XNAS:SIGI Selective Insurance Group Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 3/31/2012

Effective Date 3/31/2012

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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

 

x QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended: March 31, 2012

or

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from_____________________________to_____________________________

 

Commission File Number: 001-33067

 

SELECTIVE INSURANCE GROUP, INC.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

New Jersey   22-2168890
(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
     
40 Wantage Avenue    
Branchville, New Jersey   07890
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)

 

(973) 948-3000
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

 

 

 

(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, if Changed Since Last Report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yesx           No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

Yesx           No ¨


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer x   Accelerated filer ¨
Non-accelerated filer ¨   Smaller reporting company ¨

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

Yes ¨          No x

As of March 31, 2012, there were 54,805,134 shares of common stock, par value $2.00 per share, outstanding. 

 

 
 

 

SELECTIVE INSURANCE GROUP, INC.
Table of Contents

 

    Page
No.
PART I.   FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
     
Item 1. Financial Statements  
     
  Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2012 (Unaudited) and December 31, 2011 1
   
  Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Income for the Quarter Ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 2
   
  Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the Quarter Ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 3
 
  Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the Quarter Ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 4
   
  Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Cash Flow for the Quarter Ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 5
   
  Notes to Unaudited Interim Consolidated Financial Statements 6
   
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations  
     
  Forward-Looking Statements 24
     
  Introduction 24
     
  Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates 25
     
  Financial Highlights of Results for First Quarter 2012 and 2011 25
     
  Results of Operations and Related Information by Segment 26
     
  Financial Condition, Liquidity, Short-term Borrowings, and Capital Resources 43
     
  Ratings 45
     
  Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements 46
     
  Contractual Obligations, Contingent Liabilities, and Commitments 46
     
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 46
     
Item 4. Controls and Procedures 46
 
PART II.  OTHER INFORMATION
     
Item 1. Legal Proceedings 47
     
Item 1A. Risk Factors 47
     
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 47
     
Item 5. Other Information 48
     
Item 6. Exhibits 49

 

 
 

 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

 

ITEM 1.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS        
SELECTIVE INSURANCE GROUP, INC.  Unaudited     
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS  March 31,   December 31, 
($ in thousands, except share amounts)  2012   2011 
ASSETS          
Investments:          
Fixed maturity securities, held-to-maturity – at carrying value          
(fair value:  $711,731 – 2012; $758,043 – 2011)  $667,192    712,348 
Fixed maturity securities, available-for-sale – at fair value          
(amortized cost:  $2,897,522 – 2012; $2,766,856 – 2011)   3,034,511    2,897,373 
Equity securities, available-for-sale – at fair value          
(cost of:  $130,213 – 2012; $143,826 – 2011)   152,986    157,355 
Short-term investments (at cost which approximates fair value)   174,472    217,044 
Other investments   125,140    128,301 
Total investments   4,154,301    4,112,421 
Cash   261    762 
Interest and dividends due or accrued   35,369    35,842 
Premiums receivable, net of allowance for uncollectible accounts of:  $3,730 – 2012; $3,768 – 2011   491,401    466,294 
Reinsurance recoverables, net   446,393    561,855 
Prepaid reinsurance premiums   137,262    147,686 
Current federal income tax   -    731 
Deferred federal income tax   116,417    120,094 
Property and equipment – at cost, net of accumulated depreciation and amortization of:  $162,559 – 2012; $160,294 – 2011   43,918    43,947 
Deferred policy acquisition costs   144,331    135,761 
Goodwill   7,849    7,849 
Other assets   52,095    52,227 
Total assets  $5,629,597    5,685,469 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY          
Liabilities:          
Reserve for losses and loss expenses  $3,035,773    3,144,924 
Unearned premiums   937,909    906,991 
Notes payable   307,366    307,360 
Current federal income tax   5,576    - 
Accrued salaries and benefits   113,941    119,297 
Other liabilities   146,114    148,569 
Total liabilities  $4,546,679    4,627,141 
           
Stockholders’ Equity:          
Preferred stock of $0 par value per share:          
Authorized shares 5,000,000; no shares issued or outstanding  $-    - 
Common stock of $2 par value per share          
Authorized shares 360,000,000          
Issued:  97,809,949 – 2012; 97,246,711 – 2011   195,620    194,494 
Additional paid-in capital   262,336    257,370 
Retained earnings   1,127,142    1,116,319 
Accumulated other comprehensive income   52,984    42,294 
Treasury stock – at cost (shares:  43,004,815 – 2012; 42,836,201 – 2011)   (555,164)   (552,149)
Total stockholders’ equity   1,082,918    1,058,328 
Commitments and contingencies          
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity  $5,629,597    5,685,469 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited interim consolidated financial statements.

 

1
 

 

SELECTIVE INSURANCE GROUP, INC.        
UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME  Quarter ended 
   March 31, 
($ in thousands, except per share amounts)  2012   2011 
Revenues:          
Net premiums earned  $378,829    351,343 
Net investment income earned   32,628    43,473 
Net realized gains (losses):          
Net realized investment gains   4,779    6,390 
Other-than-temporary impairments   (257)   (532)
Other-than-temporary impairments on fixed maturity securities recognized in other comprehensive income   (164)   (98)
Total net realized gains   4,358    5,760 
Other income   3,533    2,880 
Total revenues   419,348    403,456 
           
Expenses:          
Losses and loss expenses incurred   252,906    249,206 
Policy acquisition costs   127,958    115,044 
Interest expense   4,700    4,557 
Other expenses   10,593    8,491 
Total expenses   396,157    377,298 
           
Income before federal income tax   23,191    26,158 
           
Federal income tax expense (benefit):          
Current   7,178    4,276 
Deferred   (2,080)   1,382 
Total federal income tax expense   5,098    5,658 
           
Net income  $18,093    20,500 
           
Earnings per share:          
Basic net income  $0.33    0.38 
           
Diluted net income  $0.33    0.37 
           
Dividends to stockholders  $0.13    0.13 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited interim consolidated financial statements. 

 

2
 

 

SELECTIVE INSURANCE GROUP, INC.    
UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME    
   Quarter ended March 31, 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011 
         
Net income  $18,093    20,500 
           
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax:          
           
Unrealized gains (losses) on investment securities:          
Unrealized holding gains (losses) arising during period   12,873    (606)
           
Non-credit portion of other-than-temporary impairments          
recognized in other comprehensive income   238    117 
           
Amortization of net unrealized gains on held-to-maturity securities   (516)   (764)
           
Less: reclassification adjustment for gains included in net income   (2,833)   (3,737)
           
Total unrealized gains (losses) on investment securities   9,762    (4,990)
           
Defined benefit pension plans:          
Amortization of net actuarial loss included in net income   903    718 
           
Amortization of prior service cost included in net income   25    24 
           
Total defined benefit pension plans   928    742 
           
Other comprehensive income (loss)   10,690    (4,248)
           
Comprehensive income  $28,783    16,252 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited interim consolidated financial statements.

 

3
 

 

SELECTIVE INSURANCE GROUP, INC.    
UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY    
   Quarter ended March 31, 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011 
Common stock:          
Beginning of year  $194,494    192,725 
Dividend reinvestment plan          
(shares:  22,916 – 2012; 22,697 – 2011)   46    46 
Stock purchase and compensation plans          
(shares:  540,322 – 2012; 453,409 – 2011)   1,080    907 
End of period   195,620    193,678 
           
Additional paid-in capital:          
Beginning of year   257,370    244,613 
Dividend reinvestment plan   358    360 
Stock purchase and compensation plans   4,608    3,602 
End of period   262,336    248,575 
           
Retained earnings:          
Beginning of year, as previously reported        1,176,155 
Add: Adjustment for the cumulative effect on prior years of applying retroactively the new method of accounting for deferred policy acquisition costs (Note 4)        (53,068)
Balance at beginning of year, as adjusted   1,116,319    1,123,087 
Net income   18,093    20,500 
Dividends to stockholders ($0.13 per share – 2012 and 2011)   (7,270)   (7,176)
End of period   1,127,142    1,136,411 
           
Accumulated other comprehensive income:          
Beginning of year   42,294    7,024 
Other comprehensive income (loss)   10,690    (4,248)
End of period   52,984    2,776 
           
Treasury stock:          
Beginning of year   (552,149)   (549,408)
Acquisition of treasury stock          
(shares:  168,614 – 2012; 135,095 – 2011)   (3,015)   (2,496)
End of period   (555,164)   (551,904)
Total stockholders’ equity  $1,082,918    1,029,536 

 

Selective Insurance Group, Inc. also has authorized, but not issued, 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock, without par value, of which 300,000 shares have been designated Series A junior preferred stock, without par value.

  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited interim consolidated financial statements.

 

4
 

 

SELECTIVE INSURANCE GROUP, INC.    
UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOW  Quarter ended 
   March 31, 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011 
Operating Activities          
Net income   $18,093    20,500 
           
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:          
Depreciation and amortization   9,748    8,001 
Stock-based compensation expense   3,329    3,135 
Undistributed losses (income) of equity method investments   764    (2,482)
Net realized gains   (4,358)   (5,760)
           
Changes in assets and liabilities:          
Increase in reserves for losses and loss expenses, net of reinsurance recoverables   6,311    22,196 
Increase in unearned premiums, net of prepaid reinsurance and advance premiums   41,769    11,297 
Decrease in net federal income taxes   4,227    5,663 
Increase in premiums receivable   (25,107)   (15,958)
(Increase) decrease in deferred policy acquisition costs   (8,570)   996 
Decrease in interest and dividends due or accrued   1,108    355 
Decrease in accrued salaries and benefits   (5,356)   (4,976)
Decrease in accrued insurance expenses   (13,476)   (17,082)
Other-net   7,373    2,105 
Net adjustments   17,762    7,490 
Net cash provided by operating activities   35,855    27,990 
           
Investing Activities          
Purchase of fixed maturity securities, available-for-sale   (226,525)   (114,320)
Purchase of equity securities, available-for-sale   (39,724)   (59,780)
Purchase of other investments   (2,990)   (5,008)
Purchase of short-term investments   (368,210)   (316,769)
Purchase of subsidiary   255    - 
Sale of subsidiary   287    415 
Sale of fixed maturity securities, available-for-sale   14,308    14,907 
Sale of short-term investments   410,780    321,487 
Redemption and maturities of fixed maturity securities, held-to-maturity   38,879    38,483 
Redemption and maturities of fixed maturity securities, available-for-sale   84,124    19,771 
Sale of equity securities, available-for-sale   57,513    56,836 
Distributions from other investments   5,299    9,122 
Sale of other investments   -    16,357 
Purchase of property and equipment   (2,263)   (1,366)
Net cash used in investing activities   (28,267)   (19,865)
           
Financing Activities          
Dividends to stockholders   (6,713)   (6,605)
Acquisition of treasury stock   (3,015)   (2,496)
Net proceeds from stock purchase and compensation plans   769    1,008 
Excess tax benefits from share-based payment arrangements   870    (181)
Net cash used in financing activities   (8,089)   (8,274)
Net decrease in cash   (501)   (149)
Cash, beginning of year   762    645 
Cash, end of period   $261    496 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited interim consolidated financial statements.

5
 

 

NOTES TO UNAUDITED INTERIM CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


NOTE 1. Organization
Selective Insurance Group, Inc., through its subsidiaries, (collectively referred to as “we,” “us,” or “our”) offers standard and excess and surplus lines (“E&S”) property and casualty insurance products. Selective Insurance Group, Inc. (referred to as the “Parent”) was incorporated in New Jersey in 1977 and its main offices are located in Branchville, New Jersey. The Parent’s common stock is publicly traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “SIGI.”

