42  
Money market accounts
    53,797       311       0.58       56,113       521       0.93       52,292       705       1.35  
Certificates of deposit
    184,352       2,092       1.13       239,551       4,284       1.79       242,793       6,184       2.55  
Total interest-bearing deposits
    383,628       2,965       0.77       431,854       5,601       1.30       431,512       8,052       1.87  
                                                                         
Borrowings
    37,906       1,272       3.35       60,459       2,105       3.48       89,241       3,208       3.59  
Repurchase agreements
    912       6       0.66       1,053       6       0.57       1,378       9       0.65  
Subordinated debentures
    7,186       327       4.54       7,073       318       4.50       6,962       324       4.65  
Total interest-bearing liabilities
  $ 429,632       4,570       1.06       500,439       8,030       1.60       529,093       11,593       2.19  
                                                                         
Noninterest-bearing deposits
    54,090                   49,503                   45,431              
Other noninterest-bearing liabilities
    1,014                   1,284                   1,266              
Total liabilities
    484,736                       551,226                       575,791                  
                                                                         
Stockholders’ equity
    54,289                       56,845                       80,951                  
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 539,025                     $ 608,071                     $ 656,741                  
Net interest income
          $ 17,862                     $ 18,304                     $ 18,450          
Interest rate spread
                    3.60 %                     3.21 %                     3.04 %
Net interest margin
                    3.72 %                     3.35 %                     3.23 %
Ratio of average interest-earning assets to average interest-bearing liabilities
                    111.99 %                     109.61 %                     108.76 %
­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­
(1) Average loan balances include nonaccrual loans.
 
 
28

 
 
Rate/Volume Analysis. The following table sets forth the effects of changing rates and volumes on our net interest income. The rate column shows the effects attributable to changes in rate (changes in rate multiplied by prior volume). The volume column shows the effects attributable to changes in volume (changes in volume multiplied by prior rate). The net column represents the sum of the prior columns. For purposes of this table, changes attributable to changes in both rate and volume that cannot be segregated have been allocated proportionately based on the changes due to rate and the changes due to volume.
 
   
2012 Compared to 2011
   
2011 Compared to 2010
 
   
Increase (Decrease)
Due to
         
Increase (Decrease)
Due to
       
   
Volume
   
Rate
   
Net
   
Volume
   
Rate
   
Net
 
   
(In Thousands)
 
Interest income:
                                   
Loans receivable
  $ (2,981 )   $ (999 )   $ (3,980 )   $ (3,111 )   $ 324     $ (2,787 )
Investment securities
    950       (746 )     204       (51 )     (983 )     (1,034 )
Daily interest-bearing deposits and other interest-earning assets
    (92 )     (34 )     (126 )     35       77       112  
Total interest-earning assets
    (2,123 )     (1,779 )     (3,902 )     (3,127 )     (582 )     (3,709 )
                                                 
Interest expense:
                                               
Deposits
    (571 )     (2,065 )     (2,636 )     6       (2,457 )     (2,451 )
Borrowings
    (760 )     (73 )     (833 )     (1,007 )     (99 )     (1,106 )
Subordinated debentures
    5       4       9       5       (11 )     (6 )
Total interest-bearing liabilities
    (1,326 )     (2,134 )     (3,460 )     (996 )     (2,567 )     (3,563 )
Net change in interest income
  $ (797 )   $ 355     $ (442 )   $ (2,131 )   $ 1,984     $ (147 )
 
Provision for Loan Losses.

The provision for loan losses for fiscal 2012 was $9.9 million compared to a provision of $4.4 million for fiscal 2011. Management reviews the level of the allowance for loan losses on a monthly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based on changes in the nature and volume of the loan portfolio, the amount of impaired and classified loans, historical loan loss experience and other qualitative factors. Net charge-offs for the year ended June 30, 2012 amounted to $12.2 million compared to $5.9 million for the year ended June 30, 2011. A significant portion of the loan charge-offs during fiscal 2012 were against specific reserves and did not require replenishment of the allowance for loan losses.

An analysis of the changes in the allowance for loan losses is presented under “Allowance for Loan Losses and Asset Quality.”
 
