XNAS:ORIT Oritani Financial Corp Annual Report 10-K Filing - 6/30/2012

Effective Date 6/30/2012

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Table of Contents

 

 

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

450 Fifth Street, N.W.

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2012

or

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from             to             

Commission File No. 001-34786

 

 

Oritani Financial Corp.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   30-0628335

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification Number)

370 Pascack Road, Township of Washington   07676
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   Zip Code

(201) 664-5400

(Registrant’s telephone number)

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $0.01 par value   The NASDAQ Stock Market, LLC

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    YES  ¨    NO  x

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    YES  ¨    NO  x

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding twelve months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such requirements for the past 90 days.     YES  x    NO  ¨.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    YES  x    NO  ¨.

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.   x.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a small reporting company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨    Accelerated filer   x
Non-accelerated filer   ¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).     YES  ¨    NO  x

As of September 12, 2012, there were 56,245,065 shares of the Registrant’s common stock, par value $0.01 per share, issued and 45,201,715 shares outstanding.

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the Registrant, computed by reference to the last sale price on December 31, 2011, as reported by the Nasdaq Global Market, was approximately $487.5 million.

 

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

1. Proxy Statement for the 2012 Annual Meeting of Stockholders of the Registrant (Part III).

 

 

 


Table of Contents

Oritani Financial Corp.

2012 Annual Report on Form 10-K

Index

 

     Page  
Part I   

Item 1. Business

     2   

Item 1A. Risk Factors

     39   

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

     44   

Item 2. Properties

     44   

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

     44   

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

     44   
Part II   

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

     44   

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

     46   

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     48   

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

     64   

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplemental Data

     64   

Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

     65   

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

     65   

Item 9B. Other Information

     65   
Part III   

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

     66   

Item 11. Executive Compensation

     66   

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

     66   

Item 13 Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

     66   

Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services

     66   
Part IV   

Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

     66   

Signatures

     120   


Table of Contents

PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Forward Looking Statements

This Annual Report contains certain “forward looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Such forward looking statements may be identified by reference to a future period or periods, or by use of forward looking terminology, such as “may,” “will,” “believe,” “expect,” “estimate,” “anticipate,” “continue,” or similar terms or variations on those terms, or the negative of those terms. Forward-looking statements are subject to significant risks, assumptions, and uncertainties, including, among other things, the following important factors that could affect the actual outcome of future events: general economic conditions, either nationally or in our market or service areas, that are worse than expected; significantly increased competition among depository and other financial institutions; inflation and changes in the interest rate environment that reduce our margins or fair value of financial instruments; changes in laws or government regulations affecting financial institutions, including changes in regulatory fees and capital requirements; our ability to enter new markets successfully and capitalize on growth opportunities; changes in consumer spending, borrowing, and savings habits; changes in accounting policies and practices, as may be adopted by the bank regulatory agencies, taxing authorities and the Financial Accounting Standards Board; and changes in our organization, compensation, and benefit plans.

Oritani Financial Corp. (“the Company”) wishes to caution readers not to place undue reliance on any such forward looking statements, which speak only as of the date made. The Company wishes to advise readers that the factors listed above could affect the Company’s financial performance and could cause the Company’s actual results for future periods to differ materially from any opinions or statements expressed with respect to future periods in any current statements. The Company does not undertake and specifically declines any obligation to publicly release the results of any revisions, which may be made to any forward looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of such statements or to reflect the occurrence of anticipated or unanticipated events.

Oritani Financial Corp.

Oritani Financial Corp. is the stock holding company for Oritani Bank. It is a Delaware corporation that was incorporated in March 2010. The Company is the successor to Oritani Financial Corp. (“Oritani-Federal”), a federal corporation and former stock holding company of Oritani Bank. In conjunction with the second step transaction of Oritani Financial Corp., MHC, the former mutual holding company parent, Oritani-Federal ceased to exist and the Company became its successor. The second step transaction was completed on June 24, 2010. The Company sold a total of 41,363,214 shares of common stock at $10.00 per share in the related stock offering. Concurrent with the completion of the offering, shares of Oritani-Federal common stock owned by public stockholders were exchanged for 1.50 shares of the Company’s common stock. In lieu of fractional shares, shareholders were paid in cash. The Company also issued 481,546 shares of common stock for the accelerated vesting of restricted stock awards triggered by the conversion. As a result of the offering, the exchange, and shares issued due to the accelerated vesting, as of June 30, 2010, the Company had 56,202,485 shares outstanding. Net proceeds from the offering were $401.8 million. As a result of the conversion, all share information has been revised to reflect the 1.50- to- one conversion rate.

Oritani Financial Corp. owns 100% of the outstanding shares of common stock of Oritani Bank. Oritani Financial Corp. primarily engages in the business of holding the common stock of Oritani Bank as well as two limited liability companies that own a variety of real estate investments. Oritani Financial Corp.’s executive office is located at 370 Pascack Road, in the Township of Washington, New Jersey 07676, and its telephone number is (201) 664-5400. Oritani Financial Corp. is subject to comprehensive regulation and examination by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (“FRB”). At June 30, 2012, Oritani Financial Corp. had consolidated assets of $2.70 billion, consolidated deposits of $1.39 billion and consolidated stockholders’ equity of $510.7 million. Its consolidated net income for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012 was $31.7 million.

 

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Oritani Financial Corp.’s website (www.oritani.com) contains a link to the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission including copies of annual reports on Form 10-K, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to these filings, if any. These filings can be found under the ‘Investor Relations’ heading. Oritani-Federal filings can also be found here. Information on the website should not be considered a part of this report.

Oritani Bank

General

Oritani Bank is a New Jersey-chartered savings bank headquartered in the Township of Washington, New Jersey. Oritani Bank was originally founded in 1911, as a New Jersey building and loan association. Over the years, Oritani Bank has expanded through internal growth as well as through a series of business combinations. Oritani Bank conducts business from its main office located at 370 Pascack Road, in the Township of Washington, New Jersey 07676, two lending offices in New York and its 24 branch offices located in the New Jersey Counties of Bergen, Hudson, Essex and Passaic. The telephone number at its main office is (201) 664-5400. At June 30, 2012, our assets totaled $2.67 billion and our deposits totaled $1.41 billion.

Our principal business consists of attracting retail and commercial bank deposits from the general public in the areas surrounding our main office in the Township of Washington, New Jersey, our lending offices in New York and our branch offices located in the New Jersey Counties of Bergen, Hudson, Essex and Passaic, and investing those deposits, together with funds generated from operations, in multifamily and commercial real estate loans, one to four family residential mortgage loans as well as in second mortgage and equity loans, construction loans, business loans, other consumer loans, and investment securities. We originate loans primarily for investment and hold such loans in our portfolio. Occasionally, we will also enter into loan participations. Our revenues are derived principally from interest on loans and securities as well as our investments in real estate and real estate joint ventures. We also generate revenues from fees and service charges and other income. Our primary sources of funds are deposits, borrowings and principal and interest payments on loans and securities.

Market Area

From our headquarters in the Township of Washington, New Jersey, we operate 25 full service branches, including our main office. We operate branches in four counties of New Jersey: Bergen, Hudson, Essex and Passaic. The majority of our branches (seventeen) and deposits are located in Bergen County. In addition, we operate five branches in Hudson County, one branch in Essex County and two branches in Passaic County. Our market area for commercial lending is broader, generally extending about 150 miles from our headquarters. Our lending area includes the state of New Jersey, the broader New York metropolitan area, southern New York, eastern Pennsylvania, and southern Connecticut. Our consumer lending is generally limited to the bank’s designated lending area which is considerably closer to our branch offices.

In terms of population, Bergen County ranks as the largest county in New Jersey (out of 21 counties) while Hudson County ranks fourth, Essex County ranks third and Passaic County ranks ninth. The economy in our primary market area has benefited from being varied and diverse. It is largely urban and suburban with a broad economic base. As one of the wealthiest states in the nation, New Jersey, with a population of 8.8 million, is considered one of the most attractive banking markets in the United States. As of July 2012, the unemployment rate for New Jersey was 9.8%, which was higher than the national rate of 8.3%, with a total of 3.9 million New Jersey residents employed as of July 2012. Bergen County is considered part of the New York metropolitan area. Its county seat is Hackensack. Bergen County ranks 20th among the highest-income counties in the United States in 2009 in terms of per-capita income. Some of Bergen County’s major employers are: Hackensack University Medical Center; Valley Health Systems; Medco Health Solutions; the County of Bergen; Quest Diagnostics, Inc.; Bio-Reference Laboratories, Inc.; Englewood Hospital and Medical Center; Becton Dickinson & Company; Englewood Hospital Home Health Care Services and Unilever Best Foods. See “Item 1A, Risk Factors – Current Market and Economic Conditions May Significantly Affect Our Operations and Financial Condition.”

Bergen County is bordered by Rockland County, New York to the north, the Hudson River to the east, Hudson County to the south, Passaic County to the west and also a small border with Essex County to the west.

 

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Passaic County is bordered by Orange County, New York to the north, Rockland County, New York to the northeast, Bergen County to the east, Essex County to the south, Morris County to the southwest and Sussex County to the west.

Essex County is bordered by Passaic County to the north, Morris County to the west, Union County to the south, Hudson County to the east and also a small border with Bergen County to the east.

Hudson County’s only land border is with Bergen County to the north and west. It is bordered by the Hudson River and Upper New York Bay to the east; Kill van Kull (which connects Newark Bay with Upper New York Bay) to the south and Newark Bay and the Hackensack River or the Passaic River to the west.

Competition

We face intense competition within our market area both in making loans and attracting deposits. Our market area has a high concentration of financial institutions including large money center and regional banks, community banks and credit unions. Some of our competitors offer products and services that we currently do not offer, such as trust services and private banking. As of June 30, 2011, the latest date for which statistics are available, our market share of deposits was approximately 3.1% in Bergen County and less than 1.0% in each of Hudson and Passaic Counties. We had no deposits in Essex County at June 30, 2011.

Our competition for loans and deposits comes principally from locally owned and out-of-state commercial banks, savings institutions, mortgage banking firms, insurance companies, the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (FHLMC), the Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA) and credit unions. We face additional competition for deposits from short-term money market funds, brokerage firms, mutual funds and insurance companies. Our primary focus is to build and develop profitable customer relationships across all lines of business while maintaining our role as a community bank.

Lending Activities

Our principal lending activity is the origination of multifamily loans and commercial real estate loans as well as residential real estate mortgage loans and construction loans secured by property located primarily in our market area. Our multifamily loans consist primarily of mortgage loans secured by apartment buildings. Our commercial real estate loans consist primarily of mortgage loans secured by commercial offices, retail space, warehouses and mixed-use buildings. Our residential real estate mortgage loans consist of one to four family residential real property and consumer loans. Construction loans consist primarily of one to four family and commercial development projects. We curtailed construction lending during fiscal 2009 due to market and economic conditions and now only originate such loans on an exception basis. Second mortgage and equity loans consist primarily of home equity loans and home equity lines of credit. Multifamily and commercial real estate loans represented $1.80 billion, or 88%, of our total loan portfolio at June 30, 2012. One to four family residential real estate mortgage loans represented $139.1 million, or 6.8%, of our total loan portfolio at June 30, 2012. As market rates for residential loans have decreased, Oritani Bank’s rate for these products have been less than competitive. Consequently, residential loan balances have been decreasing throughout the last three fiscal years. We also offer second mortgages and equity loans. At June 30, 2012, such loans totaled $30.1 million, or 1.5%, of our loan portfolio. At June 30, 2012, construction and land loans totaled $48.9 million, or 2.4%, of our loan portfolio. At June 30, 2012, other loans, which primarily consist of business and to a smaller extent, account loans, totaled $17.6 million, or 0.9% of our loan portfolio.

 

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Loan Portfolio Composition. The following table sets forth the composition of our loan portfolio, by type of loan at the dates indicated.

 

     At June 30,  
     2012     2011     2010     2009     2008  
     Amount      Percent     Amount      Percent     Amount      Percent     Amount      Percent     Amount      Percent  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Residential

   $ 139,072         6.8   $ 172,972         10.1   $ 244,126         15.9   $ 265,962         20.4   $ 223,087         21.8   

Multi-family

     679,783         33.5        474,776         27.8        360,380         23.5        277,589         21.3        237,490         23.2   

Commercial real estate

     1,116,335         54.9        901,916         52.9        760,076         49.5        562,138         43.3        359,681         35.2   

Second mortgage and equity loans

     30,052         1.5        38,706         2.3        48,110         3.1        54,769         4.2        59,886         5.8   

Construction and land loans

     48,887         2.4        86,502         5.1        102,137         6.6        130,831         10.0        138,195         13.5   

Other loans

     17,622         0.9        30,571         1.8        21,753         1.4        10,993         0.8        4,880         0.5   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total loans

     2,031,751         100.0     1,705,443         100.0     1,536,582         100.0     1,302,282         100.0     1,023,219         100.0   
     

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

Other items:

                         

Net deferred loan origination fees

     7,747           6,080           4,800           2,979           2,610      

Allowance for loan losses

     31,187           26,514           25,902           20,680           13,532      
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

    

Total loans, net

   $ 1,992,817         $ 1,672,849         $ 1,505,880         $ 1,278,623         $ 1,007,077      
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

    

Loan Portfolio Maturities and Yields. The following table summarizes the scheduled repayments of our loan portfolio at June 30, 2012. Maturities are based on the final contractual payment date and do not reflect the effect of prepayments and scheduled principal amortization.

 

    Residential     Multi-family     Commercial     Second Mortgage     Construction and Land     Other Loans     Total  
    Amount     Weighted
Average Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average Rate
 
    (Dollars in thousands)  

Due During the Years Ending June 30,

                           

2013

    4,704        5.40        1,608        6.98        33,849        5.97        108        5.62        32,289        6.04        9,178        6.06        81,736        5.99   

2014

    5,670        5.30        2,379        6.41        22,826        6.44        446        5.08        4,057        4.80        5,730        2.42        41,108        5.54   

2015 to 2016

    952        5.19        46,742        5.46        76,665        5.99        1,906        5.04        1,709        6.15        700        6.69        128,674        5.78   

2017 to 2021

    17,743        4.94        193,055        5.27        496,949        6.01        7,721        5.13        —          0.00        257        6.04        715,725        5.78   

2022 to 2026

    11,305        5.27        288,139        4.53        350,558        4.81        7,790        5.19        —          0.00        304        6.50        658,096        4.70   

2027 and beyond

    98,698        5.03        147,860        5.51        135,488        6.35        12,081        5.38        10,832        6.36        1,453        5.49        406,412        5.69   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

  $ 139,072        5.06   $ 679,783        5.03   $ 1,116,335        5.68   $ 30,052        5.24   $ 48,887        6.01   $ 17,622        4.86   $ 2,031,751        5.41
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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The following table sets forth, at June 30, 2012, the dollar amount of all fixed- and adjustable-rate loans that are contractually due after June 30, 2013.

 

     Due After June 30, 2013  
     Fixed      Adjustable      Total  
     (In thousands)  

Residential

   $ 106,569       $ 27,799       $ 134,368   

Multi-family

     184,468         493,707         678,175   

Commercial estate Loans

     384,666         697,820         1,082,486   

Second mortgage and equity loans

     23,583         6,361         29,944   

Construction and land loans

     13,886         2,711         16,597   

Other loans

     1,800         6,644         8,444   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total loans

   $ 714,972       $ 1,235,042       $ 1,950,014   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Loans:

Residential Loans. We originate one to four family residential mortgage loans substantially all of which are secured by properties located in our primary market area. At June 30, 2012, $139.1 million, or 6.8% of our loan portfolio, consisted of one to four family residential mortgage loans. We generally retain for our portfolio substantially all of the loans that we originate. One to four family mortgage loan originations are generally obtained from existing or past customers, through advertising, and through referrals from local builders, real estate brokers, and attorneys and are underwritten pursuant to Oritani Bank’s policies and standards. In 2008, the Company began a program where a fee is paid to a broker for a loan referral that results in an origination or a purchase of a recently closed loan. Generally, one to four family residential mortgage loans are originated in amounts up to 80% of the lesser of the appraised value or purchase price of the property, with private mortgage insurance required on loans with a loan-to-value ratio in excess of 80%. We generally will not make loans with a loan-to-value ratio in excess of 90%. Fixed rate mortgage loans are originated for terms of up to 30 years. Generally, fixed rate residential mortgage loans are underwritten according to Freddie Mac guidelines, policies and procedures, with a maximum origination amount of $2.0 million. We do not originate or purchase, and our loan portfolio does not include, any sub-prime loans.

We also offer adjustable rate mortgage loans for one to four family properties, with an interest rate based on the weekly average yield on U.S. Treasuries adjusted to a constant maturity of one-year, which adjust either annually or every three years from the outset of the loan or which adjusts annually after a five-, seven- or ten-year initial fixed rate period. Originations and purchases of adjustable rate one to four family residential loans totaled $2.1 million during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012 as compared to total originations and purchases of $20.2 million of one to four family residential loans during the 2011 fiscal year. Our adjustable rate mortgage loans generally provide for maximum rate adjustments of 2% per adjustment, with a lifetime maximum adjustment up to 6%, regardless of the initial rate. Our adjustable rate mortgage loans amortize over terms of up to 30 years.