 

We classify our business into two operating segments:

·Insurance Operations, which sells property and casualty insurance products and services in both the standard and E&S markets; and
·Investments, which invests the premiums collected by our insurance operations.

 

NOTE 2. Basis of Presentation
These interim unaudited consolidated financial statements (“Financial Statements”) include the accounts of the Parent and its subsidiaries, and have been prepared in conformity with: (i) U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”); and (ii) the rules and regulations of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) regarding interim financial reporting. The preparation of the Financial Statements in conformity with GAAP requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported financial statement balances, as well as the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. Actual results could differ from those estimates. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions between the Parent and its subsidiaries are eliminated in consolidation.

 

These Financial Statements reflect all adjustments that, in our opinion, are normal, recurring, and necessary for a fair presentation of our results of operations and financial condition. The Financial Statements cover the first quarters ended March 31, 2012 (“First Quarter 2012”) and March 31, 2011 (“First Quarter 2011”). The Financial Statements do not include all of the information and disclosures required by GAAP and the SEC for audited financial statements. Results of operations for any interim period are not necessarily indicative of results for a full year. Consequently, the Financial Statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements contained in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011 (“2011 Annual Report”).

 

NOTE 3. Reclassification 

Certain prior year amounts in these Financial Statements and related footnotes have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation. Such reclassifications had no effect on our net income, stockholders’ equity, or cash flows.

 

NOTE 4. Adoption of Accounting Pronouncements 

In October 2010, the FASB issued ASU 2010-26, Financial Services-Insurance (Topic 944): Accounting for Costs Associated with Acquiring or Renewing Insurance Contracts (“ASU 2010-26”). ASU 2010-26 requires that only costs that are incremental or directly related to the successful acquisition of new or renewal insurance contracts are to be capitalized as a deferred acquisition cost. This includes, among other items, sales commissions paid to agents, premium taxes, and the portion of employee salaries and benefits directly related to time spent on acquired contracts. We adopted this guidance on January 1, 2012, with retrospective application and, as such, all historical data in this Form 10-Q has been restated to reflect the revised guidance.

 

6
 

 

The following tables provide select restated financial information:

 

Balance Sheet Information            
December 31, 2011            
($ in thousands)  As Originally
Reported
   Effect of
Change
   As Adopted 
Deferred policy acquisition costs  $214,069    (78,308)   135,761 
Deferred federal income tax recoverable   92,686    27,408    120,094 
Retained earnings   1,167,219    (50,900)   1,116,319 

  

Income Statement Information

First Quarter 2011

 

($ in thousands, except per share amounts)  As Originally
Reported
   Effect of
Change
   As Adopted 
Policy acquisition costs  $113,430    1,614    115,044 
Deferred federal income tax expense   1,947    (565)   1,382 
Net income   21,549    (1,049)   20,500 
Net income per share:               
Basic  $0.40    (0.02)   0.38 
Diluted   0.39    (0.02)   0.37 

 

Cash Flow Information

First Quarter 2011

 

($ in thousands, except per share amounts)  As Originally
Reported
   Effect of
Change
   As Adopted 
(Increase) decrease in deferred policy acquisition costs  $(618)   1,614    996 
Decrease in net federal income taxes recoverable   6,228    (565)   5,663 

  

In May 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-04, Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRSs (“ASU 2011-04”). This guidance changes the wording used to describe the requirements in U.S. GAAP for measuring fair value and disclosing information about fair value measurements to improve consistency in the application and description of fair value between GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards. ASU 2011-04 clarifies that the concepts of highest and best use and valuation premise in a fair value measurement are relevant only when measuring the fair value of nonfinancial assets, and are not relevant when measuring the fair value of financial assets or liabilities. In addition, ASU 2011-04 expands the disclosures for unobservable inputs for Level 3 fair value measurements, requiring quantitative information to be disclosed related to: (i) the valuation processes used; (ii) the sensitivity of the fair value measurement to changes in unobservable inputs and the interrelationships between those unobservable inputs; and (iii) the use of a nonfinancial asset in a way that differs from the asset’s highest and best use. ASU 2011-04 was effective prospectively for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011. We have included the disclosures required by this guidance in our notes to the consolidated financial statements, where appropriate.

 

In June 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-05, Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Presentation of Comprehensive Income (“ASU 2011-05”). ASU 2011-05 requires that all non-owner changes in stockholders’ equity be presented either in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. The standard eliminates the option to report other comprehensive income and its components in the statement of stockholders’ equity. Based on an amendment issued in December 2011, companies are not required to present separate line items on the income statement for reclassification adjustments out of accumulated other comprehensive income into net income, as would have been required under the initial ASU. This guidance, which is ASU 2011-12, Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Deferral of the Effective Date for Amendments to the Presentation of Reclassifications of Items Out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income in Accounting Standards Update No. 2011-05, is effective concurrently with ASU 2011-05. We have retroactively restated our financial statements in this Form 10-Q to comply with the presentation required under this accounting guidance.

 

7
 

 

In September 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-08, Intangibles-Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Testing Goodwill for Impairment, which simplifies the requirements to test goodwill for impairment.  This guidance permits an entity to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount.  If, after assessing events and circumstances, an entity determines that it is not more likely than not that the fair value of the reporting unit is less than the carrying amount, then performing the two-step impairment test is unnecessary.  However, if the entity concludes otherwise, then it is required to perform the quantitative impairment test.  This guidance was effective for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011, and early adoption was permitted. The adoption of this guidance did not impact our financial condition or results of operation.

  

NOTE 5. Statements of Cash Flow

Cash paid during the period for interest and federal income taxes was as follows:

  

   Quarter ended March 31, 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011 
Cash paid during the period for:          
Interest  $2,111    1,969 
Federal income tax   -    173 

 

NOTE 6. Investments

(a) The amortized cost, carrying value, unrecognized holding gains and losses, and fair values of held-to-maturity (“HTM”) fixed maturity securities were as follows:

 

March 31, 2012      Net                 
       Unrealized       Unrecognized   Unrecognized     
   Amortized   Gains   Carrying   Holding   Holding   Fair 
($ in thousands)  Cost   (Losses)   Value   Gains   Losses   Value 
Foreign government  $5,292    272    5,564    -    (109)   5,455 
Obligations of state and political                              
 subdivisions   570,970    10,526    581,496    30,826    (29)   612,293 
Corporate securities   64,686    (1,873)   62,813    6,250    -    69,063 
Asset-backed securities (“ABS”)   7,856    (1,372)   6,484    1,379    -    7,863 
Commercial mortgage-backed                              
securities (“CMBS”)   13,520    (2,685)   10,835    6,222    -    17,057 
Total HTM fixed maturity securities  $662,324    4,868    667,192    44,677    (138)   711,731 

  

December 31, 2011      Net                 
       Unrealized       Unrecognized   Unrecognized     
   Amortized   Gains   Carrying   Holding   Holding   Fair 
($ in thousands)  Cost   (Losses)   Value   Gains   Losses   Value 
Foreign government  $5,292    292    5,584    -    (88)   5,496 
Obligations of state and political                              
 subdivisions   614,118    11,894    626,012    31,529    (156)   657,385 
Corporate securities   64,840    (2,189)   62,651    6,887    -    69,538 
ABS   8,077    (1,469)   6,608    1,353    (7)   7,954 
CMBS   14,455    (2,962)   11,493    6,177    -    17,670 
Total HTM fixed maturity securities  $706,782    5,566    712,348    45,946    (251)   758,043 

 

Unrecognized holding gains/losses of HTM securities are not reflected in the consolidated financial statements, as they represent fair value fluctuations from the later of: (i) the date a security is designated as HTM; or (ii) the date that an other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”) charge is recognized on an HTM security, through the date of the balance sheet. Our HTM securities had an average duration of 2.9 years as of March 31, 2012.

 

During First Quarter 2012, two securities with a carrying value of $4.4 million and a net unrecognized gain position of $0.1 million were reclassified from HTM designations to available-for-sale (“AFS”) designation due to credit rating downgrades by Moody’s Investors Service. These unexpected rating downgrades raised significant concerns about the issuers’ credit worthiness, which changed our intention to hold these securities to maturity. There were no downgrades on securities in our HTM portfolio from Standard and Poor’s Financial Services, or Fitch Ratings in First Quarter 2012.

 

8
 

 

(b) The cost/amortized cost, unrealized gains (losses), and fair value of AFS securities were as follows:

 

March 31, 2012                
   Cost/             
   Amortized   Unrealized   Unrealized   Fair 
($ in thousands)  Cost   Gains   Losses   Value 
U.S. government and government agencies1  $316,520    18,764    (104)   335,180 
Foreign government   36,903    1,252    (338)   37,817 
Obligations of states and political subdivisions   628,968    41,622    (1,517)   669,073 
Corporate securities   1,236,899    59,389    (1,343)   1,294,945 
ABS   93,390    1,408    (56)   94,742 
CMBS2   109,931    4,686    (2,569)   112,048 
Residential mortgage-backed                    
securities (“RMBS”)3   474,911    16,626    (831)   490,706 
AFS fixed maturity securities   2,897,522    143,747    (6,758)   3,034,511 
AFS equity securities   130,213    23,166    (393)   152,986 
  Total AFS securities  $3,027,735    166,913    (7,151)   3,187,497 

 

December 31, 2011                
   Cost/             
   Amortized   Unrealized   Unrealized   Fair 
($ in thousands)  Cost   Gains   Losses   Value 
U.S. government and government agencies1  $333,504    20,292    -    353,796 
Foreign government   33,687    1,042    (556)   34,173 
Obligations of states and political subdivisions   578,214    44,491    (46)   622,659 
Corporate securities   1,168,439    50,167    (5,296)   1,213,310 
ABS   77,706    1,289    (46)   78,949 
CMBS2   107,838    6,427    (1,667)   112,598 
RMBS3   467,468    16,187    (1,767)   481,888 
AFS fixed maturity securities   2,766,856    139,895    (9,378)   2,897,373 
AFS equity securities   143,826    13,617    (88)   157,355 
Total AFS securities  $2,910,682    153,512    (9,466)   3,054,728 

 

1 U.S. government includes corporate securities fully guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) with a fair value of $61.5 million at March 31, 2012 and $76.5 million at December 31, 2011.

2 CMBS includes government guaranteed agency securities with a fair value of $68.4 million at March 31, 2012 and $72.9 million at December 31, 2011.

3 RMBS includes government guaranteed agency securities with a fair value of $102.8 million at March 31, 2012 and $98.2 million at December 31, 2011.

