XJSE:BIL BHP Billiton PLC Annual Report 20-F Filing - 6/30/2012

Effective Date 6/30/2012

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Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 20-F

 

 

(Mark One)

 

¨ REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR 12(g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

OR

 

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2012

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

¨ SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Date of event requiring this shell company report                     

For the transition period from                      to                     

 

Commission file number: 001-09526   Commission file number: 001-31714
BHP BILLITON LIMITED   BHP BILLITON PLC
(ABN 49 004 028 077)   (REG. NO. 3196209)
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)   (Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA   ENGLAND AND WALES
(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organisation)   (Jurisdiction of incorporation or organisation)

180 LONSDALE STREET, MELBOURNE,

VICTORIA 3000 AUSTRALIA

 

NEATHOUSE PLACE, VICTORIA, LONDON,

UNITED KINGDOM

(Address of principal executive offices)   (Address of principal executive offices)

 

 

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to section 12(b) of the Act.

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on

which registered

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on

which registered

American Depositary Shares*

 

New York Stock Exchange

  American Depositary Shares*   New York Stock Exchange

Ordinary Shares**

  New York Stock Exchange   Ordinary Shares, nominal
value US$0.50 each**
  New York Stock Exchange

 

* Evidenced by American Depositary Receipts. Each American Depositary Receipt represents two ordinary shares of BHP Billiton Limited or BHP Billiton Plc, as the case may be.
** Not for trading, but only in connection with the listing of the applicable American Depositary Shares.

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act.

None

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act.

None

 

 

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report.

 

     BHP Billiton Limited    BHP Billiton Plc

Fully Paid Ordinary Shares

   3,211,691,105    2,136,185,454

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  x    No  ¨

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Note – Checking the box above will not relieve any registrant required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 from their obligations under those Sections.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  ¨    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer    x

 

Accelerated filer    ¨

 

Non-accelerated filer    ¨

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:

 

U.S. GAAP  ¨

   International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting
Standards Board  x
   Other  ¨

If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow.    Item 17  ¨    Item 18  ¨

If this is an annual report, indicate by checkmark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

 

 

 


Table of Contents

Table of Contents

 

1  

Key information

     1   
1.1  

Our business

     1   
1.2  

Chairman’s Review

     2   
1.3  

Chief Executive Officer’s Report

     3   
1.4  

Selected key measures

     4   
1.5  

Our risks

     5   
1.6  

Forward looking statements

     16   
2  

Information on the Company

     18   
2.1  

BHP Billiton locations

     18   
2.2  

Business overview

     22   
2.3  

Production

     79   
2.4  

Marketing

     83   
2.5  

Minerals exploration

     84   
2.6  

Group Resource and Business Optimisation

     84   
2.7  

Government regulations

     84   
2.8  

Sustainability

     87   
2.9  

Employees

     99   
2.10  

Organisational structure

     100   
2.11  

Material contracts

     103   
2.12  

Constitution

     104   
2.13  

Reserves

     110   
3  

Operating and financial review and prospects

     129   
3.1  

Introduction

     129   
3.2  

Our strategy

     130   
3.3  

Key measures

     131   
3.4  

External factors and trends affecting our results

     133   
3.5  

Application of critical accounting policies

     141   
3.6  

Operating results

     142   
3.7  

Liquidity and capital resources

     162   
3.8  

Off-balance sheet arrangements and contractual commitments

     171   
3.9  

Subsidiaries and related party transactions

     171   
3.10  

Significant changes

     171   
4  

Board of Directors and Group Management Committee

     172   
4.1  

Board of Directors

     172   
4.2  

Group Management Committee

     179   
5  

Corporate Governance Statement

     181   
5.1  

Governance at BHP Billiton

     181   
5.2  

Shareholder engagement

     182   
5.3  

Role and responsibilities of the Board

     183   
5.4  

Board membership

     186   
5.5  

Chairman’s role

     187   
5.6  

Senior Independent Director

     187   
5.7  

Director skills, experience and attributes

     188   
5.8  

Director induction, training and development

     193   
5.9  

Independence

     195   
5.10  

Board evaluation

     198   
5.11  

Board meetings and attendance

     200   
5.12  

Director re-election

     201   

 

i


Table of Contents
5.13  

Board committees

     202   
5.14  

Risk management governance structure

     214   
5.15  

Management

     216   
5.16  

Business conduct

     217   
5.17  

Diversity at BHP Billiton

     218   
5.18  

Market disclosure

     220   
5.19  

Remuneration

     220   
5.20  

Directors’ share ownership

     221   
5.21  

Company secretaries

     221   
5.22  

Conformance with corporate governance standards

     221   
5.23  

Additional UK disclosure

     222   
6  

Remuneration report

     223   
6.1  

Message from the Remuneration Committee Chairman

     223   
6.2  

Remuneration at a glance

     224   
6.3  

Remuneration governance

     228   
6.4  

Our remuneration strategy

     230   
6.5  

Setting Total Remuneration for the GMC

     233   
6.6  

How performance impacts remuneration outcomes

     236   
6.7  

Statutory remuneration disclosures for the GMC

     252   
6.8  

Equity awards

     255   
6.9  

Aggregate Directors’ remuneration

     269   
6.10  

Non-executive Director arrangements

     270   
7  

Directors’ Report

     273   
7.1  

Principal activities, state of affairs and business review

     273   
7.2  

Share capital and buy-back programs

     275   
7.3  

Results, financial instruments and going concern

     277   
7.4  

Directors

     277   
7.5  

Remuneration and share interests

     277   
7.6  

Secretaries

     278   
7.7  

Indemnities and insurance

     278   
7.8  

Employee policies and involvement

     279   
7.9  

Environmental performance

     280   
7.10  

Corporate Governance

     280   
7.11  

Dividends

     280   
7.12  

Auditors

     280   
7.13  

Non-audit services

     281   
7.14  

Value of land

     281   
7.15  

Political and charitable donations

     281   
7.16  

Exploration, research and development

     281   
7.17  

Creditor payment policy

     281   
7.18  

Class order

     281   
7.19  

Proceedings on behalf of BHP Billiton Limited

     282   
7.20  

Directors’ shareholdings

     282   
7.21  

GMC members’ shareholdings (other than Directors)

     283   
7.22  

Performance in relation to environmental regulation

     283   
7.23  

Share capital, restrictions on transfer of shares and other additional information

     284   
8  

Legal proceedings

     285   
9  

Financial Statements

     288   

 

ii


Table of Contents
10  

Glossary

     289   
10.1  

Non-mining terms

     289   
10.2  

Mining and mining-related terms

     294   
10.3  

Chemical terms

     298   
10.4  

Units of measure

     299   
11  

Shareholder information

     300   
11.1  

Markets

     300   
11.2  

Share ownership

     300   
11.3  

Dividends

     304   
11.4  

Share price information

     305   
11.5  

American Depositary Receipts fees and charges

     307   
11.6  

Taxation

     308   
11.7  

Ancillary information for our shareholders

     316   
 

Corporate Directory

     318   
12  

Exhibits

     322   

 

iii


Table of Contents

Form 20-F Cross Reference Table

 

Item Number

 

Description

  

Report section reference

1.

  Identity of directors, senior management and advisors    Not applicable

2.

  Offer statistics and expected timetable    Not applicable

3.

  Key information   

    A

  Selected financial information    1.4.1

    B

  Capitalisation and indebtedness    Not applicable

    C

  Reasons for the offer and use of proceeds    Not applicable

    D

  Risk factors    1.5

4.

  Information on the company   

    A

  History and development of the company    2.2.1, 2.2.2 to 2.2.10, 2.3, 2.10 and 3

    B

  Business overview    1, 2.2 to 2.8 and 3.1

    C

  Organisational structure    2.10 and Note 25 to the Financial Statements

    D

  Property, plant and equipment    2.1, 2.2.2 to 2.2.10, 2.3, 2.8, 2.13 and 3.7.2

4A.

  Unresolved staff comments    None

5.

  Operating and financial review and prospects   

    A

  Operating results    1.5, 2.7, 3.3, 3.4, 3.6

    B

  Liquidity and capital resources    3.7

    C

  Research and development, patents and licences etc    2.5, 2.6 and 7.16

    D

  Trend information    3.4

    E

  Off-balance sheet arrangements    3.8 and Notes 21 and 22 to the Financial Statements

    F

  Tabular disclosure of contractual obligations    3.8 and Notes 21 and 22 to the Financial Statements

6.

  Directors, senior management and employees   

    A

  Directors and senior management    4.1 and 4.2

    B

  Compensation    6

    C

  Board practices    4.1, 4.2, 5, 6.3 to 6.8 and 6.10

    D

  Employees    2.9 and 7.8

    E

  Share ownership    6, 7.8, 7.20 and 7.21

7.

  Major shareholders and related party transactions   

    A

  Major shareholders    11.2

    B

  Related party transactions    3.9 and Note 31 to the Financial Statements

    C

  Interests of experts and counsel    Not applicable

8.

  Financial information   

    A

  Consolidated statements and other financial information    8, 9, 11.3 and the pages beginning on page F-1 in this annual report

    B

  Significant changes    3.10

9.

  The offer and listing   

    A

  Offer and listing details    11.4

    B

  Plan of distribution    Not applicable

    C

  Markets    11.1

    D

  Selling shareholders    Not applicable

    E

  Dilution    Not applicable

    F

  Expenses of the issue    Not applicable

10.

  Additional Information   

    A

  Share capital    Not applicable

    B

  Memorandum and articles of association    2.7.2 and 2.12

 

iv


Table of Contents

Item Number

 

Description

  

Report section reference

    C

  Material contracts    2.11

    D

  Exchange controls    2.7.2

    E

  Taxation    11.6

    F

  Dividends and paying agents    Not applicable

    G

  Statement by experts    Not applicable

    H

  Documents on display    2.12.14

    I

  Subsidiary information    3.9 and Note 25 to the Financial Statements

11.

  Quantitative and qualitative disclosures about market risk    3.7.4 and Note 28 to the Financial Statements

12.

  Description of securities other than equity securities   

    A

  Debt Securities    Not Applicable

    B

  Warrants and Rights    Not applicable

    C

  Other Securities    Not applicable

    D

  American Depositary Shares    11.5

13.

  Defaults, dividend arrearages and delinquencies    There have been no defaults, dividend arrearages or delinquencies

14.

  Material modifications to the rights of security holders and use of proceeds    There have been no material modifications to the rights of security holders and use of proceeds since our last Annual Report

15.

  Controls and procedures    5.13.1

16.

    

    A

  Audit committee financial expert    4.1 and 5.13.1

    B

  Code of ethics    5.16

    C

  Principal accountant fees and services    5.13.1 and Note 34 to the Financial Statements

    D

  Exemptions from the listing standards for audit committees    Not applicable

    E

  Purchases of equity securities by the issuer and affiliated purchasers    7.2

    F

  Change in Registrant’s Certifying Accountant    There has been no change of the Registrant’s Certifying Accountant since our last Annual Report

    G

  Corporate Governance    5.22

    H

  Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) Disclosure    The information concerning mine safety violations or other regulatory matters required by section 1503(a) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. This item is included in Exhibit 95.1

17.

  Financial Statements    Not applicable as Item 18 complied with

18.

  Financial Statements    The pages beginning on page F-1 in this Annual Report, Exhibit 15.1

19.

  Exhibits    12

 

v


Table of Contents

1    Key information

1.1    Our business

We are BHP Billiton, a leading global resources company.

Our purpose is to create long-term shareholder value through the discovery, acquisition, development and marketing of natural resources.

Our strategy is to own and operate large, long-life, low-cost, expandable, upstream assets diversified by commodity, geography and market.

This strategy means more predictable business performance over time which, in turn, underpins the creation of value for our shareholders, customers, employees and, importantly, the communities in which we operate.

We are among the world’s top producers of major commodities including, iron ore, metallurgical coal, conventional and non-conventional oil and gas, copper, energy coal, aluminium, manganese, uranium, nickel and silver.

The Group is headquartered in Melbourne, Australia, and consists of the BHP Billiton Limited Group and the BHP Billiton Plc Group as a combined enterprise, following the completion of the Dual Listed Company (DLC) merger in June 2001.

BHP Billiton Limited and BHP Billiton Plc have each retained their separate corporate identities and maintained their separate stock exchange listings, but they are operated and managed as a single unified economic entity, with their boards and senior executive management comprising the same people.

BHP Billiton Limited has a primary listing on the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) in Australia. BHP Billiton Plc has a premium listing on the London Stock Exchange (LSE) in the United Kingdom and a secondary listing on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) in South Africa. In addition, BHP Billiton Limited American Depositary Receipts (ADRs) and BHP Billiton Plc ADRs trade on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in the United States.

As at 30 June 2012, we had a market capitalisation of approximately US$160.6 billion. For FY2012, we reported net operating cash flow of US$24.4 billion, revenue of US$72.2 billion and profit attributable to shareholders of US$15.4 billion. We have approximately 125,000 employees and contractors working in more than 100 locations worldwide.

We operate eight businesses, called Customer Sector Groups (CSGs):

 

 

Petroleum

 

 

Aluminium (1)

 

 

Base Metals (including Uranium)

 

 

Diamonds and Specialty Products

 

 

Stainless Steel Materials (1)

 

 

Iron Ore

 

 

Manganese

 

 

Metallurgical Coal

 

 

Energy Coal

 

(1)

In May 2012, we announced that our Stainless Steel Materials and Aluminium CSGs would consolidate into a single CSG named Aluminium and Nickel. In this Report, Aluminium and Stainless Steel Materials are reported separately.

 

1


Table of Contents

1.2    Chairman’s Review

Dear Shareholder

The past year was characterised by continued high levels of volatility and uncertainty in the world’s economy.

The debt issues of the Eurozone remain a global concern. European governments continue to take action to address these challenges, but until they are resolved, we expect the political and financial conditions of the region to remain volatile. While there are some signs of improvement in the United States economy, a recovery will only continue provided there are no large external shocks. Furthermore, China and other emerging economies have also seen subdued growth as they face cyclical and structural pressures.

In the midst of these challenges in the global economic environment, I am pleased to report that BHP Billiton performed well this past financial year. BHP Billiton’s Underlying EBIT margin remained at a robust 39 per cent, despite weakness in commodity markets and industry-wide cost pressures. These results were underpinned by the execution of our diversified strategy.

Your Board is confident that our commitment to invest in high-return growth opportunities will continue to create returns for shareholders. Our largely brownfield projects in execution will continue to drive momentum in our major businesses and create value for our shareholders in the near term. Moreover, the continued urbanisation and industrialisation of developing economies should support both demand for our products and the long-term growth of our strong pipeline of development projects across diverse commodities and geographies.

Recognising these opportunities, we will continue to prioritise investment where a sustainable competitive advantage exists, including geopolitical and fiscal stability. Our project approvals process will ensure that we allocate capital in a disciplined fashion, while the quality and diversity of our asset portfolio will continue to drive strong returns.

Investing in high-return projects, while maintaining a strong balance sheet, underpins our ability to pay a dividend that grows over time. This financial year our progressive dividend increased to 112 US cents per share. Over the last 10 years, we have returned approximately US$54 billion to shareholders through dividends and share buy-backs. That represents around 30 per cent of the Group’s current market capitalisation. Moreover, our unbroken dividend generates a yield that is well in excess of our peer group.

BHP Billiton also remains committed to making a positive contribution to our communities through capital investment, supporting local industry and creating jobs. Expanding on that commitment, this year we once again contributed one per cent of our pre-tax profit to community programs by voluntarily investing US$214 million. This included a US$65 million contribution to BHP Billiton Sustainable Communities, our UK-based charity, and a US$149 million investment in health (8 per cent), education and training (18 per cent), community infrastructure (25 per cent) and other initiatives (49 per cent). This was in addition to the US$11.9 billion in taxes and royalties paid to governments in the jurisdictions where we operate.

Tragically, this year three of our colleagues lost their lives at work. No fatality is acceptable and on behalf of the Board, I offer our condolences to their families, friends and colleagues. This is a stark reminder that we must remain vigilant about safety and continue to live our values. Supporting our communities is part of Our BHP Billiton Charter value of Sustainability, which also includes putting the health and safety of our people first and being environmentally responsible. These are set out in Our Charter, which is the foundation for everything we do at BHP Billiton.

Lastly, it is important to note that as part of our Board succession, in June 2012 Mr Pat Davies was appointed to the Board as a Non-executive Director. Pat’s appointment is a welcome addition to an already strong Board, providing corporate experience in the natural resources sector across a number of commodities and markets.

 

2


Table of Contents

In summary, while we continue to live with the uncertainty of the global economic environment, we expect the demand from emerging economies, our disciplined approach to capital management and our value-focused strategy to maintain our momentum in delivering strong results long term for our shareholders. On behalf of the Board and everyone involved in the Company, I would like to thank you for your ongoing support of BHP Billiton, as we continue to deliver on our commitments to you, our shareholders.

Jac Nasser AO

Chairman

1.3    Chief Executive Officer’s Report

I am pleased to report that BHP Billiton delivered a solid set of results in FY2012 against a backdrop of challenging industry and macro-economic conditions. Our commitment to investing through the cycle allowed us to reach new production records at 10 of our operations and was key to our financial results.

We continue to focus on safety with a commitment to establish best practice in this area. In this regard, our total recordable injury frequency rate declined by six per cent in FY2012. However, despite this rate now being at its lowest level on record, the tragic loss of three colleagues over the past year is a stark reminder of the inherent risks in our industry and the need to relentlessly pursue the elimination of all fatal risks. Any fatality has a devastating effect on family, friends and colleagues, and the impact of this is felt in every corner of this Company. We truly believe that BHP Billiton can be a business that operates free of work-related fatalities, and it is for this reason that fatality prevention remains our number one priority.

From a global perspective, FY2012 was characterised by uncertainty and volatility surrounding the European debt crisis which, in turn, affected global economic growth and the key markets for our products. The resulting weaker commodity prices coupled with stronger producer currencies and capital and operational cost pressures presented challenges for the global mining industry.

In response to the prevailing market conditions, over the past year we have implemented prudent measures that will safely and substantially reduce operational costs and non-essential expenditure across our entire business. FY2013 will see the benefits of these significant cost reduction measures, along with substantial volume growth, flow through to our financial results.