Adjustable rate mortgage loans decrease the Bank’s risk associated with changes in market interest rates by periodically repricing, but involve other risks because, as interest rates increase, the underlying payments by the borrower increase, thus increasing the potential for default by the borrower. At the same time, the marketability of the underlying collateral may be adversely affected by higher interest rates. Upward adjustment of the contractual interest rate is also limited by the maximum periodic and lifetime interest rate adjustments permitted by our loan documents and, therefore, the effectiveness of adjustable rate mortgage loans may be limited during periods of rapidly rising interest rates. At June 30, 2012, $27.8 million, or 19.9% of our one to four family residential real estate loans, had adjustable rates of interest.

 

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In an effort to provide financing for first-time homebuyers, we offer our own first-time homebuyer loan program. This program offers one to four family residential mortgage loans to qualified individuals. These loans are offered with terms and adjustable and fixed rates of interest similar to our other one to four family mortgage loan products. With this program, borrowers receive a discounted mortgage interest rate and do not pay certain loan origination fees. Such loans must be secured by an owner-occupied residence. These loans are originated using similar underwriting guidelines as our other one to four family mortgage loans. Such loans are originated in amounts of up to 90% of the lower of the property’s appraised value or the sale price. Private mortgage insurance is not required for such loans. The maximum amount of such loan is $275,000. We also participate in the Federal Home Loan Bank’s (“FHLB”) Mortgage Partnership Finance (“MPF”) program. The MPF program offers lower rates to qualified individuals on one to four family residential mortgage loans and provides the Bank with additional opportunity for income. Loans originated through the MPF program can be sold to FHLB with minimal recourse to the Bank.

We also offer our directors, officers and employees who satisfy certain criteria and our general underwriting standards fixed or adjustable rate loan products with reduced interest rates, excluding loans originated through the MPF program. These loans adhere to all other terms and conditions contained in the loan policy.

All residential mortgage loans that we originate include “due-on-sale” clauses, which give us the right to declare a loan immediately due and payable in the event that, among other things, the borrower sells or otherwise disposes of the real property subject to the mortgage and the loan is not repaid. Regulations limit the amount that a savings bank may lend relative to the appraised value of the real estate securing the loan, as determined by an appraisal of the property at the time the loan is originated. All borrowers are required to obtain title insurance for the benefit of Oritani Bank. We also require homeowner’s insurance and fire and casualty insurance and, where circumstances warrant, flood insurance on properties securing real estate loans.

Multifamily and Commercial Real Estate Loans. We originate non-residential commercial real estate mortgage loans and loans on multifamily dwellings. At June 30, 2012, $1.80 billion, or 88% of our loan portfolio, consisted of multifamily and commercial real estate loans. Our commercial real estate mortgage loans are primarily permanent loans secured by improved property such as retail stores, mixed-use properties, self-storage facilities, mobile home parks, commercial warehouses and office buildings. The retail store caption includes stand alone groceries and drug stores, and we generally seek this type of anchor tenant at multi-store facilities. Our multifamily mortgage loans are primarily permanent loans secured by apartment buildings. The typical loan has a fixed rate of interest for the first five years, after which the loan reprices to a market index plus a spread, with a floor of the original rate. The fixed rate period is occasionally extended to as much as ten years. These loans typically amortize over 30 years though we will often require shorter amortization. We also offer such loans on a self-amortizing basis with fixed rate terms up to 20 years. References to commercial real estate loans below refer to multifamily and commercial real estate.

The terms and conditions of each loan are tailored to the needs of the borrower and based on the financial strength of the project and any guarantors. In reaching a decision on whether to make a commercial real estate loan, we consider the net operating income of the property, the borrower’s expertise and credit history, risks inherent in the property’s tenants, the global cash flows of the borrower, the value of the underlying property and other factors. Loan to value ratios are a very important consideration. While our lending policies allow commercial real estate loan originations in an amount up to 80% of the appraised value or the purchase price of the property, whichever is less, our maximum loan to value ratio is generally 75%. Other factors we consider, with respect to commercial real estate rental properties, include the term of the lease(s) and the quality of the tenant(s). We generally require that the properties securing these real estate loans have debt service coverage ratios (the ratio of earnings before debt service to debt service) of at least 1.2 times. Environmental reports are generally required for commercial real estate loans. Commercial real estate loans made to corporations, partnerships and other business entities may require personal guarantees by the principals as warranted. Property inspections are conducted no less than every three years, or more frequently as warranted. Bank lending policies allow lending up to the 80% loan to value level and 1.2 times debt service coverage ratio. However, in 2008, we informally reduced our maximum loan to value ratios and increased our maximum debt service coverage ratio, as well as taking a more conservative approach on other underwriting issues. We continue to underwrite to these informal changes. We believe these actions have resulted in originations that are more conservative in nature than Bank policy allows. We intend to maintain this conservative posture at least as long as we perceive a heightened economic risk in this type of lending.

 

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For commercial loans with balances greater than $1.0 million, a borrower’s financial information is monitored on an ongoing basis by requiring periodic financial statement updates, payment history reviews and periodic face-to-face meetings with the borrower. We require commercial borrowers to provide annually updated financial statements and federal tax returns. These requirements also apply to the individual principals of our commercial borrowers. We also require borrowers with rental investment property to provide an annual report of income and expenses for the property, including a tenant list and copies of leases, as applicable. The largest commercial real estate loan in our portfolio at June 30, 2012 was a $21.0 million loan secured by a shopping center, located in Putnam County, New York. This loan is performing in accordance with its terms. Our largest commercial real estate relationship consisted of 10 properties primarily secured by multifamily dwellings located mainly in our primary market area with a real estate investor. The aggregate outstanding loan balance for this relationship is $47.0 million at June 30, 2012, and these loans are all performing in accordance with their terms.

Loans secured by commercial real estate, including multifamily properties, generally involve larger principal amounts and a greater degree of risk than one to four family residential mortgage loans. Because payments on loans secured by commercial real estate are often dependent on successful operation or management of the properties, repayment of such loans may be affected by adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy. See “Item 1A, Risk Factors – Current Market and Economic Conditions May Significantly Affect Our Operations and Financial Condition.”

Second Mortgage and Equity Loans. We also offer second mortgage and equity loans and home equity lines of credit, each of which are secured by one to four family residences, substantially all of which are located in our primary market area. At June 30, 2012, second mortgage and equity loans totaled $30.1 million, or 1.5% of total loans. Additionally, at June 30, 2012, the unadvanced amounts of home equity lines of credit totaled $11.1 million. The underwriting standards utilized for home equity loans and equity lines of credit include a determination of the applicant’s credit history, an assessment of the applicant’s ability to meet existing obligations and payments on the proposed loan and the value of the collateral securing the loan. The combined (first and second mortgage liens) loan-to-value ratio for home equity loans and equity lines of credit is generally limited to 70%. Home equity loans are offered with fixed and adjustable rates of interest and with terms of up to 30 years. Our home equity lines of credit have adjustable rates of interest which are indexed to the prime rate, as reported in The Wall Street Journal.

Equity loans entail greater risk than do residential mortgage loans, particularly if they are secured by an asset that has a superior security interest. In addition, equity loan collections depend on the borrower’s continuing financial stability, and thus are more likely to be adversely affected by job loss, divorce, illness or personal bankruptcy.

Construction Loans. We originate construction loans for the development of one to four family residential properties located in our primary market area. Residential construction loans are generally offered to experienced local developers operating in our primary market area and to individuals for the construction of their personal residences. At June 30, 2012, residential construction loans amounted to $32.1 million, or 1.6% of total loans.

Our residential construction loans generally provide for the payment of interest only during the construction phase, but in no event exceeding 24 months. Residential construction loans can be made with a maximum loan-to-value ratio of 75% of the appraised value of the land and 100% of the costs associated with the construction. Residential construction loans are generally made on the same terms as our one to four family mortgage loans. At June 30, 2012, the largest residential construction loan was for $19.0 million, with an outstanding balance of $19.0 million and is secured by a single family estate home with an appraised value of $56.0 million. The construction phase has been completed and is currently listed for sale. While this loan has performed according to its terms, the loan has been extended primarily due to the “select” market availability for a home of this magnitude. This loan was classified as watch and was performing according to it terms at June 30, 2012.

We also make construction loans for commercial development projects. The projects include multifamily, apartment, retail and office buildings. We generally require that a commitment for permanent financing be in place prior to closing the construction loan. The maximum loan-to-value ratio limit applicable to these loans is generally 80%. At June 30, 2012, commercial construction loans totaled $16.8 million, or 0.8% of total loans. At June 30, 2012, the largest outstanding commercial construction loan commitment was for $10.5 million, with an outstanding

 

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balance of $10.5 million and is secured by an office and warehouse space complex. This loan was performing according to its terms at June 30, 2012.

Before making a commitment to fund a construction loan, we require an appraisal on the property by an independent licensed appraiser. We require title insurance and, if applicable, an environmental survey prior to making a commitment to fund a construction loan. We generally also review and inspect each property before disbursement of funds during the terms of the construction loan. Loan proceeds are disbursed after inspection based on the percentage of completion method.

Construction and development financing is generally considered to involve a higher degree of credit risk than long-term financing on improved, owner-occupied real estate. Risk of loss on a construction loan depends largely upon the accuracy of the initial estimate of the value of the property at completion of construction compared to the estimated cost (including interest) of construction and other assumptions. If the estimate of construction cost proves to be inaccurate, we may be required to advance funds beyond the amount originally committed in order to protect the value of the property. Additionally, if the estimate of value proves to be inaccurate, we may be confronted with a project, when completed, having a value which is insufficient to assure full repayment.

We chose to reduce our exposure to construction lending during fiscal 2009 due to market and economic conditions. Such loans are now only originated on an exception basis. Construction originations for the years ended June 30, 2012 and 2011 were $5.7 million and $11.8 million, respectively, versus $19.1 million for the comparable 2010 period.

Other Loans. Other loans totaled $17.6 million or 0.9% of our total loan portfolio at June 30, 2012. Other loans primarily consist of business loans secured by cash and other business assets, account loans, and commercial line of credit loans. Commercial line of credit loans totaled $11.3 million. In 2009, Oritani decided to limit new line of credit lending to well-established customers.

Loan Originations, Purchases, Sales, Participations and Servicing of Loans. Lending activities are conducted primarily by our loan personnel operating at our main office as well as commercial real estate origination offices in Rockland County, New York and New York City. All loans originated by us are underwritten pursuant to our policies and procedures. We originate both adjustable rate and fixed rate loans. Our ability to originate fixed or adjustable rate loans is dependent upon the relative customer demand for such loans, which is affected by the current and expected future levels of market interest rates.

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012, loan originations totaled $528.4 million and purchases totaled $2.0 million, all of which were retained by us. In 2012, loans originated and sold under the FHLB MPF program totaled $400,000. There were no sales of loans in fiscal 2011 or 2010.

We will also participate in loans, sometimes as the “lead lender.” Whether we are the lead lender or not, we underwrite our participation portion of the loan according to our own underwriting criteria and procedures. At June 30, 2012, we had $46.3 million in loan participation interests.

At June 30, 2012, we were servicing loans sold in the amount of $2.6 million. Loan servicing includes collecting and remitting loan payments, accounting for principal and interest, contacting delinquent mortgagors, supervising foreclosures and property dispositions in the event of unremedied defaults, making certain insurance and tax payments on behalf of the borrowers and generally administering the loans.

Non-performing and Problem Assets

We commence collection efforts when a loan becomes ten days past due with system generated reminder notices. Subsequent late charges and delinquent notices are issued and the account is monitored on a regular basis thereafter. Collections meetings with executive management are regularly held and every delinquent loan is discussed. When a loan is more than 30 days past due, the credit file is reviewed and, if deemed necessary, information is updated or confirmed and collateral re-evaluated. Personal, direct contact with the borrower is attempted early in the collection process. We make every effort to contact the borrower and develop a plan of repayment to cure the delinquency. A summary report of all loans 30 days or more past due is reported to the Board

 

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of Directors on a monthly basis. If no repayment plan is in process and the loan is delinquent at least two payments, the file is referred to counsel for the commencement of foreclosure or other collection efforts.

Loans are placed on non-accrual status when they are more than 90 days delinquent. When loans are placed on a non-accrual status, unpaid accrued interest is fully reversed. Once the outstanding principal balance is brought current, income is recognized to the extent the loan is deemed fully collectible. If the deficiencies causing the delinquency are resolved, such loans may be returned to accrual status once all arrearages are resolved and a period of satisfactory payment performance, usually six months. See additional discussion regarding our non-performing assets at June 30, 2012 in “Management Discussion and Analysis.”

Non-Performing Assets and Restructured Loans. The table below sets forth the amounts and categories of our non-performing assets at the dates indicated. At June 30, 2012 and 2011, we had non-performing troubled debt restructurings (“TDR”) of $6.6 million and $8.0 million, respectively, which are included in the appropriate categories in the non-accrual table below. Additionally, we had $5.1 million and $1.5 million of troubled debt restructurings on accrual status at June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively, which do not appear in the table below. We had no troubled debt restructurings at June 30, 2010, 2009, and 2008.

 

     At June 30,  
     2012 (1)     2011 (2)     2010     2009 (3)     2008 (4)  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Non-accrual loans:

          

Residential

   $ 4,573      $ 1,005      $ 55      $ 98      $ 67   

Multifamily

     616        549        —          6,291        —     

Commercial real estate

     6,124        3,456        17,835        25,685        —     

Second mortgage and equity loans

     274        263        62        —          —     

Construction and land loans

     6,637        8,332        20,173        20,391        14,143   

Other loans

     118        1,698        —          —          —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total non-accrual loans

   $ 18,342      $ 15,303      $ 38,125      $ 52,465      $ 14,210   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loans greater than 90 days delinquent and still accruing

   $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total non-performing loans

   $ 18,342      $ 15,303      $ 38,125      $ 52,465      $ 14,210   

Real estate owned

     2,740        3,967        3,031        —          —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total non-performing assets

   $ 21,082      $ 19,270      $ 41,156      $ 52,465      $ 14,210   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ratios:

          

Non-performing loans to total loans

     0.90     0.90     2.48     4.03     1.39

Non-performing assets to total assets

     0.78     0.74     1.66     2.74     0.98

 

(1) Included in nonaccrual loans are one residential loan totaling $34,000 and one construction loan totaling $1.7 million that were less than 30 days delinquent and one equity loan totaling $7,000 that was less than 90 days delinquent.
(2) Two construction loans totaling $4.9 million and one other loan totaling $1.5 million were less than 30 days delinquent at June 30, 2011 and were classified as non-accrual.
(3) Two construction loans totaling $4.2 million were less than 60 days delinquent at June 30, 2009 and were classified as non-accrual.
(4) One construction loan totaling $335,000 was less than 60 days delinquent at June 30, 2008 and was classified as non-accrual.

As noted in the above table, there were nonaccrual loans of $18.3 million at June 30, 2012 and $15.3 million at June 30, 2011. Additional interest income of $1.1 million and $2.4 million would have been recorded during the years ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively, if the loans had performed in accordance with their original terms. Interest income on these loans of $58,000 and $423,000 was included in net income for the years ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively. See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations- Comparison of Operating Results for the Years Ended June 30, 2012 and June 30, 2011, Provision for Loan Losses.”

 

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Delinquent Loans. The following table sets forth our loan delinquencies by type, by amount and by percentage of type at the dates indicated.

 

     Loans Delinquent For                
     60-89 Days      90 Days and over      Total  
     Number      Amount      Number      Amount      Number      Amount  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

At June 30, 2012

                 

Residential

     2       $ 1,722         10       $ 4,539         12       $ 6,261   

Multifamily

     1         1,125         3         616         4         1,741   

Commercial real estate

     3         2,520         9         6,124         12         8,644   

Second mortgage and equity loans

     1         7         2         267         3         274   

Construction and land loans

     1         3,188         1         4,895         2         8,083   

Other loans

     —           —           2         118         2         118   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     8       $ 8,562         27       $ 16,559         35       $ 25,121   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

At June 30, 2011

                 

Residential

     4       $ 1,087         4       $ 1,005         8       $ 2,092   

Multifamily

     2         3,810         3         550         5         4,360   

Commercial real estate

     1         307         6         3,456         7         3,763   

Second mortgage and equity loans

     2         123         3         263         5         386   

Construction and land loans

     —           —           4         8,332         4         8,332   

Other loans

     —           —           3         1,697         3         1,697   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     9       $ 5,327         23       $ 15,303         32       $ 20,630   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

At June 30, 2010

                 

Residential

     4       $ 762         1       $ 55         5       $ 817   

Multifamily

     —           —           —           —           —           —     

Commercial real estate

     4         2,105         3         17,835         7         19,940   

Second mortgage and equity loans

     1         19         1         62         2         81   

Construction and land loans

     1         1,743         5         20,173         6         21,916   

Other loans

     —           —           —           —           —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     10       $ 4,629         10       $ 38,125         20       $ 42,754   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

At June 30, 2009

                 

Residential

     1       $ 197         2       $ 98         3       $ 295   

Multifamily

     —           —           2         6,291         2         6,291   

Commercial real estate

     3         17,209         7         25,685         10         42,894   

Second mortgage and equity loans

     —           —           —           —           —           —     

Construction and land loans

     1         419         5         15,765         6         16,184   

Other loans

     —           —           —           —           —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     5       $ 17,825         16       $ 47,839         21       $ 65,664   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

At June 30, 2008

                 

Residential

     —         $ —           2       $ 68         2       $ 68   

Multifamily

     —           —           —           —           —           —     

Commercial real estate

     —           —           —           —           —           —     

Second mortgage and equity loans

     1         18         —           —           1         18   

Construction and land loans

     —           —           2         13,808         2         13,808   

Other loans

     —           —           —           —           —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     1       $ 18         4       $ 13,876         5       $ 13,894   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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In addition to the delinquent loans listed above, we had loans that were delinquent 90 days or more past due as to principal. Typically, such loans had passed their maturity date but continued making monthly payments, keeping their interest current, while negotiating external financing or an extension from the Company. These loans totaled $6.5 million at June 30, 2012. One loan, with a principal balance of $630,000 continued making monthly payments and was subsequently extended by us, which negated its past due maturity status. Another loan, with a principal balance of $2.7 million, has continued making monthly payments. However, extension terms amenable to the Company have not yet been negotiated. A third loan, with a principal balance of $3.2 million, subsequently became past due regarding the monthly payments and is currently classified as nonaccrual. At June 30, 2011 and 2010, loans that had passed their maturity date but continued making monthly payments, keeping their interest current until paid in full or extended totaled $6.3 million and $5.6 million, respectively.