 

Unrealized gains/losses of AFS securities represent fair value fluctuations from the later of: (i) the date a security is designated as AFS; or (ii) the date that an OTTI charge is recognized on an AFS security, through the date of the balance sheet. These unrealized gains and losses are recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”) on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

 

9
 

 

c) The following tables summarize, for all securities in a net unrealized/unrecognized loss position at March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, the fair value and gross pre-tax net unrealized/unrecognized loss by asset class and by length of time those securities have been in a net loss position:

 

March 31, 2012  Less than 12 months   12 months or longer 
($ in thousands)  Fair Value  

Unrealized

Losses1

   Fair Value  

Unrealized

Losses1

 
AFS securities                    
U.S. government and government agencies  $12,738    (104)   -    - 
Foreign government   5,868    (338)   -    - 
Obligations of states and political subdivisions   56,839    (1,507)   1,202    (10)
Corporate securities   94,148    (1,005)   12,310    (338)
ABS   3,971    (27)   1,318    (29)
CMBS   4,432    (9)   15,603    (2,560)
RMBS   40,136    (282)   15,733    (549)
Total fixed maturity securities   218,132    (3,272)   46,166    (3,486)
Equity securities   11,248    (393)   -    - 
Subtotal  $229,380    (3,665)   46,166    (3,486)

 

   Less than 12 months   12 months or longer 
($ in thousands)  Fair
Value
  

Unrealized

Losses1

   Unrecognized
Gains2
   Fair
Value
  

Unrealized

Losses1

   Unrecognized
Gains2
 
HTM securities                              
Obligations of states and political subdivisions  $1,842    (88)   81    6,682    (389)   241 
ABS   -    -    -    2,834    (968)   748 
CMBS   -    -    -    2,691    (1,252)   749 
Subtotal  $1,842    (88)   81    12,207    (2,609)   1,738 
                               
Total AFS and HTM  $231,222    (3,753)   81    58,373    (6,095)   1,738 

 

 

December 31, 2011  Less than 12 months   12 months or longer 
($ in thousands)  Fair
Value
   Unrealized
Losses1
   Fair Value   Unrealized
Losses1
 
AFS securities:                    
Foreign government  $8,299    (556)   -    - 
Obligations of states and political subdivisions   517    (1)   1,740    (45)
Corporate securities   157,510    (4,415)   14,084    (881)
ABS   15,808    (14)   702    (32)
CMBS   4,822    (48)   14,564    (1,619)
RMBS   29,803    (625)   15,007    (1,142)
Total fixed maturity securities   216,759    (5,659)   46,097    (3,719)
Equity securities   743    (88)   -    - 
Subtotal  $217,502    (5,747)   46,097    (3,719)

 

 

   Less than 12 months   12 months or longer 
($ in thousands)  Fair
Value
  

Unrealized

Losses1

  

Unrecognized

Gains2

   Fair
Value
  

Unrealized

Losses1

  

Unrecognized

Gains2

 
HTM securities                              
Obligations of states and political subdivisions  $7,244    (94)   78    9,419    (519)   324 
ABS   -    -    -    2,816    (1,009)   737 
CMBS   -    -    -    2,794    (1,447)   761 
Subtotal  $7,244    (94)   78    15,029    (2,975)   1,822 
                               
Total AFS and HTM  $224,746    (5,841)   78    61,126    (6,694)   1,822 

 

1 Gross unrealized losses include non-OTTI unrealized amounts and OTTI losses recognized in AOCI.  In addition, this column includes remaining unrealized gain or loss amounts on securities that were transferred to an HTM designation in the first quarter of 2009 for those securities that are in a net unrealized/unrecognized loss position.
2 Unrecognized gains represent fair value fluctuations from the later of:  (i) the date a security is designated as HTM; or (ii) the date that an OTTI charge is recognized on an HTM security.

 

10
 

 

As evidenced by the table below, our unrealized/unrecognized loss positions improved by $2.6 million as of March 31, 2012 compared to December 31, 2011 as follows:

 

($ in thousands)     
March 31, 2012   December 31, 2011 
Number of
Issues
   % of Market/Book   Unrealized
Unrecognized Loss
   Number of
Issues
   % of
Market/Book
   Unrealized
Unrecognized
Loss
 
                      
 153    80% - 99%   $6,071    140    80% - 99%   $10,166 
 1    60% - 79%    1,516    -    60% - 79%    - 
 1    40% - 59%    442    1    40% - 59%    469 
 -    20% - 39%    -    -    20% - 39%    - 
 -    0% - 19%    -    -    0% - 19%    - 
          $8,029             $10,635 

 

We have reviewed the securities in the tables above in accordance with our OTTI policy, as described in Note 2. “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” in Item 8. “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” of our 2011 Annual Report.

  

At March 31, 2012, we had 155 securities in an aggregate unrealized/unrecognized loss position of $8.0 million, $4.4 million of which have been in a loss position for more than 12 months. Securities with non-credit OTTI impairments comprised $2.6 million of the $4.4 million balance, with the remainder related to securities that were, on average, 4% impaired compared to their amortized cost.

  

At December 31, 2011, we had 141 securities in an aggregate unrealized/unrecognized loss position of $10.6 million, $4.9 million of which had been in a loss position for more than 12 months. Non-credit OTTI impairments comprised $2.1 million of the $4.9 million balance, with the remainder related to securities that were, on average, 6% impaired compared to their amortized cost.

 

We do not have the intent to sell any securities in an unrealized/unrecognized loss position nor do we believe we will be required to sell these securities, and therefore we have concluded that they are temporarily impaired as of March 31, 2012. This conclusion reflects our current judgment as to the financial position and future prospects of the entity that issued the investment security and underlying collateral. If our judgment about an individual security changes in the future, we may ultimately record a credit loss after having originally concluded that one did not exist, which could have a material impact on our net income and financial position in future periods.

 

(d) Fixed maturity securities at March 31, 2012, by contractual maturity, are shown below. Mortgage-backed securities are included in the maturity tables using the estimated average life of each security. Expected maturities may differ from contractual maturities because issuers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment penalties.

 

Listed below are HTM fixed maturity securities at March 31, 2012:

 

($ in thousands)  Carrying Value   Fair Value 
Due in one year or less  $81,754    86,784 
Due after one year through five years   495,428    525,309 
Due after five years through 10 years   83,147    91,452 
Due after 10 years   6,863    8,186 
Total HTM fixed maturity securities  $667,192    711,731 

 

Listed below are AFS fixed maturity securities at March 31, 2012:

 

($ in thousands)  Fair Value 
Due in one year or less  $321,292 
Due after one year through five years   1,876,518 
Due after five years through 10 years   810,211 
Due after 10 years   26,490 
Total AFS fixed maturity securities  $3,034,511 

  

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(e) The following table outlines a summary of our other investment portfolio by strategy and the remaining commitment amount associated with each strategy:

 

Other Investments  Carrying Value   March 31,
2012
 
   March 31,   December 31,   Remaining 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011   Commitment 
Alternative Investments               
Secondary private equity  $29,761    30,114    8,590 
Energy/power generation   24,149    25,913    10,420 
Private equity   23,175    21,736    4,389 
Distressed debt   15,081    16,953    3,074 
Real estate   12,825    13,767    10,506 
Mezzanine financing   9,167    8,817    15,256 
Venture capital   7,327    7,248    800 
Total alternative investments   121,485    124,548    53,035 
Other securities   3,655    3,753    1,235 
Total other investments  $125,140    128,301    54,270 

 

The carrying value of our other investments decreased by $3.2 million compared to year end 2011. The carrying value was impacted in First Quarter 2012 by distributions of $8.1 million, partially offset by income of $2.0 million and additional contributions of $3.0 million under our existing commitments.

  

For a description of our seven alternative investment strategies outlined above, as well as redemption, restrictions, and fund liquidations, refer to Note 5. “Investments” in Item 8. “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” of our 2011 Annual Report.

 

The following table sets forth aggregated summarized financial information for the partnerships in our alternative investment portfolio. The last line of the table below reflects our share of the aggregate income, which is the portion included in our consolidated Financial Statements. As the majority of these investments report results to us on a quarter lag, the summarized financial statement information for the three-month periods ended December 31 is as follows:

 

Income Statement Information        
Quarter ended December 31,        
($ in millions)  2011   2010 
Net investment income  $36.1    154.2 
Realized gains (losses)   750.7    (192.3)
Net change in unrealized (depreciation) appreciation   (487.4)   1,464.2 
Net income  $299.4    1,426.1 
           
Selective’s insurance subsidiaries’ net income  $2.0    11.6 

 

(f) At March 31, 2012, we had 27 fixed maturity securities, with a carrying value of $63.4 million, pledged as collateral for our outstanding borrowing with the Federal Home Loan Bank of Indianapolis (“FHLBI”).  This borrowing, which has an outstanding principal balance of $58.0 million, is included in “Notes payable” on our Consolidated Balance Sheets.  In accordance with the terms of our agreement with the FHLBI, we retain all rights regarding the collateral securities, which are included in the “U.S. government and government agencies,” “RMBS,” and “CMBS” classifications of our AFS fixed maturity securities portfolio.

 

12
 

 

(g) The components of net investment income earned were as follows:

 

   Quarter ended March 31, 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011 
Fixed maturity securities  $31,350    33,123 
Equity securities   1,237    317 
Short-term investments   38    62 
Other investments   2,000    11,641 
Miscellaneous income   39    25 
Investment expenses   (2,036)   (1,695)
Net investment income earned  $32,628    43,473 

  

Net investment income earned, before tax, decreased by $10.8 million for First Quarter 2012 compared to First Quarter 2011, primarily driven by a decrease of $9.3 million in income from our alternative investments within our other investment portfolio. Our alternative investments, which are accounted for under the equity method, primarily consist of investments in limited partnerships, the majority of which report results to us on a one quarter lag.

 

h) The following tables summarize OTTI by asset type for the periods indicated:

 

First Quarter 2012            
($ in thousands)   Gross    Included in Other
Comprehensive
Income (“OCI”)
   Recognized in
Earnings
 
Fixed maturity securities               
ABS  $32    -    32 
CMBS   108    -    108 
RMBS   (54)   (164)   110 
Total fixed maturity securities   86    (164)   250 
Equity securities   171    -    171 
OTTI losses  $257    (164)   421 

 

First Quarter 2011            
             
           Recognized in 
($ in thousands)  Gross   Included in OCI   Earnings 
Fixed maturity securities               
Obligations of state and political subdivisions  $17    -    17 
Corporate securities   244    -    244 
CMBS   74    (256)   330 
RMBS   197    158    39 
OTTI losses  $532    (98)   630 

 

13
 

 

The following table set forth, for the periods indicated, credit loss impairments on fixed maturity securities for which a portion of the OTTI charge was recognized in OCI, and the corresponding changes in such amounts:

 

   Quarter ended
March 31,
 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011 
Balance, beginning of year  $6,602    17,723 
Addition for the amount related to credit loss for which an OTTI was not previously recognized   -    - 
Reductions for securities sold during the period   -    - 
Reductions for securities for which the amount previously recognized in OCI was recognized in earnings because of intention or potential requirement to sell before recovery of amortized cost   -    - 
Reductions for securities for which the entire amount previously recognized in OCI was recognized in earnings due to a decrease in cash flows expected   -    (3,582)
Additional increases to the amount related to credit loss for which an OTTI was previously recognized   109    227 
Accretion of credit loss impairments previously recognized due to an increase in cash flows expected to be collected   -    - 
Balance, end of period  $6,711    14,368 

 

(i)The components of net realized gains, excluding OTTI charges, were as follows:

  

   Quarter ended 
   March 31, 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011 
HTM fixed maturity securities          
Gains  $153    1 
Losses   (81)   (214)
AFS fixed maturity securities          
Gains   405    407 
Losses   (43)   (7)
AFS equity securities          
Gains   4,775    6,203 
Losses   (428)   - 
Short-term investments          
Gains   -    - 
Losses   (2)   - 
Total other net realized investment gains   4,779    6,390 
Total OTTI charges recognized in earnings   (421)   (630)
Total net realized gains (losses)  $4,358    5,760 

 

Realized gains and losses on the sale of investments are determined on the basis of the cost of the specific investments sold. Proceeds from the sale of AFS securities were $71.8 million in First Quarter 2012 and $71.7 million in First Quarter 2011. In addition to calls and maturities, the realized gain, excluding OTTI charges, in First Quarter 2012 was driven primarily by the sale of AFS equity securities for proceeds of $57.5 million with realized gains of $4.3 million due to a rebalancing of securities within the equity securities portfolio.