 
29

 
 
Noninterest Income. The following table shows the components of noninterest income and the percentage changes from 2012 to 2011.
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
% Change
2012/2011
 
   
(Dollars in Thousands)
 
Mortgage origination fees
  $ 306     $ 481       (36.4 %)
Service charges and fees
    1,106       1,288       (14.1 )
Gain on investment securities
    50       2,057       (97.6 )
Impairment on investment securities
    (29 )     (835 )     (96.5 )
Loss on sale of fixed assets
    (12 )            
Loss on foreclosed real estate
    (169 )     (681 )     (75.2 )
BOLI increase in cash value
    236       235       0.4  
Other
    692       688       0.6  
Total noninterest income
  $ 2,180     $ 3,233       (32.6 %)
 
For the year ended June 30, 2012, noninterest income decreased $1.1 million to $2.2 million compared to $3.2 million for fiscal 2011. Gain on investment securities totaled $50,000 for fiscal 2012 compared to $2.1 million for fiscal 2011. Impairment of investment securities totaled $29,000 for fiscal 2012 compared to $835,000 for fiscal 2011. The impairment charge for fiscal 2011 relates to the Company’s holdings in three collateralized debt obligations that were acquired in connection with the acquisition of State of Franklin Bancshares where the decline in value was deemed to be other-than-temporary. Loss on sale of foreclosed property decreased $512,000 to $169,000 for fiscal 2012 compared to $681,000 for fiscal 2011. Service charges and fees decreased $182,000, or 14.1%, to $1.1 million for fiscal 2012 primarily due to lower NSF fees.

Noninterest Expense. The following table shows the components of noninterest expense and the percentage changes from 2012 to 2011.
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
% Change
2012/2011
 
   
(Dollars in Thousands)
 
Compensation and benefits
  $ 6,209     $ 6,687       (7.1 %)
Occupancy
    1,379       1,374       0.4  
Equipment and data processing
    2,376       2,498       (4.9 )
Deposit insurance premiums
    811       664       22.1  
Advertising
    359       376       (4.5 )
Professional services
    442       449       (1.6 )
Valuation adjustment and expenses on OREO
    2,374       1,841       29.0  
Loss on early extinguishment of debt
          775       (100.0 )
Amortization of intangible assets
    441       497       (11.3 )
Other
    2,302       2,250       2.3  
Total noninterest expense
  $ 16,693     $ 17,411       (4.1 %)
 
For the year ended June 30, 2012, noninterest expense decreased $718,000 to $16.7 million compared to $17.4 million for fiscal 2011. Noninterest expense for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2011 included prepayment penalties of $775,000 incurred on the early payoff of FHLB advances. Compensation expense decreased $478,000, or 7.1%, to $6.2 million for fiscal 2012 compared to fiscal 2011 due to employee attrition. Valuation adjustments and expenses on other real estate owned increased $533,000 to $2.4 million for fiscal 2012 compared to $1.8 million for fiscal 2011.
 
 
30

 

Income Taxes.

For the year ended June 30, 2012, income tax benefit was $2.5 million compared to a tax benefit of $351,000 for the year ended June 30, 2011.

Balance Sheet Analysis
 
Loans. Net loans decreased $56.1 million, or 14.8%, to $322.5 million at June 30, 2012 compared to $378.6 million at June 30, 2011. Loan payments and payoffs exceeded loan originations during fiscal 2012 as the downturn in the economy has resulted in weakened loan demand. Our primary lending activity is the origination of loans secured by real estate. We originate real estate loans secured by one- to four-family homes, commercial real estate, multi-family real estate and land. We also originate construction loans and home equity loans. At June 30, 2012, real estate loans totaled $290.8 million, or 88.5% of our total loans, compared to $320.9 million, or 82.9% of total loans, at June 30, 2011. Real estate loans decreased $30.1 million, or 9.4%, in fiscal 2012.
 
 
31

 
 
        The following table sets forth the composition of our loan portfolio at the dates indicated.
 
   
At June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
   
Amount
   
Percent
   
Amount
   
Percent
   
Amount
   
Percent
   
Amount
   
Percent
   
Amount
   
Percent
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
Real estate loans:
                                                           
Residential one- to four-family
  $ 97,182       29.6 %   $ 110,046       28.4 %   $ 136,430       30.7 %   $ 144,659       28.7 %   $ 63,340       22.3 %
Home equity lines of credit
    18,395       5.6       20,029       5.2       19,768       4.4       22,467       4.5       5,723       2.0  
Commercial
    127,185       38.7       144,519       37.3       140,024       31.5       159,608       31.7       90,933       32.0  
Multi-family
    11,564       3.5       14,062       3.6       16,536       3.7       6,584       1.3       4,219       1.5  
Construction
    548       0.2       2,171       0.6       21,073       4.7       40,831       8.1       19,553       6.9  
Land
    27,487       8.4       30,053       7.8       37,135       8.4       46,987       9.3       40,862       14.4  
Total real estate loans
    282,361       85.9       320,880       82.9       370,966       83.5       421,136       83.7       224,630       78.9  
                                                                                 