Despite the volatility in global economic conditions and commodity prices we have experienced in the past financial year, we see significant opportunity for our Company in the near term. While we achieved pleasing production results and production records at 10 of our operations, three of our key assets operated below capacity in FY2012 due to temporary, one-off issues. This was largely due to industrial action in our Queensland Coal business, shut-ins at our non-operated joint venture fields in the Gulf of Mexico and a temporary decrease in grades at our Escondida copper operation. With these businesses expected to return to full capacity, we are confident we will continue to produce industry leading returns for our shareholders now and into the future.

The diversification of the BHP Billiton portfolio continues to be our defining attribute. The quality of our people, our asset base and our unchanged strategy of owning and operating large, long-life, low-cost, expandable, upstream assets diversified by commodity, geography and market, together with our ability and commitment to investing through the cycle and delivering projects on budget and to schedule, is what sets us apart from our peers.

In line with this strategy, over the next two years we will continue to invest in and grow our business. With 20 major projects currently in execution, these well advanced, low-risk, brownfield projects will deliver substantial volume growth and underpin our industry-leading returns in the future. As a result of our disciplined investment strategy and our commitment to maintaining our strong balance sheet, we are largely committed for FY2013 and do not plan to approve any additional major projects in this period.

 

3


Table of Contents

We remain confident in the long-term outlook and future demand for our products, which will continue to be driven by the urbanisation and industrialisation in the developing world. As current capital commitments reduce, we will allocate future capital to projects that maximise shareholder value and balance both short-term and long-term returns. We are in a fortunate position, with growth options unparalleled in the global resources industry, and together with our proven strategy, we will continue to deliver sustainable and superior long-term returns for our shareholders.

Finally, I would like to take this opportunity to thank our host communities, who continue to support our activities, and our shareholders, customers, suppliers and the many others who help contribute to our success. I would especially like to thank our more than 125,000 employees and contractors around the world. It is their commitment to giving their very best efforts to us each and every day that is the cornerstone of the success of this Company.

Marius Kloppers

Chief Executive Officer

1.4    Selected key measures

1.4.1    Financial information

Our selected financial information reflects the operations of the BHP Billiton Group, and should be read in conjunction with the 2012 financial statements, together with the accompanying notes.

We prepare our consolidated financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board, and as outlined in note 1 ‘Accounting policies’ to the financial statements in this Annual Report. We publish our consolidated financial statements in US dollars.

 

    2012     2011     2010     2009     2008  

Consolidated Income Statement (US$M except per share data)

         

Revenue

    72,226        71,739        52,798        50,211        59,473   

Profit from operations

    23,752        31,816        20,031        12,160        24,145   

Profit attributable to members of BHP Billiton Group

    15,417        23,648        12,722        5,877        15,390   

Dividends per ordinary share – paid during the period (US cents)

    110.0        91.0        83.0        82.0        56.0   

Dividends per ordinary share – declared in respect of the period (US cents)

    112.0        101.0        87.0        82.0        70.0   

Earnings per ordinary share (basic) (US cents) (a)

    289.6        429.1        228.6        105.6        275.3   

Earnings per ordinary share (diluted) (US cents) (a)

    288.4        426.9        227.8        105.4        274.8   

Number of ordinary shares (millions)

         

– At period end

    5,348        5,350        5,589        5,589        5,589   

– Weighted average

    5,323        5,511        5,565        5,565        5,590   

– Diluted

    5,346        5,540        5,595        5,598        5,605   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Consolidated Balance Sheet (US$M)

         

Total assets

    129,273        102,920        88,852        78,770        76,008   

Share capital (including share premium)

    2,773        2,771        2,861        2,861        2,861   

Total equity attributable to members of BHP Billiton Group

    65,870        56,762        48,525        39,954        38,335   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other financial information

         

Underlying EBIT (US$M) (b)

    27,238        31,980        19,719        18,214        24,282   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Underlying EBIT margin (b) (c) (e)

    39.4     47.0     40.7     40.1     47.5

Return on capital employed (e)

    23.0     38.5     26.4     24.6     37.5

Net operating cash flow (US$M) (d)

    24,384        30,080        16,890        17,854        16,958   

Project investment (US$M)

    22,791        24,517        10,770        13,965        11,440   

Gearing

    26.0     9.2     6.3     12.1     17.8

 

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(a) 

The calculation of the number of ordinary shares used in the computation of basic earnings per share is the aggregate of the weighted average number of ordinary shares outstanding during the period of BHP Billiton Limited and BHP Billiton Plc after deduction of the weighted average number of shares held by the Billiton share repurchase scheme and the Billiton Employee Share Ownership Plan Trust and the BHP Bonus Equity Plan Trust and adjusting for the BHP Billiton Limited bonus share issue. Included in the calculation of fully diluted earnings per share are shares contingently issuable under Employee Share Ownership Plans.

 

(b) 

Underlying EBIT is Profit from operations, excluding the effect of exceptional items. See section 3.6.2 for more information about this measure, including a reconciliation to Profit from operations.

 

(c) 

Underlying EBIT margin excludes third party product.

 

(d) 

On 1 July 2010, the Group adopted the policy of classifying exploration cash flows which are not recognised as assets as Net operating cash flows. Previously such cash flows were classified as net investing cash flows. The change in policy arose from amendments to IAS7/AASB7 ‘Cash Flows’. Comparative figures have been restated.

 

(e) 

Underlying EBIT margin and Return on capital employed are non-IFRS measures. See section 3.3 for a reconciliation to the corresponding IFRS measure.

1.4.2    Operational information

Our Board and Group Management Committee (GMC) monitor a range of financial and operational performance indicators, reported on a monthly basis, to measure performance over time. We also monitor a comprehensive set of health, safety, environment and community (HSEC) contribution indicators.

 

     2012      2011      2010  

Health, safety, environment and community

        

Total recordable injury frequency (TRIF)

     4.7         5.0         5.3   

Community investment (US$M)

     214.1         195.5         200.5   

Production(a)

        

Total Petroleum production (million barrels of oil equivalent)

     222.3         159.4         158.6   

Alumina (’000 tonnes)

     4,152         4,010         3,841   

Aluminium (’000 tonnes)

     1,153         1,246         1,241   

Copper cathode and concentrate (’000 tonnes)

     1,094.5         1,139.4         1,075.2   

Nickel (’000 tonnes)

     157.9         152.7         176.2   

Iron ore (’000 tonnes)

     159,478         134,406         124,962   

Manganese alloys (’000 tonnes)

     602         753         583   

Manganese ores (’000 tonnes)

     7,931         7,093         6,124   

Metallurgical coal (’000 tonnes)

     33,230         32,678         37,381   

Energy coal (’000 tonnes)

     71,111         69,500         66,131   

 

(a) 

Further details appear in section 2.3 of this Report.

1.5    Our risks

1.5.1    Risk factors

We believe that, because of the international scope of our operations and the industries in which we are engaged, there are numerous factors which may have an effect on our results and operations. The following describes the material risks that could affect the BHP Billiton Group.

 

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External risks

Fluctuations in commodity prices and impacts of ongoing global economic volatility may negatively affect our results

The prices we obtain for our oil, gas, minerals and other commodities are determined by, or linked to, prices in world markets, which have historically been subject to substantial volatility. Our usual policy is to sell our products at the prevailing market prices. The diversity provided by our broad portfolio of commodities does not fully insulate the effects of price changes. Fluctuations in commodity prices can occur due to sustained price shifts reflecting underlying global economic and geopolitical factors, industry demand and supply balances, product substitution and national tariffs. The ongoing global economic volatility following the global financial and European sovereign debt crises has negatively affected commodity market prices and demand. Sales into European countries generated US$8.4 billion (FY2011: US$9.4 billion), or 11.6 per cent (FY2011: 13.1 per cent), of our revenue in the year ended 30 June 2012. The ongoing uncertainty and impact on global economic growth, particularly in the developed economies, may adversely affect future demand and prices for commodities. The impact of potential longer-term sustained price shifts and shorter-term price volatility creates the risk that our financial and operating results and asset values will be materially and adversely affected by unforeseen declines in the prevailing prices of our products.

Our financial results may be negatively affected by currency exchange rate fluctuations

Our assets, earnings and cash flows are influenced by a wide variety of currencies due to the geographic diversity of the countries in which we operate. Fluctuations in the exchange rates of those currencies may have a significant impact on our financial results. The US dollar is the currency in which the majority of our sales are denominated. Operating costs are influenced by the currencies of those countries where our mines and processing plants are located and also by those currencies in which the costs of imported equipment and services are determined. The Australian dollar, South African rand, Chilean peso, Brazilian real and US dollar are the most important currencies influencing our operating costs. The appreciation in recent years of currencies in which the majority of our operating costs are incurred, (in particular the Australian dollar, if sustained relative to US dollar denominated commodity prices), has and may continue to adversely impact our profit margins. Given the dominant role of the US currency in our affairs, the US dollar is the currency in which we present financial performance. It is also the natural currency for borrowing and holding surplus cash. We do not generally believe that active currency hedging provides long-term benefits to our shareholders. From time to time, we consider currency protection measures appropriate in specific commercial circumstances, subject to strict limits established by our Board. Therefore, in any particular year, our financial results may be negatively affected by currency exchange rate fluctuations.

Reduction in Chinese demand may negatively impact our results

The Chinese market has become a significant source of global demand for commodities. In CY2011, China represented 61 per cent of global seaborne iron ore demand, 39 per cent of copper demand, 40 per cent of nickel demand, 43 per cent of aluminium demand, 48 per cent of energy coal demand and 10 per cent of oil demand. China’s demand for these commodities has been driving global materials demand and price increases over the past decade. Sales into China generated US$21.6 billion (FY2011: US$20.3 billion), or 29.9 per cent (FY2011: 28.2 per cent), of our revenue in the year ended 30 June 2012. A slowing in China’s economic growth could result in lower prices and demand for our products and negatively impact our results.

In response to its increased demand for commodities, China is increasingly seeking strategic self-sufficiency in key commodities, including investments in existing businesses or new developments in other countries. These investments may adversely impact future commodity demand and supply balances and prices.

 

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Actions by governments or political events in the countries in which we operate could have a negative impact on our business

We have operations in many countries around the globe, which have varying degrees of political and commercial stability. We operate in emerging markets, which may involve additional risks that could have an adverse impact upon the profitability of an operation. These risks could include terrorism, civil unrest, nationalisation, renegotiation or nullification of existing contracts, leases, permits or other agreements, restrictions on repatriation of earnings or capital and changes in laws and policy, as well as other unforeseeable risks. Risks relating to bribery and corruption, including possible delays or disruption resulting from a refusal to make so-called facilitation payments, may be prevalent in some of the countries in which we operate. If any of our major projects are affected by one or more of these risks, it could have a negative effect on the operations in those countries, as well as the Group’s overall operating results and financial condition.

Our operations are based on material long-term investments that anticipate long-term fiscal stability. Following the global financial and European sovereign debt crises, some governments face increased debt and funding obligations and have sought additional sources of revenue and economic rent by increasing rates of taxation, royalties or resource rent taxes such as the Minerals Resource Rent Tax (MRRT) and Petroleum Resource Rent Tax (PRRT) extension in Australia. These may continue to levels that are globally uncompetitive to the resource industry. Such taxes may negatively impact the financial results of existing businesses and reduce the anticipated future returns and overall level of prospective investment in those countries.

The Australian Government through the Business Tax Working Group is considering measures to reform tax law to provide relief for certain industry sectors. The basis of any law change is a revenue neutral outcome and as such, it is possible the mining and petroleum industries may be negatively impacted by disproportionately funding any measures that may eventually become law. The Business Tax Working Group will make its recommendations to the Australian government by the end of CY2012, with any potential law change happening thereafter.

Our business could be adversely affected by new government regulations, such as controls on imports, exports and prices. Increasing requirements relating to regulatory, environmental and social approvals can potentially result in significant delays in construction and may adversely affect the economics of new mining and oil and gas projects, the expansion of existing operations and results of our operations.

We have oil and gas operations located in the Gulf of Mexico region of the United States. In October 2010, the United States Government lifted the deepwater drilling moratorium in the Gulf of Mexico initially put in place in May 2010 in response to the oil spill from BP’s Macondo well. Although the moratorium was lifted, and BHP Billiton was among the first to return to drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, the industry now faces more stringent permitting requirements. Delays or additional costs may occur in receiving future permits for deepwater drilling activities in the Gulf of Mexico.

Infrastructure, such as rail, ports, power and water, is critical to our business operations. We have operations or potential development projects in countries where government provided infrastructure or regulatory regimes for access to infrastructure, including our own privately operated infrastructure, may be inadequate or uncertain. These may adversely impact the efficient operations and expansion of our businesses.

On 30 June 2010, the Australian Competition Tribunal granted declaration of BHP Billiton’s Goldsworthy rail line, but rejected the application for declaration of our Newman rail line under Part IIIA of the Trade Practices Act. Following the Tribunal’s decision, access seekers may now negotiate for access to the Goldsworthy railway. These negotiations, and the availability and terms of access, are governed by the Part IIIA statutory framework, and either the access seeker or BHP Billiton can refer disputed matters to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission for arbitration. The outcome of this process will govern whether access will be provided and on what terms.

 

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We operate in several countries where ownership of land is uncertain and where disputes may arise in relation to ownership. In Australia, the Native Title Act (1993) provides for the establishment and recognition of native title under certain circumstances. In South Africa, the Extension of Security of Tenure Act (1997) and the Restitution of Land Rights Act (1994) provide for various landholding rights. Such legislation could negatively affect new or existing projects.

Our Cerro Matoso Operation in Colombia operates under mining concessions that are due to expire on 30 September 2012 and we have applied, in accordance with the law and its contracts, for an extension of these mining concessions. If this extension is not granted, Cerro Matoso has an underlying agreement with the Colombian Government that grants it rights to continue mining and producing through to 2029 under a lease arrangement, with a further extension of 15 years possible. While our operating rights are maintained, there is no established precedent in Colombia for bringing a reversion of title under contract and therefore the situation remains uncertain.

These regulations are complex, difficult to predict and outside of our control and could negatively affect our business and results.

Business risks

Failure to discover new reserves, maintain or enhance existing reserves or develop new operations could negatively affect our future results and financial condition

The demand for our products and production from our operations results in existing reserves being depleted over time. As our revenues and profits are derived from our oil and gas and minerals operations, our results and financial condition are directly related to the success of our exploration and acquisition efforts, and our ability to replace existing reserves. Exploration activity occurs adjacent to established operations and in new regions, in developed and less developed countries. These activities may increase land tenure, infrastructure and related political risks. A failure in our ability to discover new reserves, enhance existing reserves or develop new operations in sufficient quantities to maintain or grow the current level of our reserves could negatively affect our results, financial condition and prospects.

Future deterioration in commodities pricing may make drilling some acreage and existing reserves uneconomic. Our actual drilling activities and future drilling budget will depend on drilling results, commodity prices, drilling and production costs, availability of drilling services and equipment, lease expirations, gathering system pipeline transportation and other infrastructure constraints, regulatory approvals and other factors.

There are numerous uncertainties inherent in estimating ore and oil and gas reserves, and geological, technical and economic assumptions that are valid at the time of estimation may change significantly when new information becomes available. The uncertain global financial outlook may affect economic assumptions related to reserve recovery and require reserve restatements. Reserve restatements could negatively affect our results and prospects.

We may not be able to successfully complete acquisitions or integrate our acquired businesses

We have grown our business in part through acquisitions. We expect that some of our future growth will stem from acquisitions. There are numerous risks encountered in business combinations. These include adverse regulatory conditions and obligations, commercial objectives not achieved due to minority interests, unforeseen liabilities arising from the acquired businesses, retention of key staff, sales revenues and operational performance not meeting our expectations, anticipated synergies and cost savings being delayed or not being achieved, uncertainty in sales proceeds from planned divestments, and planned acquisition projects being cancelled, delayed or costing more than anticipated. These factors could negatively affect our future results and financial condition.

 

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We may not be able to attract and retain the necessary people

Our existing operations and especially our pipeline of development projects in regions of numerous large projects, such as Western Australia, Queensland and the United States, if activated, require many highly skilled staff with relevant industry and technical experience. In the competitive labour markets that exist in these regions, the inability of the Group to attract and retain such people may adversely impact our ability to complete projects under development on time and budget or successfully respond to new development opportunities. The lack of short- and long-term suitable accommodation in regional centres and townships adjacent to development projects and community reactions to development and potential workforce fly in, fly out arrangements may impact costs and the ability to optimise construction and operating workforces. Skills shortages in engineering, technical service, construction and maintenance may adversely impact the cost and schedule of current development projects, the cost and efficiency of existing operations and our ability to execute on development opportunities.

Increased costs and schedule delays may adversely affect our development projects

Although we devote significant time and resources to our project planning, approval and review process, and have established a number of project hubs to provide continuity to capital programs, we may underestimate the cost or time required to complete a project. In addition, we may fail to manage projects as effectively as we anticipate and unforeseen challenges may emerge.

Any of these may result in increased capital costs and schedule delays at our development projects, adversely affecting our development projects and impacting anticipated financial returns.

Financial risks

If our liquidity and cash flow deteriorate significantly it could adversely affect our ability to fund our major capital programs

We seek to maintain a solid ‘A’ credit rating as part of our strategy; however, fluctuations in commodity prices and the ongoing global economic volatility, and European sovereign debt crises, may continue to adversely impact our future cash flows and ability to access capital from financial markets at acceptable pricing. Despite our portfolio risk management strategies and monitoring of cash flow volatility, if our key financial ratios and credit rating were not maintained, our liquidity and cash reserves, interest rate costs on borrowed debt, future access to financial capital markets and the ability to fund current and future major capital programmes could be adversely affected.

We may not recover our investments in mining and oil and gas projects

Our strategy is to maintain an asset portfolio diversified by commodity, geography and market. Despite the benefits arising from this diversification, one or more of our assets may be impacted by changed market or industry structures, commodity prices, technical operating difficulties, inability to recover our mineral, oil or gas reserves and increased operating cost levels. These may cause us to fail to recover all or a portion of our investment in mining and oil and gas projects and may require financial write-downs adversely impacting our financial results.

The commercial counterparties we transact with may not meet their obligations which may negatively impact our results

We contract with a large number of commercial and financial counterparties, including customers, suppliers and financial institutions. The ongoing global economic volatility and European sovereign debt crises have placed strains on global financial markets, reduced liquidity and adversely affected business conditions generally. We maintain a ‘one book’ approach with commercial counterparties to ensure that all credit exposures are quantified.