 

Net realized gains, excluding OTTI charges, in First Quarter 2011 was driven by the sale of AFS equity securities for proceeds of $56.8 million with realized gains of $6.2 million due to a reallocation of the equity securities portfolio into a high dividend yield equities strategy.

 

14
 

 

NOTE 7. Fair Value Measurements

The following table presents the carrying amounts and estimated fair values of our financial instruments as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011:

 

   March 31, 2012   December 31, 2011 
   Carrying   Fair   Carrying   Fair 
($ in thousands)  Amount   Value   Amount   Value 
Financial Assets                    
Fixed maturity securities:                    
HTM  $667,192    711,731    712,348    758,043 
AFS   3,034,511    3,034,511    2,897,373    2,897,373 
Equity securities, AFS   152,986    152,986    157,355    157,355 
Short-term investments   174,472    174,472    217,044    217,044 
Receivable for proceeds related to sale of Selective HR Solutions (“Selective HR”)   2,989    2,989    3,212    3,212 
Financial Liabilities                    
Notes payable:                    
7.25% Senior Notes   49,909    59,814    49,908    51,111 
6.70% Senior Notes   99,457    113,261    99,452    113,195 
7.50% Junior Notes   100,000    100,520    100,000    100,360 
2.90% borrowings from FHLBI   13,000    13,725    13,000    13,759 
1.25% borrowings from FHLBI   45,000    44,688    45,000    44,629 
Total notes payable  $307,366    332,008    307,360    323,054 

 

The techniques used to value our financial assets are as follows:

·For valuations of securities in our equity securities portfolio and U.S. Treasury notes held in our fixed maturity securities portfolio, we receive prices from an independent pricing service that are based on observable market transactions. We validate these prices against a second external pricing service, and if established market value comparison thresholds are breached, further analysis is performed, in conjunction with our external investment managers, to determine the price to be used. These securities are classified as Level 1 in the fair value hierarchy.

 

·For approximately 95% of our fixed maturity securities portfolio, we utilize a market approach, using primarily matrix pricing models prepared by external pricing services. Matrix pricing models use mathematical techniques to value debt securities by relying on the securities relationship to other benchmark quoted securities, and not relying exclusively on quoted prices for specific securities, as the specific securities are not always frequently traded. As a matter of policy, we consistently use one pricing service as our primary source and secondary pricing services if prices are not available from the primary pricing service. In conjunction with our external investment portfolio managers, fixed maturity securities portfolio pricing is reviewed for reasonableness in the following ways: (i) comparing positions traded directly by the external investment portfolio managers to prices received from the third-party pricing services; (ii) comparing the primary vendor pricing to other third-party pricing services as well as benchmark indexed pricing; (iii) comparing market value fluctuations between months for reasonableness; and (iv) reviewing stale prices. If further analysis is needed, a challenge is sent to the primary pricing service for review and confirmation of the price. In addition to the tests described above, management also selects a sample of prices for a comparison to a secondary price source. Historically, we have not experienced significant variances in prices, and therefore, we have consistently used our primary pricing service. These prices are typically Level 2 in the fair value hierarchy.

 

·For the small portion of our fixed maturity securities portfolio that we cannot price using our primary service, we typically use non-binding broker quotes. These prices are from various broker/dealers that utilize bid or ask prices, or benchmarks to indices, in measuring the fair value of a security. In conjunction with our external investment portfolio managers, broker quotes are reviewed for reasonableness. This review includes an analysis of price fluctuations between months with variances over established thresholds being analyzed further. These prices are generally classified as Level 3 in the fair value hierarchy, as the inputs cannot be corroborated by observable market data.
15
 

 

·Short-term investments are carried at cost, which approximates fair value. Given the liquid nature of our short-term investments, we generally validate their fair value by way of active trades within approximately one week of the financial statement close. These securities are classified as Level 1 in the fair value hierarchy.

 

·Our investments in other miscellaneous securities are generally accounted for under the equity method. Investments in tax credits are carried under the effective yield method of accounting.

 

·The fair value of the receivable for proceeds related to the 2009 sale of Selective HR Solutions operations (“Selective HR”) is estimated using a discounted cash flow analysis, which includes our judgment regarding future worksite life generation and retention assumptions. These assumptions are derived based on our historical experience modified to reflect current and anticipated future trends. Proceeds related to the sale are scheduled to be received over a 10-year period based on the ability of the purchaser to retain and generate new worksite lives though our independent agency distribution channel. We have concluded that these proceeds are not directly related to the operations of Selective HR since we have no continuing involvement with the operations of this company and have no continuing cash flows other than these proceeds. This receivable is classified as Level 3 in the fair value hierarchy.

 

The techniques used to value our financial liabilities are as follows:

·The fair values of the 7.25% Senior Notes due November 15, 2034, the 6.70% Senior Notes due November 1, 2035, and the 7.50% Junior Subordinated Notes due September 27, 2066 are based on quoted market prices. These prices are typically Level 1 in the fair value hierarchy.

  

·The fair value of the 2.90% and 1.25% borrowings from the FHLBI are estimated using a discounted cash flow analysis based on a current borrowing rate provided by the FHLBI consistent with the remaining term of the borrowing. These prices are typically Level 2 in the fair value hierarchy.

 

The following tables provide quantitative disclosures of our financial assets that were measured at fair value at March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011:

 

 

March 31, 2012      Fair Value Measurements Using 
       Quoted Prices in         
   Assets   Active Markets for   Significant Other   Significant 
   Measured at   Identical Assets/   Observable   Unobservable 
   Fair Value   Liabilities   Inputs   Inputs 
($ in thousands)  at 3/31/12   (Level 1) 1   (Level 2) 1   (Level 3) 
Description                    
Measured on a recurring basis:                    
U.S. government and government agencies2  $335,180    130,189    183,768    21,223 
Foreign government   37,817    -    37,817    - 
Obligations of states and political subdivisions   669,073    -    669,073    - 
Corporate securities   1,294,945    -    1,292,433    2,512 
ABS   94,742    -    94,742    - 
CMBS   112,048    -    111,667    381 
RMBS   490,706    -    490,706    - 
Total AFS fixed maturity securities   3,034,511    130,189    2,880,206    24,116 
Equity securities   152,986    152,986    -    - 
Short-term investments   174,472    174,472    -    - 
Receivable for proceeds related to sale of Selective HR   2,989    -    -    2,989 
Total assets  $3,364,958    457,647    2,880,206    27,105 

 

16
 

 

December 31, 2011      Fair Value Measurements Using 
       Quoted Prices in         
   Assets   Active Markets for   Significant Other   Significant 
   Measured at   Identical Assets/   Observable   Unobservable 
   Fair Value   Liabilities   Inputs   Inputs 
($ in thousands)  at 12/31/11   (Level 1)   (Level 2)   (Level 3) 
Description                    
Measured on a recurring basis:                    
U.S. government and government agencies2  $353,796    126,475    205,580    21,741 
Foreign government   34,173    -    34,173    - 
Obligations of states and political subdivisions   622,659    -    622,659    - 
Corporate securities   1,213,310    -    1,210,707    2,603 
ABS   78,949    -    78,949    - 
CMBS   112,598    -    112,244    354 
RMBS   481,888    -    481,888    - 
Total AFS fixed maturity securities   2,897,373    126,475    2,746,200    24,698 
Equity securities   157,355    157,355    -    - 
Short-term investments   217,044    217,044    -    - 
Receivable for proceeds related to sale of Selective HR   3,212    -    -    3,212 
Total assets  $3,274,984    500,874    2,746,200    27,910 

 

1 There were no transfers of securities between Level 1 and Level 2 in First Quarter 2012.

2 U.S. government includes corporate securities fully guaranteed by the FDIC.

 

The following tables provide a summary of the changes in the fair value of securities measured using Level 3 inputs and related quantitative information as of March 31, 2012:

 

($ in thousands)  Government   Corporate   CMBS   Receivable for
Proceeds
Related to Sale
of Selective HR
   Total 
                     
Fair value, December 31, 2011  $21,741    2,603    354    3,212    27,910 
Total net (losses) gains for the period included in:                         
OCI1   105    99    27    -    231 
Net income2,3   (46)   -    -    64    18 
Purchases   -    -    -    -    - 
Sales   -    -    -    -    - 
Issuances   -    -    -    -    - 
Settlements   (577)   (190)   -    (287)   (1,054)
Transfers into Level 3   -    -    -    -    - 
Transfers out of Level 3   -    -    -    -    - 
Fair value, March 31, 2012  $21,223    2,512    381    2,989    27,105 

 

1 Amounts are reported in “Unrealized holding gains (losses) arising during period” on the Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income.
2 Amounts are reported in “Net realized gains (losses)” for realized gains and losses and “Net investment income earned” for amortization of securities on the Consolidated Statements of Income.
3 Amounts are reported in “Other income” for the receivable related to the sale of Selective HR on the Consolidated Statements of Income  and are related to interest accretion on the receivable.

 

As discussed above, the fair value of our Level 3 fixed maturity securities are typically obtained through non-binding broker quotes, which we review for reasonableness. The receivable related to the sale of Selective HR is also a Level 3 fair value measurement using unobservable inputs, the most significant of which is our assumption regarding the retention of business. If this assumption were to change by +/-10%, the value of this receivable would increase/decrease by approximately $0.1 million.

 

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The following table provides a summary of the changes in the fair value of securities measured using Level 3 inputs in 2011:

 

2011              Receivable for
Proceeds
Related to Sale
     
($ in thousands)  Government   Corporate   CMBS   of Selective HR   Total 
                     
Fair value, December 31, 2010  $-    -    185    5,002    5,187 
Total net (losses) gains for the period included in:                         
OCI1   -    -    507    -    507 
Net income2,3   -    -    (322)   (638)   (960)
Purchases   -    -    -    -    - 
Sales   -    -    -    -    - 
Issuances   -    -    -    -    - 
Settlements   -    -    (16)   (1,152)   (1,168)
Transfers into Level 3   21,741    2,603    -    -    24,344 
Transfers out of Level 3   -    -    -    -    - 
Fair value, December 31, 2011  $21,741    2,603    354    3,212    27,910 

  

1 Amounts are reported in “Other net unrealized gains on investment securities, net of deferred income tax” on the Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity in our 2011 Annual Report.
2 Amounts are reported in “Net realized gains (losses)” for realized gains and losses and “Net investment income earned” for amortization for the CMBS securities on the Consolidated Statements of Income in our 2011 Annual Report.
3 Amounts are reported in either “Loss on disposal of discontinued operations, net of tax” or “Other income” for the receivable related to the sale of Selective HR on the Consolidated Statements of Income.  Amounts in “Loss on disposal of discontinued operations, net of tax” related to charges to reduce the fair value of our receivable, and amounts in “Other income” related to interest accretion on the receivable in our 2011 Annual Report.

 

The transfers of the government and corporate securities into level 3 classification at December 31, 2011 were primarily the result of broker-priced securities being transferred from an HTM to an AFS designation in 2011.