Real Estate Owned. Real estate acquired by us as a result of foreclosure or by deed in lieu of foreclosure is classified as real estate owned until sold. When property is acquired it is recorded at the lower of cost or fair market value at the date of foreclosure, establishing a new cost basis. Holding costs and declines in fair value result in charges to expense after acquisition. The Company had real estate owned of $2.7 million at June 30, 2012 and $4.0 million at June 30, 2011. During the twelve months ended June 30, 2012, Oritani Bank obtained title to seven properties securing $3.9 million of non-performing loans. The properties were written down to $2.8 million upon acquisition and were subsequently written down further to $2.4 million by June 30, 2012. The Company sold ten properties with book value of $3.7 million during the twelve months ended June 30, 2012. Proceeds from the sale of real estate owned were $3.9 million, resulting in gross gains and gross losses of $237,000 and $27,000, respectively.

Classified Assets. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) regulations provide that loans and other assets of lesser quality should be classified as “substandard,” “doubtful” or “loss” assets. An asset is considered “substandard” if it is inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or of the collateral pledged, if any. “Substandard” assets include those characterized by the “distinct possibility” that we will sustain “some loss” if the deficiencies are not corrected. Assets classified as “doubtful” have all of the weaknesses inherent in those classified “substandard,” with the added characteristic that the weaknesses present make “collection or liquidation in full,” on the basis of currently existing facts, conditions, and values, “highly questionable and improbable.” Assets classified as “loss” are those considered “uncollectible” and of such little value that their continuance as assets without the establishment of a specific loss reserve is not warranted.

We are required to establish general allowances for loan losses for loans classified substandard or doubtful, as well as for other problem loans, including those classified as special mention or watch. General allowances represent loss allowances which have been established to recognize the inherent losses associated with lending activities, but which, unlike specific allowances, have not been allocated to particular problem assets. When we classify problem assets as “loss,” we are required either to establish a specific allowance for losses equal to 100% of the amount of the asset so classified or to charge off such amount. Since 2005, the Company has engaged a third party loan review firm to help ensure that loans are properly classified. They report to the Audit Committee quarterly and their scope is determined by the Audit Committee annually. On an annual basis, the loan review firm reviews a significant portion of the existing portfolio over the course of the year, typically an aggregate of at least 60% of the commercial real estate, multifamily and construction loan portfolios, including a sampling of both new and seasoned loans, a review of all Regulation “O” loans and review of all delinquent loans. Our determination as to the classification of our assets and the amount of our valuation allowances is subject to review by the FDIC and the New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance (“NJDOBI”) which can order the establishment of additional general or specific loss allowances. Such examinations typically occur annually. Our last examination by the FDIC was as of June 30, 2011 and as of March 31, 2010 by the NJDOBI.

The following table shows the aggregate amounts of our classified assets, including non-performing loans, at the date indicated.

 

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     Classified Assets At  
     June 30, 2012      June 30, 2011      June 30, 2010  
     Number      Amount      Number      Amount      Number      Amount  

Substandard assets:

                 

Residential

     13       $ 5,219         4       $ 1,005         1       $ 55   

Multi-family loans

     6         6,004         3         3,979         —           —     

Commercial real estate loans

     19         23,793         9         8,590         9         25,219   

Second mortgage and equity loans

     2         267         3         263         —           —     

Construction and land loans

     7         10,699         8         15,195         11         31,424   

Other loans

     2         117         3         1,698         2         699   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     49       $ 46,099         30       $ 30,730         23       $ 57,397   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The loan portfolio is reviewed on a regular basis to determine whether any loans require classification in accordance with applicable regulations. Not all classified assets constitute non-performing assets.

We also utilize additional classifications for assets that do not meet the definition of any of the classified assets yet contain an element that warrants a rating that is less than “pass.” We classify an asset as “special mention” if the asset has a potential weakness that warrants management’s close attention. While such assets are not impaired, management has concluded that if the potential weakness in the asset is not addressed, the value of the asset may deteriorate, adversely affecting the repayment of the asset. Our assets classified as “special mention” totaled $43.0 million, $32.2 million, and $21.6 million at June 30, 2012, 2011, and 2010, respectively. Effective September 30, 2009, we began to also utilize the classification of “watch” for assets where complete current information has not been procured or a minor weakness is indicated. Our assets classified as “watch” totaled $132.2 million, $103.7 million and $32.2 at June 30, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

Impaired Loans. The Company defines an impaired loan as a loan for which it is probable, based on current information, that the Company will not collect all amounts due under the contractual terms of the loan agreement. Loans we individually classify as impaired include multifamily, commercial mortgage and construction loans with balances of $1.0 million or more, unless a condition exists for loans less than $1.0 million that would increase the Bank’s potential loss exposure. Impaired loans are individually assessed to determine that each loan’s carrying value is not in excess of the fair value of the related collateral or the present value of the expected future cash flows. If the loan’s carrying value does exceed the fair value, specific reserves are established to reduce the loan’s carrying value. For classification purposes, impaired loans are typically classified as substandard. Impaired loans at June 30, 2012, 2011 and 2010 were $17.3 million, $12.7 million and $21.9 million, respectively.

Allowance for Loan Losses

Our allowance for loan losses is maintained at a level necessary to absorb loan losses that are both probable and reasonably estimable. Management, in determining the allowance for loan losses, considers the losses inherent in our loan portfolio and changes in the nature and volume of loan activities, along with the general economic and real estate market conditions. Loan losses are charged to the allowance for loans losses and recoveries are credited to it. Additions to the allowance for loan losses are provided by charges against income based on various factors which, in our judgment, deserve current recognition in estimating probable losses. We regularly review the loan portfolio and make adjustments for loan losses in order to maintain the allowance for loan losses in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). The allowance for loan losses consists primarily of the following two components:

(1) Allowances are established for impaired loans (generally defined by the Company as a loan for which it is probable, based on current information, that the Company will not collect all amounts due under the contractual terms of the loan agreement). The amount of impairment provided for as an allowance is represented by the deficiency, if any, between the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the original loan’s effective interest rate or the underlying collateral value (less estimated costs to sell,) if the loan is collateral dependent, and the carrying value of the loan. Impaired loans that have no impairment losses are not considered for general valuation allowances described below.

 

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(2) General allowances are established for loan losses on a portfolio basis for loans that do not meet the definition of impaired. The portfolio is grouped into similar risk characteristics, primarily loan type, collateral type, if collateral dependent, and internal credit risk rating. We apply an estimated loss rate to each loan group. The loss rates applied are based on our cumulative prior two year loss experience adjusted, as appropriate, for the environmental factors discussed below. This evaluation is inherently subjective, as it requires material estimates that may be susceptible to significant revisions based upon changes in economic and real estate market conditions. Actual loan losses may be significantly more than the allowance for loan losses we have established, which could have a material negative effect on our financial results.

The adjustments to our loss experience are based on our evaluation of several environmental factors, including:

 

  changes in local, regional, national, and international economic and business conditions and developments that affect the collectibility of our portfolio, including the condition of various market segments;

 

  changes in the nature and volume of our portfolio and in the terms of our loans;

 

  changes in the experience, ability, and depth of lending management and other relevant staff;

 

  changes in the volume and severity of past due loans, the volume of nonaccrual loans, and the volume and severity of adversely classified or graded loans;

 

  changes in the quality of our loan review system;

 

  changes in the value of underlying collateral for collateral-dependent loans;

 

  the existence and effect of any concentrations of credit, and changes in the level of such concentrations; and

 

  the effect of other external factors such as competition and legal and regulatory requirements on the level of estimated credit losses in our existing portfolio

In evaluating the estimated loss factors to be utilized for each loan group, management also reviews actual loss history over an extended period of time as reported by the FDIC for institutions both nationally and in our market area for periods that are believed to have been under similar economic conditions.

We evaluate the allowance for loan losses based on the combined total of the impaired and general components. Generally when the loan portfolio increases, absent other factors, our allowance for loan loss methodology results in a higher dollar amount of estimated probable losses than would be the case without the increase. Generally when the loan portfolio decreases, absent other factors, our allowance for loan loss methodology results in a lower dollar amount of estimated probable losses than would be the case without the decrease.

Each quarter we evaluate the allowance for loan losses and adjust the allowance as appropriate through a provision or recovery for loan losses. While we use the best information available to make evaluations, future adjustments to the allowance may be necessary if conditions differ substantially from the information used in making the evaluations. In addition, as an integral part of their examination process, the NJDOBI and the FDIC will periodically review the allowance for loan losses. They may require us to adjust the allowance based on their analysis of information available to them at the time of their examination. Such examinations typically occur annually. Our last examination by the FDIC was as of June 30, 2011 and as of March 31, 2010 by the NJDOBI.

The Company also maintains an unallocated component related to the general allowance. Management does not target a specific unallocated percentage of the total general allocation, or total allowance for loan losses. The primary purpose of the unallocated component is to account for the inherent imprecision of the loss estimation process related primarily to periodic updating of appraisals on impaired loans, as well as periodic updating of commercial loan credit risk ratings by loan officers and the Company’s internal credit review process.

 

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Allowance for Loan Losses. The following table sets forth activity in our allowance for loan losses for the fiscal years indicated.

 

     At or For the Years Ended June 30,  
     2012     2011     2010     2009     2008  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Balance at beginning of period $

     26,514      $ 25,902      $ 20,680      $ 13,532      $ 8,882   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Charge-offs:

          

Residential

     669        —          —          —          —     

Multifamily

     194        —          16        260        —     

Commercial real estate

     529        3,018        1,196        —          —     

Second mortgage and equity loans

     —          —          —          —          —     

Construction and land loans

     897        5,750        3,526        2,250        —     

Other loans

     1,598        —          43        222        —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total charge-offs

     3,887        8,768        4,781        2,732        —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Recoveries:

          

Residential

     18        —          —          —          —     

Multifamily

     —          —          —          —          —     

Commercial real estate

     —          80        —          —          —     

Second mortgage and equity loans

     —          —          —          —          —     

Construction and land loans

     42        —          —          —          —     

Other loans

     —          —          3        —          —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total recoveries

     60        80        3        —          —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net charge-offs

     (3,827     (8,688     (4,778     (2,732     —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Provision for loan losses

     8,500        9,300        10,000        9,880        4,650   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at end of year $

     31,187      $ 26,514      $ 25,902      $ 20,680      $ 13,532   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ratios:

          

Net charge-offs to average loans outstanding

     0.21     0.54     0.35     0.23     —  

Allowance for loan losses to total loans at end of period

     1.53     1.55     1.69     1.59     1.32

The increase in the allowance for loan losses since 2008, and related provisions, is primarily due to charge-off levels, the evaluation of ongoing local and regional economic factors and the growth in the multifamily and commercial real estate portfolios. The continued increase in the multifamily and commercial real estate loan portfolio is a factor as these types of loans inherently contain more credit risk than one to four family residential loans. The elevated level of charge-offs in the 2011 period were primarily incurred in conjunction with the disposal of two large problem assets.

Allocation of Allowance for Loan Losses. The following table sets forth the allowance for loan losses allocated by loan category, the total loan balances by category (including loans held for sale), and the percent of loans in each category to total loans at the dates indicated. The allowance for loan losses allocated to each category is not necessarily indicative of future losses in any particular category and does not restrict the use of the allowance to absorb losses in other categories.

 

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     At June 30,  
     2012     2011     2010  
            Percent of            Percent of            Percent of  
            Loans in            Loans in            Loans in  
     Allowance      Each     Allowance      Each     Allowance      Each  
     for Loan      Category to     for Loan      Category to     for Loan      Category to  
     Losses      Total Loans     Losses      Total Loans     Losses      Total Loans  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Residential

   $ 2,343         6.8   $ 1,274         10.1   $ 1,390         15.9

Multifamily

     3,113         33.5        2,703         27.8        2,175         23.5   

Commercial real estate

     20,087         54.9        15,597         52.9        15,295         49.5   

Second mortgage and equity loans

     475         1.5        369         2.3        421         3.1   

Construction and land loans

     2,498         2.4        3,455         5.1        4,595         6.6   

Other loans

     348         0.9        1,625         1.8        482         1.4   

Unallocated

     2,323         —          1,491         —          1,544         —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 31,187         100.0   $ 26,514         100.0   $ 25,902         100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

     At June 30,  
     2009     2008  
            Percent of            Percent of  
            Loans in            Loans in  
     Allowance      Each     Allowance      Each  
     for Loan      Category to     for Loan      Category to  
     Losses      Total Loans     Losses      Total Loans  
            (Dollars in thousands)         

Conventional

   $ 1,012         20.4   $ 845         21.8   

Multifamily

     2,912         21.3        2,535         23.2   

Commercial real estate

     9,683         43.3        5,560         35.2   

Second mortgage and equity loans

     274         4.2        299         5.8   

Construction and land loans

     5,791         10        3,883         13.5   

Other loans

     268         0.8        92         0.5   

Unallocated

     740         —          318         —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 20,680         100.0   $ 13,532         100.0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Investments

The Board of Directors is responsible for adopting our investment policy. The investment policy is reviewed periodically by management and any changes to the policy are recommended to and subject to the approval of the Board of Directors. Authority to make investments under the approved investment policy guidelines is delegated to appropriate officers. While general investment strategies are developed and authorized by the Board of Directors, the execution of specific actions primarily rests with Oritani Bank’s President, Chief Financial Officer and Asset/Liability Committee, which have responsibility for ensuring that the guidelines and requirements included in the investment policy are followed and that all securities are considered prudent for investment. Each of our President, Chief Financial Officer and Asset/Liability Committee have specified authority to purchase various types of investments; all individual investment purchases in excess of $20.0 million and all daily purchases in excess of $30 million must be approved by our Board of Directors. All investment transactions are reviewed and ratified or approved (as the case may be) at regularly scheduled meetings of the Board of Directors. Any investment which, subsequent to its purchase, fails to meet the guidelines of the policy is reported to the Board of Directors at its next meeting where the Board decides whether to hold or sell the investment.

 

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New Jersey-chartered savings banks have authority to invest in various types of assets, including U.S. Treasury obligations, securities of various federal agencies, mortgage-backed securities, certain certificates of deposit of insured financial institutions, overnight and short-term loans to other banks and corporate debt instruments. Oritani Financial Corp., as a Delaware Corporation, may invest in equity securities subject to certain limitations.

The investment policy requires that all securities transactions be conducted in a safe and sound manner. Investment decisions must be based upon a thorough analysis of each security instrument to determine if its quality and inherent risks fit within Oritani Bank’s overall asset/liability management objectives, the effect on its risk-based capital measurement and the prospects for yield and/or appreciation. The investment policy provides that Oritani Bank may invest in U.S. treasury notes, U.S. and state agency securities, mortgage-backed securities, and other conservative investment opportunities. Typical investments are currently in U.S. agency or Federal Home Loan Bank securities and government sponsored mortgage-backed securities as well as overnight loans to other banks.

Our investment portfolio at June 30, 2012, consisted of $24.6 million in federal agency obligations and $1.4 million in equity securities. We also invest in mortgage-backed securities, all of which are guaranteed by government sponsored enterprises. At June 30, 2012, our mortgage-backed securities portfolio totaled $510.1 million, or 18.9% of total assets, and consisted of $478.3 million in fixed-rate securities and $31.7 million in adjustable-rate securities, guaranteed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or Ginnie Mae. Securities can be classified as held to maturity or available for sale at the date of purchase.

U.S. Government and Federal Agency Obligations. At June 30, 2012, our U.S. Government and federal agency securities portfolio totaled $24.6 million, all of which was classified as available for sale.

Equity Securities. At June 30, 2012, our equity securities portfolio totaled $1.4 million, or 0.1% of our total assets, all of which were classified as available for sale. The portfolio consists of financial industry common stock. During fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, several of these holdings were deemed other-than-temporarily impaired and the Company recorded non-cash impairment charges to earnings of $262,000, $31,000 and $202,000, respectively. Equity securities are not insured or guaranteed investments and are affected by market interest rates and stock market fluctuations. Such investments are carried at their fair value and fluctuations in the fair value of such investments, including temporary declines in value, directly affect out net capital position.