 

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Our existing counterparty credit controls may not prevent a material loss due to credit exposure to a major customer or financial counterparty. In addition, customers, suppliers, contractors or joint venture partners may fail to perform against existing contracts and obligations. Non-supply of key inputs, such as tyres, mining and mobile equipment and other key consumables, may unfavourably impact costs and production at our operations. These factors could negatively affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Operational risks

Operating cost pressures, reduced productivity and labour shortages could negatively impact our operating margins and expansion plans

Increasing cost pressures and shortages in skilled personnel, contractors, materials and supplies that are required as critical inputs to our existing operations and planned developments have occurred and may continue to occur across the resources industry. As the prices for our products are determined by the global commodity markets in which we operate, we do not generally have the ability to offset these operating cost increases through corresponding price increases, which can adversely affect our operating margins. Notwithstanding our efforts to reduce costs and a number of key cost inputs being commodity price-linked, the inability to reduce costs and a timing lag may adversely impact our operating margins for an extended period.

Our Australian-based operations may continue to be affected by the Australian Fair Work Act 2009 as labour agreements expire and businesses are required to negotiate labour agreements with unions. In some instances labour unions are pursuing claims in the bargaining process about union access and involvement in some areas of operational decision-making. These claims may adversely affect workplace flexibility, productivity and costs. Industrial action in pursuit of claims associated with the bargaining process has occurred in some businesses, in particular our BHP Billiton Mitsubishi Alliance coal operation in Queensland, Australia, and is likely to continue to occur as unions press for new claims as part of the negotiation process.

A number of our operations, such as aluminium and copper, are energy or water intensive and, as a result, the Group’s costs and earnings could be adversely affected by rising costs or by supply interruptions. These could include the unavailability of energy, fuel or water due to a variety of reasons, including fluctuations in climate, significant increases in costs, inadequate infrastructure capacity, interruptions in supply due to equipment failure or other causes and the inability to extend supply contracts on economical terms.

These factors could lead to increased operating costs at existing operations and could negatively impact our operating margins and expansion plans.

Unexpected natural and operational catastrophes may adversely impact our operations

We operate extractive, processing and logistical operations in many geographic locations both onshore and offshore. Our operational processes may be subject to operational accidents such as port and shipping incidents, underground mine and processing plant fire and explosion, open-cut pit wall failures, loss of power supply, railroad incidents, loss of well control, environmental pollution and mechanical critical equipment failures. Our key port facilities are located at Port Hedland and Hay Point in Australia. We have 13 underground mines, including seven underground coal mines. Our operations may also be subject to unexpected natural catastrophes such as earthquakes, flood, hurricanes and tsunamis. Our Western Australia Iron Ore, Queensland coal and Gulf of Mexico oil and gas operations are located in areas subject to cyclones or hurricanes. Our Chilean copper operations are located in a known earthquake and tsunami zone. Based on our claims, insurance premiums and loss experience, our risk management approach is not to purchase insurance for property damage, business interruption and construction related risk exposures. Existing business continuity plans may not provide protection for all of the costs that arise from such events. The impact of these events could lead to disruptions in production, increased costs and loss of facilities more than offsetting premiums saved, which would adversely affect our financial results and prospects. Third party claims arising from these events may exceed the limit of liability insurance policies we have in place.

 

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Our non-controlled assets may not comply with our standards

Some of our assets are controlled and managed by joint venture partners or by other companies. Management of our non-controlled assets may not comply with our management and operating standards, controls and procedures (including our HSEC standards). Failure to adopt equivalent standards, controls and procedures at these assets could lead to higher costs and reduced production and adversely impact our results and reputation.

Breaches in our information technology security processes may adversely impact the conduct of our business activities

We maintain global information technology (IT) and communication networks and applications to support our business activities. Our extensive IT infrastructure and network may experience service outages that may adversely impact the conduct of our business activities. IT security processes protecting these systems are in place and subject to regular monitoring and assessment, and are included as part of the review of internal control over financial reporting. These security processes may not prevent future malicious action or fraud by individuals, groups or organisations resulting in the corruption of operating systems, theft of commercially sensitive data, including commercial price outlooks, mergers and acquisitions and divestment transactions, misappropriation of funds and disruptions to our business operations.

Sustainability risks

HSEC impacts, incidents or accidents and related regulations may adversely affect our people, operations and reputation or licence to operate

We are a major producer of carbon-related products such as energy and metallurgical coal, oil, gas, and liquefied natural gas. Our oil and gas operations are both onshore and offshore.

The nature of the industries in which we operate means that many of our activities are highly regulated by health, safety and environmental laws. As regulatory standards and expectations are constantly developing, we may be exposed to increased litigation, compliance costs and unforeseen environmental rehabilitation expenses.

Potential safety events that may have a material adverse impact on our operations include fire, explosion or rock fall incidents in underground mining operations, personnel conveyance equipment failures in underground operations, aircraft incidents, incidents involving light vehicles and mining mobile equipment, ground control failures, well blowouts, explosions or gas leaks, isolation, working from heights or lifting operations.

Environmental incidents that have the potential to create a material impact include uncontrolled tailings breaches, subsidence from mining activities, escape of polluting substances, and uncontrolled releases of hydrocarbons.

Our operations by their nature have the potential to impact biodiversity, water resources and related ecosystem services. Changes in scientific understanding of these impacts, regulatory requirements or stakeholder expectations may prevent or delay project approvals and result in increased costs for mitigation, offsets or compensatory actions.

We provide for operational closure and site rehabilitation. Our operating and closed facilities are required to have closure plans. Changes in regulatory or community expectations may result in the relevant plans not being adequate. This may impact financial provisioning and costs at the affected operations.

We contribute to the communities in which we operate by providing skilled employment opportunities, salaries and wages, taxes and royalties and community development programs, including a commitment to one per cent of pre-tax profits invested in community programs. Notwithstanding these actions, local communities may become dissatisfied with the impact of our operations or oppose our new development projects, including through litigation, potentially affecting costs and production, and in extreme cases viability. Community related risks may include community protests or civil unrest, delays to proposed developments and inadvertent breaches of human rights or other international laws or conventions.

 

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Health risks faced include fatigue and occupational exposure to noise, silica, manganese, diesel exhaust particulate, fluorides, coal tar pitch, nickel and sulphuric acid mist. Longer-term health impacts may arise due to unanticipated workplace exposures or historical exposures to hazardous substances by employees or site contractors. These effects may create future financial compensation obligations.

We invest in workplace and community health programs, where indicated by risk assessment. However, infectious diseases such as HIV and malaria may have a material adverse impact upon our workers or on our communities, primarily in Africa. Because we operate globally, we may be affected by potential pandemic influenza outbreaks, such as A(H1N1) and avian flu, in any of the regions in which we operate.

Legislation requiring manufacturers, importers and downstream users of chemical substances, including metals and minerals, to establish that the substances can be used without negatively affecting health or the environment may impact our operations and markets. These potential compliance costs, litigation expenses, regulatory delays, rehabilitation expenses and operational costs could negatively affect our financial results.

During FY2011, BHP Billiton acquired Chesapeake Energy Corporation’s interests in the Fayetteville Operation in the United States, and in August 2011, acquired Petrohawk Energy Corporation, a US shale development company. Both businesses include operations that involve hydraulic fracturing, an essential and common practice in the oil and gas industry to stimulate production of natural gas and oil from dense subsurface rock formations. Hydraulic fracturing involves using water, sand and a small amount of chemicals to fracture the hydrocarbon-bearing rock formation to allow flow of hydrocarbons into the wellbore. We routinely apply hydraulic fracturing techniques in our drilling and completion programs.

Increased regulation and attention given to the hydraulic fracturing process could lead to greater opposition to oil and gas production activities using hydraulic fracturing techniques, including regulations that could impose more stringent permitting, public disclosure and well construction requirements on hydraulic fracturing operations. Additional legislation or regulation could also lead to operational delays or increased operating costs in the production of oil and natural gas, including from the developing shale plays, or could make it more difficult to perform hydraulic fracturing. The adoption of any federal, state or local laws or the implementation of regulations regarding hydraulic fracturing could potentially cause a decrease in the completion of new oil and gas wells, increased compliance costs and time, and potential class action claims, all of which could adversely affect our business.

Due to the nature of our operations HSEC incidents or accidents and related regulations may adversely affect our reputation or licence to operate.

Climate change and greenhouse effects may adversely impact our operations and markets

Carbon-based energy is a significant input in a number of the Group’s mining and processing operations and we have significant sales of carbon-based energy products.

A number of governments or governmental bodies have introduced or are contemplating regulatory change in response to the impacts of climate change. Under the December 2009 Copenhagen Accord, developed countries established individual greenhouse gas targets and developing countries established national mitigation actions. The European Union Emissions Trading System (EU ETS), which came into effect on 1 January 2005, has had an impact on greenhouse gas and energy-intensive businesses based in the EU. Our Petroleum assets in the United Kingdom are currently subject to the EU ETS, as are our EU based customers. Elsewhere, there is current and emerging climate change regulation that will affect energy prices, demand and margins for carbon intensive products. The Australian Government’s plan of action on climate change, which commenced on 1 July 2012, includes a fixed price on carbon emissions and converting to an emissions trading scheme after three years, and a mandatory renewable energy target of 20 per cent by the year 2020. From a medium to long-term perspective, we are likely to see some changes in the cost position of our greenhouse-gas-intensive assets and energy-intensive

 

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assets as a result of regulatory impacts in the countries in which we operate. These proposed regulatory mechanisms may impact our operations directly or indirectly through our suppliers and customers. Inconsistency of regulations particularly between developed and developing countries may also change the competitive position of some of our assets. Assessments of the potential impact of future climate change regulation are uncertain given the wide scope of potential regulatory change in the many countries in which we operate. The South African Government plans to introduce a carbon tax beginning in 2013, however the details are not yet finalised. Carbon pricing has also been discussed as part of a broader tax reform package in Chile.

The physical impacts of climate change on our operations are highly uncertain and will be particular to the geographic circumstances. These may include changes in rainfall patterns, water shortages, rising sea levels, increased storm intensities and higher average temperature levels. These effects may adversely impact the productivity and financial performance of our operations.

A breach of our governance processes may lead to regulatory penalties and loss of reputation

We operate in a global environment straddling multiple jurisdictions and complex regulatory frameworks. Our governance and compliance processes, which include the review of internal control over financial reporting and specific internal controls in relation to offers of things of value to government officials and representatives of state owned enterprises, may not prevent future potential breaches of law, accounting or governance practice. The BHP Billiton Code of Business Conduct, together with our mandatory policies, such as the anti-corruption and the anti-trust policies, may not prevent instances of fraudulent behaviour and dishonesty nor guarantee compliance with legal or regulatory requirements. This may lead to regulatory fines, litigation, loss of operating licences or reputational damage.

1.5.2    Approach to risk management

We believe that the identification and management of risk is central to achieving our corporate purpose of creating long-term shareholder value.

Our approach to risk recognises that it will manifest itself in many forms and has the potential to impact our health and safety, environment, community, reputation, regulatory, market and financial performance and, thereby, the achievement of our corporate purpose.

By understanding and managing risk, we provide greater certainty and confidence for our shareholders, employees, customers, suppliers, and for the communities in which we operate. Successful risk management can be a source of competitive advantage.

Risks faced by the Group are managed on an enterprise-wide basis. The natural diversification in the Group’s portfolio of commodities, geographies, currencies, assets and liabilities is a key element in our risk management approach.

Risk management is embedded in our critical business activities, functions and processes. Materiality and our tolerance for risk are key considerations in our decision-making.

Risk issues are identified, analysed and assessed in a consistent manner. Performance requirements exist for the identification, assessment, control and monitoring of material risk issues that could threaten our corporate purpose and business plans. These include:

 

 

The potential for impacts on the achievement of our corporate purpose and business plans is identified through risk assessments using approved materiality and tolerability criteria. The severity of any risk event is assessed according to a matrix that describes the degree of harm, injury or loss from the most severe impact associated with that risk event, assuming reasonable effectiveness of controls.

 

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A risk assessment (risk identification, risk analysis and risk evaluation) is conducted for material risk issues.

 

 

Risk controls are designed, implemented, operated and assessed to produce a residual risk that is tolerable. Performance standards are established for critical controls over material risks with supporting monitoring and verification processes.

The Group has established processes that apply when entering or commencing new activities in higher governance risk countries. Risk assessments and a supporting risk management plan are required to ensure that potential reputation, legal, business conduct and corruption-related exposures are tolerable and legislative compliance is maintained, including relevant anti-corruption legislation and the application of any sanctions or trade embargos.

Our risk management governance approach is described in sections 5.13.1 and 5.14.

1.5.3    Management of principal risks

The scope of our operations and the number of industries in which we operate and engage mean that a range of factors may impact our results. Material risks that could negatively affect our results and performance are described in section 1.5.1 of this Report. Our approach to managing these risks is outlined below.

 

Principal risk area

  

Risk management approach

External risks

  
Risks arise from fluctuations in commodity prices and currency exchange rates, demand changes in major markets (such as China or Europe) or actions by governments and political events that impact long-term fiscal stability.    The diversification of our portfolio of commodities, geographies and currencies is a key strategy for reducing volatility. Section 3.4 describes external factors and trends affecting our results and Note 28 to the financial statements outlines the Group’s financial risk management strategy, including market, commodity, and currency risk. The Financial Risk Management Committee oversees these as described in section 5.15. We engage with governments and other key stakeholders to ensure the potential impacts of proposed fiscal, tax, resource investment, infrastructure access and regulatory changes are understood and where possible mitigated.

Business risks

  
Our continued growth creates risks related to identifying and proving reserves, integrating newly acquired businesses, managing our capital development projects and attracting and retaining the people necessary to support our growth.    We support our growth strategy through minerals and petroleum exploration programs which are focused on identifying and capturing new world-class projects supported by exploration activity adjacent to existing operations. The Group Resource and Business Optimisation function provides governance and technical leadership for resource development and Ore Reserves reporting as described in section 2.13.2 Reserves and Resources and section 2.6 Group Resources and Business Optimisation. Our Petroleum reserves are described in section 2.13.1.

 

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Principal risk area

  

Risk management approach

  

We have established investment processes and tollgates that apply to all major capital and mergers and acquisitions projects. The Investment Committee oversees these as described in section 5.15. The Project Management function additionally ensures that the optimum framework and capabilities are in place to deliver safe, predictable and competitive projects. Additionally we have established project hubs as operating centres for the study and execution of a pipeline of major capital projects using a program management approach.

 

Group-wide human resource processes are established covering recruitment planning, diversity, remuneration, development and mobility of staff to ensure we continue to maintain a strong diversified global talent pool.

Financial risks

  
Continued volatility in global financial markets may adversely impact future cash flows, the ability to adequately access and source capital from financial markets and our credit rating. This may impact planned expenditures as well as the ability to recover investments in mining and oil and gas projects. In addition, the commercial counterparties (customers, suppliers and financial institutions) we transact with may, due to adverse market conditions, not meet their obligations.    We seek to maintain a solid ‘A’ credit rating, supported by our portfolio risk management strategy. As part of this strategy, commodity prices and currency exchange rates are not hedged and, wherever possible we take the prevailing market price, which serves to mitigate counterparty performance risk. We use cash flow at risk analysis to monitor volatilities and key financial ratios. Credit limits and review processes are established for all customers and financial counterparties. The Financial Risk Management Committee oversees these as described in section 5.15. Note 28 to the financial statements outlines our financial risk management strategy.

Operational risks

  
Operating cost pressures, reduced productivity and labour shortages could negatively impact operating margins and expansion plans. Non-controlled assets may not comply with our standards. Unexpected natural and operational catastrophes may adversely impact our operations. Breaches in information technology (IT) security processes may adversely impact the conduct of our business activities.    We seek to ensure that adequate operating margins are maintained through our strategy to own and operate large, long-life, low-cost and expandable upstream assets. We have implemented an Operating Model designed to deliver a simple and scalable organisation, providing a competitive advantage through defining work, organisation and performance measurement. Defined global business processes, including 1SAP, provide a standardised way of working across the organisation. Common processes generate reliable data and improve operating discipline. Global sourcing arrangements have been established to ensure continuity of supply and competitive costs for key supply inputs. We seek to influence non-controlled assets to apply to our standards.

 

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Principal risk area

  

Risk management approach

  

Through the application of our risk management processes, we identify material catastrophic operational risks and implement the critical controls and performance requirements to maintain control effectiveness. Business continuity plans are established to mitigate consequences. Consistent with our portfolio risk management approach, we continue to be largely self-insured for losses arising from property damage, business interruption and construction.

 

We maintain appropriate IT security devices, perimeter monitoring and mobile device protective measures. Security crisis management, incident management and service continuity and disaster recovery plans are established.

Sustainability risks

  
HSEC incidents or accidents and related regulations may adversely affect our people, operations and reputation or licence to operate. The potential physical impacts and related government regulatory responses to climate change and greenhouse effects may adversely impact our operations and markets. Given that we operate in a challenging global environment straddling multiple jurisdictions, a breach of our governance processes may lead to regulatory penalties and loss of reputation.   

Our approach to sustainability risks is reflected in Our BHP Billiton Charter and described in section 2.8. A comprehensive set of Group Level Documents (GLD) set out Group-wide HSEC-related performance requirements to ensure effective management control of these risks.

 

The BHP Billiton Code of Business Conduct sets out requirements related to working with integrity including dealings with government officials and third parties. Processes and controls are in place for the financial control over financial reporting, including under Sarbanes-Oxley. We have established anti-corruption and anti-trust related performance requirements overseen by the Legal and Compliance function. The Disclosure Committee oversees our compliance with securities dealing obligations and continuous and periodic disclosure obligations.

1.6    Forward looking statements

This Report contains forward looking statements, including statements regarding:

 

 

trends in commodity prices and currency exchange rates;

 

 

demand for commodities;

 

 

plans, strategies and objectives of management;

 

 

closure or divestment of certain operations or facilities (including associated costs);

 

 

anticipated production or construction commencement dates;

 

 

capital costs and scheduling;

 

 

operating costs and shortages of materials and skilled employees;

 

16


Table of Contents
 

anticipated productive lives of projects, mines and facilities;

 

 

provisions and contingent liabilities;

 

 

tax and regulatory developments.

Forward looking statements can be identified by the use of terminology such as ‘intend’, ‘aim’, ‘project’, ‘anticipate’, ‘estimate’, ‘plan’, ‘believe’, ‘expect’, ‘may’, ‘should’, ‘will’, ‘continue’ or similar words. These statements discuss future expectations concerning the results of operations or financial condition, or provide other forward looking statements.