 

The following tables provide quantitative information regarding our financial assets and liabilities that were disclosed at fair value at March 31, 2012:

 

March 31, 2012      Fair Value Measurements Using 
   Assets/   Quoted Prices in         
   Liabilities   Active Markets for   Significant Other   Significant 
   Disclosed at   Identical Assets/   Observable   Unobservable 
   Fair Value   Liabilities   Inputs   Inputs 
($ in thousands)  at 3/31/12   (Level 1)   (Level 2)   (Level 3) 
Financial Assets                    
HTM:                    
Foreign government  $5,455    -    5,455    - 
Obligations of states and political subdivisions   612,293    -    612,293    - 
Corporate securities   69,063    -    63,280    5,783 
ABS   7,863    -    6,188    1,675 
CMBS   17,057    -    14,366    2,691 
Total HTM fixed maturity securities  $711,731    -    701,582    10,149 
                     
Financial Liabilities                    
Notes payable:                    
7.25% Senior Notes  $59,814    59,814    -    - 
6.70% Senior Notes   113,261    113,261    -    - 
7.50% Junior Notes   100,520    100,520    -    - 
2.90% borrowings from FHLBI   13,725    -    13,725    - 
1.25% borrowings from FHLBI   44,688    -    44,688    - 
Total notes payable  $332,008    273,595    58,413    - 

 

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NOTE 8. Reinsurance

The following table contains a listing of direct, assumed, and ceded reinsurance amounts for premiums written, premiums earned, and losses and loss expenses incurred. For more information concerning reinsurance, refer to Note 8. “Reinsurance” in Item 8. “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” in our 2011 Annual Report.

  

   Quarter ended 
   March 31, 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011 
Premiums written:          
Direct  $475,966    423,342 
Assumed   21,989    5,653 
Ceded   (77,783)   (67,160)
Net  $420,172    361,835 
           
Premiums earned:          
Direct  $451,988    412,879 
Assumed   15,049    5,889 
Ceded   (88,208)   (67,425)
Net  $378,829    351,343 
           
Losses and loss expenses incurred:          
Direct  $252,203    269,404 
Assumed   10,599    3,833 
Ceded   (9,896)   (24,031)
Net  $252,906    249,206 

 

Direct premium written (“DPW”) for First Quarter 2012 was $52.6 million higher than First Quarter 2011 due to the following: (i) our E&S operations that generated DPW of $13.2 million; (ii) Commercial Lines renewal pure price increases of 5.1% coupled with a three-point increase in retention to 83%; (iii) Personal Lines filed rate increases that were effective for the quarter that averaged 5.9% while retention improved one point from a year ago to 87%; (iv) an increase in direct new business premiums of $21.8 million; and (v) audit and endorsement additional premium of $5.7 million compared to return premium of $4.0 million. Direct premium earned increases in First Quarter 2012 were consistent with the fluctuation in DPW for the twelve-month period ended March 31, 2012 as compared to the twelve-month period ended March 31, 2011.

 

Assumed premiums written and earned for First Quarter 2012 was $16.3 million and $9.2 million higher, respectively, than First Quarter 2011 primarily due to the August 2011 E&S renewal rights acquisition.

 

The ceded premiums and losses related to our involvement with the National Flood Insurance Program (“NFIP”), in which all of our Flood premiums, losses, and loss expenses are ceded to the NFIP, are as follows:

 

National Flood Insurance Program  Quarter ended 
   March 31, 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011 
Ceded premiums written  $(51,724)   (48,314)
Ceded premiums earned   (51,905)   (47,948)
Ceded losses and loss expenses incurred  $14,922    (14,540)

 

 

NFIP ceded losses and loss expenses incurred in First Quarter 2012 were $29.5 million lower than First Quarter 2011. This decrease was a direct result of Hurricane Irene and Lee claims from August and September 2011 being settled in First Quarter 2012 for roughly $15 million less than their original estimates. On an overall company basis, this decrease was partially offset by ceded loss activity related to our E&S business.

 

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NOTE 9. Segment Information
We have classified our operations into two segments, the disaggregated results of which are reported to and used by senior management to manage our operations:

 

·Insurance Operations, which is evaluated based on statutory underwriting results (net premiums earned, incurred losses and loss expenses, policyholders dividends, policy acquisition costs, and other underwriting expenses) and statutory combined ratios; and
·Investments, which is evaluated based on net investment income and net realized gains and losses.

 

Our Insurance Operations segment has historically reflected the results of our standard market insurance products. In 2011, through our acquisition activities, we began writing E&S business. This business has not met the quantitative thresholds for individual segment reporting, as our E&S operations share various economic, regulatory, and production-related characteristics with our standard market insurance products, we have aggregated their results into our Insurance Operations segment.

 

In computing the results of each segment, we do not make adjustments for interest expense, net general corporate expenses, or federal income taxes. We do not maintain separate investment portfolios for the segments, and therefore, do not allocate assets to the segments.

 

The following summaries present revenue (net investment income and net realized gain (loss) on investments in the case of the Investments segment) and pre-tax income for the individual segments:

 

Revenue by Segment  Quarter ended 
   March 31, 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011 
Insurance Operations:          
Net premiums earned:          
Commercial automobile  $70,484    69,670 
Workers compensation   65,811    62,526 
General liability   90,143    82,566 
Commercial property   49,371    48,193 
Business owners’ policies   16,857    16,485 
Bonds   4,663    4,767 
Other   12,891    2,556 
Total commercial lines   310,220    286,763 
Personal automobile   37,456    36,962 
Homeowners   27,958    24,555 
Other   3,195    3,063 
Total personal lines   68,609    64,580 
Total net premiums earned   378,829    351,343 
Miscellaneous income   3,457    2,770 
Total Insurance Operations revenues   382,286    354,113 
Investments:          
Net investment income   32,628    43,473 
Net realized gain on investments   4,358    5,760 
Total investment revenues   36,986    49,233 
Total all segments   419,272    403,346 
Other income   76    110 
Total revenues  $419,348    403,456 

 

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Income Before Federal Income Tax  Quarter ended 
   March 31, 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011 
Insurance Operations:          
Commercial lines underwriting  $(4,484)   (6,192)
Personal lines underwriting   3,121    (6,506)
Underwriting loss, before federal income tax   (1,363)   (12,698)
GAAP combined ratio   100.4%   103.6 
Statutory combined ratio   99.1%   102.6 
Investments:          
Net investment income  $32,628    43,473 
Net realized gain on investments   4,358    5,760 
Total investment income, before federal income tax   36,986    49,233 
Total all segments   35,623    36,535 
Interest expense   (4,700)   (4,557)
General corporate and other expenses   (7,732)   (5,820)
           
Income before federal income tax  $23,191    26,158 

 

NOTE 10. Retirement Plans

The following tables show the costs of the Retirement Income Plan for Selective Insurance Company of America (“Retirement Income Plan”) and the retirement life insurance component (“Retirement Life Plan”) of the Selective Insurance Company of America Welfare Benefits Plan. For more information concerning these plans, refer to Note 16. “Retirement Plans” in Item 8. “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” of our 2011 Annual Report.

 

   Retirement Income Plan   Retirement Life Plan 
   Quarter ended March 31,   Quarter ended March 31, 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011   2012   2011 
Components of Net Periodic Benefit Cost:                    
Service cost  $2,154    2,173    -    - 
Interest cost   3,230    3,155    74    77 
Expected return on plan assets   (3,547)   (3,482)   -    - 
Amortization of unrecognized prior service cost   38    37    -    - 
Amortization of unrecognized net loss   1,383    1,101    7    4 
Net periodic cost  $3,258    2,984    81    81 
                     
Weighted-Average Expense Assumptions for the years ended December 31:                    
Discount rate   5.16%   5.55    5.16%   5.55 
Expected return on plan assets   7.75%   8.00    -%   - 
Rate of compensation increase   4.00%   4.00    -%   - 

 

We presently anticipate contributing $8.4 million to the Retirement Income Plan in 2012, $2.4 million of which has been funded as of March 31, 2012.

 

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NOTE 11. Comprehensive Income
The components of comprehensive income, both gross and net of tax, for First Quarter 2012 and 2011 are as follows:

 

 

First Quarter 2012            
($ in thousands)  Gross   Tax   Net 
Net income  $23,191    5,098    18,093 
Components of OCI:               
Unrealized gains on securities:               
Unrealized holding gains during the period   19,804    6,931    12,873 
Portion of OTTI recognized in OCI   367    129    238 
Amortization of net unrealized gains on HTM securities   (794)   (278)   (516)
Reclassification adjustment for gains included in net income   (4,359)   (1,526)   (2,833)
Net unrealized gains   15,018    5,256    9,762 
Defined benefit pension and post-retirement plans:               
Reversal of amortization items:               
Net actuarial loss   1,390    487    903 
Prior service cost   38    13    25 
Defined benefit pension and post-retirement plans   1,428    500    928 
Comprehensive income  $39,637    10,854    28,783 

 

 

First Quarter 2011            
($ in thousands)  Gross   Tax   Net 
Net income  $26,158    5,658    20,500 
Components of OCI:               
Unrealized losses on securities:               
Unrealized holding losses during the period   (933)   (327)   (606)
Portion of OTTI recognized in OCI   180    63    117 
Amortization of net unrealized gains on HTM securities   (1,175)   (411)   (764)
Reclassification adjustment for gains included in net income   (5,749)   (2,012)   (3,737)
Net unrealized losses   (7,677)   (2,687)   (4,990)
Defined benefit pension and post-retirement plans:               
Reversal of amortization items:               
Net actuarial loss   1,105    387    718 
Prior service cost   37    13    24 
Defined benefit pension and post-retirement plans   1,142    400    742 
Comprehensive income  $19,623    3,371    16,252 

  

The balances of, and changes in, each component of AOCI (net of taxes) as of March 31, 2012 are as follows:

  

March 31, 2012      Defined     
   Net Unrealized Gain (Loss)   Benefit     
   OTTI   HTM   All   Pension and
Post-
Retirement
   Total
Accumulated
 
($ in thousands)  Related   Related   Other   Plans   OCI 
Balance, December 31, 2011  $(3,500)   4,622    96,125    (54,953)   42,294 
Changes in component during period   238    (585)   10,109    928    10,690 
Balance, March 31, 2012  $(3,262)   4,037    106,234    (54,025)   52,984 

 

Note 12. Commitments and Contingencies

At March 31, 2012, we had contractual obligations that expire at various dates through 2022 to invest up to an additional $54.3 million in alternative and other investments. There is no certainty that any such additional investment will be required.

  

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Note 13. Litigation

In the ordinary course of conducting business, we are named as defendants in various legal proceedings. Most of these proceedings are claims litigation involving our eight insurance subsidiaries (the “Insurance Subsidiaries”) as either: (a) liability insurers defending or providing indemnity for third-party claims brought against insureds; or (b) insurers defending first-party coverage claims brought against them. We account for such activity through the establishment of unpaid loss and loss adjustment expense reserves. We expect that the ultimate liability, if any, with respect to such ordinary course claims litigation, after consideration of provisions made for potential losses and costs of defense, will not be material to our consolidated financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.