Mortgage-Backed Securities. We purchase mortgage-backed securities insured or guaranteed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or Ginnie Mae. We invest in mortgage-backed securities to achieve positive interest rate spreads with minimal administrative expense, and to lower our credit risk as a result of the guarantees provided by Freddie Mac, Fannie Mae or Ginnie Mae. Our investment policy also authorizes the investment in collateralized mortgage obligations (“CMOs”), also insured or issued by Freddie Mac, Fannie Mae and Ginnie Mae. We limit CMO investments to those classes of CMOs carrying the most stable cash flows and lowest prepayment risk of any class of CMOs and which pass the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council’s average life restriction tests at the time of purchase. These CMO classes are typically referred to as Planned Amortization Classes or sequentials.

Mortgage-backed securities are created by the pooling of mortgages and the issuance of a security with an interest rate which is less than the interest rate on the underlying mortgages. Mortgage-backed securities typically represent a participation interest in a pool of single-family or multifamily mortgages, although we focus our investments on mortgage-backed securities backed by one to four family mortgages. The issuers of such securities (generally U.S. government agencies and government sponsored enterprises, including Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and Ginnie Mae) pool and resell the participation interests in the form of securities to investors such as us, and guarantee the payment of principal and interest to investors. Mortgage-backed securities generally yield less than the loans that underlie such securities because of the cost of payment guarantees and credit enhancements. However, mortgage-backed securities are usually more liquid than individual mortgage loans and may be used to collateralize our specific liabilities and obligations.

At June 30, 2012, our mortgage-backed securities totaled $510.1 million or 18.9%, of total assets and 19.5% of interest earning assets. At June 30, 2012, 6.2% of the mortgage-backed securities were backed by adjustable rate mortgage loans and 93.8% were backed by fixed rate mortgage loans. The mortgage-backed securities portfolio had a weighted average yield of 2.4% at June 30, 2012. The estimated fair value of our

 

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mortgage-backed securities at June 30, 2012 was $511.6 million, which is $10.8 million more than the amortized cost of $500.8 million. Investments in mortgage-backed securities involve a risk that actual prepayments may differ from estimated prepayments over the life of the security, which may require adjustments to the amortization of any premium or accretion of any discount relating to such instruments thereby changing the net yield on such securities. There is also reinvestment risk associated with the cash flows from such securities or if such securities are redeemed by the issuer. In addition, the market value of such securities may be adversely affected by changes in interest rates. All of the Company’s mortgage-backed securities are insured or guaranteed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or Ginnie Mae.

Securities Portfolios. The following table sets forth the composition of our investment securities portfolio at the dates indicated.

Securities and Mortgage-Backed Securities Held to Maturity

 

     At June 30,  
     2012      2011      2010  
     Amortized
Cost
     Fair Value      Amortized
Cost
     Fair Value      Amortized
Cost
     Fair Value  
     (In thousands)  

Mortgage-backed securities:

                 

Freddie Mac

   $ 5,438       $ 5,746       $ 7,546       $ 7,948       $ 11,449       $ 12,015   

Ginnie Mae

     3,200         3,350         3,425         3,490         2,282         2,316   

Fannie Mae

     24,955         25,943         22,413         22,743         21,593         22,348   

Collateralized mortgage obligations

     2,537         2,609         4,225         4,341         31,144         31,943   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total securities held to maturity

   $ 36,130       $ 37,648       $ 37,609       $ 38,522       $ 66,468       $ 68,622   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Securities and Mortgage-Backed Securities Available for Sale

 

     At June 30,  
     2012      2011      2010  
     Amortized
Cost
     Fair Value      Amortized
Cost
     Fair Value      Amortized
Cost
     Fair Value  
     (In thousands)  

United States Government and federal agency obligations

   $ 24,283       $ 24,622       $ 88,355       $ 87,884       $ 347,470       $ 349,959   

Corporate bonds

     —           —           2,000         2,021         2,000         2,072   

Mutual funds

     —           —           —           —           4,671         4,937   

Equity securities

     1,210         1,409         1,472         1,537         1,763         1,755   

Mortgage-backed securities:

                 

Freddie Mac

     15,822         16,436         9,448         10,118         17,988         19,061   

Fannie Mae

     59,232         62,345         75,789         77,026         22,869         24,020   

Collateralized mortgage obligations

     389,613         395,139         414,443         418,788         34,399         35,396   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total securities available for sale

   $ 490,160       $ 499.951       $ 591,507       $ 597,374       $ 431,160       $ 437,200   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Portfolio Maturities and Yields. The composition and maturities of the investment securities portfolio at June 30, 2012 are summarized in the following table. Maturities are based on the final contractual payment dates, and do not reflect the impact of prepayments, scheduled redemptions or early redemptions that may occur.

 

     One Year or Less      More than One Year
through Five Years
    More than Five Years
through Ten Years
    More than Ten Years     Total Securities  
     Amortized
Cost
     Weighted
Average
Yield
     Amortized
Cost
     Weighted
Average
Yield
    Amortized
Cost
     Weighted
Average
Yield
    Amortized
Cost
     Weighted
Average
Yield
    Amortized
Cost
     Fair Value      Weighted
Average
Yield
 
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Mortgage-backed securities:

                             

Freddie Mac

   $ —           —         $ —           —        $ 312         4.00      $ 5,126         2.88      $ 5,438       $ 5,746         2.94

Ginnie Mae

     —           —           —           —          3,200         4.43        —           —          3,200         3,350         4.43   

Fannie Mae

     —           —           —           —          10,953         2.89        14.002         2.58        24,955         25,943         2.71   

Collateralized mortgage obligations

     —           —           —           —          2,537         3.65        —           —          2,537         2,609         3.65   
  

 

 

       

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total securities held to maturity

   $ —           —         $ —           —        $ 17,002         3.24   $ 19,128         2.66   $ 36,130       $ 37,648         2.92   
  

 

 

       

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

    

 

 

    

United States Government and federal agency obligations

   $ —           —         $ 24,283         1.26   $ —           —        $ —           —     $ 24,283       $ 24,622         1.26

Equity securities

     1,210         —           —           —          —           —          —           —          1,210         1,409         —     

Mortgage-backed securities:

                             

Freddie Mac

     —           —           —           —          5,238         4.74        10,584         2.51        15,822         16,436         3.26   

Fannie Mae

     —           —           —           —          56,726         3.31        2,506         4.64        59,232         62,345         3.37   

Collateralized mortgage obligations

     —           —           —           —          177,277         2.27        212,336         2.31        389.613         395,139         2.29   
  

 

 

       

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total securities available for sale

   $ 1,210         —         $ 24,283         1.26   $ 239,241         2.57   $ 225,426         2.34   $ 490,160       $ 499,951         2.40
  

 

 

       

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

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Sources of Funds

General. Deposits have traditionally been the primary source of funds for use in lending and investment activities. We also use borrowings, primarily Federal Home Loan Bank advances, to supplement cash flow needs, to lengthen the maturities of liabilities for interest rate risk management purposes and to manage the cost of funds. In addition, funds are derived from scheduled loan payments, mortgaged-backed securities scheduled payments and prepayments, investment maturities, loan prepayments, retained earnings and income on other earning assets. While scheduled loan payments and income on earning assets are relatively stable sources of funds, deposit inflows and outflows can vary widely and are influenced by prevailing interest rates, market conditions and levels of competition.

Deposits. Our deposits are generated primarily from residents and businesses within our primary market area. We offer a selection of deposit accounts, including checking accounts (demand deposits and NOW), money market deposit accounts, savings accounts, retirement accounts and time deposits. The Bank accepts brokered deposits on a limited basis, when it is deemed cost effective. Deposit account terms vary, with the principal differences being the minimum balance required, the amount of time the funds must remain on deposit and the interest rate.

Interest rates, maturity terms, service fees and other account features are established on a periodic basis. Deposit rates and terms are based primarily on current operating strategies and market rates, liquidity requirements, rates paid by competitors and growth goals. Personalized customer service, attractive account features, long-standing relationships with customers, convenient locations, competitive rates of interest and an active marketing program are relied upon to attract and retain deposits.

The flow of deposits is influenced significantly by general economic conditions, changes in prevailing interest rates and competition. The variety of deposit accounts offered allows us to be competitive in obtaining funds and responding to changes in consumer demand while managing interest rate risk and minimizing interest expense.

At June 30, 2012, $569.5 million, or 40.98% of our deposit accounts were time deposits, of which $410.3 million had maturities of one year or less. At June 30, 2012 and 2011, we had brokered time deposits totaling $22.9 million. There were no brokered time deposits at June 30, 2010 and 2009. The following table sets forth the distribution of total deposits by account type, at the dates indicated.

 

     At June 30,  
     2012     2011  
     Balance      Percent     Weighted
Average
Rate
    Balance      Percent     Weighted
Average
Rate
 
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Deposit type:

              

Checking accounts

   $ 215,566         15.51     0.24   $ 162,147         11.74     0.42

Money market accounts

     444,476         31.98        0.72        390,684         28.28        1.01   

Savings accounts

     160,115         11.52        0.31        152,906         11.07        0.55   

Time deposits

     569,549         40.98        1.14        675,573         48.91        1.48   
  

 

 

    

 

 

     

 

 

    

 

 

   

Total deposits

   $ 1,389,706         100.00     0.77   $ 1,381,310         100.00     1.12
  

 

 

    

 

 

     

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

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Table of Contents
     At June 30,  
     2010     2009  
     Balance      Percent     Weighted
Average
Rate
    Balance      Percent     Weighted
Average
Rate
 
     (Dollars in thousands)     (Dollars in thousands)  

Deposit type:

              

Checking accounts

   $ 131,029         10.16     0.71   $ 88,759         7.87     0.90

Money market accounts

     297,540         23.07        1.07        199,965         17.73        2.07   

Savings accounts

     146,675         11.37        0.68        147,669         13.10        1.04   

Time deposits

     714,502         55.40        1.76        691,237         61.30        2.84   
  

 

 

    

 

 

     

 

 

    

 

 

   

Total deposits

   $ 1,289,746         100.00     1.37   $ 1,127,630         100.00     2.32
  

 

 

    

 

 

     

 

 

    

 

 

   

As of June 30, 2012, the aggregate amount of outstanding time deposits in amounts greater than or equal to $100,000 was approximately $235.2 million. The following table sets forth the maturity of those deposits as of June 30, 2012.

 

     At
June 30,  2012
 
     (In thousands)  

Three months or less

   $ 57,557   

Over three months through six months

     47,412   

Over six months through one year

     49,444   

Over one year to three years

     56,800   

Over three years

     23,978   
  

 

 

 

Total

   $ 235,191   
  

 

 

 

Borrowings. Our borrowings consist of advances from the FHLB of New York. As of June 30, 2012, we had total borrowings in the amount of $745.9 million, which represented 34.1% of total liabilities, with an estimated weighted average maturity of 3.3 years and a weighted average rate of 2.6%. The weighted average maturity is estimated because several of our borrowings, under certain circumstances, can be called by the FHLB prior to the scheduled maturity. If this were to occur, our weighted average maturity would decrease. At June 30, 2012 borrowings are secured by mortgage-backed securities and investment securities with a book value of $380.4 million and performing mortgage loans with an outstanding balance of $1.5 billion.

The following table sets forth information concerning balances and interest rates on our FHLB advances and other borrowings at and for the periods shown:

 

     At or For the Years Ended June 30,  
     2012     2011     2010  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Balance at end of period

   $ 745,865      $ 509,315      $ 495,552   

Average balance during period

   $ 642,947      $ 521,541      $ 506,592   

Maximum outstanding at any month end

   $ 745,865      $ 621,680      $ 529,004   

Weighted average interest rate at end of period

     2.64     3.77     4.00

Average interest rate during period

     3.19     3.95     4.10

 

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Subsidiary Activities and Joint Venture Information

Oritani Financial Corp. is the owner of Oritani Bank, Hampshire Financial LLC and Oritani LLC. Hampshire Financial LLC and Oritani LLC are New Jersey limited liability companies that own real estate and investments in real estate as described below. In addition, at June 30, 2012, Oritani Financial Corp., either directly or through one of its subsidiaries, had loans with an aggregate balance of $38.0 million on 13 of the properties in which it (either directly or through one of its subsidiaries) had an ownership interest. All such loans are performing in accordance with their terms.

Oritani Bank has the following subsidiaries: Ormon LLC, Oritani Finance Company, Oritani Investment Corp. and Oritani Asset Corporation. Ormon LLC is a New Jersey limited liability company that owns real estate investments in New Jersey as well as investments in joint ventures that own income-producing commercial and residential rental properties in New Jersey as described below.

Oritani Finance Company is a New Jersey corporation that invests in non-New Jersey multifamily and commercial real estate loans and provides lending opportunities in New York and the surroundings states, other than New Jersey.

Oritani Investment Corp. is a New Jersey corporation that owns Oritani Asset Corporation, a real estate investment trust, formed in 1998 for the sole purpose of acquiring mortgage loans and mortgage-backed securities from Oritani Bank.

Oritani Asset Corporation’s primary objective is to maximize long-term returns on equity. At June 30, 2012, Oritani Asset Corporation had $493.0 million in assets. Oritani Asset Corporation is taxed and operates in a manner that enables it to qualify as a real estate investment trust under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.

Through these various subsidiaries, we maintain investments in real estate and investment in joint ventures. Detailed below is a summary of these various investments by subsidiary and by type.

Ormon LLC

Ormon LLC is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Oritani Bank. Ormon LLC maintains the following investments in real estate and joint ventures:

Investments in Real Estate

Park Lane Associates—Ormon LLC maintains a 50% undivided ownership interest in Park Lane Associates. Park Lane Associates is a 142-unit apartment complex located in Little Falls, New Jersey. Our initial investment was made in March 1980. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized net income of $427,000 on the investment and received cash distributions of $365,000 during this period. At June 30, 2012, we had a loan to Park Lane Associates totaling $1.6 million.

Park View Apartments—Ormon LLC maintains a 50% undivided ownership interest in Park View Apartments. Park View Apartments is a 114-unit apartment complex located in White Hall, Pennsylvania. We initially invested in Park View in December 1986. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized net income of $107,000 on the investment in Park View and received cash distributions of $70,000 during this period. At June 30, 2012, we had a loan to Park View Apartments totaling $1.1 million.

Winstead Village—Ormon LLC maintains a 50% undivided ownership interest in Winstead Village. Winstead Village is a 40-unit apartment complex located in Moorestown, New Jersey. We initially invested in Winstead in December 1986. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized net income of $58,000 on the investment and also received cash distributions of $38,000 during that period. At June 30, 2012, we had a loan to Winstead Village totaling $713,000.

Parkway East—Ormon LLC maintains a 50% undivided ownership interest in Parkway East. Parkway East is a 43-unit apartment complex located in Caldwell, New Jersey. We initially invested in Parkway East in July 1981. For

 

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the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized net income of $92,000 on the investment in Parkway East and received cash distributions of $82,000 during this period. We have no loans to this entity.

Marine View Apartments—Ormon LLC maintains a 75% undivided ownership interest in Marine View Apartments. Marine View is an 85-unit apartment complex located in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. We initially invested in Marine View in October 1993. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized net income of $126,000 on the investment in Marine View and received cash distributions of $210,000 over that period. We have no loans to this entity.

Ormon LLC also wholly owns one property that is held and operated for investment purposes. The property is a 54-unit mixed-use property (49 residential units and 5 store fronts) located in Palisades Park, New Jersey. We recognized net income of $415,000 for the year ended June 30, 2012, from the operation of this property.

During fiscal 2010, Ormon LLC sold a 19-unit office building located in Hillsdale, New Jersey and recognized a net gain of $1.0 million.

Investments in Joint Ventures

Oaklyn Associates—Oaklyn Associates is a 50% owned joint venture on a 100-unit apartment complex located in Oaklyn, New Jersey. We initially invested in this joint venture in February 1978. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized net income of $55,000 on the investment and received cash distributions of $65,000 over that period. At June 30, 2012, we had a loan to Oaklyn Associates totaling $754,000.

Madison Associates—Madison Associates is a 50% owned joint venture on 30-unit apartment complex located in Madison, New Jersey. We initially invested in this joint venture in January 1989. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized net income of $76,000 on the investment and received cash distribution of $80,000 over that period. We have no loans to this entity.

Brighton Court Associates—Brighton Court Associate is a 50% owned joint venture on a 47-unit apartment complex located in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. We initially invested in Brighton Court in July 1996. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized income of $16,000 on the investment and received cash distributions of $25,000. At June 30, 2012, our loans to Brighton Court Associates totaled $1.4 million.

Plaza 23 Associates—Plaza 23 Associates is 50% owned joint venture on a shopping center in Pequannock, New Jersey. We initially invested in Plaza 23 Associates in October 1983. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized net income of $531,000 related to the investment and received cash distributions of $129,000 during that period. We have no loans to Plaza 23 Associates but have a $10.0 million loan to its partner in this joint venture, Plains Plaza Ltd. Plains Plaza Ltd. has pledged its equity interest in Plaza 23 Associates as collateral for this loan.

Oritani, LLC

Oritani, LLC is a wholly-owned limited liability corporation of Oritani Financial Corp. The primary business of Oritani, LLC is real estate investments.

Investments in Joint Ventures

Ridge Manor Associates—Ridge Manor Associates is a 50% owned joint venture on a 44-unit apartment complex located in Park Ridge, New Jersey. We initially invested in Ridge Manor Associates in May 2004. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized net income of $5,000 related to the investment, and also received cash distributions of $22,000 during that period. At June 30, 2012, we had a loan to this entity that totaled $4.3 million.