These forward looking statements are not guarantees or predictions of future performance, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, many of which are beyond our control, and which may cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in the statements contained in this release. Readers are cautioned not to put undue reliance on forward looking statements.

For example, our future revenues from our operations, projects or mines described in this Report will be based, in part, upon the market price of the minerals, metals or petroleum products produced, which may vary significantly from current levels. These variations, if materially adverse, may affect the timing or the feasibility of the development of a particular project, the expansion of certain facilities or mines, or the continuation of existing operations.

Other factors that may affect the actual construction or production commencement dates, costs or production output and anticipated lives of operations, mines or facilities include our ability to profitably produce and transport the minerals, petroleum and/or metals extracted to applicable markets; the impact of foreign currency exchange rates on the market prices of the minerals, petroleum or metals we produce; activities of government authorities in some of the countries where we are exploring or developing these projects, facilities or mines, including increases in taxes, changes in environmental and other regulations and political uncertainty; labour unrest; and other factors identified in the risk factors described in section 1.5.1.

We cannot assure you that our estimated economically recoverable reserve figures, closure or divestment of such operations or facilities, including associated costs, actual production or commencement dates, cost or production output or anticipated lives of the projects, mines and facilities discussed in this Annual Report, will not differ materially from the statements contained in this Annual Report.

Except as required by applicable regulations or by law, the Group does not undertake any obligation to publicly update or review any forward looking statements, whether as a result of new information or future events.

 

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2    Information on the Company

2.1    BHP Billiton locations

LOGO

Projects and exploration activities are not shown on this map.

Locations are current at 10 September 2012.

 

18


Table of Contents

Petroleum

 

Ref

  

Country

  

Fields

  

Description

  

Ownership

 

1

   Algeria    ROD Integrated Development (a)    Onshore oil production      38

2

   Australia    Bass Strait (a)    Offshore Victoria oil, condensate, LPG, natural gas and ethane production      50

3

   Australia    Minerva    Offshore Victoria natural gas and condensate production      90

4

  

Australia

   North West Shelf (a)    Offshore Western Australia oil, condensate, LPG, natural gas and LNG production      8.3 – 16.7

5

   Australia    Pyrenees    Offshore Western Australia oil production      40 – 71.4

6

   Australia    Stybarrow    Offshore Western Australia oil and gas production      50

7

   Pakistan    Zamzama    Onshore natural gas and condensate production      38.5

8

  

Trinidad

and Tobago

   Angostura    Offshore oil and natural gas production      45

9

   UK    Bruce/Keith/ Liverpool Bay   

Offshore North Sea and Irish Sea oil and natural gas production

- Bruce (a) 16%

- Keith 31.8%

- Liverpool Bay 46.1%

  

10

   US    Gulf of Mexico   

Offshore oil, LPG and natural gas production from several fields

- Atlantis (a) 44%

- Neptune 35%

- Genesis (a) 5%

- Shenzi 44%

- Mad Dog (a) 23.9%

  

11

   US    Onshore US   

Onshore shale gas and liquids in Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas

- Eagle Ford

- Haynesville

- Fayetteville

- Permian

     <1 – 100

Aluminium (b)

 

  

Ref

  

Country

  

Asset

  

Description

  

Ownership

 

12

   Australia    Worsley    Integrated alumina refinery and bauxite mine in Western Australia      86

13

   Brazil    Alumar (a)    Integrated alumina refinery and aluminium smelter      36 – 40

14

   Brazil    Mineração Rio do Norte (a)    An open-cut bauxite mine      14.8

15

   Mozambique    Mozal    An aluminium smelter, located near Maputo      47.1

16

   South Africa    Aluminium South Africa    Hillside and Bayside aluminium smelters, located at Richards Bay      100

 

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Stainless Steel Materials (b)

 

Ref

  

Country

  

Asset

  

Description

  

Ownership

 

17

   Australia    Nickel West    Mt Keith and Leinster nickel-sulphide mines, Kalgoorlie nickel smelter, Kambalda nickel concentrator and the Kwinana nickel refinery      100

18

   Colombia    Cerro Matoso   

Integrated laterite ferronickel mining and smelting operation in northern Colombia

     99.9

Base Metals

 

  

Ref

  

Country

  

Asset

  

Description

  

Ownership

 

19

   Australia    Cannington    Underground silver, lead and zinc mine, located in northwest Queensland      100

20

   Chile    Pampa Norte    Cerro Colorado and Spence open-cut mines producing copper cathode in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile      100

21

   Chile    Escondida    Comprises the world’s largest copper mine, concentrators and solvent extraction plants and port operations      57.5

22

   Peru    Antamina (a)    A joint venture open-cut copper and zinc mine, located in the Andes north-central Peru      33.8

23

   US    Base Metals North America    Includes the Pinto Valley open-cut copper mine, located in Arizona      100

Uranium (c)

 

  

Ref

  

Country

  

Asset

  

Description

  

Ownership

 

24

   Australia   

Olympic

Dam

   Large poly-metallic orebody and the world’s largest uranium deposit, producing copper, uranium, gold and silver      100

Diamonds and Specialty Products

 

  

Ref

  

Country

  

Asset

  

Description

  

Ownership

 

25

   Canada    EKATI Diamond Mine    Open-cut and underground diamond mines, located in the Northwest Territories of Canada      80

Iron Ore

 

  

Ref

  

Country

  

Asset

  

Description

  

Ownership

 

26

   Australia    Western Australia Iron Ore    Integrated iron ore mines (Area C, Jimblebar, Yandi, Newman and Yarrie), and rail and port operations in the Pilbara region of Western Australia      85 – 100

27

   Brazil    Samarco (a)    Open-cut mine that produces iron ore pellets      50

 

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Manganese

 

  

Ref

  

Country

  

Asset

  

Description

  

Ownership

 

28

   Australia    Manganese Australia    Producer of manganese ore at GEMCO in the Northern Territory and manganese alloys at TEMCO in Tasmania      60

29

   South Africa    Manganese South Africa    Mamatwan open-cut and Wessels underground manganese mines and the Metalloys manganese alloy plant      44.4 – 60

Metallurgical Coal

 

Ref

  

Country

  

Asset

  

Description

  

Ownership

 

30

   Australia   

Illawarra

Coal

   Underground coal mines (West Cliff, Dendrobium, Appin) in southern New South Wales, with access to rail and port facilities      100

31

   Australia    BHP Billiton Mitsubishi Alliance    Saraji, Goonyella Riverside, Peak Downs, Norwich Park, Gregory Crinum, Blackwater and Broadmeadow open-cut and underground mines in the Queensland Bowen Basin and Hay Point Coal Terminal      50

32

  

Australia

   BHP Billiton Mitsui Coal    South Walker Creek and Poitrel open-cut coal mines in the Queensland Bowen Basin      80

Energy Coal

 

  

Ref

  

Country

  

Asset

  

Description

  

Ownership

 

33

   Australia    New South Wales Energy Coal    Mt Arthur Coal open-cut mine      100

34

   Colombia    Cerrejón (a)    An open-cut coal mine, with integrated rail and port operations      33.3

35

   South Africa    Energy Coal South Africa    Khutala, Middelburg, Klipspruit, Wolvekrans open-cut and underground mines and coal processing operations      50 – 100

36

   US    New Mexico Coal    Navajo open-cut and San Juan underground mines      100

BHP Billiton principal office locations

 

  

Ref

  

Country

  

Location

  

Office

 

37

   Australia    Adelaide    Uranium Head Office   

38

   Australia    Brisbane    Metallurgical Coal Head Office   

39

   Australia    Melbourne    Global Headquarters   

40

   Australia    Perth   

Aluminium (b) and Stainless Steel Materials (b) Head Offices

Iron Ore Head Office

  

  

41

   Australia    Sydney    Energy Coal Head Office   

42

   Canada    Saskatoon    Diamonds and Specialty Products Head Office   

43

   Chile    Santiago    Base Metals Head Office   

44

   Malaysia    Kuala Lumpur    Global Shared Services Centre   

 

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Table of Contents

Ref

  

Country

  

Location

  

Office

45

   Singapore    Singapore   

Marketing Head Office

Minerals Exploration Head Office

46

   South Africa    Johannesburg    Manganese Head Office

47

   UK    London    Corporate Office

48

   US    Houston    Petroleum Head Office

 

(a) Jointly or non-operated BHP Billiton Assets or Fields.
(b) Aluminium and Stainless Steel Materials form the Aluminium and Nickel Customer Sector Group.
(c) Uranium is part of the Base Metals Customer Sector Group.

Percentage ownership figures have been rounded to one decimal place.

2.2    Business overview

2.2.1    History and development

Since 29 June 2001, we have operated under a Dual Listed Company (DLC) structure. Under the DLC structure, the two parent companies, BHP Billiton Limited (formerly BHP Limited and before that The Broken Hill Proprietary Company Limited) and BHP Billiton Plc (formerly Billiton Plc) operate as a single economic entity, run by a unified Board and management team. More details of the DLC structure are located under section 2.10 of this Report.

BHP Billiton Limited was incorporated in 1885 and is registered in Australia with ABN 49 004 028 077. BHP Billiton Plc was incorporated in 1996 and is registered in England and Wales with registration number 3196209. Successive predecessor entities to BHP Billiton Plc have operated since 1860.

The registered office of BHP Billiton Limited is 180 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia, and its telephone number is 1300 55 47 57 (within Australia) or +61 3 9609 3333 (outside Australia). The registered office of BHP Billiton Plc is Neathouse Place, London SW1V 1BH, United Kingdom, and its telephone number is +44 20 7802 4000. Our agent for service in the United States is Maria Isabel Reuter at 1360 Post Oak Boulevard, Suite 150, Houston, TX 77056.

2.2.2    Petroleum Customer Sector Group

Our Petroleum Customer Sector Group (CSG) comprises a base of onshore and offshore operations that are located in six countries throughout the world. We explore for significant upstream opportunities around the world.

Petroleum continues to invest through economic cycles and maintains a long-term view. The acquisition of Petrohawk Energy Corporation was completed in FY2012 at a purchase price of US$12.0 billion, excluding the assumption of net debt of US$3.8 billion, and provided us with operating positions in the Eagle Ford, Haynesville and Permian fields in the United States. Combined with our interests in the Fayetteville field, acquired from Chesapeake Energy Corporation in the third quarter of FY2011, oil and gas operations in these fields constitute our Onshore US business. We will continue to evaluate other commercial opportunities for growth, including through acquisitions, in the future.

During FY2012, total production increased by 40 per cent from the prior year to 222.3 million barrels of oil equivalent (MMboe). Production from our Onshore US business, strong uptime performance from existing operated assets and the first full year of production from the Angostura gas facility (Trinidad and Tobago) largely offset reduced production caused by maintenance activity and adverse weather at our non-operated offshore Gulf of Mexico, United States, and North West Shelf, Australia, fields and natural field decline at our operated Pyrenees facility.

 

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We remain committed to organic growth opportunities through exploration, using the latest seismic and geophysical technology to locate new resources and yield results. In FY2012, we executed a major international drilling campaign focused on proven basins in Southeast Asia, Western Australia and the Gulf of Mexico.

Our production operations are as follows:

Bass Strait

Together with our 50-50 joint venture partner, Esso Australia (a subsidiary of ExxonMobil), we have been producing oil and gas from Bass Strait, off the south-eastern coast of Australia, for over 40 years, having participated in the original discovery of hydrocarbons in 1965. We dispatch the majority of our Bass Strait crude oil and condensate production to refineries along the east coast of Australia. Gas is piped onshore to our Longford processing facility, from which we sell our production to domestic distributors under contracts with periodic price reviews.

North West Shelf

We are a joint venture participant in the North West Shelf Project in Western Australia. The North West Shelf Project was developed in phases: the domestic gas phase supplies gas to the Western Australian domestic market mainly under long-term contracts, and a series of liquefied natural gas (LNG) expansion phases supplying LNG to buyers in Japan, Korea and China under a series of long-term contracts. The project also produces LPG and condensate.

We are also a joint venture participant in four nearby oil fields. Both the North West Shelf gas and oil ventures are operated by Woodside.

Australia operated

We operate two oil fields offshore Western Australia and one gas field in Victoria.

The Pyrenees oil development consists of three fields, two of which (Crosby and Stickle) are located in blocks WA-42-L (71.43 per cent interest), while the third (Ravensworth) straddles blocks WA-42-L and WA-43-L (40 per cent interest). The project uses a FPSO facility.

The Stybarrow operation (50 per cent BHP Billiton share) is an oil development located offshore Western Australia. The project uses a FPSO facility.

The Minerva operation (90 per cent BHP Billiton share) is a gas field located offshore Victoria. The operation consists of two subsea producing wells which pipe gas onshore to a processing plant. The gas is delivered into a pipeline and sold domestically.

Gulf of Mexico

We operate two fields in the Gulf of Mexico (Neptune and Shenzi) and hold non-operating interests in a further three fields (Atlantis, Mad Dog and Genesis). We divested our interest in the West Cameron and Starlifter areas in June 2012. We also own 25 per cent and 22 per cent, respectively, of the companies that own and operate the Caesar oil pipeline and the Cleopatra gas pipeline which transport oil and gas from the Green Canyon area, where a number of our fields are located, to connecting pipelines that transport product to the mainland. We deliver our oil production to refineries along the Gulf Coast of the United States.

 

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Table of Contents

Onshore US

We operate in four shale fields located onshore in the United States – Fayetteville, Eagle Ford, Haynesville and Permian.

The combined leasehold acreage of the Onshore US fields is approximately 1.6 million net acres in the states of Texas, Louisiana and Arkansas. Our ownership interests range from less than one per cent to 100 per cent. Working interest will change due to events such as a party’s non consent election, or through farm-ins and farm-outs with other parties.

In FY2012, the Onshore US business delivered 6.9 million barrels of crude oil and condensates, 448 billion cubic feet of natural gas and 4.0 million barrels of natural gas liquids. Our Onshore US total production increased by 80 MMboe from 6 MMboe in FY2011 to 86 MMboe in FY2012, which more than accounted for the 63 MMboe increase in total production.

Due to the low price of US natural gas in FY2012, the capital expenditure in the Onshore US business in the second half of the financial year was focused on the liquids-rich Eagle Ford and Permian fields, both in Texas. Consequently, we reduced the development of the dry gas assets in the Haynesville and Fayetteville fields in the second half of FY2012. The mix of liquids and gas development opportunities in all four fields provides us with the flexibility to adjust our onshore development program towards those operations with the highest return on investment.

Liverpool Bay and Bruce/Keith

The Liverpool Bay, United Kingdom, integrated development consists of five producing offshore gas and oil fields in the Irish Sea, the Point of Ayr onshore processing plant in north Wales, and associated infrastructure. We deliver the Liverpool Bay gas by pipeline to E.ON’s Connah’s Quay power station.

We own 46.1 per cent of and operate Liverpool Bay. We also hold a 16 per cent non-operating interest in the Bruce oil and gas field in the North Sea and operate the Keith field (31.83 per cent share), a subsea tie-back, which is processed via the Bruce platform facilities.

Algeria

Our Algerian operations comprise our effective 38 per cent interest in the ROD Integrated Development, which consists of six satellite oil fields that pump oil back to a dedicated processing train. We exited our effective 45 per cent interest in the Ohanet wet gas development in October 2011.

Our interest in ROD is subject to a contractual determination to ensure interest from participating association leases is accurately reflected. Future redetermination of our interest may be possible under certain conditions.

Trinidad and Tobago

The Greater Angostura project is an integrated oil and gas development located offshore east Trinidad. We operate the field and have a 45 per cent interest in the production sharing contract for the project. Gas sales from the gas export platform commenced in May 2011.

Zamzama

We hold a 38.5 per cent working interest in and operate the Zamzama gas project in Sindh province of Pakistan. Both gas and condensate are sold domestically.

 

24


Table of Contents

Information on Petroleum operations

The following table contains additional details of our production operations. This table should be read in conjunction with the production (see section 2.3.1) and reserve tables (see section 2.13.1).