 

Our Insurance Subsidiaries are also from time-to-time involved in other legal actions, some of which assert claims for substantial amounts. These actions include, among others, putative class actions seeking certification of a state or national class. Such putative class actions have alleged, for example, improper reimbursement of medical providers paid under workers compensation and personal and commercial automobile insurance policies. Our Insurance Subsidiaries also are involved from time-to-time in individual actions in which extra-contractual damages, punitive damages, or penalties are sought, such as claims alleging bad faith in the handling of insurance claims. We believe that we have valid defenses to these cases. We expect that the ultimate liability, if any, with respect to such lawsuits, after consideration of provisions made for estimated losses, will not be material to our consolidated financial condition. Nonetheless, given the large or indeterminate amounts sought in certain of these actions, and the inherent unpredictability of litigation, an adverse outcome in certain matters could, from time-to-time, have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations or cash flows in particular quarterly or annual periods.

 

23
 

 

ITEM 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations


Forward-Looking Statements
In this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, we discuss and make statements regarding our intentions, beliefs, current expectations, and projections regarding our company’s future operations and performance. Such statements are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements are often identified by words such as “anticipates,” “believes,” “expects,” “will,” “should,” and “intends” and their negatives. We caution prospective investors that such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance. Risks and uncertainties are inherent in our future performance. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, those discussed under Item 1A. “Risk Factors” below in Part II “Other Information”. These risk factors may not be exhaustive. We operate in a continually changing business environment and new risk factors emerge from time to time. We can neither predict such new risk factors nor can we assess the impact, if any, of such new risk factors on our businesses or the extent to which any factor or combination of factors may cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in any forward-looking statements in this report. In light of these risks, uncertainties, and assumptions, the forward-looking events discussed in this report might not occur. We make forward-looking statements based on currently available information and assume no obligation to update these statements due to changes in underlying factors, new information, future developments, or otherwise.

  

Introduction

We classify our business into two operating segments:

·Insurance Operations, which sells property and casualty insurance products and services; and
·Investments, which invests the premiums collected by our insurance operations.

 

Our Insurance Operations offers standard market insurance products and services through seven insurance subsidiaries and, in 2011, we began offering excess and surplus lines (“E&S”) insurance products through one insurance subsidiary as the result of the following acquisition activity:

·The purchase of the renewal rights to an E&S book of business in August 2011; and
·The purchase of Montpelier U.S. Insurance Company (now known as Mesa Underwriters Specialty Insurance Company) (“MUSIC”) in December 2011.

Our eight insurance subsidiaries are collectively referred to as the “Insurance Subsidiaries”.

 

For additional information regarding our recent acquisitions, refer to Note 13. “Business Combinations” in Item 8. “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011 (“2011 Annual Report”).

 

The purpose of the Management’s Discussion and Analysis (“MD&A”) is to provide an understanding of the consolidated results of operations and financial condition and known trends and uncertainties that may have a material impact in future periods. Consequently, investors should read the MD&A in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements in our 2011 Annual Report.

  

In the MD&A, we will discuss and analyze the following:

·Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates;
·Financial Highlights of Results for First Quarter 2012 and 2011;
·Results of Operations and Related Information by Segment;
·Financial Condition, Liquidity, Short-term Borrowings, and Capital Resources;
·Ratings;
·Off-balance Sheet Arrangements; and
·Contractual Obligations, Contingent Liabilities, and Commitments.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

These unaudited interim consolidated financial statements include amounts based on our informed estimates and judgments for those transactions that are not yet complete. Such estimates and judgments affect the reported amounts in the consolidated financial statements. Those estimates and judgments most critical to the preparation of the consolidated financial statements involve the following: (i) reserves for losses and loss expenses; (ii) deferred policy acquisition costs; (iii) premium audit; (iv) pension and post-retirement benefit plan actuarial assumptions; (v) other-than-temporary investment impairments; and (vi) reinsurance. These estimates and judgments require the use of assumptions about matters that are highly uncertain and, therefore, are subject to change as facts and circumstances develop. If different estimates and judgments had been applied, materially different amounts might have been reported in the financial statements. For additional information regarding our critical accounting policies, refer to our 2011 Annual Report, pages 47 through 56.

 

Financial Highlights of Results for First Quarter 2012 and 20111

 

   Unaudited     
   Quarter Ended     
   March 31,     
($ and shares in thousands)  2012   2011   Change 
GAAP measures:               
Revenues  $419,348    403,456    4%
Pre-tax net investment income   32,628    43,473    (25)
Pre-tax net income   23,191    26,158    (11)
Net income   18,093    20,500    (12)
Diluted net income per share   0.33    0.37    (11)
Diluted weighted-average outstanding shares   55,605    55,054    1 
GAAP combined ratio   100.4%   103.6    (3.2) pts
Statutory combined ratio   99.1%   102.6    (3.5)
Return on average equity   6.8%   8.0    (1.2)
Non-GAAP measures:               
Operating income2  $15,260    16,756    (9)%
Diluted operating income per share2   0.28    0.30    (7)
Operating return on average equity2   5.7%   6.5    (0.8) pts

 

1 Refer to the Glossary of Terms attached to our 2011 Annual Report as Exhibit 99.1 for definitions of terms used in this Form 10-Q.

2 Operating income is used as an important financial measure by us, analysts, and investors, because the realization of investment gains and losses on sales in any given period is largely discretionary as to timing. In addition, these realized investment gains and losses, as well as other-than-temporary impairments (“OTTI”) that are charged to earnings could distort the analysis of trends. See below for a reconciliation of operating income to net income in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). Operating return on average equity is calculated by dividing annualized operating income by average stockholders’ equity.

 

Our pre-tax net income decreased by $3.0 million in the first quarter of 2012 (“First Quarter 2012”) as compared to the first quarter of 2011 (“First Quarter 2011”), primarily due to a reduction in net investment income of $10.8 million partially offset by improved underwriting operations. The net income fluctuation between 2012 and 2011 is consistent with these pre-tax income changes.

 

The following table reconciles operating income and net income for the periods presented above:

 

   Quarter ended
 March 31,
 
($ in thousands, except per share amounts)  2012   2011 
         
Operating income  $15,260    16,756 
Net realized gains, net of tax   2,833    3,744 
Net income  $18,093    20,500 
           
Diluted operating income per share  $0.28    0.30 
Diluted net realized gains per share   0.05    0.07 
Diluted net income per share  $0.33    0.37 

 

The variances in operating income are reflective of the results discussed above.

 

25
 

 

Results of Operations and Related Information by Segment

 

Insurance Operations

 

Our standard market insurance products and services are sold primarily in 22 states in the Eastern and Midwestern U.S. through approximately 1,000 independent insurance agencies. Our recent E&S acquisitions provide us the opportunity to write contract binding authority E&S business in all 50 states and the District of Columbia through approximately 100 wholesale agents across the entire country.

 

Our Insurance Operations segment consists of two components: (i) Commercial Lines, which markets primarily to businesses and represents approximately 82% of net premiums written (“NPW”); and (ii) Personal Lines, which markets primarily to individuals and represents approximately 18% of NPW. Our E&S operations write exclusively commercial lines of business, and for purposes of this MD&A, this business is included within Commercial Lines. The underwriting performance of these lines is generally measured by four different statutory ratios: (i) the loss and loss expense ratio; (ii) the underwriting expense ratio; (iii) the dividend ratio; and (iv) the combined ratio.

 

Summary of Insurance Operations

 

All Lines  Quarter ended   Change 
   March 31,   % or 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011   Points 
GAAP Insurance Operations Results:               
NPW   420,172    361,835    16 
Net premiums earned (“NPE”)   378,829    351,343    8 
Less:               
Losses and loss expenses incurred   252,906    249,206    1 
Net underwriting expenses incurred   126,372    113,549    11 
Dividends to policyholders   914    1,286    (29)
Underwriting loss  $(1,363)   (12,698)   89%
GAAP Ratios:               
Loss and loss expense ratio   66.8%   70.9    (4.1) pts
Underwriting expense ratio   33.4    32.3    1.1 
Dividends to policyholders ratio   0.2    0.4    (0.2)
Combined ratio   100.4    103.6    (3.2)
Statutory Ratios:               
Loss and loss expense ratio   66.7    70.9    (4.2)
Underwriting expense ratio   32.2    31.3    0.9 
Dividends to policyholders ratio   0.2    0.4    (0.2)
Combined ratio   99.1%   102.6    (3.5) pts 

 

Overall NPW increased by 16% in First Quarter 2012 compared to First Quarter 2011, 7.1 points of which were attributable to our E&S operations that generated NPW of $25.8 million. The remainder of the increase was attributable to our standard market business due to the following: (i) Commercial Lines renewal pure price increases of 5.1% coupled with a three-point increase in retention to 83%; (ii) Personal Lines filed rate increases that were effective for the quarter that averaged 5.9% while retention improved one point from a year ago to 87%; (iii) an overall increase in direct new business premiums of $21.8 million; and (iv) audit and endorsement additional premium of $5.7 million compared to return premium of $4.0 million in First Quarter 2011.

 

·NPE increases in First Quarter 2012 were consistent with the fluctuation in NPW for the twelve-month period ended March 31, 2012 as compared to the twelve-month period ended March 31, 2011.

 

26
 

 

·The GAAP loss and loss expense ratio decreased in First Quarter 2012 compared to the same quarter in the prior year primarily attributable to a decrease in non-catastrophe property losses of $9.3 million, or 3.7 points, to $51.9 million coupled with growth in NPE that has outpaced loss cost trends. Catastrophe losses of $6.9 million in First Quarter 2012 were comparable to catastrophe losses of $6.8 million in First Quarter 2011.

 

·The GAAP underwriting expense ratio in First Quarter 2012 increased by 1.1 points compared to First Quarter 2011 primarily driven by expenses of $7.2 million associated with our E&S business. As MUSIC unearned premiums as of the acquisition date were fully ceded, our underwriting expense ratio will be under pressure going forward until the premiums that we write subsequent to the purchase are earned to support the ongoing expenses of these operations.

 

Insurance Operations Outlook  

The insurance industry continues to demonstrate higher levels for pricing and underwriting discipline, in part due to the extreme levels of catastrophe losses in 2011. However, until a sustained hard market has been established, the industry is expected to remain unprofitable as evidenced by A.M. Best’s industry combined ratio projection of 102.0% for 2012, including approximately 2 points of favorable prior year reserve development. Our Insurance Operations segment reported a statutory combined ratio of 99.1% for First Quarter 2012 as compared to 102.6% in First Quarter 2011. Our full year 2012 expectation remains at a statutory combined ratio of 101.5%.

 

A.M Best continues to maintain its negative outlook on the commercial lines sector as widespread pricing improvements have not yet materialized. A recent report from the Commercial Lines Insurance Pricing Survey showed that industry pricing increased by 3.3% during the fourth quarter of 2011. While industry pricing continues to improve, we are on our twelfth consecutive quarter of Commercial Lines renewal pure price increases with 5.1% in First Quarter 2012 while retention continues to be strong at 83%, an increase of three points as compared to the prior year. The price increases that we have obtained demonstrate the overall strength of the relationships that we have with our independent agents, even in difficult economic times.

 

The personal lines market continues to be more receptive to price increases, and A.M. Best has continued to maintain a stable outlook for the sector, citing that capitalization will continue to be strong and rating actions will generally be affirmations. Our Personal Lines operations continue to experience NPW growth driven by ongoing rate increases that went into effect over the past several years. Personal Lines filed rate increases that were effective for the quarter that averaged 5.9% while retention improved one point from a year ago to 87%. As we achieve rate increases in excess of loss trends, we expect profitability in this line to improve

 

In First Quarter 2012, some positive variances in underwriting results and some negative variances in investments led to overall earnings within expectations.  We are maintaining the 2012 guidance as follows:

 

·A statutory combined ratio of 101.5% and a GAAP combined ratio of 102.5%, which do not include any additional reserve development assumptions, either favorable or unfavorable, and catastrophe losses of 2.5 points – about a point higher than the historical average to reflect the more severe weather patterns;
·Investment income expected to be approximately flat with 2011 levels; and
·Weighted average shares outstanding of 55.6 million.