Van Buren Apartments—Van Buren Apartments is a 50% owned joint venture on a 32-unit apartment complex located in River Edge, New Jersey. We initially invested in Van Buren in March 2002. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized a net income on the investment of $69,000 and received cash distributions of $79,000 during that period. At June 30, 2012, we had a loan to Van Buren Apartments that totaled $2.1 million.

 

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10 Landing Lane—10 Landing Lane is a 50% owned joint venture on a 143-unit apartment complex located in New Brunswick, New Jersey. We initially invested in 10 Landing Lane in August 1998. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized net income of $22,000 related to the investment and received cash distributions of $145,000 during that period. We have no loans to this entity.

FAO Hasbrouck Heights—FAO Hasbrouck Heights is a 50% owned joint venture on 93 mixed-use units (primarily residential) in Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey. We initially invested in FAO Hasbrouck Heights in November 2005. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized a net loss of $2,000 related to the investment and received cash distributions of $74,000 over that period. At June 30, 2012, we had a loan to FAO Hasbrouck Heights that totaled $7.5 million.

FAO Terrace Associates- FAO Terrace Associates is a 50% owned joint venture on a 34-unit apartment complex located in Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey. We initially invested in FAO Terrace Associates in January 2009. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized a net loss of $41,000 related to the investment and received cash distributions of $25,000 over that period. At June 30, 2012, we had a loan to FAO Terrace Associates that totaled $2.6 million.

FAO Gardens Associates- FAO Garden Associates is a 50% owned joint venture on a 34-unit apartment complex located in Hackensack, New Jersey. We initially invested in FAO Garden Associates in February 2009. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized a net loss of $32,000 related to the investment and did not receive cash distributions over that period. At June 30, 2012, we had a loan to FAO Garden Associates that totaled $2.5 million.

River Villas Mews, LLC- River Villas Mews, LLC is a 50% owned joint venture on a 44 unit apartment complex located in Palmyra, New Jersey. We initially invested in River Villa Mews, LLC in August, 2009. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized a net loss of $24,000 related to the investment and received cash distributions of $12,000. At June 30, 2012, we had a loan to River Villa Mews, LLC that totaled $612,000.

Hampshire Financial is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Oritani Financial Corp. The primary business of Hampshire Financial is real estate investments.

Investments in Joint Ventures

Hampshire Realty—Hampshire Realty is a 50% owned joint venture on an 81-unit apartment complex located in Allentown, Pennsylvania. We initially invested in Hampshire in June 2002. For the year ended June 30, 2012, we recognized net income of $14,000 related to the investment and received cash distributions of $38,000 over that period. At June 30, 2012, we had a loan to Hampshire that totaled $2.8 million.

 

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The following table presents a summary of our investments in real estate and investments in joint ventures (in thousands).

 

     Book     Year Ended June 30, 2012      Book  
     Value at     Profit /     Distributions     Additional      Value at  

Property Name

   June 30, 2011     (Loss)     Received     Investment      June 30, 2012  

Real Estate Held For Investment

           

Ormon, LLC—Undivided Interests in Real Estate

           

Park Lane

   $ (397   $ 427      $ (365   $ —         $ (335

Park View

     (335     107        (70     —           (298

Winstead Village

     (220     58        (38     —           (200

Parkway East

     (350     92        (82     —           (340

Marine View

     852        126        (210     —           768   

Ormon, LLC—Wholly Owned Properties

           

Palisades Park(1)

     333        415        —          19         355   

Real Estate Held For Investment Summary

           

Assets(1)

   $ 1,185      $ 541      $ (210   $ 19       $ 1,123   

Liabilities

   $ (1,302   $ 684      $ (555   $ —         $ (1,173

Investments in Joint Ventures

           

Ormon, LLC

           

Oaklyn Associates

   $ (179   $ 55      $ (65   $ —         $ (189

Madison Associates

     (55     76        (80     —           (59

Brighton Court Associates

     107        16        (25     —           98   

Plaza 23 Associates

     2,916        531        (129     —           3,318   

Oritani, LLC

           

Ridge Manor Associates

     449        5        (22     —           432   

Van Buren Apartments

     126        69        (79     —           116   

10 Landing Lane

     (319     22        (145     —           (442

FAO Hasbrouck Heights

     304        (2     (74     —           228   

FAO Terrace Associates

     533        (41     (25     —           467   

FAO Gardens

     404        (32     —          —           372   

River Villas Mews, LLC

     383        (24     (12     —           347   

Hampshire Financial

           

Hampshire Realty

     87        14        (38     —           63   

Investments in Joint Ventures Summary

           

Assets

   $ 5,309      $ 536      $ (404   $ —         $ 5,441   

Liabilities

   $ (553   $ 153      $ (290   $ —         $ (690

 

(1) The book values for wholly owned properties represent the costs of the fixed assets associated with the property, less accumulated depreciation.

 

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Personnel

As of June 30, 2012, we had 161 full-time employees and 56 part-time employees. Our employees are not represented by any collective bargaining group. Management believes that we have good relations with our employees.

SUPERVISION AND REGULATION

General

Federal law allows a state savings bank, such as Oritani Bank, that qualifies as a “qualified thrift lender” (discussed below), to elect to be treated as a savings association for purposes of the savings and loan holding company provisions of the Home Owners’ Loan Act, as amended (“HOLA”). Such an election results in the savings bank’s holding company being regulated as savings and loan holding company rather than as a bank holding company. At the time of its reorganization into a holding company structure, Oritani Bank elected to be treated as a savings association under the applicable provisions of the HOLA. Accordingly, Oritani Financial Corp. is a savings and loan holding company and is required to file certain reports with, and is subject to examination by, and otherwise must comply with the rules and regulations of the Federal Reserve Board that are applicable to savings and loan holding companies. On July 21, 2011, the Federal Reserve Board assumed the regulatory authority over savings and loan holding company previously exercised by the Office of Thrift Supervision (“OTS”) pursuant to a regulatory restructuring required by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (the “Dodd-Frank Act”). Oritani Financial Corp. is also subject to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission under the federal securities laws.

Oritani Bank is a New Jersey-chartered savings bank, and its deposit accounts are insured up to applicable limits by the Deposit Insurance Funds (“DIF”) of the FDIC. Oritani Bank is subject to extensive regulation, examination and supervision by the Commissioner of the NJDOBI as the issuer of its charter, and by the FDIC as the deposit insurer and its primary federal regulator. Oritani Bank must file reports with the NJDOBI and the FDIC concerning its activities and financial condition, and it must obtain regulatory approval prior to entering into certain transactions, such as mergers with, or acquisitions of, other depository institutions and opening, closing, moving or acquiring branch offices. The NJDOBI and the FDIC conduct periodic examinations to assess Oritani Bank’s compliance with various regulatory requirements. This regulation and supervision establishes a comprehensive framework of activities in which a savings bank may engage and is intended primarily for the protection of the deposit insurance fund and depositors. The regulatory structure also gives the regulatory authorities extensive discretion in connection with their supervisory and enforcement activities and examination policies, including policies with respect to the classification of assets and the establishment of adequate loan loss reserves for regulatory purposes.

Any change in these laws or regulations, whether by the NJDOBI, the FDIC, the FRB or the U.S. Congress, could have a material adverse impact on Oritani Financial Corp., Oritani Bank and their operations.

Certain of the regulatory requirements that are or will be applicable to Oritani Bank and Oritani Financial Corp. are described below. This description of statutes and regulations is not intended to be a complete explanation of such statutes and regulations and their effects on Oritani Bank and Oritani Financial Corp. and is qualified in its entirety by reference to the actual statutes and regulations.

New Jersey Banking Regulation

Activity Powers. Oritani Bank derives its lending, investment and other powers primarily from the applicable provisions of the New Jersey Banking Act and its related regulations. Under these laws and regulations, savings banks, such as Oritani Bank, generally may invest in:

 

  (1) real estate mortgages;

 

  (2) consumer and commercial loans;

 

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  (3) specific types of debt securities, including certain corporate debt securities and obligations of federal, state and local governments and agencies;

 

  (4) certain types of corporate equity securities; and

 

  (5) certain other assets.

A savings bank may also invest pursuant to a “leeway” power that permits investments not otherwise permitted by the New Jersey Banking Act. “Leeway” investments must comply with a number of limitations on the individual and aggregate amounts of “leeway” investments. Under this “leeway” authority, New Jersey savings banks may exercise those powers, rights, benefits or privileges authorized for national banks or out-of-state banks or for federal or out-of-state savings banks or savings associations, provided that before exercising any such power, right, benefit or privilege, prior approval by the NJDOBI by regulation or by specific authorization is required. A savings bank may also exercise trust powers upon approval of the NJDOBI. The exercise of these lending, investment and activity powers are limited by federal law and the related regulations. See “Federal Banking Regulation-Activity Restrictions on State-Chartered Banks” below.

Loans-to-One-Borrower Limitations. With certain specified exceptions, a New Jersey-chartered savings bank may not make loans or extend credit to a single borrower or to entities related to the borrower in an aggregate amount that would exceed 15% of the bank’s capital funds. A savings bank may lend an additional 10% of its capital funds if the loan is secured by collateral meeting the requirements of the New Jersey Banking Act. Oritani Bank currently complies with applicable loans-to-one-borrower limitations.

Dividends. Under the New Jersey Banking Act, a stock savings bank may declare and pay a dividend on its capital stock only to the extent that the payment of the dividend would not impair the capital stock of the savings bank. In addition, a stock savings bank may not pay a dividend unless the savings bank would, after the payment of the dividend, have a surplus of not less than 50% of its capital stock, or alternatively, the payment of the dividend would not reduce the surplus. Federal law may also limit the amount of dividends that may be paid by Oritani Bank. See “-Federal Banking Regulation-Prompt Corrective Action” below.

Minimum Capital Requirements. Regulations of the NJDOBI impose on New Jersey-chartered depository institutions, such as Oritani Bank, minimum capital requirements similar to those imposed by the FDIC on insured state banks. See “Federal Banking Regulation-Capital Requirements.”

Examination and Enforcement. The NJDOBI may examine Oritani Bank whenever it deems an examination advisable. The NJDOBI typically examines Oritani Bank at least every two years. The NJDOBI may order any savings bank to discontinue any violation of law or unsafe or unsound banking practice, and may direct any director, officer, attorney or employee of a savings bank engaged in an objectionable activity, after the NJDOBI has ordered the activity to be terminated, to show cause at a hearing before the NJDOBI why such person should not be removed.

Federal Banking Regulation

Capital Requirements. FDIC regulations require banks to maintain minimum levels of capital. The FDIC regulations define two tiers, or classes, of capital.

Tier 1 capital is comprised of the sum of:

 

   

common stockholders’ equity, excluding the unrealized appreciation or depreciation, net of tax, from available for sale securities;

 

   

non-cumulative perpetual preferred stock, including any related retained earnings; and

 

   

minority interests in consolidated subsidiaries minus all intangible assets, other than qualifying servicing rights and any net unrealized loss on marketable equity securities.

The components of Tier 2 capital currently include:

 

   

cumulative perpetual preferred stock;

 

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certain perpetual preferred stock for which the dividend rate may be reset periodically;

 

   

hybrid capital instruments, including mandatory convertible securities;

 

   

term subordinated debt;

 

   

intermediate term preferred stock;

 

   

allowance for loan losses; and

 

   

up to 45% of pretax net unrealized holding gains on available for sale equity securities with readily determinable fair market values.

The allowance for loan losses includible in Tier 2 capital is limited to a maximum of 1.25% of risk-weighted assets (as discussed below). Overall, the amount of Tier 2 capital that may be included in total capital cannot exceed 100% of Tier 1 capital. The FDIC regulations establish a minimum leverage capital requirement for banks in the strongest financial and managerial condition of not less than a ratio of 3.0% of Tier 1 capital to total assets. For all other banks, the minimum leverage capital requirement is 4.0%, unless a higher leverage capital ratio is warranted by the particular circumstances or risk profile of the depository institution.

The FDIC regulations also require that banks meet a risk-based capital standard. The risk-based capital standard requires the maintenance of a ratio of total capital, which is defined as the sum of Tier 1 capital and Tier 2 capital, to risk-weighted assets of at least 8% and a ratio of Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets of at least 4%. In determining the amount of risk-weighted assets, all assets, plus certain off balance sheet items, are multiplied by a risk-weight of 0% to 100%, based on the risks the FDIC believes are inherent in the type of asset or item.

The federal banking agencies, including the FDIC, have also adopted regulations to require an assessment of an institution’s exposure to declines in the economic value of a bank’s capital due to changes in interest rates when assessing the bank’s capital adequacy. Under such a risk assessment, examiners evaluate a bank’s capital for interest rate risk on a case-by-case basis, with consideration of both quantitative and qualitative factors. Institutions with significant interest rate risk may be required to hold additional capital. According to the agencies, applicable considerations include:

 

   

the quality of the bank’s interest rate risk management process;

 

   

the overall financial condition of the bank; and

 

   

the level of other risks at the bank for which capital is needed.

The following table shows Oritani Bank’s Core capital, Tier 1 risk-based capital, and Total risk-based capital ratios at June 30, 2012:

 

     As of June 30, 2012  
     Capital      Percent  of
Assets(1)
 
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Core capital

     412,031         15.42

Tier 1 risk-based capital

     412,031         19.25

Total risk-based capital

     438,837         20.51

 

(1) For purposes of calculating Core capital, assets are based on adjusted total leverage assets. In calculating Tier 1 risk-based capital and total risk-based capital, assets are based on total risk-weighted assets.

As the table shows, as of June 30, 2012, Oritani Bank was considered “well capitalized” under FDIC guidelines.

The federal banking regulators have recently issued proposed rules that, if adopted, significantly increase regulatory capital requirements. Among other things, the proposed rules would introduce a new minimum common equity tier 1 capital ratio of 4.5% of risk-weighted assets and increase the minimum tier 1 risk-based capital ratio from 4.0% to 6.0% of risk-weighted assets. There would also be a new “capital conservation buffer” that would require an institution to hold an additional 2.5% of common equity tier 1 capital to risk-based assets in order to

 

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avoid restrictions on dividends and executive compensation. The proposed rules would also impose stricter capital deduction requirements and revise the current risk-weighting categories to increase risk sensitivity. If finalized, the new requirements would be phased in over a period of several years.

Prompt Corrective Action. Federal law requires, among other things, that the federal bank regulatory authorities take “prompt corrective action” with respect to institutions that do not meet minimum capital requirements. For these purposes, the law establishes five categories: well capitalized, adequately capitalized, undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized and critically undercapitalized. The FDIC’s regulations define the five capital categories as follows:

An institution is classified as “well capitalized” if:

 

   

its ratio of total capital to risk-weighted assets is at least 10%;

 

   

its ratio of Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets is at least 6%; and

 

   

its ratio of Tier 1 capital to total assets is at least 5%, and it is not subject to any order or directive by the FDIC to meet a specific capital level.

An institution is classified as “adequately capitalized” if:

 

   

its ratio of total capital to risk-weighted assets is at least 8%; or

 

   

its ratio of Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets is at least 4%; and

 

   

its ratio of Tier 1 capital to total assets is at least 4% (3% if the bank receives the highest rating under the Uniform Financial Institutions Rating System) and it is not a well-capitalized institution.

An institution is classified as “undercapitalized” if:

 

   

its total risk-based capital is less than 8%; or

 

   

its Tier 1 risk-based-capital is less than 4%; and

 

   

its leverage ratio is less than 4% (or less than 3% if the institution receives the highest rating under the Uniform Financial Institutions Rating System).

An institution is classified as “significantly undercapitalized” if:

 

   

its total risk-based capital is less than 6%;

 

   

its Tier 1 capital is less than 3%; or

 

   

its leverage ratio is less than 3%.

An institution that has a tangible capital to total assets ratio equal to or less than 2% is deemed to be “critically undercapitalized.”

The FDIC is required, with some exceptions, to appoint a receiver or conservator for an insured state bank if that bank is “critically undercapitalized.” The FDIC may also appoint a conservator or receiver for a state bank on the basis of the institution’s financial condition or upon the occurrence of certain events, including:

 

   

insolvency, or when the assets of the bank are less than its liabilities to depositors and others;

 

   

substantial dissipation of assets or earnings through violations of law or unsafe or unsound practices;

 

   

existence of an unsafe or unsound condition to transact business;

 

   

likelihood that the bank will be unable to meet the demands of its depositors or to pay its obligations in the normal course of business; and

 

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insufficient capital, or the incurring or likely incurring of losses that will deplete substantially all of the institution’s capital with no reasonable prospect of replenishment of capital without federal assistance.

The recent proposed rules related to increased regulatory capital requirements would, if adopted, adjust the prompt corrective action categories accordingly.

Activity Restrictions on State-Chartered Banks. Federal law and FDIC regulations generally limit the activities and investments of state-chartered FDIC insured banks and their subsidiaries to those permissible for national banks and their subsidiaries, unless such activities and investments are specifically exempted by law or consented to by the FDIC.

Before making a new investment or engaging in a new activity as principal that is not permissible for a national bank or otherwise permissible under federal law or FDIC regulations, an insured bank must seek approval from the FDIC to make such investment or engage in such activity. The FDIC will not approve the activity unless the bank meets its minimum capital requirements and the FDIC determines that the activity does not present a significant risk to the FDIC insurance funds. Certain activities of subsidiaries that are engaged in activities permitted for national banks only through a “financial subsidiary” are subject to additional restrictions.