 

Operation &
Location

 

Product

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or Options

 

Nominal Production
Capacity

 

Facilities, Use & Condition

Australia

 

Bass Strait

Offshore Victoria   Oil and gas  

BHP Billiton 50%

 

Esso Australia (Exxon Mobil subsidiary) 50%

 

Oil Basins Ltd 2.5% royalty interest in 19 production licences

  Esso Australia  

20 production licences and 2 retention leases issued by Australian Government

 

Expire between 2016 and end of life of field

 

One production licence held with Santos Ltd

 

Oil: 200 Mbbl/d

Gas: 1,075 MMcf/d

LPG: 5,150 tpd

Ethane: 850 tpd

 

20 producing fields with 21 offshore developments (14 steel jacket platforms, 3 subsea developments, 2 steel gravity based mono towers, 2 concrete gravity based platforms)

 

Onshore infrastructure: Longford Facility (3 gas plants, liquid processing facilities)

Interconnecting pipelines

 

Long Island Point LPG and oil storage facilities

 

Ethane pipeline

North West Shelf            

Offshore Western Australia

 

North Rankin, Goodwyn, Perseus, Echo-Yodel, Angel, Searipple fields

 

Domestic gas, LPG, condensate,

LNG

 

North West Shelf Project is an unincorporated JV

 

BHP Billiton:

8.33% of original domestic gas JV, will progressively increase to 16.67%

 

16.67% of Incremental Pipeline Gas (IPG) domestic gas JV

 

16.67% of original LNG JV 12.5% of China LNG JV

 

16.67% of LPG JV Approximately 15% of current condensate production

 

  Woodside Petroleum Ltd  

9 production licences issued by Australian Government

 

6 expire in 2022 and 3 expire 5 years from end of production

 

North Rankin A platform: 2,300 MMcf/d gas 60 Mbbl/d condensate

 

Goodwyn A platform: 1,450 MMcf/d gas 110 Mbbl/d condensate

 

Angel platform: 960 MMcf/d gas 50 Mbbl/d condensate

 

Withnell Bay gas plant: 600 MMcf/d gas

 

5-train LNG plant: 45,000 tpd LNG

 

Production from North Rankin and Perseus processed through North Rankin A platform

 

Production from Goodwyn, Searipple and Echo-Yodel processed through Goodwyn A platform

 

4 subsea wells in Perseus field tied into Goodwyn A platform

 

Production from Angel field processed through Angel platform

           

 

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Table of Contents

Operation &
Location

 

Product

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or Options

 

Nominal Production
Capacity

 

Facilities, Use & Condition

    Other participants: subsidiaries of Woodside Energy, Chevron, BP, Shell, Mitsubishi/Mitsui and China National Offshore Oil Corporation        

Onshore gas treatment plant at Withnell Bay processes gas for domestic market

 

5-train LNG plant

North West Shelf            

Offshore Western Australia

 

Wanaea, Cossack, Lambert and Hermes fields

  Oil  

BHP Billiton 16.67%

 

Woodside Energy 33.34%, BP, Chevron, Japan Australia LNG (MIMI) 16.67% each

  Woodside Petroleum Ltd   3 production licences issued by Australian Government. 2 expire in 2014 and 2018. The third production licence, WA-9-L, expired in 2012 and was recently renewed for a period of 21 years and will expire in 2033  

Production capacity: 60 Mbbl/d

 

Storage capacity: 1 MMbbl

  Floating production storage and off-take unit
           
Minerva            

Offshore Victoria

 

Gas plant located approximately 4 km inland from Port Campbell

  Gas and condensate  

BHP Billiton 90%

 

Santos (BOL) 10%

  BHP Billiton   Production licence issued by Australian Government expires 5 years after production ceases  

150 TJ/d gas

 

600 bbl/d condensate

 

2 well completions

 

Single flow line transports gas to onshore gas processing facility

Stybarrow            

Offshore Western Australia

 

Stybarrow and Eskdale fields

  Oil and gas  

BHP Billiton 50%

 

Woodside Energy 50%

  BHP Billiton   Production licence issued by Australian Government expires 5 years after production ceases  

Production: 80 Mbbl/d oil

 

Storage: 900 Mbbl

 

10 subsea well completions (6 producers, 3 water injectors, 1 gas injector)

 

Gas production is reinjected

Pyrenees            

Offshore Western Australia

 

Crosby and Stickle Ravensworth fields

  Oil  

WA-42-L permit:

BHP Billiton 71.43% Apache PVG 28.57%

 

WA-43-L permit: BHP Billiton 40% Apache Permits 31.5%

 

Inpex Alpha 28.5%

  BHP Billiton   Production licence issued by Australian Government expires 5 years after production ceases  

Production: 96 Mbbl/d oil

 

Storage: 920 Mbbl

 

18 subsea well completions (14 producers, 3 water injectors, 1 gas injector), FPSO

 

WA-42-L production commenced third quarter of FY2010

 

WA-43-L production commenced first quarter of FY2011

 

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Table of Contents

Operation &
Location

 

Product

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or Options

 

Nominal Production
Capacity

 

Facilities, Use & Condition

US

 

Onshore US

Fayetteville –Arkansas

 

Eagle Ford – South Texas

 

Haynesville – Northern Louisiana and East Texas

 

Permian – West Texas

  Oil, condensate, gas and NGL  

BHP Billiton working interest in leases range from <1% to 100%.

 

BHP Billiton average working interest: Operated wells – 69.5% Non-operated wells – 12.5%

 

Largest partners include Southwestern Energy, XTO Energy and Chesapeake Energy.

 

BHP Billiton – 1,905 wells

Partners – 4,032 wells

 

We currently own leasehold interests in approximately 1.6 million net acres

Fayetteville – 487,000 acres

Eagle Ford – 341,000 acres

Haynesville – 268,000 acres

Permian – 433,000 acres Other – 76,000 acres

 

Leases associated with producing wells remain in place as long as oil and gas is produced in paying quantities

 

Maximum net daily production (1) achieved during FY2012

1,455 MMcf/d gas 29 Mbbl/d oil and condensate 17 Mbbl/d NGL

 

Fayetteville – producing gas wells with associated pipeline and compression infrastructure

 

Eagle Ford – producing oil and gas wells and associated pipeline and compression facilities

 

Haynesville – producing gas wells with a pipeline network operated by a third party

 

Permian – oil and gas wells with associated pipelines and compression facilities under construction

 

All production from Onshore US fields is transported to various intrastate and interstate pipelines through multiple interconnects

 

(1)        Capacity varies due to additional wells and pipelines.

 

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Table of Contents

Operation &
Location

 

Product

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or Options

 

Nominal Production
Capacity

 

Facilities, Use & Condition

Neptune

 

         
(Green Canyon 613)            

Offshore

Deepwater

Gulf of Mexico (1,300 m)

  Oil and gas  

BHP Billiton 35%

 

Marathon Oil 30% Woodside Energy 20% Maxus US Exploration 15%

  BHP Billiton   Lease from US Government as long as oil and gas produced in paying quantities   50 Mbbl/d oil
50 MMcf/d gas
  Permanently moored tension-leg platform (TLP)
Shenzi          

 

(Green Canyon 653)

           

Offshore

Deepwater

Gulf of Mexico (1,310 m)

  Oil and gas  

BHP Billiton 44%

 

Hess Corporation 28%

 

Repsol 28%

  BHP Billiton   Lease from US Government as long as oil and gas produced in paying quantities   100 Mbbl/d oil 50 MMcf/d gas  

Stand-alone TLP

 

Genghis Khan field (part of same geological structure) tied back to Marco Polo TLP

Atlantis

 

         
(Green Canyon 743)            

Offshore Deepwater

Gulf of Mexico

(2,155 m)

  Oil and gas  

BHP Billiton 44%

 

BP 56%

  BP   Lease from US Government as long as oil and gas produced in paying quantities   200 Mbbl/d oil 180 MMcf/d gas   Permanently moored semi-submersible platform

 

Mad Dog

 

         
(Green Canyon 782)            

Offshore Deepwater

Gulf of Mexico

(1,310 m)

  Oil and gas  

BHP Billiton 23.9%

 

BP 60.5% Chevron 15.6%

  BP   Lease from US Government as long as oil and gas produced in paying quantities   80 Mbbl/d oil 60 MMcf/d gas   Permanently moored integrated truss spar, facilities for simultaneous production and drilling operations

 

Genesis

         
(Green Canyon 205)            

Offshore Deepwater

Gulf of Mexico

(approximately 790 m)

  Oil and gas  

BHP Billiton 4.95%

 

Chevron 56.67% ExxonMobil 38.38%

  Chevron   Lease from US Government as long as oil and gas produced in paying quantities   55 Mbbl/d oil 72 MMcf/d gas   Floating cylindrical hull (spar) moored to seabed with integrated drilling facilities

 

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Operation &
Location

 

Product

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or Options

 

Nominal Production
Capacity

 

Facilities, Use & Condition

Other

 

Liverpool Bay

           

Offshore northwest England, Irish Sea

 

Douglas and Douglas West oil fields, Hamilton, Hamilton North gas fields, Lennox oil and gas field

  Oil and gas  

BHP Billiton 46.1%

 

ENI 53.9%

 

  BHP Billiton   3 production licences issued by UK Government expire 2016, 2025 and 2027   308 MMcf/d gas 70 Mbbl/d oil and condensate  

Integrated development of 5 producing fields

 

Oil treated at Douglas complex then piped to oil storage barge for export by tankers

 

Gas processed at Douglas complex then piped by subsea pipeline to Point of Ayr gas terminal for further processing

           

Bruce/Keith

           
Offshore North Sea, UK   Oil and gas  

Bruce:

BHP Billiton 16% BP 37% Total 43.25% Marubeni 3.75%

 

Keith:

BHP Billiton 31.83%

 

BP 34.84%

 

Total 25%

 

Marubeni 8.33%

 

Keith – BHP Billiton

 

Bruce – BP

  3 production licences issued by UK Government expire 2015, 2018 and 2046   920 MMcf/d gas  

Integrated oil and gas platform

Keith developed as tie-back to Bruce facilities

           
ROD          
Integrated Development            

Onshore

Berkine Basin, 900 km southeast of Algiers, Algeria

  Oil  

BHP Billiton 45% interest in 401a/402a production sharing contract ENI 55%

 

BHP Billiton effective 38% interest in ROD unitised integrated development ENI 62%

  Joint Sonatrach/ENI entity  

Production sharing contract with Sonatrach (title holder)

 

Expires 2016 with option for two 5-year extensions under certain conditions

  Approximately 80 Mbbl/d oil  

Development and production of 6 oil fields

 

2 largest fields (ROD and SFNE) extend into neighbouring blocks 403a, 403d

 

Production through dedicated processing train on block 403

           

 

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Table of Contents

Operation &
Location

 

Product

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or Options

 

Nominal Production
Capacity

 

Facilities, Use & Condition

Greater

 

Angostura

         
Offshore Trinidad and Tobago   Oil and gas  

BHP Billiton 45%

Total 30% Chaoyang 25%

  BHP Billiton   Production sharing contract with Trinidad and Tobago Government entitles us to operate Greater Angostura until 2021  

100 Mbbl/d oil

280 MMcf/d gas

 

Integrated oil and gas development: central processing platform connected to the Kairi-2 platform and gas export platform with 3 satellite wellhead protector platforms and flow lines

 

Oil pipeline from processing platform to storage and export at Guayaguayare

 

Gas supplied to Trinidad and Tobago domestic markets

           

Zamzama

           

Onshore Sindh Province,

Pakistan

  Gas and condensate  

BHP Billiton 38.5%

 

ENI Pakistan 17.75%

 

PKP Exploration 9.375%

 

PKP Exploration 2 9.375% Government Holdings 25%

  BHP Billiton   20-year development and production lease from Pakistan Government expires 2022 (option to extend 5 years)   500 MMcf/d gas 3,350 bbl/d condensate  

8 production wells, 4 process trains

2 front end compression trains

           

 

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Table of Contents

Development projects

Australia

North West Shelf North Rankin gas compression project

The North West Shelf gas compression project was approved by the Board in March 2008 to recover remaining lower pressure gas from the North Rankin and Perseus gas fields. The project consists of a new gas compression platform, North Rankin B, capable of processing 2,500 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d) of gas, which will be constructed adjacent to the existing North Rankin A platform, 135 kilometres offshore from Karratha on the northwest coast of Western Australia. The two platforms will be connected by a 100 metre long bridge and operate as a single facility. We own a 16.67 per cent share in the project and our development costs are approximately US$850 million, of which US$561 million was incurred as of 30 June 2012. First gas production is expected in CY2013. This project is operated by Woodside with an equally shared interest between Woodside, BHP Billiton, BP, Chevron, MIMI and Shell.

Bass Strait Kipper gas field development

Initial development of the Kipper gas field in the Gippsland Basin located offshore Victoria was approved by the Board in December 2007. A supplemental approval of the development was granted in January 2011. The first phase of the project includes two new subsea wells, three new pipelines and platform modifications to supply 10 thousand barrels of condensate per day (Mbbl/d) and 80 (MMcf/d) of gas. Gas and liquids will be processed via the existing Gippsland Basin joint venture facilities. Our share of development costs is approximately US$900 million, of which US$832 million was incurred as of 30 June 2012. Facilities are expected to be ready in CY2012 with first production pending resolution of mercury content. Additional treatment facilities will be required onshore due to mercury containment within the gas. The mercury issue will be undertaken as a separate project. The Kipper gas field development is comprised of the Kipper Unit Joint Venture and the Gippsland Basin Joint Venture. We own a 32.5 per cent interest in the Kipper Unit Joint Venture, with Esso Australia and Santos owning the remaining 67.5 per cent. We own a 50 per cent interest in the Gippsland Basin Joint Venture with Esso Australia owning the remaining 50 per cent.

Bass Strait Turrum field development

Further expansion of the Gippsland Basin facilities is underway following approval by the Board in July 2008 of the full field development of the Turrum oil and gas field. A supplemental approval of the development was obtained in January 2011. The project consists of a new platform, Marlin B, linked by a bridge to the existing Marlin A platform. The Turrum field, which has a capacity of 11 Mbbl/d of oil and 200 MMcf/d of gas, is located 42 kilometres from shore in approximately 60 metres of water. Our share of development costs is approximately US$1.4 billion, of which US$941 million was incurred as of 30 June 2012. Initial production is targeted for CY2013. The Turrum field development operates under the Gippsland Basin Joint Venture in which we own a 50 per cent interest with Esso Australia owning the remaining 50 per cent.

Macedon

Macedon is a domestic gas development in Western Australia. The project will consist of a 200 MMcf/d stand alone gas plant, four subsea production wells, a 90 kilometre, 20 inch wet gas pipeline and a 67 kilometre, 2 inch sales gas pipeline. In August 2010, the project was approved at an investment level of US$1.1 billion (BHP Billiton share) of which US$770 million was incurred as of 30 June 2012. Execution phase work is on track with first gas production expected in CY2013. We are the operator with a 71.43 per cent interest and Apache PVG Pty Ltd holds the remaining 28.57 per cent interest.

 

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United States

Onshore US

BHP Billiton’s Onshore US capital program in FY2012 was US$3.3 billion, primarily related to drilling and completion activities at the Fayetteville, Haynesville and Eagle Ford fields and the installation of approximately 500 kilometres of pipeline infrastructure and additional gas processing facilities. In FY2012, 190 wells were completed in Onshore US. Drilling in the Permian Basin was primarily exploration and appraisal in FY2012.

Due to the low US natural gas price in FY2012, the majority of drilling and completion activity in Onshore US was directed towards the liquids rich Eagle Ford and Permian fields. At the end of FY2012, over 80 per cent of drilling activity was focused on these areas and Onshore US liquids production had risen to more than 40 thousand barrels per day.

BHP Billiton’s Onshore US capital expenditure in FY2013 is expected to rise to US$4.0 billion and the program will include drilling and completion, gas processing facilities and pipeline infrastructure. The majority of the activity will focus on the liquids-rich Eagle Ford and Permian fields. Development of these liquids rich fields complements our traditional project pipeline. Development plans will remain flexible and aligned with the external environment.

Exploration and appraisal

We focus on capturing and operating large acreage positions primarily in areas that are in proven hydrocarbon basins. We have exploration interests around the world, particularly in the Gulf of Mexico, Australia and the South China Sea. During FY2012, our gross expenditure on exploration was US$1.4 billion, of which US$674 million was expensed. Our major exploration interests are as follows:

Australia

We have a 55 per cent interest in WA-351-P and in March 2012 we drilled the Tallaganda-1 exploration well. The well encountered hydrocarbons. The well has been plugged and abandoned and is being evaluated to determine development potential.

The North Scarborough-1 well was spud in January 2012 in permit WA-346-P. The well encountered hydrocarbons. The well was plugged and abandoned and is being evaluated to determine development potential. We own a 100 per cent working interest in the permit.

The Argus-2 appraisal well was spud in June 2011 in the AC/RL8 retention lease over the Argus gas field. The well failed to reach the primary objective and was temporarily plugged and abandoned in September 2011. Woodside Browse Pty Ltd operates the AC/RL8 retention lease with a 60 per cent interest while we hold the remaining 40 per cent.

We have a 16.67 per cent interest in the North West Shelf Project with Woodside as Operator. In August 2011, the Seraph-1 well was drilled. It has been plugged and abandoned and expensed as a dry hole. In November 2011, the Tidepole East-1 well was drilled and hydrocarbons were encountered. It has been plugged and abandoned and is being evaluated to determine development potential.

In July 2012, we acquired an additional 6.5 per cent interest in block WA-335-P offshore Western Australia from Apache, taking our total participating interest to 52.5 per cent. We have exercised our right to assume operatorship from Apache (28.6 per cent). Kufpec holds the remaining 18.9 per cent.

In June 2012, we farmed into block WA-389-P in the Northern Carnarvon basin. We acquired a 40 per cent interest, while Woodside (Operator) owns 25 per cent and Cue Energy Resources owns 35 per cent. The Banambu Deep-1 exploration well was spud in May 2012. The well was plugged and abandoned and expensed as a dry hole.

 

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In May 2012, we were awarded three exploration permits following our bids in the October 2011 Gazettal round WA-469-P, WA-470-P, and WA-475-P offshore Western Australia. The minimum exploration program for blocks WA-469-P and WA-470-P includes the acquisition and processing of 3D seismic data. The minimum exploration program for block WA-475-P includes the acquisition and processing of 3D seismic data and the drilling of two exploration wells.

United States

Onshore US

BHP Billiton’s Onshore US exploration and appraisal program in FY2012 was US$392 million, primarily focused on the Permian Basin and included land acquisitions and the drilling and completion of seven exploration wells. Initial results from the Permian Basin exploration and appraisal program were positive, with four of the seven exploration wells proving to be productive.

Deep Blue – Green Canyon 723

We owned a 31.9 per cent interest in the Deep Blue prospect located in the Green Canyon area. Partners in the well were Noble (33.8 per cent), Statoil (15.6 per cent), Samson (9.3 per cent) and Murphy (9.3 per cent). The Deep Blue exploration well-1 was drilled in November 2009 and concluded in May 2010. The well’s original hole was drilled to a total depth of 9,962 metres and encountered hydrocarbons. Sidetrack drilling started in May and was suspended in June 2010 due to the Gulf of Mexico drilling moratorium issued by the US Government. The moratorium was lifted in October 2010 and the sidetrack well recommenced drilling in August 2011. The sidetrack encountered a non-commercial quantity of hydrocarbons and as a result the well was plugged and abandoned and the block relinquished.

Gunflint – Mississippi Canyon 948

In June 2011, we entered into a Participation Agreement with the Gunflint partnership by consolidating our block (MC 992) with four other blocks in the area. The agreement provided us with an 11.2 per cent interest in the Gunflint prospect with Noble serving as the operator. Our partners include Noble (26.05 per cent), BP (31.50 per cent), Samson (16 per cent) and Marathon (15.25 per cent). The Mississippi Canyon 948 appraisal well was spud in December 2011. The well was plugged and abandoned and the well results are being evaluated.

Ness Deep – Green Canyon 507

In May 2012, we entered into the Ness Deep prospect by consolidating the interest in our block (Green Canyon 463) with the interest in our partner’s block (Green Canyon 507). We acquired operatorship of the prospect with a 50 per cent interest. The remaining 50 per cent interest is held by our partner Hess. The Green Canyon 507 Ness Deep exploration well spud in June 2012, and is in progress.

Knotty Head

The Knotty Head project is currently in the earliest phase of project development. The development assumptions for this project consist of a joint wet tree TLP development, production and water injection wells. The operator is Nexen and we hold a 25 per cent interest.