 

27
 

 

Review of Underwriting Results by Line of Business

 

Commercial Lines

 

Commercial Lines  Quarter ended   Change 
   March 31,   % or 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011   Points 
GAAP Insurance Operations Results:               
NPW  $354,626    300,334    18%
NPE   310,220    286,763    8 
Less:               
Losses and loss expenses incurred   205,273    196,022    5 
Net underwriting expenses incurred   108,517    95,647    14 
Dividends to policyholders   914    1,286    (29)
Underwriting loss  $(4,484)   (6,192)   28%
GAAP Ratios:               
Loss and loss expense ratio   66.2%   68.4    (2.2) pts 
Underwriting expense ratio   34.9    33.4    1.5 
Dividends to policyholders ratio   0.3    0.4    (0.1)
Combined ratio   101.4    102.2    (0.8)
Statutory Ratios:               
Loss and loss expense ratio   66.1    68.4    (2.3)
Underwriting expense ratio   32.8    31.8    1.0 
Dividends to policyholders ratio   0.3    0.4    (0.1)
Combined ratio   99.2%   100.6    (1.4) pts

 

·Overall NPW increased by 18% in First Quarter 2012 compared to First Quarter 2011, including $25.8 million, or 8.6 points, from our E&S operations. The remainder of the increases were attributable to our standard market Commercial Lines business, which reflects the following:
oRenewal pure price increases of 5.1% coupled with a three-point increase in retention to 83%;

oIncrease in direct new business of 48%, or $22.7 million, to $69.9 million; and

oAudit and endorsement additional premium of $5.7 million in First Quarter 2012, compared to return premium of $4.1 million in First Quarter 2011.

 

·NPE increases in First Quarter 2012 compared to First Quarter 2011 are consistent with the fluctuation in NPW for the twelve-month period ended March 31, 2012 as compared to the twelve-month period ended March 31, 2011.

 

·The 2.2-point decrease in the GAAP loss and loss expense ratio from First Quarter 2011 primarily reflects the reduction in non-catastrophe property losses of $2.1 million, or 1.6 points. In addition, the loss and loss expense ratio reflects: (i) a reduction in catastrophe losses of 0.5 points, or $1.1 million, to $3.9 million in First Quarter 2012; and (ii) growth in NPE that has outpaced cost trends.

 

·The increase in the GAAP underwriting expense ratio of 1.5 points in First Quarter 2012 compared to First Quarter 2011 was driven by underwriting expenses of $7.2 million associated with our E&S business, which added 1.3 points for the First Quarter 2012. As MUSIC unearned premiums as of the acquisition date were fully ceded, our underwriting expense ratio will be under pressure going forward until the premiums that we write subsequent to the purchase are earned to support the ongoing expenses of these operations.

 

28
 

 

The following is a discussion of our most significant standard market commercial lines of business:

 

General Liability

 

   Quarter ended   Change 
   March 31,   % or 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011   Points 
             
Statutory NPW  $100,628    88,772    13%
Statutory NPE   90,143    82,566    9 
Statutory combined ratio   100.2%   100.3    (0.1) pts 
% of total statutory commercial NPW   28%   30      

 

We continue to see improvements in pricing in this line as our renewal pure price increase was 5.8% in First Quarter 2012. Along with our ability to achieve price increases, we are seeing premium improvement in this line compared to First Quarter 2011 as evidenced by the following:

oNew business up 49%, or $6.2 million, to $19.1 million compared to First Quarter 2011;
oA three-point improvement in retention compared to First Quarter 2011 to approximately 83%; and
oAudit and endorsement premium of $2.0 million in First Quarter 2012, compared to return premium of $3.0 million in First Quarter 2011.

 

The statutory combined ratio for First Quarter 2012 was flat compared to the same period last year. While there was no prior year development in First Quarter 2012, First Quarter 2011 was impacted by favorable prior year development of approximately $3 million, or 3.5 points. The prior year development was driven by 2008 and prior accident years partially offset by adverse development in the 2010 accident year.

 

Workers Compensation

 

   Quarter ended   Change 
   March 31,   % or 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011   Points 
             
Statutory NPW  $73,188    67,768    8%
Statutory NPE   65,811    62,526    5 
Statutory combined ratio   110.9%   122.8    (11.9) pts
% of total statutory commercial NPW   21%   23      

 

In First Quarter 2012, we achieved renewal pure price increases of 6.9%. In addition, improvements in NPW include the following:

oNew business up 36%, or $4.1 million, to $15.4 million compared to First Quarter 2011;
oA one-point improvement in retention compared to First Quarter 2011 to approximately 80%; and
oAudit and endorsement additional premium of $2.8 million in First Quarter 2012, compared to $2.9 million of return premium in First Quarter 2011.

 

The decrease in the statutory combined ratio of this line reflects no net prior year development in First Quarter 2012, compared to $6 million, or 9.6 points, of unfavorable development related to the 2010 accident year for First Quarter 2011.

 

29
 

 

Commercial Automobile

  

   Quarter ended   Change 
   March 31,   % or 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011   Points 
             
Statutory NPW  $75,838    71,729    6%
Statutory NPE   70,484    69,670    1 
Statutory combined ratio   96.6%   92.3    4.3 pts
% of total statutory commercial NPW   21%   24      

 

NPW increased 6% on this line of business in First Quarter 2012 compared to the same period last year driven by: (i) new business growth of 48%, or $4.8 million, to $14.6 million; (ii) renewal pure price increases of 4.0%; and (iii) a three-point improvement in retention to 83%.

 

The increase in the statutory combined ratio was primarily driven by lower favorable casualty prior year development in First Quarter 2012 compared to First Quarter 2011. Prior year casualty development was as follows:

o2012: $1 million, or 1.4 points, of favorable development; and
o2011: $5 million, or 6.5 points of favorable development, driven by accident years 2006 through 2009.

 

Commercial Property

 

   Quarter ended   Change 
   March 31,   % or 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011   Points 
             
Statutory NPW  $53,027    48,331    10%
Statutory NPE   49,371    48,193    2 
Statutory combined ratio   83.9%   86.8    (2.9) pts
% of total statutory commercial NPW   15%   16      

 

NPW for this line of business increased in First Quarter 2012 compared to First Quarter 2011 primarily due to: 

oNew business, which was up 73%, or $5.4 million, to $12.7 million;
oAn increase in retention of three points, to 82%; and
oRenewal pure price increases of 3.9%.

 

The improvement in the statutory combined ratio was driven by a decrease in catastrophe losses of $2.3 million, or 4.9 points, compared to First Quarter 2011. Partially offsetting the catastrophe losses were non-catastrophe property losses that increased by 1.2 points for First Quarter 2012 compared to First Quarter 2011.

 

30
 

 

Personal Lines

 

Personal Lines  Quarter ended   Change 
   March 31,   % or 
($ in thousands)  2012   2011   Points 
GAAP Insurance Operations Results:               
NPW  $65,546    61,501    7%
NPE   68,609    64,580    6 
Less:               
Losses and loss expenses incurred   47,633    53,184    (10)
Net underwriting expenses incurred   17,855    17,902    - 
Underwriting gain (loss)  $3,121    (6,506)   148%
GAAP Ratios:               
Loss and loss expense ratio   69.4%   82.4    (13.0) pts 
Underwriting expense ratio   26.1    27.7    (1.6)
Combined ratio   95.5    110.1    (14.6)
Statutory Ratios:               
Loss and loss expense ratio   69.4    82.2    (12.8)
Underwriting expense ratio   28.3    29.3    (1.0)
Combined ratio   97.7%   111.5    (13.8) pts

 

·NPW increased in First Quarter 2012 compared to First Quarter 2011 primarily due to:
oFiled rate increases that were effective for the quarter that averaged 5.9%; and

oImproved retention of one point to 87%.

 

·NPE increases in First Quarter 2012, compared to the same period last year, are consistent with the fluctuation in NPW for the 12-month period ended March 31, 2012 as compared to the 12-month period ended March 31, 2011.

 

·The 13-point decrease in the GAAP loss and loss expense ratio in First Quarter 2012 compared to First Quarter 2011 was primarily attributable to: (i) a decrease in non-catastrophe property losses of $7.1 million, or 12.7 points, to $18.4 million; and (ii) growth in NPE that has outpaced loss trends. Catastrophe losses slightly offset this decrease with $3.0 million, or 4.4 points in First Quarter 2012 compared to $1.8 million, or 2.8 points, in First Quarter 2011.

 

·The decrease in the GAAP underwriting expense ratio in First Quarter 2012 compared to First Quarter 2011 reflects the impact of premiums outpacing expenses last year. On a statutory basis, the impact of this trend is recognized immediately in the expense ratio, while on a GAAP basis, the impact is recognized over the policy period.

 

31
 

 

Investments

Our investment philosophy includes certain return and risk objectives for the fixed maturity, equity, and other investment portfolios. The primary fixed maturity portfolio return objective is to maximize after-tax investment yield and income while balancing risk. A secondary objective is to meet or exceed a weighted-average benchmark of public fixed income indices. Within the equity portfolio, the high dividend yield equities strategy is designed to generate consistent dividend income while maintaining a minimal tracking error to the Standard & Poor’s (“S&P”) 500 Index. Additional equity security strategies are focused on meeting or exceeding strategy specific benchmarks of public equity indices. Although yield and income generation remain the key drivers to our investment strategy, our overall philosophy is to invest with a long-term horizon along with predominately a “buy-and-hold” approach. The return objective of the other investment portfolio, which includes alternative investments, is to meet or exceed the S&P 500 Index.

 

Total Invested Assets

 

($ in thousands)  March 31, 2012   December 31,
2011
   Change % 
             
Total invested assets  $4,154,301    4,112,421    1%
Unrealized gain – before tax   164,630    149,612    10 
Unrealized gain – after tax   107,009    97,248    10 

 

The increase in our investment portfolio compared to year-end 2011 was driven primarily by: (i) operating cash flows generated from Insurance Operations; and (ii) valuation improvements on securities in our available-for-sale (“AFS”) portfolio. The cash generated from our Insurance Operations in First Quarter 2012 was used to invest primarily in corporate securities within our fixed income portfolio.