Federal law permits a state-chartered savings bank to engage, through financial subsidiaries, in any activity in which a national bank may engage through a financial subsidiary and on substantially the same terms and conditions. In general, the law permits a national bank that is well-capitalized and well-managed to conduct, through a financial subsidiary, any activity permitted for a financial holding company other than insurance underwriting, insurance investments, real estate investment or development or merchant banking. The total assets of all such financial subsidiaries may not exceed the lesser of 45% of the bank’s total assets or $50 billion. The bank must have policies and procedures to assess the financial subsidiary’s risk and protect the bank from such risk and potential liability, must not consolidate the financial subsidiary’s assets with the bank’s and must exclude from its own assets and equity all equity investments, including retained earnings, in the financial subsidiary. State chartered savings banks may retain subsidiaries in existence as of March 11, 2000 and may engage in activities that are not authorized under federal law. Although Oritani Bank meets all conditions necessary to establish and engage in permitted activities through financial subsidiaries, it has not yet determined to do so.

Insurance of Deposit Accounts. Oritani Bank is a member of the DIF, which is administered by the FDIC. Deposit accounts at Oritani Bank are insured by the FDIC, generally up to a maximum of $250,000. The Dodd-Frank Act extends unlimited deposit insurance to certain non-interest paying checking accounts through December 31, 2012.

The FDIC imposes an assessment for deposit insurance against all insured depository institutions. This assessment is primarily based on the risk category of the institution, and certain risk adjustments specified by the FDIC, with riskier institutions paying higher assessments. Effective April 1, 2011, the FDIC implemented a requirement of the Dodd-Frank Act that it revise its assessment system to base it on each institution’s total assets less tangible capital of each institution instead of deposits. The FDIC also revised its assessment schedule so that it ranges from 2.5 basis points for the least risky institutions to 45 basis points for the riskiest.

On May 22, 2009, the FDIC adopted a final rule imposing a 5 basis point special assessment on each insured depository institution’s assets minus Tier 1 capital as of June 30, 2009. Our total expense for the special assessment was $846,000 as of June 30, 2009.

The FDIC also adopted a rule pursuant to which all insured depository institutions were required to prepay their estimated assessments for the fourth quarter of 2009, and for all of 2010, 2011 and 2012. The prepayment amount was collected on December 30, 2009. The assessment rate for the fourth quarter of 2009 and for 2010 was based on each institution’s total base assessment rate for the third quarter of 2009, modified to assume that the assessment rate in effect on September 30, 2009 had been in effect for the entire third quarter, and the assessment rate for 2011 and 2012 was equal to the modified third quarter assessment rate plus an additional three basis points. In addition, each institution’s base assessment rate for each period was calculated using its third quarter assessment base, adjusted quarterly for an estimated 5% annual growth rate in the assessment base through the end of 2012. We recorded the pre-payment as a prepaid expense, which will be amortized to expense over three years. On December

 

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30, 2009, the Company paid $8.1 million in estimated assessments, of which $7.1 million was prepaid for the 2010, 2011 and 2012 assessment periods.

The deposit insurance assessment rates are in addition to the assessments for payments on the bonds issued in the late 1980s by the Financing Corporation, or FICO, to recapitalize the now defunct Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation. The FICO payments will continue until the FICO bonds mature in 2017 through 2019. Excluding the special assessment noted above, our expense for the assessment of deposit insurance and the FICO payments was $1.2 million for the year ended June 30, 2012 and $1.4 million for the year ended June 30, 2011.

The FDIC has authority to increase deposit insurance assessments. A material increase in insurance assessments would likely have an adverse effect on the operating expenses and results of the Bank.

Federal Home Loan Bank System. Oritani Bank is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank System, which consists of 12 regional Federal Home Loan Banks. The Federal Home Loan Bank System provides a central credit facility primarily for member institutions. As a member of the FHLB of New York, Oritani Bank is required to acquire and hold shares of capital stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank in an amount at least equal to 1% of the aggregate principal amount of its unpaid residential mortgage loans and similar obligations at the beginning of each year, 4.5% of its borrowings from the Federal Home Loan Bank, or 0.3% of assets, whichever is greater. As of June 30, 2012 Oritani Bank was in compliance with this requirement.

Enforcement. The FDIC has extensive enforcement authority over insured savings banks, including Oritani Bank. This enforcement authority includes, among other things, the ability to assess civil money penalties, to issue cease and desist orders, to remove directors and officers and terminate deposit insurance. In general, these enforcement actions may be initiated in response to violations of laws and regulations and to unsafe or unsound practices.

Transactions with Affiliates of Oritani Bank. Transactions between an insured bank, such as Oritani Bank, and any of its affiliates are governed by Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act and implementing regulations. An affiliate of an insured bank is any company or entity that controls, is controlled by or is under common control with the bank. Generally, a subsidiary of a bank that is not also a depository institution or financial subsidiary is not treated as an affiliate of the bank for purposes of Sections 23A and 23B.

Section 23A:

 

   

limits the extent to which the bank or its subsidiaries may engage in “covered transactions” with any one affiliate to an amount equal to 10% of such bank’s capital stock and retained earnings, and limits all such transactions with all affiliates to an amount equal to 20% of such capital stock and retained earnings; and

 

   

requires that all such transactions be on terms that are consistent with safe and sound banking practices.

The term “covered transaction” includes the making of loans, purchase of assets, issuance of guarantees and other similar types of transactions. Further, most loans by a bank to any of its affiliates must be secured by collateral in amounts ranging from 100% to 130% of the loan amounts. There is a general prohibition on the purchase of a low quality asset from an affiliate. In addition, any covered transaction by a bank with an affiliate and any purchase of assets or services by a bank from an affiliate must be on terms that are substantially the same, or at least as favorable to the bank, as those that would be provided to a non-affiliate.

Prohibitions Against Tying Arrangements. Banks are subject to the prohibitions of 12 U.S.C. Section 1972 on certain tying arrangements. A depository institution is prohibited, subject to some exceptions, from extending credit to or offering any other service, or fixing or varying the consideration for such extension of credit or service, on the condition that the customer obtain some additional service from the institution or its affiliates or not obtain services of a competitor of the institution.

Privacy Standards. FDIC regulations require Oritani Bank to disclose its privacy policy, including identifying with whom it shares “non-public personal information,” of customers at the time of establishing the

 

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customer relationship and annually thereafter. Oritani Bank does not share “non-public personal information” with third parties.

In addition, Oritani Bank is required to provide its customers with the ability to “opt-out” of having Oritani Bank share their non-public personal information with unaffiliated third parties before they can disclose such information, subject to certain exceptions.

The FDIC and other federal banking agencies adopted guidelines establishing standards for safeguarding customer information. The guidelines describe the agencies’ expectations for the creation, implementation and maintenance of an information security program, which would include administrative, technical and physical safeguards appropriate to the size and complexity of the institution and the nature and scope of its activities. The standards set forth in the guidelines are intended to insure the security and confidentiality of customer records and information, protect against any anticipated threats or hazards to the security or integrity of such records and protect against unauthorized access to or use of such records or information that could result in substantial harm or inconvenience to any customer.

Community Reinvestment Act and Fair Lending Laws. All FDIC insured institutions have a responsibility under the Community Reinvestment Act and related regulations to help meet the credit needs of their communities, including low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. In connection with its examination of a state chartered savings bank, the FDIC is required to assess the institution’s record of compliance with the Community Reinvestment Act. Among other things, the current Community Reinvestment Act regulations replace the prior process-based assessment factors with an evaluation system that rates an institution based on its actual performance in meeting community needs. In particular, the current evaluation system focuses on three tests:

 

   

a lending test, to evaluate the institution’s record of making loans in its service areas;

 

   

an investment test, to evaluate the institution’s record of investing in community development projects, affordable housing, and programs benefiting low or moderate income individuals and businesses; and

 

   

a service test, to evaluate the institution’s delivery of services through its branches, ATMs and other offices.

An institution’s failure to comply with the provisions of the Community Reinvestment Act could, at a minimum, result in an inability to receive regulatory approval for certain activities such as branching and acquisitions. Oritani Bank received a “satisfactory” Community Reinvestment Act rating in our most recently completed federal examination, which was conducted by the FDIC in 2011.

In addition, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Housing Act prohibit lenders from discriminating in their lending practices on the basis of characteristics specified in those statutes. The failure to comply with the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Housing Act could result in enforcement actions by the FDIC, as well as other federal regulatory agencies and the Department of Justice.

Loans to a Bank’s Insiders

Federal Regulation. A bank’s loans to its executive officers, directors, any owner of more than 10% or more of its stock (each, an insider) and any of certain entities affiliated with any such persons (an insider’s related interest) are subject to the conditions and limitations imposed by Section 22(h) of the Federal Reserve Act and its implementing regulations. Under these restrictions, the aggregate amount of the loans to any insider and the insider’s related interests may not exceed the loans-to-one-borrower limit applicable to national banks, which is comparable to the loans-to-one-borrower limit applicable to Oritani Bank. See “New Jersey Banking Regulation-Loans-to-One Borrower Limitations.” All loans by a bank to all insiders and insiders’ related interests in the aggregate generally may not exceed the bank’s unimpaired capital and unimpaired surplus. With certain exceptions, loans to an executive officer, other than loans for the education of the officer’s children and certain loans secured by the officer’s primary residence, may not exceed the lesser of (1) $100,000 or (2) the greater of $25,000 or 2.5% of the bank’s unimpaired capital and surplus. Federal regulation also requires that any proposed loan to an insider or a related interest of that insider be approved in advance by a majority of the board of directors of the bank, with any interested directors not participating in the voting, if such loan, when aggregated with any existing loans to that

 

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insider and the insider’s related interests, would exceed either (1) $500,000 or (2) the greater of $25,000 or 5% of the bank’s unimpaired capital and surplus.

Generally, loans to insiders must be made on substantially the same terms as, and follow credit underwriting procedures that are not less stringent than, those that are prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with other persons. An exception is made for extensions of credit made pursuant to a benefit or compensation plan of a bank that is widely available to employees of the bank and that does not give any preference to insiders of the bank over other employees of the bank.

In addition, federal law prohibits extensions of credit to a bank’s insiders and their related interests by any other institution that has a correspondent banking relationship with the bank, unless such extension of credit is on substantially the same terms as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with other persons and does not involve more than the normal risk of repayment or present other unfavorable features.

New Jersey Regulation. Provisions of the New Jersey Banking Act impose conditions and limitations on the liabilities to a savings bank of its directors and executive officers and of corporations and partnerships controlled by such persons that are comparable in many respects to the conditions and limitations imposed on the loans and extensions of credit to insiders and their related interests under federal law, as discussed above. The New Jersey Banking Act also provides that a savings bank that is in compliance with federal law is deemed to be in compliance with such provisions of the New Jersey Banking Act.

Other Regulations

Interest and other charges collected or contracted for by Oritani Bank are subject to state usury laws and federal laws concerning interest rates. Oritani Bank’s operations are also subject to federal laws applicable to credit transactions, such as the:

 

   

Truth-In-Lending Act, governing disclosures of credit terms to consumer borrowers;

 

   

Home Mortgage Disclosure Act of 1975, requiring financial institutions to provide information to enable the public and public officials to determine whether a financial institution is fulfilling its obligation to help meet the housing needs of the community it serves;

 

   

Equal Credit Opportunity Act, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, creed or other prohibited factors in extending credit;

 

   

Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1978, governing the use and provision of information to credit reporting agencies;

 

   

Fair Debt Collection Act, governing the manner in which consumer debts may be collected by collection agencies; and

 

   

rules and regulations of the various federal agencies charged with the responsibility of implementing such federal laws.

The operations of Oritani Bank also are subject to the:

 

   

Right to Financial Privacy Act, which imposes a duty to maintain confidentiality of consumer financial records and prescribes procedures for complying with administrative subpoenas of financial records;

 

   

Electronic Funds Transfer Act and Regulation E promulgated thereunder, which govern automatic deposits to and withdrawals from deposit accounts and customers’ rights and liabilities arising from the use of automated teller machines and other electronic banking services;

 

   

Check Clearing for the 21st Century Act (also known as “Check 21”), which gives “substitute checks,” such as digital check images and copies made from that image, the same legal standing as the original paper check;

 

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Title III of The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (referred to as the “USA PATRIOT Act”), which significantly expanded the responsibilities of financial institutions, including savings banks, in preventing the use of the U.S. financial system to fund terrorist activities. Among other provisions, the USA PATRIOT Act and the related regulations of the FRB require savings associations operating in the United States to develop new anti-money laundering compliance programs, due diligence policies and controls to ensure the detection and reporting of money laundering. Such required compliance programs are intended to supplement existing compliance requirements, also applicable to financial institutions, under the Bank Secrecy Act and the Office of Foreign Assets Control Regulations; and

 

   

The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, which placed limitations on the sharing of consumer financial information by financial institutions with unaffiliated third parties. Specifically, the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act requires all financial institutions offering financial products or services to retail customers to provide such customers with the financial institution’s privacy policy and provide such customers the opportunity to “opt out” of the sharing of certain personal financial information with unaffiliated third parties.

The Dodd-Frank Act

Congress enacted the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) in 2010. That new law is significantly changing the current bank regulatory structure and has affected the lending, deposit, investment, trading and operating activities of financial institutions and their holding companies. The Dodd-Frank Act required various federal agencies to adopt a broad range of new implementing rules and regulations, and to prepare numerous studies and reports for Congress. The federal agencies are given significant discretion in drafting the implementing rules and regulations, and consequently, many of the details and much of the ultimate impact of the Dodd-Frank Act may not be known for many years.

Certain provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act have had a near term effect on us. For example, the law provided for the elimination of the OTS, which is the former primary federal regulator for Oritani Financial Corp. The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System assumed supervision and regulation of all savings and loan holding companies that were formerly regulated by the OTS, including Oritani Financial Corp., on July 21, 2011. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, which is the primary federal regulator for national banks, became the primary federal regulator for federal thrifts on the same date.

The Dodd-Frank Act eliminated the federal prohibitions on paying interest on demand deposits, thus allowing businesses to have interest bearing checking accounts, as of July 21, 2011. Depending on competitive responses, this significant change to existing law could have an adverse effect on our interest expense. The legislation also requires that originators of certain securitized loans retain a percentage of the risk for transferred loans, directed the FRB to regulate pricing of certain debit card interchange fees and contains a number of reforms regarding home mortgage originators.

The Dodd-Frank Act also broadened the base for Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insurance assessments. Assessments are now based on the average consolidated total assets less tangible equity capital of a depository institution, rather than deposits. The Dodd-Frank Act also permanently increase the maximum amount of deposit insurance for banks, savings institutions and credit unions to $250,000 per depositor, retroactive to January 1, 2008, and non-interest bearing transaction accounts have unlimited deposit insurance through December 31, 2012.

The Dodd-Frank Act also requires publicly traded companies to give stockholders a non-binding vote on executive compensation and so-called “golden parachute” payments, and authorized the Securities and Exchange Commission to promulgate rules that would allow stockholders to nominate their own candidates using a company’s proxy materials. The legislation also directs the Federal Reserve Board to promulgate rules prohibiting excessive compensation paid to bank holding company executives, regardless of whether the company is publicly traded or not.

 

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The Dodd-Frank Act created a new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau with broad powers to supervise and enforce consumer protection laws. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which was created as of July 21, 2011, has broad rule-making authority for a wide range of consumer protection laws that apply to all banks and savings institutions, including the authority to prohibit “unfair, deceptive or abusive” acts and practices. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has examination and enforcement authority over all banks and savings institutions with more than $10 billion in assets. Banks and savings institutions with $10 billion or less in assets continue to be examined for compliance by their applicable bank regulators. The Dodd-Frank Act also weakens the federal preemption rules that have been applicable for national banks and federal savings associations, and gives state attorneys general the ability to enforce federal consumer protection laws.

It is difficult to predict at this time what specific impact the Dodd-Frank Act ultimately will have on community banks. However, it is expected that, at a minimum, our operating and compliance costs will increase.

Holding Company Regulation

General. Oritani Financial Corp. is a non-diversified savings and loan holding company within the meaning of the HOLA. As such, Oritani Financial Corp. is registered with the Federal Reserve Board and subject to Federal Reserve Board regulations, examinations, supervision and reporting requirements. In addition, the Federal Reserve Board has enforcement authority over Oritani Financial Corp and its subsidiaries. Among other things, this authority permits the Federal Reserve Board to restrict or prohibit activities that are determined to be a serious risk to the subsidiary savings institution. As a Delaware corporation, Oritani Financial Corp. is generally subject to state business organization laws. Oritani Financial Corp. is subject to the requirements of Delaware law that generally limit dividends to an amount equal to the difference between the amount by which total assets exceed total liabilities and the amount equal to the aggregate par value of the outstanding shares of capital stock. If there is no difference between these amounts, dividends are limited to net income for the current and/or preceding year. The rights of the stockholders of Oritani Financial Corp. are governed by the Delaware General Corporate Law.

Permitted Activities. Pursuant to the HOLA and federal regulations and policy, a savings and loan holding company such as Oritani Financial Corp. may generally engage in the activities permitted for financial holding companies under Section 4(k) of the Bank Holding Company Act and certain other activities that have been authorized for savings and loan holding companies by regulation.