Atlantis East – Green Canyon 700

The Atlantis East appraisal well was spud in April 2012 and is currently drilling. BP operates the well with a 56 per cent interest, while we hold the remaining 44 per cent. Once the appraisal well has been drilled, a reasonable assessment of commercial hydrocarbon potential will be performed.

 

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Mad Dog North – Green Canyon 738

The Mad Dog North appraisal well (GC 738) was spud in June 2011. The appraisal program was operated by BHP Billiton using the Transocean Development Driller 1 rig in 1,362 metres of water. Partners in the well are BP (60.5 per cent) and Chevron (15.6 per cent). BHP Billiton’s interest is 23.9 per cent. The primary objective of the program was to evaluate fully the structure on the northern flank of Mad Dog field. The Mad Dog North appraisal well penetrations confirm the existence of economically recoverable hydrocarbons. Additional work is ongoing to better define the recoverable volumes and development options.

Other

Colombia

In September 2008, we entered into a technical evaluation of hydrocarbon potential in Block 5 in the Llanos basin onshore Colombia. We operate the project and hold a 71.4 per cent working interest in the joint venture, with SK Energy Co holding the remaining 28.6 per cent interest. The minimum work program includes the acquisition of 1,000 kilometres of 2D seismic plus the drilling of five stratigraphic wells. The airborne survey was completed in January 2010, and 621 kilometres of 2D seismic were acquired from December 2010 to May 2011. In addition, four stratigraphic wells were drilled. Technical analysis and discussions with commercial partners and the Colombian Government continue.

India

In December 2008, we signed production sharing contracts covering seven blocks located offshore India. We hold a 26 per cent interest in the blocks. Our partner, GVK, holds the remaining 74 per cent interest in the blocks. The minimum exploration program includes the acquisition and processing of 2D seismic data across the seven blocks and a small 3D seismic acquisition in one block. We have a partner option to increase our interest to 50 per cent prior to drilling the first well or within six months of completing final seismic data interpretation.

In June 2010, we signed production sharing contracts covering an additional three blocks located offshore India. We hold a 100 per cent interest in the blocks. The minimum work program associated with the three blocks includes the acquisition and processing of 2D and 3D seismic data.

We are the operator of all 10 blocks and have met the commitment for acquiring the 2D seismic in all blocks. 2D seismic processing is nearly complete, and we are currently interpreting the processed seismic data. The 3D seismic acquisition, processing and interpretation, which will complete the committed exploration work program, will be planned once the 2D seismic data interpretation is completed. Our offshore India blocks are impacted by an access issue related to delays in receiving permits from the Ministry of Defence for the Government of India to conduct necessary exploration activities. BHP Billton and GVK have claimed force majeure as a result of these delays. Discussions aimed at resolving the access issue are ongoing with the Government of India.

Malaysia

In March 2007, we were awarded offshore Blocks N and Q in Malaysia with a 60 per cent interest and operatorship. Petronas Carigali holds the remaining 40 per cent. The minimum exploration program includes the acquisition and processing of seismic data across the two blocks and the drilling of four Block N exploration wells within the first seven years. The initial seismic acquisition program commenced in June 2008 and was completed in September 2008 for both blocks. Additional seismic acquisition and processing for Block Q is planned for completion by March 2013. The first exploration well was drilled in February 2010 and was plugged, abandoned and expensed as a dry hole. Drilling of the second exploration well was completed in February 2012 and was plugged, abandoned and expensed as a dry hole.

 

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Philippines

In November 2009, we acquired a 75 per cent interest in Service Contract 59, located offshore Philippines and we assumed operatorship in April 2010. PNOC Exploration Corp owns the remaining 25 per cent interest. As part of the minimum work program, the joint venture completed the acquisition and processing of a 2D seismic survey in April 2010. A 3D seismic acquisition program was completed in January 2011. In addition a 2D seismic acquisition was completed in December 2011 with processing currently ongoing. The remaining obligations on the current work program require us to drill one exploration well prior to January 2014.

In May 2011, we exercised an option to farm-in to the fourth sub phase Service Contract 55, located offshore Philippines to acquire a 60 per cent working interest. In January 2012, the Philippines Department of Energy approved our farm-in and granted us operatorship of the block. The remaining interest is divided between Otto Energy, at 33.18 per cent interest, and Trans-Asia, at 6.82 per cent interest. For the current sub phase a 3D seismic acquisition has been completed in 2011, and we have a one well commitment that is required to be drilled by August 2013.

In August 2009, we exercised our option with partner Mitra Energy (25 per cent) to acquire a 25 per cent non-operating interest in Service Contract 56 located offshore Philippines. ExxonMobil was operator and held the remaining 50 per cent interest in the block. The joint venture completed drilling the first exploration well in December 2009, and the second exploration well in February 2010. Both wells were expensed as dry holes. The drilling of these wells fulfilled our minimum work commitment against the service contract. We exited the block in November 2011 and reassigned our working interest back to Mitra Energy.

Vietnam

In October 2009, we became operator of Vietnam Blocks 28 and 29/03 located approximately 200 kilometres offshore southern Vietnam. We had a 50 per cent interest in each of the blocks, with Mitra Energy holding the remaining 50 per cent. The minimum work program for the first sub-phase included 2D seismic data and two wells. We also acquired and processed 3D data. The first exploration well was drilled in May 2011 while drilling of the second well commenced in June 2011. Both wells were plugged, abandoned and expensed as dry holes in FY2011. We have exited these two Vietnam blocks and transferred operatorship to Mitra Energy in July 2012.

Brunei

In September 2010, we entered into a Deed of Amendment with respect to Block CA1 (formerly Block J) following the settlement of the maritime dispute between Brunei and Malaysia. We own a 22.5 per cent interest in the block, with the residual interests held by Total Deep Offshore Borneo (54 per cent and operator), Hess (Borneo Block CA1) Ltd (13.5 per cent), Petronas Carigali (five per cent) and Canam Brunei Oil Ltd (Murphy Oil) (five per cent). The minimum work obligation includes the drilling of seven exploration wells. Julong Center began drilling in September 2011 and was plugged, abandoned and expensed as a dry hole. Julong East began drilling in January 2012 and encountered hydrocarbons. Jagus East began drilling in April 2012 and encountered hydrocarbons. Both wells have been plugged and abandoned and the well results are being evaluated to determine development potential.

South Africa

In September 2010, we entered into exploration agreements for two blocks offshore South Africa. We own and operate a 60 per cent interest in Block 3A/4A, and a 90 per cent interest in Block 3B/4B. The remaining interest in Block 3A/4A is held by PetroSA (30 per cent) and Sasol Petroleum International (10 per cent). Global Offshore Oil Exploration South Africa holds a 10 per cent interest in Block 3B/4B. The minimum work program includes the drilling of one exploration well within each block.

 

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Trinidad and Tobago

We have a 45 per cent interest in the Greater Angostura Joint Venture with our partners Total (30 per cent interest) and Chaoyang (25 per cent interest). In July 2011, the Canteen North 1 well was drilled within the producing Block 2c area. The well encountered hydrocarbons and was plugged and abandoned. The fault block is being evaluated to determine development potential.

Drilling

The number of wells in the process of being drilled (including temporarily suspended wells and excluding wells drilled and completed in FY2012) as of 30 June 2012 was as follows:

 

     Exploratory wells      Development Wells      Total  
     Gross      Net  (1)      Gross      Net  (1)      Gross      Net  (1)  

Australia

                                               

United States

     4         2         305         136         309         138   

Other

                     1         1         1         1   

Total

     4         2         306         137         310         139   

 

(1) 

Represents our share of the gross well count.

Other significant activities

Australia

Browse

The Browse LNG Development comprises development of the Torosa, Brecknock and Calliance gas fields, which were discovered in 1971, 1979, and 2000, respectively. The fields are located approximately 440 kilometres north-northwest of Broome, Western Australia in water depths up to 800 metres. Evaluation of the in-place resources continues together with definition of the on and offshore facilities required to extract hydrocarbons and produce and export LNG.

Woodside is the operator and we own 8.33 per cent of the East Browse resources and 20 per cent of West Browse.

Longford

The Longford Gas Conditioning Plant (LGCP) Project will enable the production of Turrum reserves plus the production of Kipper and other undeveloped high carbon dioxide content hydrocarbons. The project scope includes a carbon dioxide extraction facility, brownfield tie-ins, an electrical upgrade, and multiple supporting utilities. Esso is the operator of LGCP owning a 50 per cent interest and BHP Billiton owns the remaining 50 per cent.

Scarborough

Development planning for the large Scarborough gas field offshore Western Australia is in progress. We continue to evaluate development options for a LNG plant and offshore production facilities. Esso is the operator of the WA-1-R lease and we hold a 50 per cent working interest. We are the operator and have a 100 per cent working interest in the WA-346-P block.

Greater Western Flank-A

The Greater Western Flank-A (GWF-A) gas project was approved by the Board in November 2011 to recover gas from the near field Goodwyn H and Tidepole fields. The project consists of a five well subsea tie-back of the

 

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Goodwyn H and Tidepole fields to the Goodwyn A platform. The Goodwyn A platform is located in 130 metres of water, approximately 130 kilometres offshore from Karratha on the northwest coast of Australia. The development is estimated to have the potential to provide gross sales of 30 MMboe (BHP Billiton share), including condensate and liquefied gas. Woodside is the operator and we own a 16.67 per cent share.

NWS Other – (Persephone/Greater Western Flank ‘2’)

Planning is underway for the development of the Persephone field and Greater Western Flank ‘2’. The Persephone field is located near existing NWS infrastructure, approximately eight kilometres northeast of the North Rankin A platform. Greater Western Flank ‘2’ represents the second phase of development of the core Greater Western Flank fields, behind the GWF-A development, which are located to the southwest of the existing Goodwyn A platform. Woodside is the operator and we own a 16.67 per cent share of both Persephone and Greater Western Flank ‘2’.

United States

Shenzi Water Injection

The Shenzi Water Injection program includes drilling and completion of five water injection wells and provides facilities to inject up to 125 Mbbl/d of water at 7,000 pounds per square inch (psi). The program was approved as part of the original sanctioned Shenzi project which began production in 2009 to supplement aquifer pressure for additional recovery. To date, Water Injector (WI) #1 has been drilled and completed and WI #2 has been drilled. Planning for the completion of WI #2 and drilling of WI #3 is underway.

Atlantis South Water Injection

The Atlantis South Water Injection project is in the execution phase and involves drilling four subsea water injectors, tying them into the existing infrastructure and commissioning the 75 Mbbl/d of water injection facilities. This water injection project mitigates natural production decline due to low aquifer pressure. BP is the operator and we hold a 44 per cent working interest.

Mad Dog Phase 2

In April 2012, we announced approval for US$708 million (BHP Billiton share) in pre-commitment funding for the Mad Dog Phase 2 project. The Mad Dog Phase 2 project is in response to the successful Mad Dog South appraisal well, which confirmed significant hydrocarbons in the southern portion of the Mad Dog field. Mad Dog Phase 2 will be a spar development with all subsea production and injection wells and includes water injection capability to provide support to the east, west and south of the field.

Delivery commitments

We have delivery commitments of natural gas and LNG of approximately 3,286 billion cubic feet through 2031 (72 per cent Australia and 28 per cent Other) and crude, condensate and NGL commitments of 532.7 million barrels through 2023 (94 per cent United States, five per cent Australia, and one per cent Other). We have sufficient proved reserves and production capacity to fulfil these delivery commitments. Further information can be found in section 2.13.1.

2.2.3    Aluminium Customer Sector Group

Our Aluminium CSG is a portfolio of assets at three stages of the aluminium value chain: mining bauxite, refining bauxite into alumina, and smelting alumina into aluminium metal. We are the world’s eighth-largest producer of aluminium, with total production in FY2012 of 1.2 million tonnes (Mt) of aluminium. We also produced 12.8 Mt of bauxite and 4.2 Mt of alumina.

 

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During FY2012, we consumed 34 per cent of our alumina production in our aluminium smelters and sold the balance to other smelters. Our alumina sales are a mixture of long-term contract sales at LME-linked prices and spot sales at negotiated prices. Prices for our aluminium sales are generally linked to prevailing LME prices.

Boddington/Worsley

Boddington/Worsley is an integrated bauxite mining/alumina refining operation. The Boddington bauxite mine in Western Australia supplies bauxite ore to the Worsley alumina refinery via a 62-kilometre long conveying system. We own 86 per cent of the mine and the refinery. It is our sole integrated bauxite mining/alumina refining asset. Worsley, one of the largest and lowest-cost refineries in the world, is currently in the ramp-up phase of a major expansion (see Development projects below). Our share of Worsley’s FY2012 production was 2.9 Mt of alumina. Worsley’s export customers include our own Hillside, Bayside and Mozal smelters in southern Africa. Boddington has a reserve life of 18 years.

Mineração Rio do Norte

We own 14.8 per cent of Mineração Rio do Norte (MRN), which owns and operates a large bauxite mine in Brazil.

Alumar

Alumar is an integrated alumina refinery/aluminium smelter. We own 36 per cent of the Alumar refinery and 40 per cent of the smelter. Alcoa operates both facilities. The operations, and their integrated port facility, are located at São Luís in the Maranhão province of Brazil. Alumar sources bauxite from MRN. During FY2012, approximately 27 per cent of Alumar’s alumina production was used to feed the smelter, while the remainder was exported. Our share of Alumar’s FY2012 saleable production was 1,235 kilotonnes (kt) of alumina and 170 kt of aluminium.

Hillside and Bayside

Our Hillside and Bayside smelters are located at Richards Bay, South Africa. Hillside’s capacity of approximately 715 kilotonnes per annum (ktpa) makes it the largest aluminium smelter in the southern hemisphere. Following the mothballing of the potlines B and C in support of a national energy conservation scheme, Bayside has reduced smelting capacity to approximately 95 ktpa since 2009. Hillside imports alumina from our Worsley refinery. Both Hillside and Bayside source power from Eskom, the South African state utility, under long-term contracts with prices linked to the LME price of aluminium (except for Hillside Potline 3, the price of which is linked to the South African and US producer price indices). Potline capacity was impacted as a result of a major unplanned outage in the March 2012 quarter.

Mozal

We own 47.1 per cent of and operate the Mozal aluminium smelter in Mozambique, which has a total capacity of approximately 563 ktpa. Mozal sources power generated by Hydro Cahora Basa via Motraco, a transmission joint venture between Eskom and the national electricity utilities of Mozambique and Swaziland. Our share of Mozal’s FY2012 production was 264 kt.

 

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Information on Aluminium mining operations

The following table contains additional details of our mining operations. This table should be read in conjunction with the production (see section 2.3.2) and reserve tables (see section 2.13.2).

 

Mine & Location

 

Means of Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation
Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

Bauxite
Boddington bauxite mine                
Boddington, 123 km southeast of Perth, Western Australia   Public road
Ore transported to Worsley alumina refinery by a 62 km conveyor
 

BHP Billiton 86%

 

Sojitz Alumina

4%

Japan Alumina Associates 10%

 

Ownership structure of operator as per Worsley JV

  BHP Billiton Worsley, Alumina Pty Ltd  

Mining leases from Western Australia Government expire over the period 2014–2032, all with 21-year renewal available

 

2 sub-leases from Alcoa of Australia

 

Opened 1983

 

Significantly extended 2000

 

Open-cut

 

Surficial gibbsite-rich lateritic weathering of Darling Range rocks

  JV owned powerline connected to Worsley alumina refinery site   Crushing plant Nominal capacity: 19 mtpa bauxite
Mineração Rio do Norte                
Porto Trombetas, Pará, Brazil   Sealed road and rail connects mine area with Porto Trombetas village, accessed by air or river  

BHP Billiton 14.8%

 

Alcoa and affiliates 18.2%

Vale 40%

Rio Tinto Alcan 12%

Votorantim 10%

Hydro 5%

  MRN   Mining rights granted by Brazilian Government until reserves exhausted  

Production commenced

1979

 

Expanded 2003

 

Open-cut

 

Lateritic weathering of nepheline syenite occurring primarily as gibbsite in a clay matrix overlain by clay sediments

  On-site fuel oil generators  

Crushing facilities, long distance conveyors, wash plant

 

Nominal capacity: 18 mtpa washed bauxite

 

Village and airport

 

Drying and ship loading facilities near Porto Trombetas

 

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Information on Aluminium smelters and refineries

 

Smelter,

Refinery or

Processing

Plant

  

Location

  

Ownership

  

Operator

  

Title, Leases or

Options

  

Product

  

Nominal
Production
Capacity

  

Power Source

Aluminium and

alumina

                    
Hillside                     
Aluminium smelter    Richards Bay, 200 km north of Durban, KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa    100%    BHP Billiton   

Freehold title to property, plant, equipment

 

Leases over harbour facilities

   Standard aluminium ingots    715 ktpa primary aluminium   

Eskom (national power supplier) under long-term contracts

 

Contract prices for Hillside 1 and 2 linked to LME aluminium price Prices for Hillside 3 linked to SA and US producer price index

Bayside                     
Aluminium smelter   

Richards Bay, 200 km north of Durban,

South Africa

   100%    BHP Billiton    Freehold title to property, plant, equipment    Primary aluminium, slab products    95 ktpa primary aluminium on remaining Potline A   

Eskom, under long-term contract

 

Contract price linked to LME aluminium price

Mozal                     
Aluminium smelter    17 km from Maputo, Mozambique   

BHP Billiton 47.1%

 

Mitsubishi 25%

Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Ltd 24%

Mozambique Government 3.9%

   BHP Billiton    50-year government concession to use the land Renewable for 50 years    Standard aluminium ingots    563 ktpa    Motraco

Worsley

                    
Alumina refinery    55 km northeast of Bunbury, Western Australia   

BHP Billiton 86%

 

Sojitz Alumina 4%

Japan Alumina Associates 10%

 

Ownership structure of operator as per Worsley JV

   BHP Billiton Worsley Alumina Pty Ltd   

2,480 ha refinery lease from Western Australian Government Expires 2025

 

21-year renewal available

   Metallurgical grade alumina    4.6 mtpa    JV owned on-site coal power station, third party on-site gas-fired steam power generation plant

Alumar

                    
Alumina refinery and aluminium smelter    São Luis, Maranhão, Brazil   

Aluminium smelter: BHP Billiton 40%

Alcoa 60%

 

Alumina refinery: BHP Billiton 36%

 

Alcoa & affiliates 54%

Rio Tinto 10%

   Alcoa operates both facilities    All assets held freehold    Alumina and aluminium ingots   

Refinery: 3.5 mtpa alumina

 

Smelter: 450 ktpa primary aluminium

   Electronorte (Brazilian public power generation concessionaire), 20-year contract

 

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Development projects

Worsley Efficiency and Growth project

In May 2008, we announced the Board’s approval of an expansion project to increase the capacity of the Worsley refinery from 3.5 million tonnes per annum (mtpa) of alumina to 4.6 mtpa (100 per cent capacity) through expanded mining operations at Boddington, additional refinery capacity and upgraded port facilities. A supplementary approval of the development was obtained in June 2011. The expansion project, with a budgeted capital expenditure of US$3.0 billion, achieved first production in March 2012 and full production is on track to be achieved within the original ramp up schedule of 12–16 months from March 2012. The operations are well placed to achieve a smooth ramp-up due to the extensive commissioning and operating planning that has been put in place. Worsley is already one of the most efficient and productive alumina refineries in the world and its unit cash costs are expected to benefit from the increased scale of production.