Commercial business loans
    42,107       12.8       60,497       15.6       66,699       15.0       73,467       14.6       52,037       18.3  
                                                                                 
Non-real estate loans:
                                                                               
Automobile loans
    833       0.3       1,237       0.3       1,848       0.4       2,754       0.5       3,973       1.4  
Mobile home loans
    3       0.0       13       0.0       23       0.0       43       0.0       60       0.0  
Loans secured by deposits
    381       0.1       1,268       0.3       1,372       0.3       1,322       0.3       930       0.3  
Other consumer loans
    2,989       0.9       3,235       0.8       3,566       0.8       4,609       0.9       2,961       1.0  
Total non-real estate loans
    4,206       1.3       5,753       1.5       6,809       1.5       8,728       1.7       7,924       2.8  
                                                                                 
Total gross loans
    328,674       100.0 %     387,130       100.0 %     444,474       100.0 %     503,331       100.00 %     284,591       100.00 %
                                                                                 
Less:
                                                                               
Deferred loan fees, net
    (323 )             (362 )             (447 )             (502 )             (272 )        
Allowance for losses
    (5,852 )             (8,181 )             (9,649 )             (4,722 )             (1,836 )        
Total loans receivable, net
  $ 322,499             $ 378,587             $ 434,378             $ 498,107             $ 282,483          
 
 
32

 
 
       The following table sets forth certain information at June 30, 2012 regarding the dollar amount of principal repayments becoming due during the periods indicated for loans. The table does not include any estimate of prepayments which significantly shorten the average life of all loans and may cause our actual repayment experience to differ from that shown below. Demand loans having no stated schedule of repayments and no stated maturity are reported as due in one year or less.
 
   
Real Estate
Loans
   
Commercial
Business Loans
   
Consumer
Loans
   
Total
Loans
 
Amounts due in:
 
(In thousands)
 
One year or less
  $ 64,760     $ 23,003     $ 2,982     $ 90,745  
More than one to three years
    63,081       10,217       1,024       74,322  
More than three to five years
    52,791       6,201       193       59,185  
More than five to 15 years
    39,554       2,686       7       42,247  
More than 15 years
    62,175                   62,175  
Total
  $ 282,361     $ 42,107     $ 4,206     $ 328,674  
 
The following table sets forth the dollar amount of all loans at June 30, 2012 that are due after June 30, 2013 and have either fixed interest rates or floating or adjustable interest rates.
 
   
Fixed-Rates
   
Floating or
Adjustable Rates
   
Total
 
   
(In thousands)
 
Real estate loans:
                 
One- to four-family
  $ 895     $ 16,926     $ 17,821  
Home equity lines of credit
    18,753       68,623       87,376  
Commercial
    51,820       33,650       85,470  
Multi-family
    5,794       4,740       10,534  
Construction
    10,850       4,582       15,432  
Land
    769       199       968  
Commercial business loans
    6,221       12,883       19,104  
Consumer loans
    1,203       21       1,224  
Total
  $ 96,305     $ 141,624     $ 237,929  
 
The following table shows activity in our loan portfolio, excluding loans held for sale, during the periods indicated.
 
   
Year Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2010
 
   
(In thousands)
 
                   
Total loans at beginning of period
  $ 387,130     $ 444,474     $ 503,331  
Loans originated:
                       
Real estate
    21,219       25,706       27,420  
Commercial business
    6,386       14,051       23,210  
Consumer
    1,011       1,387       2,008  
Total loans originated
    28,616       41,144       52,638  
Loan principal repayments
    (87,072 )     (98,488 )     (111,495 )
Net loan activity
    (58,456 )     (57,344 )     (58,857 )
Total gross loans at end of period
  $ 328,674     $ 387,130     $ 444,474  
 
Investments. Our investment portfolio consists of U.S. agency securities, mortgage-backed securities, corporate securities, and municipal securities. Investment securities increased $8.7 million to $83.5 million at June 30, 2012 compared to $74.8 million at June 30, 2011 as the result of excess liquidity deployed into the investment portfolio. Investments classified as available-for-sale are carried at fair market value and reflect an unrealized gain of $1.8 million, or $1.1 million net of taxes. The increase in the investment portfolio reflects security purchases totaling $58.3 million, partially offset by sales, paydowns and calls of securities totaling approximately $50.1 million.
 