The HOLA prohibits a savings and loan holding company, including Oritani Financial Corp., directly or indirectly, or through one or more subsidiaries, from acquiring more than 5% of another savings institution or holding company thereof, without prior regulatory approval. It also prohibits the acquisition or retention of, with certain exceptions, more than 5% of a non-subsidiary company engaged in activities other than those permitted by the HOLA, or acquiring or retaining control of an institution that is not federally insured. In evaluating applications by holding companies to acquire savings institutions, the Federal Reserve Board must consider the financial and managerial resources, future prospects of the company and institution involved, the effect of the acquisition on the risk to the federal deposit insurance fund, the convenience and needs of the community and competitive factors.

Any acquisition that would result in a multiple savings and loan holding company controlling savings institutions in more than one state is prohibited, subject to two exceptions:

 

  (i) the approval of interstate supervisory acquisitions by savings and loan holding companies; and

 

  (ii) the acquisition of a savings institution in another state if the laws of the state of the target savings institution specifically permit such acquisitions.

Qualified Thrift Lender Test. In order for Oritani Financial Corp. to continue to be regulated as a savings and loan holding company (rather than as a bank holding company), Oritani Bank must qualify as a “qualified thrift lender” under federal law or satisfy the “domestic building and loan association” test under the Internal Revenue Code. The qualified thrift lender test requires that a savings institution maintain at least 65% of its “portfolio assets” (total assets less: (i) specified liquid assets up to 20% of total assets; (ii) intangible, including goodwill; and (iii) the value of property used to conduct business) in certain “qualified thrift investments” (primarily residential mortgages and related investments, including certain mortgage-backed and related securities) in at least nine out of each 12

 

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month period. Oritani Bank currently maintains the majority of its portfolio assets in qualified thrift investments and has met the qualified thrift lender test in each of the last 12 months.

Capital. Savings and loan holding companies are not currently subject to specific regulatory capital requirements. The Dodd-Frank Act, however, requires the Federal Reserve Board to promulgate consolidated capital requirements for depository institution holding companies that are no less stringent, both quantitatively and in terms of components of capital, than those applicable to depository institutions themselves. Instruments such as cumulative preferred stock and trust preferred securities will no longer be includable as Tier 1 capital, which is currently permitted for bank holding companies. Instruments issued by May 19, 2010 will be grandfathered for companies with consolidated assets of $15 billion or less. There is a five-year transition period (from the July 21, 2010 effective date of the Dodd-Frank Act) before the capital requirements will apply to savings and loan holding companies. The previously referenced proposed rule related to increased capital requirements for insured depository institutions would also apply such capital requirements to savings and loan holding companies.

Source of Strength. The Dodd-Frank Act extended the “source of strength” doctrine to savings and loan holding companies. The regulatory agencies must issue regulations requiring that all bank and savings and loan holding companies serve as a source of strength to their subsidiary depository institutions by providing capital, liquidity and other support in times of financial stress.

Dividends. Oritani must notify the Federal Reserve Board thirty days before declaring any dividend to the Company. The financial impact of a holding company on its subsidiary institution is a matter that is evaluated by the regulator and the agency has authority to order cessation of activities or divestiture of subsidiaries deemed to pose a threat to the safety and soundness of the institution.

Acquisition. Under the Federal Change in Control Act, a notice must be submitted to the Federal Reserve Board if any person (including a company), or group acting in concert, seeks to acquire direct or indirect “control” of a savings and loan holding company. Under certain circumstances, a change of control may occur, and prior notice is required, upon the acquisition of 10% or more of the company’s outstanding voting stock, unless the Federal Reserve Board has found that the acquisition will not result in control of the company. A change in control definitively occurs upon the acquisition of 25% or more of the company’s outstanding voting stock. Under the Change in Control Act, the Federal Reserve Board generally has 60 days from the filing of a complete notice to act, taking into consideration certain factors, including the financial and managerial resources of the acquirer and the competitive effects of the acquisition. Certain acquisitions of control of a New Jersey savings bank or its parent company require the prior approval of the NJDOBI. In addition, federal regulations prohibit, for three years following the completion of a conversion, the direct or indirect acquisition of more than 10.0% of any class of equity security of a savings institution or regulated holding company of a converted institution without the prior approval of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

Federal Securities Laws

Oritani Financial Corp.’s common stock is registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Oritani Financial Corp. is subject to the information, proxy solicitation, insider trading restrictions and other requirements under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Oritani Financial Corp. common stock held by persons who are affiliates (generally officers, directors and principal stockholders) of Oritani Financial Corp. may not be resold without registration or unless sold in accordance with certain resale restrictions. If Oritani Financial Corp. meets specified current public information requirements, each affiliate of Oritani Financial Corp. is able to sell in the public market, without registration, a limited number of shares in any three-month period.

Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 addresses, among other issues, corporate governance, auditing and accounting, executive compensation, and enhanced and timely disclosure of corporate information. As directed by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer each will be required to

 

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certify that our quarterly and annual reports do not contain any untrue statement of a material fact. The rules adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 have several requirements, including having these officers certify that: they are responsible for establishing, maintaining and regularly evaluating the effectiveness of our internal controls; they have made certain disclosures to our auditors and the audit committee of the board of directors about our internal controls; and they have included information in our quarterly and annual reports about their evaluation and whether there have been significant changes in our internal controls or in other factors that could significantly affect internal controls. Oritani Financial Corp is required to report under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and has reported that it complies with such in all material respects.

 

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FEDERAL AND STATE TAXATION

Federal Taxation

General. Oritani Financial Corp. and Oritani Bank are subject to federal income taxation in the same general manner as other corporations, with some exceptions discussed below. Neither Oritani Financial Corp.’s nor Oritani Bank’s federal tax returns are currently under audit, and neither entity has been audited during the past five years. The following discussion of federal taxation is intended only to summarize certain pertinent federal income tax matters and is not a comprehensive description of the tax rules applicable to Oritani Financial Corp. or Oritani Bank.

Method of Accounting. For federal income tax purposes, Oritani Financial Corp. currently reports its income and expenses on the accrual method of accounting and uses a tax year ending December 31 for filing its federal and state income tax returns.

Bad Debt Reserves. Historically, Oritani Bank has been subject to special provisions in the tax law regarding allowable tax bad debt deductions and related reserves. Tax law changes were enacted in 1996, pursuant to the Small Business Protection Act of 1996 (the “1996 Act”), that eliminated the use of the percentage of taxable income method for tax years after 1995 and required recapture into taxable income over a six year period of all bad debt reserves accumulated after 1988. Oritani Bank recaptured its reserve balance over the six-year period ended December 31, 2003.

Currently, the Oritani Bank consolidated group uses the specific charge-off method to account for bad debt deductions for income tax purposes.

Taxable Distributions and Recapture. Prior to the 1996 Act, bad debt reserves created prior to January 1, 1988 were subject to recapture into taxable income should Oritani Bank fail to meet certain thrift asset and definitional tests.

At June 30, 2012, our total federal pre-base year reserve was approximately $15.1 million. However, under current law, pre-base year reserves remain subject to recapture should Oritani Bank make certain non-dividend distributions, repurchase any of its stock, pay dividends in excess of tax earnings and profits, or cease to maintain a bank charter.

Alternative Minimum Tax. The Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”) imposes an alternative minimum tax (“AMT”) at a rate of 20% on a base of regular taxable income plus certain tax preferences (“alternative minimum taxable income” or “AMTI”). The AMT is payable to the extent such AMTI is in excess of an exemption amount and the AMT exceeds the regular income tax. Net operating losses can offset no more than 90% of AMTI. Certain payments of alternative minimum tax may be used as credits against regular tax liabilities in future years. Oritani Financial Corp. and Oritani Bank have not been subject to the AMT and have no such amounts available as credits for carryover.

Net Operating Loss Carryforwards. A financial institution may carry back net operating losses to the preceding two taxable years and forward to the succeeding 20 taxable years. At June 30, 2012, Oritani Bank had no net operating loss carryforwards for federal income tax purposes.

State Taxation

New Jersey State Taxation. Oritani Financial Corp. and it’s subsidiaries file New Jersey Corporation Business income tax returns on a calendar year basis. Generally, New Jersey income, which is calculated based on federal taxable income, subject to certain adjustments, is subject to New Jersey tax. New Jersey corporate tax is imposed in an amount equal to the corporate business tax (“CBT”) at 9% of taxable income or the minimum tax due per entity, whichever is greater. However, if Oritani Investment Corp, a subsidiary of the Bank, meets certain requirements, it may be eligible to elect to be taxed as a New Jersey Investment Company, which would allow it to be taxed at a rate of 3.6%.

 

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New Jersey tax law does not and has not allowed for a taxpayer to file a tax return on a combined or consolidated basis with another member of the affiliated group where there is common ownership. However, under recent tax legislation, if the taxpayer cannot demonstrate by clear and convincing evidence that the tax filing discloses the true earnings of the taxpayer on its business carried on in the State of New Jersey, the New Jersey Director of the Division of Taxation may, at the director’s discretion, require the taxpayer to file a consolidated return for the entire operations of the affiliated group or controlled group, including its own operations and income.

New York State Taxation. Oritani Bank files New York State franchise tax returns on a calendar year basis. New York State imposes an annual franchise tax on banking corporations, based on net income allocable to New York State at a rate of 7.1%. If, however, the application of an alternative minimum tax (based on taxable assets allocated to New York, “alternative” net income, or a flat minimum fee) results in a greater tax, an alternative minimum tax will be imposed. In addition, New York State imposes a tax surcharge of 17% of the New York State Franchise Tax, calculating using an annual franchise tax of 9.00% (which represents the 2000 annual franchise rate), allocable to business activities carried on in the Metropolitan Commuter Transportation District. These taxes apply to Oritani Bank.

New York City Taxation. Oritani Bank is also subject to the New York City Financial Corporation Tax calculated, subject to a New York City income and expense allocation, on a similar basis as the New York State Franchise Tax. A significant portion of Oritani’s entire net income is derived from outside of the New York City jurisdiction which has the effect of significantly reducing the New York City taxable income of Oritani Bank.

Delaware State Taxation. As a Delaware holding company not earning income in Delaware, the Company is exempt from Delaware corporate income tax but is required to file annual returns and pay annual fees and a franchise tax to the state of Delaware.

Our state tax returns are not currently under audit or have not been subject to an audit during the past five years.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

Future Changes in Interest Rates Could Reduce Our Profits.

Our ability to make a profit largely depends on our net interest income, which could be negatively affected by changes in interest rates. Net interest income is the difference between:

 

   

the interest income we earn on our interest-earning assets, such as loans and securities; and

 

   

the interest expense we pay on our interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowings.

In addition, changes in interest rates can affect the average life of loans and mortgage-backed and related securities. A reduction in interest rates results in increased prepayments of loans and mortgage-backed and related securities, as borrowers refinance their debt in order to reduce their borrowing costs. This creates reinvestment risk, which is the risk that we may not be able to reinvest prepayments at rates that are comparable to the rates we earned on the prepaid loans or securities. Reinvestment risk is particularly high in this current rate environment. Increases in interest rates may decrease loan demand and/or make it more difficult for borrowers to repay adjustable rate loans.

Changes in interest rates also affect the current market value of our interest-earning securities portfolio. Generally, the value of securities moves inversely with changes in interest rates. At June 30, 2012 the fair value of our available for sale agency securities, mortgage-backed securities and corporate debt obligations totaled $498.5 million. Unrealized net gains on these available for sale securities totaled approximately $9.6 million at June 30, 2012 and are reported as a separate component of stockholders’ equity. Decreases in the fair value of securities available for sale in future periods would have an adverse effect on stockholders’ equity.

 

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In addition, many of our FHLB of New York advances are callable, often five years from the date of issuance. To the extent the FHLB of New York calls all or a portion of these advances, we would need to find another funding source, which might be more expensive to us than these advances.

The Company’s net interest income is particularly vulnerable to a scenario in which market interest rates “flatten.” This would occur if short term interest rates were approximately the same rate as long term interest rates. In such a scenario, interest income would likely decrease and interest expense would likely increase.

We evaluate interest rate sensitivity by estimating the change in Oritani Bank’s net portfolio value over a range of interest rate scenarios. Net portfolio value is the discounted present value of expected cash flows from assets, liabilities and off-balance sheet contracts. At June 30, 2012, in the event of an immediate 200 basis point increase in interest rates, the model projects that we would experience a $110.6 million, or 19.0%, decrease in net portfolio value. See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations-Management of Market Risk.”

Historically Low Interest Rates May Adversely Affect Our Net Interest Income and Profitability.

During the past four years it has been the policy of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System to maintain interest rates at historically low levels through its targeted federal funds rate and the purchase of mortgage-backed securities. As a result, market rates on the loans we have originated and the yields on securities we have purchased have been at lower levels than as available prior to 2008. Consequently, the average yield on our interest earning assets has decreased to 4.88% for the year ended June 30, 2012 from 5.57% for the year ended June 30, 2009. This trend of decreasing average yield on interest earning assets is expected to continue. Our cost of interest bearing liabilities has also decreased over the period, to 1.64% for the year ended June 30, 2012 from 3.21% for the year ended June 30, 2009. However, many of our deposit products are currently priced below 1.00% and the ability to reduce these costs further is limited. The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System has indicated its intention to maintain low interest rates in the near future. Accordingly, our net interest income (the difference between interest income earned on assets and interest expense paid on liabilities) may decrease, which may have an adverse affect on our profitability.

Our Continued Emphasis On Multifamily and Commercial Real Estate Lending Could Expose Us To Increased Lending Risks.

Our business strategy centers on continuing our emphasis on multifamily and commercial real estate lending. We have grown our loan portfolio in recent years with respect to these types of loans and intend to continue to emphasize these types of lending. At June 30, 2012, $1.8 billion, or 88.4%, of our total loan portfolio consisted of multifamily loans and commercial real estate loans. As a result, our credit risk profile will be higher than traditional thrift institutions that have higher concentrations of one to four family residential loans. Loans secured by multifamily and commercial real estate generally expose a lender to greater risk of non-payment and loss than one to four family residential mortgage loans because repayment of the loans often depends on the successful operation of the property and the income stream of the underlying property. This risk increases during a negative economic cycle. Additionally, such loans typically involve larger loan balances to single borrowers or groups of related borrowers compared to one to four family residential mortgage loans. Accordingly, an adverse development with respect to one loan or one credit relationship can expose us to greater risk of loss compared to an adverse development with respect to a one to four family residential mortgage loan. We seek to minimize these risks through our underwriting policies, which require such loans to be qualified on the basis of the property’s collateral value, net income and debt service ratio; however, there is no assurance that our underwriting policies will protect us from credit-related losses. Finally, if we foreclose on multifamily and commercial real estate loans, our holding period for the collateral typically is longer than one to four family residential mortgage loans because there a fewer potential purchasers of the collateral.

The largest commercial real estate loan in our portfolio at June 30, 2012 was a $21.0 million loan secured by a shopping center, located in Putnam County, New York. Our largest loan relationship consisted of multifamily properties located mainly in our primary market area with a real estate investor. The aggregate outstanding loan balance for this relationship is $47.0 million at June 30, 2012. As discussed in “Business of Oritani Financial Corp-

 

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Lending Activities”, we have recently been utilizing stricter underwriting for these types of loans, and curtailed our construction lending.

If Our Allowance for Loan Losses is Not Sufficient to Cover Actual Loan Losses, Our Earnings Will Decrease.

We make various assumptions and judgments about the collectibility of our loan portfolio, including the creditworthiness of our borrowers and the value of the real estate and other assets serving as collateral for the repayment of many of our loans. In determining the amount of the allowance for loan losses, we review our loans and our loss and delinquency experience, and we evaluate economic conditions. If our assumptions are incorrect, our allowance for loan losses may not be sufficient to cover losses inherent in our loan portfolio, resulting in additions to our allowance. While our allowance for loan losses was 1.53% of total loans at June 30, 2012, material additions to our allowance could materially decrease our net income.

In addition, bank regulators periodically review our allowance for loan losses and may require us to increase our provision for loan losses or recognize further loan charge-offs. Any increase in our allowance for loan losses or loan charge-offs as required by these regulatory authorities might have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Further downgrades in the U.S. government’s sovereign credit rating, and in the credit ratings of instruments issued, insured or guaranteed by certain related institutions, agencies and instrumentalities, could result in risks to us and the general economy that we are not able to predict.

On August 5, 2011, Standard & Poor’s downgraded the United States long-term debt rating from its AAA rating to AA+. On August 8, 2011, Standard & Poor’s downgraded the credit ratings of certain long-term debt instruments issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and other U.S. government agencies linked to long-term U.S. debt. Instruments of this nature are key assets on the balance sheets of financial institutions, including Oritani Bank. These downgrades could adversely affect the market value of such instruments, and could adversely impact our ability to obtain funding that is collateralized by affected instruments, as well as affecting the pricing of that funding when it is available. We cannot predict if, when or how these changes to the credit ratings will affect economic conditions. These ratings downgrades could result in a significant adverse impact to us, and could exacerbate the other risks to which we are subject.

We have been negatively affected by current market and economic conditions. A continuation or worsening of these conditions could adversely affect our operations, financial condition, and earnings.