Guinea Alumina

We have a one-third interest in a joint venture that has undertaken a feasibility study into the construction of a 10 mtpa bauxite mine, an alumina refinery with processing capacity exceeding 3.3 mtpa and associated infrastructure approximately 110 kilometres from the port of Kamsar in Guinea. We are seeking to exit the project.

2.2.4    Base Metals Customer Sector Group

Our Base Metals CSG is one of the world’s premier producers of copper, silver, lead and uranium, and a leading producer of zinc. Our portfolio of large, low-cost mining operations includes the Escondida mine in Chile, the world’s largest single producer of copper, and Olympic Dam in South Australia, already a major producer of copper and uranium with the potential for expansion.

Our total copper production in FY2012 was 1.1 Mt. In addition to conventional mine development, we continue to pursue advanced treatment technologies, such as leaching low-grade chalcopyrite ores, which we believe have the potential to recover copper from ores previously uneconomic to treat.

We market five primary products: copper concentrates, copper cathodes, uranium oxide, lead concentrates and zinc concentrates.

We sell most of our copper, lead and zinc concentrates to smelters under long-term volume contracts at prices based on the LME price for the contained metal, typically set three or four months after shipment, less treatment charges and refining charges (collectively referred to as ‘TCRCs’) that are negotiated with the smelters mostly on an annual or bi-annual basis. Some of the ores we mine contain quantities of silver and gold, which remain in the base metal concentrates we sell. We receive payment credits for the silver and gold recovered by our customers in the smelting and refining process.

We sell most of our copper cathode production to wire rod mills, brass mills and casting plants around the world under annual contracts with prices at premiums to LME prices. We sell uranium oxide to electricity generating utilities, principally in Western Europe, North America and North Asia. Uranium is typically sold under a mix of longer-term and shorter-term contracts. A significant portion of our uranium production is sold into fixed price contracts, although increasingly sales are based on flexible pricing terms.

We have six assets, with Pampa Norte having two operations.

Escondida

Our 57.5 per cent owned and operated Escondida mine is the largest producer in the world. In FY2012, our share of Escondida production was 333.8 kt of payable copper in concentrate and 172.0 kt of copper cathode.

 

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Escondida has a reserve life of 54 years. The increase in reserves from 35 years in FY2011 is predominantly due to OGP1 approval that will deliver double the current flotation capacity that allows improved recovery of lower grade ores with commensurate expansion of the reserves footprint.

The availability of key inputs like power and water at competitive prices is an important focus at Escondida. Escondida’s power demand of approximately 440 MW is currently covered by four contracts: one of which provides 340 MW until 2029; and the balance of which provide 252 MW until 2016.

To address limitations on the availability of water, we desalinate and carefully manage our use and re-use of available water. We are exploring alternative sources, including further desalination of seawater.

Olympic Dam

Olympic Dam is already a significant producer of copper cathode and uranium oxide and a refiner of smaller amounts of gold and silver bullion. We are exploring a series of staged development options that would make our wholly owned Olympic Dam operation one of the world’s largest producers of copper, the largest producer of uranium and a significant producer of gold (see Development projects below).

Production in FY2012 was lower than that achieved in FY2011. Olympic Dam produced 192.6 kt (FY2011: 194.1 kt) of copper cathode, 3.9 kt (FY2011: 4.0 kt) of uranium oxide, 117.8 kilo-ounces (FY2011: 111.4 kilo-ounces) of refined gold and 907 kilo-ounces (FY2011: 982 kilo-ounces) of refined silver in FY2012.

Olympic Dam has a reserve life of 57 years.

Antamina

We own 33.75 per cent of Antamina, a large, low-cost, long-life copper/zinc mine in Peru. Antamina has a reserve life of 16 years. Our share of Antamina’s FY2012 production was 127.0 kt of copper in concentrate, and 57.5 kt of zinc in concentrate. Antamina also produces smaller amounts of molybdenum and lead/bismuth concentrate.

Pampa Norte Spence Operation

Our wholly owned Spence copper mine produces copper cathode. During FY2012, we produced 180.3 kt of copper cathode.

Spence has a reserve life of 11 years.

Pampa Norte Cerro Colorado Operation

Our wholly owned Cerro Colorado mine in Chile remains a significant producer of copper cathode, although production levels have declined in recent years as grades have declined. Production in FY2012 was 83.4 kt of copper cathode.

Cerro Colorado has a reserve life of 10 years.

Cannington

Our wholly owned Cannington mine in northwest Queensland, Australia, is one of the world’s largest producers of silver. In FY2012, Cannington produced concentrates containing 239.1 kt of lead, 54.7 kt of zinc and approximately 34.2 million ounces of silver.

Cannington has a reserve life of eight years.

 

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North America – Pinto Valley

As a result of favourable economic conditions in FY2012, in particular copper prices, the decision was made to resume sulphide mining and milling operations at the Pinto Valley located in Arizona, United States. The mine, which will produce copper and molybdenum concentrate, is expected to have annual production capacity of approximately 60 kt of copper in concentrate. The project is expected to resume mining at the end of the CY2012 (FY2013).

Copper cathode will also continue to be produced at Pinto Valley and the neighbouring Miami Unit from residual solvent extraction electrowinning (SXEW) operations.

Pinto Valley has a reserve life of four years.

 

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Information on Base Metals mining operations

The following table contains additional details of our mining operations. This table should be read in conjunction with the production (see section 2.3.2) and reserve tables (see section 2.13.2).

 

Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

Copper

Escondida                
Atacama Desert, 170 km southeast of Antofagasta, Chile  

Public road

 

Copper cathode transported by privately owned rail to ports at Antofagasta and Mejillones

 

Copper concentrate transported by Escondida-owned pipeline to its Coloso port facilities

 

BHP Billiton 57.5% of Minera Escondida Limitada (MEL)

 

Rio Tinto 30% JECO Corporation consortium comprising Mitsubishi, Nippon Mining and Metals 10%
Jeco 2 Ltd 2.5%

  BHP Billiton   Mining concession from Chilean Government valid indefinitely (subject to payment of annual fees)  

Original construction completed 1990

 

Subsequent expansion projects cost US$3.0 billion (100%)

 

Sulphide Leach copper project cost US$1.0 billion (100%)

First production 2006

 

2 open-cut pits: Escondida and Escondida Norte

 

Escondida and Escondida Norte mineral deposits are adjacent but distinct supergene enriched porphyry copper deposits

 

Escondida owned transmission lines connect to Chile’s northern power grid

 

Electricity purchased under contract

 

2 concentrator plants extract copper concentrate from sulphide ore by flotation extraction process

 

2 solvent extraction plants produce copper cathode

 

Nominal capacity: 3.2 mtpa copper concentrate 330 ktpa copper cathode

               
Spence                
Atacama Desert, 150 km northeast of Antofagasta, Chile  

Public road

 

Copper cathode transported by rail to ports at Mejillones and Antofagasta

  100%   BHP Billiton   Mining concession from Chilean Government valid indefinitely (subject to payment of annual fees)  

Development cost of US$1.1 billion approved 2004

 

First copper produced 2006

 

Open-cut

 

Supergene enriched porphyry copper deposit that includes copper oxide ores overlying a sulphide zone

 

Group-owned transmission lines connect to Chile’s northern power grid

 

Electricity purchased under contract

 

Processing and crushing facilities, separate dynamic (on-off) leach pads, solvent extraction plant, electrowinning plant

 

Nominal capacity: 200 ktpa

               

 

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Table of Contents

Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &

Condition

Cerro Colorado                
Atacama Desert, 120 km east of Iquique, Chile  

Public road

 

Copper cathode trucked to port at Iquique

  100%   BHP Billiton   Mining concession from Chilean Government valid indefinitely (subject to payment of annual fees)  

Commercial production commenced 1994

 

Expansions 1996 and 1998

 

Open-cut

 

Supergene enriched and oxidised porphyry copper deposit that consists of a sulphide enrichment zone overlayed by oxide ore (chrysocolla and brochantite)

  Long-term contracts with northern Chile power grid  

2 primary, secondary and tertiary crushers, leaching pads, solvent extraction

plant, electrowinning plant

 

Nominal capacity: 120 ktpa

               
Pinto Valley                
125 km east of Phoenix, Arizona, US  

Public road

 

As a result of the resumption of the sulphide operations, copper and molybdenum concentrate to be trucked

  100%   BHP Billiton   Freehold title to the land  

Acquired 1996 as part of Magma Copper acquisition

 

Sulphide mining and milling operations discontinued 2009 to restart FY2013 (1)

 

Residual SXEW production continues

 

Pinto Valley: open-pit

 

Miami Unit: in-situ leach Porphyry copper deposit of low-grade primary mineralisation

  Salt River Project   2 SXEW operations at Pinto Valley and Miami
               

 

(1)        Mining operations previously discontinued in 1998 and restarted in 2007 and again discontinued in 2009.

 

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Table of Contents

Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

Copper Uranium

               

Olympic Dam

               
560 km northwest of Adelaide, South Australia  

Public road

 

Copper cathode trucked to ports. Uranium oxide transported by road to ports

  100%   BHP Billiton  

Mining lease granted by South Australian Government expires 2036

 

Right of extension for 50 years

 

Acquired 2005 as part of WMC acquisition

 

Copper production began 1988

 

Throughput raised to 9 mtpa in 1999 Optimisation project completed 2002

 

New copper solvent extraction plant commissioned 2004

 

Underground

 

Large poly-metallic deposit of iron oxide-copper-gold mineralisation

  Supplied via a 275 kV powerline from Port Augusta, transmitted by ElectraNet  

Automated train and trucking network. Crushing, storage and ore hoisting facilities.

 

2 grinding circuits to extract copper concentrate from sulphide ore.

 

Flash furnace produces copper anodes, which are then refined to produce copper cathodes (2)

 

Nominal capacity: 200 ktpa copper cathode

               

 

(2)        Electrowon copper cathode and uranium oxide concentrate produced by leaching and solvent extracting flotation tailings.

 

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Table of Contents

Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

Copper Zinc

Antamina

               
Andes mountain range, 270 km north of Lima, north-central Peru  

Public road

 

Copper and zinc concentrates transported by pipeline to port of Huarmey

 

Molybdenum and lead/bismuth concentrates transported by truck

 

BHP Billiton 33.75% of Compañía Minera Antamina

S.A.

 

Xstrata 33.75%

Teck Cominco 22.5%

Mitsubishi 10%

  Compañía Minera Antamina S.A.   Mining rights from Peruvian Government held indefinitely, subject to payment of annual fees and supply of information on investment and production  

Commercial production commenced 2001

 

Capital cost US$2.3 billion (100%)

 

Open-cut

 

Zoned porphyry and skarn deposit with central Cu-only ores and an outer band of

Cu-Zn ore

zone

  Long-term contracts with individual power producers  

Primary crusher, concentrator (nominal capacity 130,000 tpd), copper and zinc flotation circuits, bismuth/moly cleaning circuit

 

300 km concentrate pipeline (design throughput

2.3 dry mtpa)

 

Port facilities at Huarmey

               

Silver, Lead and Zinc

               
Cannington                

300 km southeast of Mt Isa, Queensland,

Australia

 

Public road and Group-owned airstrip

 

Product trucked to Yurbi, then by rail to public port

  100%   BHP Billiton   Mining leases granted by Queensland Government expire 2029   Concentrate production commenced 1997, subsequent projects improved mill throughput and metal recovery   Underground Broken Hill-type silver-lead-zinc sulphide deposit   On-site power station operated under contract  

Beneficiation plant: primary and secondary grinding circuits, pre-flotation circuits, flotation circuits, leaching circuits, concentrate filtration circuit, paste plant

 

Nominal milling capacity: 3.2 mtpa

               

 

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Development projects

Olympic Dam

The proposed expansion of Olympic Dam would be a progressive development requiring construction activity to increase production up to 750 kt per annum (ktpa) of copper, 19 ktpa of uranium oxide and 800 kilo-ounces of gold. On 10 October 2011, the South Australian Government and Australian Commonwealth Government approved the Environmental Impact Statement for the Olympic Dam Project.

We announced on 22 August 2012 that we will not approve the open-pit expansion of our Olympic Dam mine in South Australia in time to meet the Roxby Downs (Indenture Ratification) (Amendment of Indenture) Amendment Act 2011 deadline of 15 December 2012. We will investigate a less capital intensive design of the Olympic Dam open-pit expansion, involving new technologies to substantially improve the economics of the project.

Yeelirrie

On 27 August 2012, we announced we have signed an agreement to sell our wholly owned Yeelirrie uranium deposit in Western Australia to Cameco Corporation for US$430 million. The sale is subject to relevant approvals from the Australian Foreign Investment Review Board and Government of Western Australia.

Escondida

Exploration of the Escondida lease and early drilling results have resulted in an announcement of extensive additional mineralisation in close proximity to existing infrastructure and processing facilities, including the Pampa Escondida and Pinta Verde prospects. In FY2012, Escondida has expensed US$104.7 million (US$60.2 million BHP Billiton share) in exploration.

The Escondida Ore Access project provides access to higher-grade ore and commenced the execution phase during FY2011 with first production achieved during the June 2012 quarter. In addition, the Laguna Seca Debottlenecking project, which will provide additional processing capacity, commenced the execution phase in FY2011 and is expected to complete this phase during the second half of CY2012. Organic Growth Project 1 (OGP1), which is the replacement of the Los Colorados concentrator allowing access to higher-grade ore and additional processing capacity, was approved and moved into the execution phase in February 2012. OGP1 is expected to cost US$3.8 billion (US$2.2 billion BHP Billiton share). In February 2012, BHP Billiton also approved the Oxide Leach Area Project (OLAP), which creates a new dynamic leaching pad and mineral handling system that will include several overland conveyers. The new pad is expected to maintain oxide leaching capacity at current levels following the exhaustion of the existing heap leach in CY2014. OLAP is expected to cost US$721 million (US$414 million BHP Billiton share) with commissioning anticipated in the middle of CY2014.

Antamina

In FY2012, Antamina continued execution of the expansion project. With a total investment of US$1.3 billion (US$435 million BHP Billiton share), the project expands milling capacity by 38 per cent to 130 kt per day (ktpd). The expansion project includes a new SAG mill, a new 55-kilometre power transmission line, an expanded truck shop facility and upgrades to the crushing and tailing systems, flotation circuit and port capacity. Commissioning of the SAG mill and first production was achieved in March 2012. The project is more than 92 per cent complete.

Resolution Copper

We hold a 45 per cent interest in the Resolution Copper project in Arizona, United States, operated by Rio Tinto (55 per cent interest).

 

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Resolution Copper is undertaking a pre-feasibility study into a substantial underground copper mine and processing facility.

In FY2012, Resolution Copper continued to advance the sinking of the No. 10 Shaft in order to gain access to the ore deposit for characterisation work of mineralisation and geotechnical conditions.

Work also continued towards gaining approval from the US Congress for a Federal Land Exchange to access the ore deposit.

2.2.5    Diamonds and Specialty Products Customer Sector Group

Our Diamonds and Specialty Products CSG operates our diamonds business and engages in the exploration and development of a potash business. On 1 February 2012 we announced that we had exercised an option to sell our 37.8 per cent non-operated interest in Richards Bay Minerals to Rio Tinto and will exit the titanium minerals industry. On 7 September 2012, we announced the sale was complete.

Diamonds

Our diamonds business is comprised of the EKATI Diamond Mine in the Northwest Territories of Canada. EKATI has produced on average almost three million carats per year of rough diamonds over the last five years. The grade of ore we process fluctuates from year to year, resulting in variations in carats produced. In addition, the proportion of our production consisting of high-value carats (larger and/or higher-quality stones) and low-value carats (smaller and/or lower-quality stones) fluctuates from year to year. EKATI has a reserve life of three years.

Our interest in EKATI consists of an 80 per cent interest in the Core Zone Joint Venture, comprising existing operations and a 58.8 per cent interest in the Buffer Zone Joint Venture, primarily focusing on exploration targets.

Annual sales from EKATI (100 per cent terms) represented approximately two per cent of current world rough diamond supply by weight and approximately six per cent by value in FY2012. We sell most of our rough diamonds to international diamond buyers through our Antwerp sales office.

On 30 November 2011, we announced that we are reviewing our diamonds business, comprising our interests in the EKATI Diamond Mine and the Chidliak exploration project in Canada. This review is examining whether a continued presence in the diamonds industry is consistent with our strategy and evaluating the potential sale of all or part of the diamonds business. On 20 December 2011, we confirmed that we agreed to sell our 51 per cent interest in the Chidliak diamonds exploration project on Baffin Island, Canada, to our joint venture partner, Peregrine Diamonds Ltd.

Potash

Our potash strategy is to build a material industry position over the long term. We continue advancing the Jansen Project, a greenfield potash project in Saskatchewan, Canada. Jansen progressed into the feasibility study phase (an advanced stage of our project approvals process) in February 2011. Approved spending for Jansen is US$1.1 billion.

Jansen is designed ultimately to produce approximately eight mtpa of agricultural grade potash.

We are also continuing to study other potential projects in the Saskatchewan potash basin, including Young, Boulder and Melville, and are progressing these projects in the context of our development portfolio.

 

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We are conducting a potash exploration program, including 3D seismic survey and drilling programs. We have approved spending of almost US$2 billion (including Jansen and other acquisitions) in respect of developing our potash business. Our permit positions for potash extend over 14,500 square kilometres in the Saskatchewan basin.