 
33

 
 
   
At June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2010
 
   
Amortized
Cost
   
Fair
Value
   
Amortized
Cost
   
Fair
Value
   
Amortized
Cost
   
Fair
Value
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
                                     
Federal agency securities
  $ 24,033     $ 24,296     $ 43,721     $ 43,949     $ 31,975     $ 32,107  
Mortgage-backed securities
    52,822       54,415       24,551       25,356       5,650       24,313  
Municipal securities
    4,245       4,563       5,150       5,237       21,812       5,764  
Other securities
    609       209       613       238       1,597       805  
Total
  $ 81,709     $ 83,483     $ 74,035     $ 74,780     $ 61,034     $ 62,989  
 
The following table sets forth the maturities and weighted average yields of investment securities at June 30, 2012.
 
   
More than
One Year to
Five Years
   
More than
Five Years to
Ten Years
   
More than
Ten Years
   
Total
 
   
Carrying
Value
   
Weighted
Average
Yield
   
Carrying
Value
   
Weighted
Average
Yield
   
Carrying
Value
   
Weighted
Average
Yield
   
Carrying
Value
   
Weighted
Average
Yield
 
                                                 
Federal agency securities
  $ 12,385       1.42 %   $ 3,018       2.27 %   $ 8,893       2.62 %   $ 24,296       1.97 %
Mortgage-backed securities
    53       3.76       9,192       1.24       45,051       2.42       54,296       2.22  
Municipal securities
    350       3.54       1,579       3.26       2,466       3.78       4,395       3.58  
Other securities
          0.00             0.00       207       0.00       207       0.00  
Total
  $ 12,788       1.49 %   $ 13,789       1.69 %   $ 56,617       2.48 %   $ 83,194       2.20 %
 
Deposits. Our primary source of funds is our deposit accounts. The deposit base is comprised of checking, savings, money market and time deposits. These deposits are provided primarily by individuals and businesses within our market area. We do not use brokered deposits as a source of funding. Total deposits decreased $30.4 million, to $423.9 million at June 30, 2012 primarily due to the planned runoff of higher cost certificates of deposit. Certificates of deposit decreased $40.5 million, or 19.2%, to $170.4 million while transaction accounts increased $10.1 million to $253.5 million at June 30, 2012 compared to $243.4 million at June 30, 2011. Management monitors the deposit mix and deposit pricing on a regular basis and has focused on growth in lower cost transaction accounts. Our deposit pricing strategy is to offer competitive rates, but not to offer the highest deposit rates in our markets.
 
   
At June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2010
 
   
(In thousands)
 
Noninterest-bearing accounts
  $ 52,436     $ 54,340     $ 41,653  
NOW accounts
    52,958       46,134       58,257  
Passbook accounts
    96,588       91,637       82,830  
Money market deposit accounts
    51,492       51,252       56,247  
Certificates of deposit
    170,408       210,899       240,196  
Total
  $ 423,882     $ 454,262     $ 479,183  
 
34

 
 
The following table indicates the amount of jumbo certificates of deposit by time remaining until maturity as of June 30, 2012. Jumbo certificates of deposit require minimum deposits of $100,000.
 
   
Certificates
of Deposit
 
Maturity Period
 
(In thousands)
 
       
Three months or less
  $ 12,450  
Over three through six months
    16,707  
Over six through twelve months
    12,818  
Over twelve months
    25,527  
Total
  $ 67,502  
 
The following table sets forth the time deposits classified by rates at the dates indicated.
 
   
At June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2010
 
   
(In thousands)
 
0.01 – 1.00%
  $ 129,619     $ 82,706     $  
1.01 – 2.00%
    36,538       108,257       183,723  
2.01 – 3.00%
    2,313       8,046       22,211  
3.01 – 4.00%
    64       4,963       22,273  
4.01 – 5.00%
    1,874       6,927       11,989  
Total
  $ 170,408     $ 210,899     $ 240,196  
 
The following table sets forth the amount and maturities of time deposits at June 30, 2012.
 
   
At June 30, 2012
 
   
Less Than
One Year
   
1-2
Years
   
2-3
Years
   
3-4
Years
   
4 or More
Years
   
Total
   
Percent of Total Certificate Accounts
 
   
(In Thousands)
 
0.01 – 1.00%
  $ 115,080     $ 9,328     $ 4,217     $ 786     $ 208     $ 129,619       76.1 %
1.01 – 2.00%
    6,930       17,866       10,013       213       1,516       36,538       21.4  
2.01 – 3.00%
    1,764       463       86                   2,313       1.4  
3.01 – 4.00%
    30       34                         64       0.0  
4.01 – 5.00%
    1,227       647                         1,874       1.1  
Total
  $ 125,031     $ 28,338     $ 14,316     $ 999     $ 1,724     $ 170,408       100.0 %
 
Borrowings. We have relied upon advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) of Cincinnati to supplement our supply of lendable funds and to meet deposit withdrawal requirements. FHLB advances remained relatively stable at $37.9 million at June 30, 2012 compared to June 30, 2011. The following table presents certain information regarding our use of FHLB advances during the periods and at the dates indicated.
 