 

We structure our portfolio conservatively with a focus on: (i) asset diversification; (ii) investment quality; (iii) liquidity, particularly to meet the cash obligations of our Insurance Operations segment; (iv) consideration of taxes; and (v) preservation of capital. We believe that we have a high quality and liquid investment portfolio. The breakdown of our investment portfolio is as follows:

 

   March 31,   December 31, 
   2012   2011 
U.S. government obligations   8%   9%
Foreign government obligations   1    1 
State and municipal obligations   30    30 
Corporate securities   33    31 
Mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”)   15    15 
Asset-backed securities (“ABS”)   2    2 
Total fixed maturity securities   89    88 
           
Equity securities   4    4 
Short-term investments   4    5 
Other investments   3    3 
Total   100%   100%

 

32
 

 

Fixed Maturity Securities 

The average duration of the fixed maturity securities portfolio as of March 31, 2012 was 3.3 years compared to the Insurance Subsidiaries’ liability duration of approximately 3.8 years, which was relatively consistent with the prior year. The current duration of the fixed maturity securities portfolio is within our historical range, and is monitored and managed to maximize yield and limit interest rate risk. We are currently experiencing pressure on our yields within our fixed maturity securities portfolio, as higher yielding bonds that are either maturing or have been sold are being replaced with the lower yielding bonds that are currently available in the marketplace. We manage liquidity with a laddered maturity structure and an appropriate level of short-term investments to avoid liquidation of AFS fixed maturities in the ordinary course of business. We typically have a long investment time horizon, and every purchase or sale is made with the intent of maximizing risk adjusted investment returns in the current market environment while balancing capital preservation. In First Quarter 2012, we continued to migrate to investment-grade corporate bonds as part of our overall investment strategy, due to the more attractive risk/return characteristics of the corporate sector. We also invested in high credit quality municipal bonds and MBS.

 

Our fixed maturity securities portfolio maintains a weighted average credit rating of “AA-” as of March 31, 2012. The following table presents the credit ratings of our fixed maturity securities portfolio:

 

 

Fixed Maturity  March 31,   December 31, 
Security Rating  2012   2011 
Aaa/AAA   15%   14%
Aa/AA   50    52 
A/A   25    24 
Baa/BBB   9    9 
Ba/BB or below   1    1 
Total   100%   100%

 

33
 

 

The following table summarizes the fair value, unrealized gain (loss) balances, and the weighted average credit qualities of our AFS fixed maturity securities at March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011:

 

   March 31, 2012   December 31, 2011 
           Average           Average 
    Fair    Unrealized   Credit    Fair    Unrealized   Credit 
($ in millions)   Value    Gain (Loss)   Quality    Value    Gain (Loss)   Quality 
AFS Fixed Maturity Portfolio:                              
U.S. government obligations1  $335.2    18.7    AA+    353.8    20.3    AA+ 
Foreign government obligations   37.8    0.9    AA    34.2    0.5    AA 
State and municipal obligations   669.1    40.1    AA    622.7    44.4    AA 
Corporate securities   1,294.9    58.0    A    1,213.3    44.9    A 
MBS   602.8    17.9    AA    594.5    19.2    AA 
ABS   94.7    1.4    AAA    78.9    1.2    AAA 
Total AFS fixed maturity portfolio  $3,034.5    137.0    AA-    2,897.4    130.5    AA- 
                               
State and Municipal Obligations:                              
General obligations  $304.2    20.0    AA+    282.6    22.1    AA+ 
Special revenue obligations   364.9    20.1    AA    340.1    22.3    AA 
Total state and municipal obligations  $669.1    40.1    AA    622.7    44.4    AA 
                               
Corporate Securities:                              
Financial  $420.6    12.9    A    379.0    3.7    A 
Industrials   86.3    6.8    A-    86.9    6.1    A- 
Utilities   82.5    3.8    BBB+    75.6    3.5    BBB+ 
Consumer discretion   113.0    5.6    A-    104.3    4.9    BBB+ 
Consumer staples   141.8    7.3    A    137.3    6.9    A 
Healthcare   153.0    8.6    AA-    145.0    8.3    AA- 
Materials   69.4    3.3    A-    66.5    2.5    A- 
Energy   82.7    3.6    A-    77.9    3.3    A- 
Information technology   80.0    2.8    A    74.3    2.6    A 
Telecommunications services   54.3    2.0    BBB+    50.9    1.5    BBB+ 
Other   11.3    1.3    AA+    15.6    1.6    AA+ 
Total corporate securities  $1,294.9    58.0    A    1,213.3    44.9    A 
                               
MBS:                              
Government guaranteed agency commercial MBS (“CMBS”)  $68.4    3.4    AA+    72.9    5.0    AA+ 
Non-agency CMBS   43.7    (1.3)   A    39.7    (0.3)   A- 
Government guaranteed agency residential MBS (“RMBS”)   102.8    4.8    AA+    98.2    4.7    AA+ 
Other agency RMBS   340.1    10.6    AA+    339.1    10.8    AA+ 
Non-agency RMBS   40.7    0.3    BBB+    37.1    (1.0)   BBB 
Alternative-A (“Alt-A”) RMBS   7.1    0.1    AA+    7.5    -    AA+ 
Total MBS  $602.8    17.9    AA    594.5    19.2    AA 
                               
ABS:                              
ABS  $93.4    1.4    AAA    77.5    1.3    AAA 
Alt-A ABS3   0.6    -    D    0.7    -    D 
Sub-prime ABS2, 3   0.7    -    D    0.7    (0.1)   D 
Total ABS  $94.7    1.4    AAA    78.9    1.2    AAA 

 

1 U.S. government obligations include corporate securities fully guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”).

2 We define sub-prime exposure as exposure to direct and indirect investments in non-agency residential mortgages with average FICO® scores below 650. 

3 Alt-A ABS and subprime ABS each consist of one security whose issuer is currently expected by rating agencies to default on its obligations.

 

34
 

 

The following tables provide information regarding our held-to-maturity (“HTM”) fixed maturity securities and their credit qualities at March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011:

 

March 31, 2012                        

 

($ in millions)

  Fair
Value
   Carry
Value
   Unrecognized
Holding Gain
(Loss)
   Unrealized
Gain (Loss) in
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income
   Total
Unrealized/
Unrecognized
Gain (Loss)
   Average
Credit
Quality
 
HTM Portfolio:                              
Foreign government obligations  $5.5    5.6    (0.1)   0.3    0.2    AA+ 
State and municipal obligations   612.3    581.5    30.8    10.5    41.3    AA 
Corporate securities   69.0    62.8    6.2    (1.8)   4.4    A 
MBS   17.0    10.8    6.2    (2.7)   3.5    AA- 
ABS   7.9    6.5    1.4    (1.4)   -    A 
Total HTM portfolio  $711.7    667.2    44.5    4.9    49.4    AA 
                               
State and Municipal Obligations:                              
General obligations  $196.7    187.6    9.1    5.5    14.6    AA 
Special revenue obligations   415.6    393.9    21.7    5.0    26.7    AA 
Total state and municipal obligations  $612.3    581.5    30.8    10.5    41.3    AA 
                               
Corporate Securities:                              
Financial  $20.7    18.7    2.0    (1.3)   0.7    A- 
Industrials   20.0    17.8    2.2    (0.5)   1.7    A 
Utilities   15.3    13.7    1.6    (0.1)   1.5    A 
Consumer discretion   5.8    5.6    0.2    0.1    0.3    AA- 
Consumer staples   5.1    5.0    0.1    -    0.1    A 
Materials   2.1    2.0    0.1    -    0.1    BBB 
Total corporate securities  $69.0    62.8    6.2    (1.8)   4.4    A 
                               
MBS:                              
Non-agency CMBS  $17.0    10.8    6.2    (2.7)   3.5    AA- 
Total MBS  $17.0    10.8    6.2    (2.7)   3.5    AA- 
                               
ABS:                              
ABS  $5.6    4.9    0.7    (0.5)   0.2    BBB+ 
Alt-A ABS   2.3    1.6    0.7    (0.9)   (0.2)   AAA 
Total ABS  $7.9    6.5    1.4    (1.4)   -    A 

 

35
 

 

December 31, 2011
 

($ in millions)
  Fair
Value
   Carry
Value
   Unrecognized
Holding Gain
(Loss)
   Unrealized
Gain (Loss) in
AOCI
   Total
Unrealized/
Unrecognized
Gain (Loss)
   Average
Credit
Quality
 
HTM Portfolio:                              
Foreign government obligations  $5.5    5.6    (0.1)   0.3    0.2    AA+ 
State and municipal obligations   657.4    626.0    31.4    11.9    43.3    AA 
Corporate securities   69.5    62.6    6.9    (2.2)   4.7    A 
MBS   17.7    11.5    6.2    (3.0)   3.2    AA- 
ABS   7.9    6.6    1.3    (1.4)   (0.1)   A 
Total HTM portfolio  $758.0    712.3    45.7    5.6    51.3    AA 
                               
State and Municipal Obligations:                              
General obligations  $214.8    205.3    9.5    6.3    15.8    AA 
Special revenue obligations   442.6    420.7    21.9    5.6    27.5    AA 
Total state and municipal obligations  $657.4    626.0    31.4    11.9    43.3    AA 
                               
Corporate Securities:                              
Financial  $20.7    18.5    2.2    (1.5)   0.7    A- 
Industrials   20.3    17.8    2.5    (0.7)   1.8    A 
Utilities   15.4    13.7    1.7    (0.1)   1.6    A+ 
Consumer discretion   5.9    5.6    0.3    0.1    0.4    AA- 
Consumer staples   5.1    5.0    0.1    -    0.1    A 
Materials   2.1    2.0    0.1    -    0.1    BBB 
Total corporate securities  $69.5    62.6    6.9    (2.2)   4.7    A 
                               
MBS:                              
Non-agency CMBS  $17.7    11.5    6.2    (3.0)   3.2    AA- 
Total MBS  $17.7    11.5    6.2    (3.0)   3.2    AA- 
                               
ABS:                              
ABS  $5.6    5.0    0.6    (0.5)   0.1    BBB+ 
Alt-A ABS   2.3    1.6    0.7    (0.9)   (0.2)   AAA 
Total ABS  $7.9    6.6    1.3    (1.4)   (0.1)   A 

 

A portion of our AFS and HTM municipal bonds contain insurance enhancements. The following table provides information regarding these insurance-enhanced securities as of March 31, 2012:

 

Insurers of Municipal Bond Securities      Ratings   Ratings 
       with   without 
($ in thousands)  Fair Value   Insurance   Insurance 
National Public Finance Guarantee Corporation, a subsidiary of MBIA, Inc.  $327,772    AA-    AA- 
Assured Guaranty   218,128    AA    AA- 
Ambac Financial Group, Inc.   91,420    AA-    AA- 
Other   15,091    AA    AA- 
Total  $652,411    AA-    AA- 

 

To manage and mitigate exposure, we perform analyses on MBS both at the time of purchase and as part of the ongoing portfolio evaluation. This analysis includes review of average FICO® scores, loan-to-value ratios, geographic spread of the assets securing the bond, delinquencies in payments for the underlying mortgages, gains/losses on sales, evaluations of projected cash flows, as well as other information that aids in determination of the health of the underlying assets. We also consider the overall credit environment, economic conditions, total projected return on the investment, and overall asset allocation of the portfolio in our decisions to purchase or sell structured securities.

 

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The following table details the top 10 state exposures of the municipal bond portion of our fixed maturity securities portfolio at March 31, 2012:

 

State Exposures of Municipal Bonds  General Obligation   Special   Fair   Average Credit 
($ in thousands)  Local   State   Revenue   Value   Quality 
                     
Texas  $85,276    1,100    54,479    140,855    AA+ 
New York   -    -    81,008    81,008    AA+ 
Washington   49,461    1,983    28,890    80,334    AA 
Arizona   7,003    -    65,459    72,462    AA 
Florida   -    3,545    52,938    56,483    A+ 
Ohio   13,489    7,196    29,865    50,550    AA+ 
Colorado   30,456    1,795    17,239    49,490    AA- 
Illinois   20,460    -    28,259    48,719    AA- 
North Carolina   13,603    3,705    23,977    41,285    AA 
Missouri   17,010    - <