The severe economic recession of 2008 and 2009 and the weak economic recovery since then have resulted in continued uncertainty in the financial markets and the expectation of weak general economic conditions, including high levels of unemployment. The resulting economic pressure on consumers and businesses has adversely affected our business, financial condition, and results of operations. The credit quality of loan and investment securities portfolios has deteriorated at many financial institutions and the values of real estate collateral supporting many commercial loans and home mortgages have declined and may continue to decline. Some of our commercial and multifamily real estate loan customers have experienced increases in vacancy rates and declines in rental rates for both multifamily and commercial properties Housing market conditions in the New York metropolitan area, where most of our lending activity occurs, deteriorated over the past several years. The S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices, the leading measure of U.S. home prices, showed that the price of existing single family homes in the New York metro area as June 2012 decreased 2.1% versus the June 2011 prices. RealtyTrac, a leading online marketplace for foreclosure properties, reported that national foreclosure filings for July 2012 decreased 10% versus July 2011 while foreclosure starts increased 6 percent from July 2011. The decreasing trend in foreclosures is not an indicator of a recovering economy but more likely the result of short-term interventions such as loan modifications, national and state-level foreclosure prevention efforts and foreclosure processing delays. Financial companies’ stock prices have been negatively affected, as has the ability of banks and bank holding companies to raise capital or borrow in the debt markets. A continuation or worsening of these conditions could result in reduced loan demand and further increases in loan delinquencies, loan losses, loan loss provisions, costs associated with monitoring delinquent loans and disposing of foreclosed property, and otherwise negatively affect our operations, financial condition, and earnings.

Our Deposit Growth Has Been A Primary Funding Source. If Deposit Growth Slows, It May Be More Expensive For Us To Fund Loan Originations.

Over the past four years, we have realized strong deposit growth, although this trend slowed in 2011. Management believes a portion of this growth was due to external factors, as funds were withdrawn from the stock market and deposited into investment options considered safe by the investors, such as Oritani Bank. Such depositors may choose to redeploy these funds in the stock market at a future date, regardless of our efforts. If this

 

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occurs, it would hamper our ability to grow deposits and could even result in a net outflow of deposits. In addition, the increase in deposit insurance limits also may have contributed to our deposit growth and we could experience a net outflow of deposits of such deposit insurance limits were reduced. Another factor increasing the risk of an outflow of deposits pertains to money market accounts. The majority of the deposit growth by the Company was in money market accounts. Money market funds can be withdrawn by depositors at any time without penalty. We will continue to focus on deposit growth, which we use to fund loan originations and purchase investment securities. However, if we are unable to continue to sufficiently increase our deposit balances, we may be required to utilize alternative sources of funding, including Federal Home Loan Bank advances, or increase our deposit rates, each of which will increase our cost of funds.

If Our Investment in the Federal Home Loan Bank of New York is Classified as Other-Than-Temporarily Impaired or as Permanently Impaired, Earnings and Stockholders’ Equity Could Decrease.

We own common stock of the Federal Home Loan Bank of New York (“FHLB-NY”), which is part of the Federal Home Loan Bank system. We hold the FHLB-NY common stock to qualify for membership in the Federal Home Loan Bank System and to be eligible to borrow funds under the FHLB-NY’s advance program. The aggregate cost and fair value of our FHLB-NY common stock as of June 30, 2012 was $38.2 million based on its par value. There is no market for our FHLB-NY common stock.

Although the Federal Home Loan Bank of New York is not reporting current operating difficulties, it is possible that the capital of the Federal Home Loan Bank system, including the Federal Home Loan Bank of New York, could be substantially diminished. This could occur with respect to an individual Federal Home Loan Bank due to the requirement that each Federal Home Loan Bank is jointly and severally liable along with the other Federal Home Loan Banks for the consolidated obligations issued through the Office of Finance, a joint office of the Federal Home Loan Banks, or due to the merger of a Federal Home Loan Bank experiencing operating difficulties into a stronger Federal Home Loan Bank. Consequently, there continues to be a risk that our investment in Federal Home Loan Bank of New York common stock could be deemed other-than-temporarily impaired at some time in the future, and if this occurs, it would cause our earnings and stockholders’ equity to decrease by the impairment charge.

Our Inability to Achieve Profitability on New Branches May Negatively Affect Our Earnings.

We have expanded our presence throughout our market area and we intend to pursue further expansion through de novo branching. The profitability of our expansion strategy will depend on whether the income that we generate from the new branches will offset the increased expenses resulting from operating these branches. We expect that it may take a period of time before these branches can become profitable, especially in areas in which we do not have an established presence. During this period, the expense of operating these branches may negatively affect our net income.

Because the Nature of the Financial Services Business Involves a High Volume of Transactions, We Face Significant Operational Risks.

We operate in diverse markets and rely on the ability of our employees and systems to process a high number of transactions. Operational risk is the risk of loss resulting from our operations, including but not limited to, the risk of fraud by employees or persons outside our company, the execution of unauthorized transactions by employees, errors relating to transaction processing and technology, breaches of the internal control system and compliance requirements, and business continuation and disaster recovery. Insurance coverage may not be available for such losses, or where available, such losses may exceed insurance limits. This risk of loss also includes the potential legal actions that could arise as a result of an operational deficiency or as a result of noncompliance with applicable regulatory standards, adverse business decisions or their implementation, and customer attrition due to potential negative publicity. In the event of a breakdown in the internal control system, improper operation of systems or improper employee actions, we could suffer financial loss, face regulatory action, and suffer damage to our reputation

 

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Risks Associated with System Failures, Interruptions, or Breaches of Security Could Negatively Affect Our Earnings.

Information technology systems are critical to our business. We use various technology systems to manage our customer relationships, general ledger, securities, deposits, and loans. We have established policies and procedures to prevent or limit the impact of system failures, interruptions, and security breaches, but such events may still occur and may not be adequately addressed if they do occur. In addition any compromise of our systems could deter customers from using our products and services. Although we rely on security systems to provide security and authentication necessary to effect the secure transmission of data, these precautions may not protect our systems from compromises or breaches of security.

In addition, we outsource a majority of our data processing to certain third-party providers. If these third-party providers encounter difficulties, or if we have difficulty communicating with them, our ability to adequately process and account for transactions could be affected, and our business operations could be adversely affected. Threats to information security also exist in the processing of customer information through various other vendors and their personnel.

The occurrence of any system failures, interruption, or breach of security could damage our reputation and result in a loss of customers and business thereby subjecting us to additional regulatory scrutiny, or could expose us to litigation and possible financial liability. Any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Strong Competition Within Our Market Area May Limit Our Growth and Profitability.

Competition in the banking and financial services industry is intense. In our market area, we compete with numerous commercial banks, savings institutions, mortgage brokerage firms, credit unions, finance companies, mutual funds, insurance companies, and brokerage and investment banking firms operating locally and elsewhere. Some of our competitors have substantially greater resources and lending limits than we have, have greater name recognition and market presence that benefit them in attracting business, and offer certain services that we do not or cannot provide. In addition, larger competitors may be able to price loans and deposits more aggressively than we do. Our profitability depends upon our continued ability to successfully compete in our market area. The greater resources and deposit and loan products offered by some of our competitors may limit our ability to increase our interest-earning assets. For additional information see “Business of Oritani Financial Corp—Competition.”

We Operate in a Highly Regulated Industry, Which Limits the Manner and Scope of Our Business Activities.

We are subject to extensive supervision, regulation and examination by the NJDOBI, FDIC and Federal Reserve Board. As a result, we are limited in the manner in which we conduct our business, undertake new investments and activities and obtain financing. This regulatory structure is designed primarily for the protection of the DIF and our depositors, and not to benefit our stockholders. This regulatory structure also gives the regulatory authorities extensive discretion in connection with their supervisory and enforcement activities and examination policies, including policies with respect to capital levels, the timing and amount of dividend payments, stock repurchases, the classification of assets and the establishment of adequate loan loss reserves for regulatory purposes. In addition, we must comply with significant anti-money laundering and anti-terrorism laws. Government agencies have substantial discretion to impose significant monetary penalties on institutions which fail to comply with these laws.

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act has changed the bank regulatory framework, created an independent consumer protection bureau that has assumed the consumer protection responsibilities of the various federal banking agencies, and established more stringent capital standards for banks and bank holding companies. Bank regulatory agencies also have been responding aggressively to concerns and adverse trends identified in examinations. Ongoing uncertainty and adverse developments in the financial services industry and the domestic and international credit markets, and the effect of the Dodd-Frank Act and regulatory actions, may adversely affect our operations by restricting our business activities, including our ability to originate or sell loans, modify loan terms, or foreclose on property securing loans. These risks could affect the performance

 

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and value of our loan and investment securities portfolios, which also would negatively affect our financial performance.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

At June 30, 2012, the Company and the Bank conducted business from its corporate headquarters in Washington Township, New Jersey, and 24 full service branch offices located in Bergen, Hudson, Essex and Passaic Counties, New Jersey. The aggregate net book value of premises and equipment was $15.4 million at June 30, 2012.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

The Company and its subsidiaries are subject to various legal actions arising in the normal course of business. In the opinion of management, the resolution of these legal actions is not expected to have a material adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Our shares of common stock are traded on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol “ORIT”. As of June 30, 2012, we have 2,056 stockholders of record (excluding the numbers of person or entities holding stock in street name through various brokerage firms), and 45,198,765 shares outstanding. The following table presents quarterly market information for Oritani Financial Corp.’s common stock for the periods indicated, adjusted to reflect the 1.50-for-one stock split in connection with the second step transaction. The following information was provided by the NASDAQ Stock Market.

 

     For the Years Ended June 30,  
     2012      2011  
     High      Low      Dividends      High      Low      Dividends  

First Quarter

   $ 13.64       $ 11.57       $ 0.100       $ 10.07       $ 9.10       $ 0.075   

Second Quarter

     14.00         12.02       $ 0.125         12.68         9.82       $ 0.100   

Third Quarter

     15.06         12.42       $ 0.125         12.98         11.75       $ 0.100   

Fourth Quarter

     15.13         13.27       $ 0.150         12.96         11.83       $ 0.100   

The Company’s Board of Directors intends to review the payment of dividends quarterly and plans to maintain a regular cash dividend in the future, subject to capital requirements, financial condition, results of operations, tax considerations, industry standards, economic conditions, regulatory restrictions that affect the payment of dividends by the Bank to the Company and other relevant factors. No assurances can be given that any cash dividends will be paid or that, if paid, will not be reduced or eliminated in the future.

 

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The sources of funds for the payment of a cash dividend are the retained proceeds from the sale of shares of common stock and earnings on those proceeds, interest and principal payments with respect to Oritani Financial Corp.’s loan to the Employee Stock Ownership Plan, and dividends from Oritani Bank. For a discussion of the limitations applicable to Oritani Bank’s ability to pay dividends, see “Supervision and Regulation—Federal Banking Regulation.”

Stock Performance Graph

Set forth below is a stock performance graph comparing (a) the cumulative total return on the Company’s Common Stock, adjusted to reflect the 1.5-for-one stock split in connection with the second step transaction, for the period beginning January 24, 2007, the date that Oritani Financial Corp. began trading as a public company as reported by the NASDAQ Global Market (at a closing price of $10.65 per share on such date), through June 30, 2012, the cumulative total return on stocks over such period included in (b) the NASDAQ Bank Index, (c) the NASDAQ Composite Index. (d) the SNL US Thrift Index and (e) the KBW Bank index. The SNL US Thrift and the KBW indices have been added to enhance stockholder perspective of the Company's stock performance. The initial offering price of Oritani Financial Corp. common stock was $6.67 per share and the first trading day increase in the value of the stock is not reflected in the graph. Cumulative return assumes the reinvestment of dividends, and is expressed in dollars based on an assumed investment of $100.

 

LOGO

 

     Period Ending  

Index

   01/24/07      06/30/07      06/30/08      06/30/09      06/30/10      06/30/11      06/30/12  

Oritani Financial Corporation

     100.00         89.48         100.19         85.85         96.13         127.11         148.40   

NASDAQ Bank

     100.00         95.38         64.02         49.69         55.24         58.96         61.22   

NASDAQ Composite

     100.00         105.93         94.07         76.08         88.27         117.28         125.56   

SNL US Thrift Index

     100.00         92.54         47.88         32.44         35.24         34.96         34.17   

KBW Bank

     100.00         97.11         52.24         34.02         43.45         46.08         44.60   

 

* Source: SNL Financial LC, Charlottesville, VA

 

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The Company does not have any equity compensation program that was not approved by stockholders, other than its employee stock ownership plan.

The following table shows Company’s repurchase of its common stock for each calendar month in the three months ended June 30, 2012 and the stock repurchase plan approved by our Board of Directors.

 

                   Total Number of      Maximum Number of  
     Total Number      Average      Shares Purchased as      Shares That May Yet  
     of Shares      Price Paid      part of Publicly      Be Purchased Under  

Period

   Repurchased      Per Share      Announced Plan      the Plan (1)  

April 1, 2012 through April 30, 2012

     —           —           —           2,160,375   

May 1, 2012 through May 31, 2012

     —           —           —           2,160,375   

June 1, 2012 through June 30, 2012

     255,900       $ 13.46         255,900         1,904,475   

 

(1) On November 14, 2011, the Company announced its third Share Repurchase Program, which authorized the purchase of an additional 5% of its outstanding shares of common stock, or 2,278,776 shares. This stock repurchase program commenced upon the completion of the second repurchase program on November 14, 2011. The timing of the repurchases depend on certain factors, including but not limited to, market conditions and prices, the Company’s liquidity and capital requirements, and alternative uses of capital. Repurchased shares will be held as treasury stock and will be available for general corporate purposes. The Company conducts such repurchases in accordance with a Rule 10b5-1 trading plan. This program has no expiration date and has 1,904,475 shares yet to be purchased as of June 30, 2012.

As of September 12, 2012, the Company has repurchased, under the repurchase plans approved since the second step transaction, 11,159,700 shares of its stock at an average price of $13.00 per share.

 

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following information is derived from the audited consolidated financial statements of Oritani Financial Corp. For additional information, reference is made to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the Consolidated Financial Statements of Oritani Financial Corp. and related notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report.

 

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     At June 30,  
     2012      2011      2010      2009      2008  
     (In thousands)  

Selected Financial Condition Data:

              

Total assets

   $ 2,700,982       $ 2,587,233       $ 2,477,420       $ 1,913,521       $ 1,443,294   

Loans, net

     1,992,817         1,672,849         1,505,880         1,278,623         1,007,077   

Securities available for sale, at market value

     499,951         597,374         437,200         273,022         171,494   

Mortgage-backed securities held to maturity

     36,130         37,609         66,468         118,817         163,950   

Bank owned life insurance

     46,283         44,689         30,529         29,385         26,425   

Federal Home Loan Bank of New York stock, at cost

     38,222         26,844         25,081         25,549         21,547   

Accrued interest receivable

     10,630         9,237         9,425         7,967         5,646   

Investments in real estate joint ventures, net

     5,441         5,309         5,562         5,767         5,564   

Real estate held for investment

     1,123         1,185         1,221         1,338         3,681   

Deposits

     1,389,706         1,381,310         1,289,746         1,127,630         698,932   

Borrowings

     745,865         509,315         495,552         508,991         433,672   

Stockholders’ equity

     510,709         645,412         643,393         240,098         278,975   

Selected Operating Data:

              

Interest income

   $ 121,990       $ 117,353       $ 105,339       $ 88,429       $ 71,591   

Interest expense

     33,333         36,330         42,386         44,500         37,208   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net interest income

     88,657         81,023         62,953         43,929         34,383   

Provision for loan losses

     8,500         9,300         10,000         9,880         4,650   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net interest income after provision for loan losses

     80,157         71,723         52,953         34,049         29,733   

Other income

     5,401         5,452         5,486         2,780         4,936   

Other expense

     35,451         31,716         42,779         27,257         19,491   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Income before income tax expense

     50,107         45,459         15,660         9,572         15,178   

Income tax expense

     18,457         16,952         7,296         4,020         6,218   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 31,650       $ 28,507       $ 8,364       $ 5,552       $ 8,960   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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     At or For the Years Ended June 30,  
     2012     2011     2010     2009     2008  

Selected Financial Ratios and Other Data:

          

Performance Ratios:

          

Return on assets (ratio of net income to average total assets)

     1.21     1.13     0.41     0.33     0.68

Return on equity (ratio of net income to average equity)

     5.95     4.42     3.26     2.20     3.21

Average interest rate spread (1)

     3.24     2.88     2.99     2.36     2.06

Net interest margin (2)

     3.55     3.36     3.25     2.77     2.77

Efficiency ratio (3)

     37.69     36.68     48.22     58.35     49.59

Non-interest expense to average total assets

     1.36     1.26     2.11     1.63     1.49

Average interest-earning assets to average interest-bearing liabilities

     123.33     132.25     111.83     114.47     123.59

Asset Quality Ratios:

          

Non-performing assets to total assets

     0.78     0.74     1.66     2.74     0.98

Non-performing loans to total loans

     0.90     0.90     2.48     4.03     1.39

Allowance for loan losses to total loans

     1.53     1.55     1.69     1.59     1.32

Capital Ratios:

          

Total capital (to risk-weighted assets)

     24.48     35.46     39.64     19.15     27.78

Tier I capital (to risk-weighted assets)

     23.23     34.21     38.38     17.90     26.53

Tier I capital (to average assets)

     19.02     25.09     31.58     14.31     19.71

Other Data:

          

Number of full service offices

     25        23        22        21        19   

Full time equivalent employees

     188        184        179        174        155   

 

(1) The average interest rate spread represents the difference between the weighted-average yield on interest-earning assets and the weighted-average cost of interest-bearing liabilities for the period.
(2) The net interest margin represents net interest income as a percent of average interest-earning assets for the period.
(3)