   
Year Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2010
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
                   
Maximum amount of advances outstanding at any month end
  $ 37,936     $ 85,104     $ 90,269  
Average advances outstanding
  $ 37,906     $ 60,459     $ 89,241  
Weighted average interest rate during the period
    2.77 %     3.48 %     3.59 %
Balance outstanding at end of period
  $ 37,863     $ 37,942     $ 84,834  
Weighted average interest rate at end of period
    2.77 %     2.77 %     4.08 %
 
 
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Stockholders’ Equity. Stockholders’ equity was $52.6 million at June 30, 2012 compared to $55.9 million at June 30, 2011. The Bank’s total risk-based capital ratio was 13.42% at June 30, 2012, compared to 13.00% at June 30, 2011. During the year ended June 30, 2012, there were 2,534 shares of Company common stock purchased through the Company’s stock repurchase program at a cost of $7,000. At June 30, 2012, an additional 437,752 shares remained eligible for repurchase under the current stock repurchase program. Unrealized gains and losses, net of taxes, in the available-for-sale investment portfolio are reflected as an adjustment to stockholders’ equity. At June 30, 2012, the adjustment to stockholders’ equity was a net unrealized gain of $1.1 million compared to a net unrealized gain of $459,000 at June 30, 2011.
 
Allowance for Loan Losses and Asset Quality

Allowance for Loan Losses. The allowance for loan losses is a valuation allowance for probable losses inherent in the loan portfolio. We evaluate the need to establish reserves against losses on loans on a monthly basis. When additional reserves are necessary, a provision for loan losses is charged to earnings.

In connection with assessing the allowance, we have established a systematic methodology for determining the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses. The methodology segments loans with similar risk characteristics. Management performs a monthly assessment of the allowance for loan losses based on the nature and volume of the loan portfolio, the amount of impaired and classified loans and historical loan loss experience. In addition, management considers other qualitative factors, including delinquency trends, economic conditions and loan considerations.

The Tennessee Department of Financial Institutions and the FDIC, as an integral part of their examination process, periodically review our allowance for loan losses. The Tennessee Department of Financial Institutions and FDIC may require us to make additional provisions for loan losses based on judgments different from ours.

The allowance for loan losses decreased $2.3 million to $5.9 million at June 30, 2012. Primarily as a result of management’s evaluation of credit quality and current economic conditions, the provision for loan losses was $9.9 million for fiscal 2012, compared to a provision of $4.4 million for fiscal 2011. Net charge-offs were $12.2 million for fiscal 2012 compared to $5.9 million for fiscal 2011. Net charge-offs for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012 were primarily attributable to commercial business loans. At June 30, 2012, our allowance for loan losses represented 1.78% of total gross loans and 31.53% of nonperforming loans, compared to 2.11% of total gross loans and 99.2% of nonperforming loans at June 30, 2011. A significant portion of the loan charge-offs during fiscal 2012 were against specific reserves and did not require replenishment of the allowance for loan losses.

Although we believe that we use the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future adjustments to the allowance for loan losses may be necessary and results of operations could be adversely affected if circumstances differ substantially from the assumptions used in making the determinations. Furthermore, while we believe we have established our allowance for loan losses in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles, there can be no assurance that regulators, in reviewing our loan portfolio, will not request us to increase our allowance for loan losses. In addition, because future events affecting borrowers and collateral cannot be predicted with certainty, there can be no assurance that the existing allowance for loan losses is adequate or that increases will not be necessary should the quality of any loans deteriorate as a result of the factors discussed above. Any material increase in the allowance for loan losses may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 
36

 

Summary of Loan Loss Experience. The following table sets forth an analysis of the allowance for loan losses for the periods indicated. Where specific loan loss reserves have been established, any difference between the loss reserve and the amount of loss realized has been charged or credited to current income.
 
   
Year Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
                               
Allowance at beginning of period
  $ 8,181     $ 9,649     $ 4,722     $ 1,836     $ 1,955  
Provision for loan losses
    9,873       4,447       8,809       910       451  
Reserve for acquired bank