Titanium minerals

Our principal interest in titanium minerals consists of our 37.8 per cent economic interest in Richards Bay Minerals (RBM). RBM is a major producer of titania slag, high-purity pig iron, rutile and zircon from mineral sands. Approximately 90 per cent of the titanium dioxide slag produced by RBM is suitable for the chloride process of titanium dioxide pigment manufacture and is sold internationally under a variety of short-, medium- and long-term contracts.

On 1 February 2012, we announced that we exercised an option to sell our non-operated interest in RBM to Rio Tinto and will exit the titanium minerals industry. On 7 September 2012, we announced the sale was complete. The sale price was US$1.9 billion before adjustments.

 

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Information on Diamonds and Specialty Products mining operations

The following table contains additional details of our mining operations. This table should be read in conjunction with the production (see section 2.3.2) and reserve tables (see section 2.13.2).

 

Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

Diamonds                
EKATI Diamond Mine                
310 km northeast of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada  

Aircraft

 

Ice road open approximately 10 weeks per year

 

Core Zone JV

BHP Billiton 80%

 

Buffer Zone JV BHP Billiton 58.8%

 

Remaining interest held by 2 individuals

  BHP Billiton   Mining leases granted by Canadian Government until 2022  

Production began1997

 

Mine and processing plant began operating 1998

 

Ownership increased with acquisition of Dia Met Minerals in 2001

 

Fox: open-cut

Koala and Koala North: underground

 

Eocene age kimberlite pipes – dominantly volcaniclastic infill

  JV owned and operated diesel power station  

Crushers, washers/scrubber and grinder and heavy media separator

 

Magnetics and X-ray sorters for diamond recovery

Fuel storage

Titanium minerals
Richards Bay Minerals                
10-50 km north of Richards Bay, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa  

Public road

 

Product transported by public rail to port

 

BHP Billiton 37.8% economic interest through 50% interest in the 2 legal entities that comprise RBM, Richards Bay Mining (Pty) Ltd and Richards Bay Titanium (Pty) Ltd

 

RBM functions as a single economic entity

  Rio Tinto   Long-term renewable mineral leases from South African Government subject to South African Mining Charter  

RBM formed 1976

 

Fifth mine added 2000

 

One mining plant decommissioned in 2008

 

Announced exercise of option to sell interest in RBM on 1 February 2012 and completion of the sale on 7 September 2012

 

Dune sand dredging

 

Quaternary age coastal dune deposits – heavy mineral sands concentrated by wave and wind action

  Eskom (national utility company)  

4 dune sand dredge mines, minor supplementary dry mining

 

Gravity separation produces heavy mineral concentrate which is trucked to central processing plant to produce rutile, zircon and ilmenite

 

Nominal titanium slag capacity (1) 1.05 mtpa

               

 

(1) 

Smelter processes ilmenite to produce titanium dioxide slag and high-purity iron.

 

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Development projects

Jansen Potash Project

On 24 June 2011, we approved US$488 million of pre-commitment spending to fund early-stage site preparation for surface construction, procurement of long lead time items and the first sections of the production and service shafts. On 30 June 2011, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment approved our Environmental Impact Statement for the development of the Jansen project.

We are currently executing a ground freezing program in which the ground will be frozen using a closed system of refrigeration pipes through which brine is circulated. Excavation of shafts is also under way with shaft collars completed and shaft sinking due to begin by the end of CY2012. Sinking headframes and hoists are also being installed. The eventual depth of the service and production shafts will be approximately one kilometre.

Diamonds

On 9 May 2011, we approved the Misery open-pit project at the EKATI Diamond Mine in the Northwest Territories of Canada. This project consists of a pushback of the existing Misery open-pit, which was mined from 2001 to 2005. Stripping operations began in September 2011, with ore production expected to begin in late 2015 and final production from Misery expected in mid-2017. The estimated capital expenditure required to complete the execution phase is US$323 million (BHP Billiton share).

2.2.6    Stainless Steel Materials Customer Sector Group

Our Stainless Steel Materials CSG is primarily a supplier of nickel to the stainless steel industry. Nickel is an important component of the most commonly used types of stainless steel. We also supply nickel to other markets, including the specialty alloy, foundry, chemicals and refractory material industries. We are the world’s fifth-largest producer of nickel and we sell our nickel products under a mix of long-term, medium-term and spot volume contracts, with prices linked to the LME nickel price.

Our nickel business comprises two Assets:

Nickel West

Nickel West is the name for our wholly owned Western Australian nickel Asset, which consists of an integrated system of mines, concentrators, a smelter and a refinery. We mine nickel-bearing sulphide ore at our Mt Keith, Leinster and Cliffs Operations north of Kalgoorlie. We operate concentrator plants at Mt Keith and at Leinster, which also concentrate ore from Cliffs. Leinster and Mt Keith have reserve lives of eight and 13 years, respectively, both have options for further expansion. The Mt Keith Talc Redesign project, which enables the processing of talc bearing ore, was successfully commissioned in December 2011. Cliffs is a high-grade underground mine with a reserve life of three years.

We also operate the Kambalda concentrator south of Kalgoorlie, where we source ore through tolling and concentrate purchase arrangements with third parties in the Kambalda region. We also have purchase agreements in place for the direct purchase of concentrate, which we re-pulp, dry and blend with other concentrate processed at Kambalda.

We transport concentrate from Leinster, Mt Keith and Kambalda to our Kalgoorlie smelter, where it is processed into nickel matte, containing approximately 67 per cent nickel. In FY2012, we exported approximately 48 per cent of our nickel matte production. We processed the remaining nickel matte at our Kwinana nickel refinery, which produces nickel metal in the form of LME grade briquettes, and nickel powder together with a range of saleable by-products.

Nickel West production in FY2012 was 109 kt of contained nickel.

 

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During FY2012 the Nickel West Kwinana hydrogen plant was successfully commissioned, following a restriction in hydrogen supply which impacted production of nickel metal from the Kwinana nickel refinery.

Cerro Matoso

Cerro Matoso, our 99.94 per cent owned nickel Asset in Colombia, combines a lateritic nickel ore deposit with a ferronickel smelter. Cerro Matoso is the world’s second-largest producer of ferronickel and is one of the lowest-cost producers of ferronickel. The smelter produces high-purity, low-carbon ferronickel granules. Cerro Matoso has an estimated current reserve life of 32 years. Production in FY2012 was 48.9 kt of nickel in ferronickel form following the successful early completion of the planned furnace replacement.

Cerro Matoso operates under mining concessions that are due to expire on 30 September 2012 and has applied, in accordance with the law and its contracts, for an extension of these mining concessions. If this extension is not granted, Cerro Matoso has an underlying agreement with the Colombian Government that grants it the rights to continue mining and producing through to 2029 under a mining arrangement, with a further extension of 15 years possible.

 

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Information on Stainless Steel Materials mining operations

The following table contains additional details of our mining operations. This table should be read in conjunction with the production (see section 2.3.2) and reserve tables (see section 2.13.2).

 

Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &

Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

Nickel

               

Mt Keith

               
Western Australia  

Private road

 

Nickel concentrate transported by road to Leinster nickel operations for drying and on-shipping

  100%   BHP Billiton  

Leases over the land from Western Australian Government

 

Key leases expire 2013 – 2033

 

Renewals at government discretion

 

Officially commissioned 1995 by WMC

 

Mt Keith was acquired as part of acquisition of WMC in 2005

 

Open-cut

 

Disseminated textured magmatic nickel-sulphide mineralisation, associated with a metamorphosed ultramafic intrusion

 

On-site third party gas-fired turbines

 

Natural gas sourced and transported under separate long-term contracts

  Concentration plant with a nominal capacity: 11.5 mtpa of ore
               

Leinster

               
Western Australia  

Public road

 

Nickel concentrate shipped by road and rail to Kalgoorlie nickel smelter

  100%   BHP Billiton  

Leases over the land from Western Australian Government

 

Key leases expire 2013 – 2031

 

Renewals at government discretion

 

Production commenced 1979

 

Leinster was acquired as part of acquisition of WMC in 2005

 

Underground and open-cut

 

Steeply dipping disseminated and massive textured nickel-sulphide mineralisation, associated with metamorphosed ultramafic lava flows and intrusions

 

On-site third party gas-fired turbines

 

Natural gas sourced and transported under separate long-term contracts

  Concentration plant with a nominal capacity: 3 mtpa of ore

Cliffs

               
Western Australia  

Private road

 

Nickel ore transported by road to Leinster nickel operations for further processing

  100%   BHP Billiton  

Leases over the land from Western Australian Government Key leases expire 2025 – 2028

 

Renewals at government discretion

 

Production commenced 2008

 

Cliffs was acquired as part of acquisition of WMC in 2005

 

Underground

 

Steeply dipping massive textured nickel-sulphide mineralisation, associated with metamorphosed ultramafic lava flows

  Supplied from Mt Keith   Mine site

 

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Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &

Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

Cerro Matoso

               
Montelibano, Córdoba, Colombia   Public road  

BHP Billiton 99.94%

Employees and former employees 0.06%

  BHP Billiton  

Existing mining concessions either renewable as of 1 October 2012 with 30-year extension until 2042 or, in absence of extension, to be automatically incorporated on 1 October 2012 into a larger area mining lease with a term until 2029

with the possibility of an extension for a further 15 years

 

Mining commenced 1980

Nickel production started 1982

Ownership increased to 53% in 1989 and to 99.94% in 2007

Expansion project to double installed capacity completed 2001

 

Open-cut

 

Nickel-laterite mineralisation formed from residual weathering of ophiolitic peridotite

 

National electricity grid under contracts expiring December 2014

 

Domestic natural gas for drier and kiln operation supplied by pipeline from national grid

 

Gas supply contracts expiring December 2021

 

Ferronickel smelter and refinery integrated with the mine

 

Beneficiation plant: primary and secondary crusher

 

Nominal capacity: 50 ktpa of nickel in ferronickel form

 

Actual capacity depends on nickel grade from the mine

 

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Information on Stainless Steel Materials smelters, refineries and processing plants

 

Smelter, Refinery or
Processing Plant

 

Location

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or Options

 

Product

 

Nominal Production
Capacity

 

Power source

Nickel

Kambalda

             
Nickel concentrator   56 km south of Kalgoorlie, Western Australia   100%   BHP Billiton  

Mineral leases over the land from Western Australian Government expire 2028

 

Renewals at government discretion

  Concentrate containing approximately 14% nickel  

1.6 mtpa ore

 

Ore sourced through tolling and concentrate purchase arrangements with third parties in Kambalda region

 

On-site third party gas-fired turbines

 

Natural gas sourced and transported under separate long-term contracts

             

Kalgoorlie

             
Nickel smelter   Kalgoorlie, Western Australia   100%   BHP Billiton   Freehold title over the property   Matte containing approximately 67% nickel   110 ktpa nickel matte  

On-site third party gas-fired turbines

 

Natural gas sourced and transported under separate long-term contracts

Kwinana

             
Nickel refinery   30 km south of Perth, Western Australia   100%   BHP Billiton   Freehold title over the property  

LME grade nickel briquettes, nickel powder

 

Also intermediate products, including copper sulphide, cobalt-nickel-sulphide, ammonium-sulphate

  65 ktpa nickel metal   A combination of power generated by Southern Cross Energy and distributed via Western Power’s network and power sourced from other generators on the Western Power network

 

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Development projects

Cerro Matoso expansion options

Cerro Matoso has undertaken conceptual studies on options for expanding production. A feasibility study is in progress for the Cerro Matoso Heap Leach project.

2.2.7    Iron Ore Customer Sector Group

Our Iron Ore CSG consists of our Western Australia Iron Ore (WAIO) interests and a 50 per cent interest in the Samarco Joint Venture in Brazil. We are one of the leading iron ore producers in the world. We sell lump and fines product produced in Australia and pellets from our operations in Brazil.

Western Australia Iron Ore

WAIO’s operations involve a complex integrated system of mines and more than 1,000 kilometres of rail infrastructure and port facilities in the Pilbara region of northern Western Australia. Our strategy is to maximise output utilising available infrastructure at our disposal.

Our WAIO operations consist of three joint ventures: Mt Newman, Yandi and Mt Goldsworthy, and our 100 per cent interest in Jimblebar. Our interest in these joint ventures is 85 per cent. Mitsui and ITOCHU own the remaining 15 per cent. Along with the other joint venture participants, we have entered into marketing agreements in the form of joint ventures with certain customers. These joint ventures, JW4, Wheelarra and POSMAC, involve subleases of part of WAIO’s existing mineral leases whereby ore is sold to the existing joint ventures with contractual terms applying to the customers’ share. As a consequence, we are entitled to 85 per cent of production from these subleases and the customer joint ventures are accounted for as marketing arrangements rather than as jointly controlled assets.

We have been expanding our WAIO operations in response to increasing demand for iron ore. Since 2001, we have completed six expansion projects to increase our system production capacity from 69 mtpa to 190 mtpa (100 per cent basis). Our share of FY2012 production was 148.1 Mt of ore. We now have additional projects in various stages of the project life cycle (including construction) to further increase system capacity (see Development projects below).

Our Pilbara reserve base is relatively concentrated, allowing us to plan our development around a series of integrated ‘mining hubs’ joined to the orebodies by conveyors or spur lines. This approach enables us to maximise the value of installed infrastructure by using the same processing plant and rail infrastructure for a number of orebodies. Blending ore at the hub gives us greater flexibility to respond to changing customer requirements as well as changing properties in the ore being mined and reduces the risk of port bottlenecks.

The reserve lives of our mines range from 14 years at Yandi to 44 years at Jimblebar.

Acquisition of HWE Mining Subsidiaries

On 30 September 2011, BHP Billiton completed its acquisition of HWE Mining Subsidiaries from Leighton Holdings. The acquisition relates to the mining equipment, people and related assets that service the Area C, Yandi and Orebody 23 and 25 Operations. These operations collectively account for almost 70 per cent of WAIO’s total material movement. The amount paid was US$710 million (A$725 million) representing purchase consideration of US$449 million and settlement of pre-existing obligations of US$241 million and US$20 million for transitional services to be provided post acquisition.

 

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Samarco

We are a 50 – 50 joint venture partner with Vale at the Samarco Operation in Brazil. Samarco is currently comprised of a mine and two concentrators located in the State of Minas Gerais, and three pellet plants and a port located in the State of Espirito Santo. Two 396 kilometre pipelines connect the mine site to the pelletising facilities.

In FY2012, our share of production was 10.7 Mt of pellets. Samarco’s total ore reserve is about 2.1 billion tonnes.

 

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Information on Iron Ore mining operations

The following table contains additional details of our mining operations. This table should be read in conjunction with the production (see section 2.3.2) and reserve tables (see section 2.13.2).

 

Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

Iron ore

Mt Newman JV                

Pilbara region, Western Australia

 

Mt Whaleback Orebodies 18, 23, 25, 29 and 30

 

Private road

 

Iron ore shipped by Mt Newman JV owned rail to JV’s Nelson Point shipping facilities and Mt Goldsworthy JV’s Finucane Island shipping facilities, Port Hedland

 

BHP Billiton 85%

 

Mitsui ITOCHU Iron 10% ITOCHU Minerals and Energy of Australia 5%

 

BHP Billiton: Mt Whaleback Orebodies 29 and 30 Orebodies 23 and 25 (since October 2011)

 

Independent contractors: Orebody 18 Orebodies 23 and 25 (until October 2011)

  Mining lease under the Iron Ore (Mt Newman) Agreement Act 1964 expires 2030 with right to successive renewals of 21 years  

Production began Mt Whaleback orebody 1969

 

Production from orebodies 18, 23, 25, 29 and 30 complements production from Mt Whaleback

 

First ore from Newman Hub as part of RGP4 construction delivered 2009

 

Open-cut

 

Bedded ore types classified as per host Archaean or Proterozoic iron formation, which are Brockman, Marra Mamba and Nimingarra

  Alinta Dewap’s Newman gas-fired power station via Mt Newman JV owned power lines  

Newman Hub: primary and secondary crushing and screening plants (nominal capacity 53 mtpa); heavy media beneficiation plant, stockyard blending facility, single cell rotary car dumper, train-loading facility

 

Orebody 23/25: primary and secondary crushing and screening plant (nominal capacity 10 mtpa)

               

Yandi JV

               
Pilbara region, Western Australia  

Private Road

 

Iron ore shipped by JV owned rail to Finucane Island and Nelson Point shipping facilities, Port Hedland

 

Our railway spur links Yandi mine to Newman main line

 

BHP Billiton 85%

 

Mitsui Iron Ore Corporation 7% ITOCHU Minerals and Energy of Australia 8%

 

BHP Billiton (since October 2011)

 

Previously operated by independent contractors

  Mining lease under the Iron Ore (Marillana Creek) Agreement Act 1991 expires 2033 with one renewal right to a further 21 years  

Development began 1991

 

First shipment 1992

 

Capacity expanded between 1994 – 2011

 

Open-cut

 

Channel Iron Deposits are Cainozoic fluvial sediments

  Alinta Dewap’s Newman gas-fired power station via Mt Newman JV owned power lines  

Three processing plants, primary crusher and overland conveyor (normal capacity 75 mtpa)

Ore delivered to two train-loading facilities

               

 

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Table of Contents

Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

JW4 JV

               
Pilbara region, Western Australia  

Private road

 

Iron ore on-sold to Yandi JV, then transported via rail to Finucane Island and Nelson Point shipping facilities, Port Hedland

 

BHP Billiton 68%

 

ITOCHU Minerals and Energy of Australia 6.4%, Mitsui Iron Ore Corporation 5.6%,

 

JFE Steel Australia 20%

 

Sublease agreement over JW4 deposit

 

BHP Billiton (since October 2011)

 

Previously operated by independent contractors

  Sublease from Yandi JV, with mining lease under the Iron Ore (Marillana Creek) Agreement Act 1991 expires 2033 with one renewal right for a further 21 years  

Operations began April 2006

 

Ore currently being produced is sold to Yandi JV and blended with Yandi ore

 

Open-cut

 

Channel Iron Deposits are Cainozoic fluvial sediments

  Alinta Dewap’s Newman gas-fired power station via Mt Newman JV owned power lines   Mine site
               
Jimblebar                
Pilbara region, Western Australia   Private road   BHP Billiton 100% of the Jimblebar lease   New mine is currently under construction which BHP Billiton will operate   Mining lease under the Iron Ore (McCamey’s Monster) Agreement Authorisation Act 1972 expires 2030 with rights to successive renewals of 21 years  

Production at Jimblebar began in March 1989

 

From 2004, production was transferred to Wheelarra as part of the Wheelarra sublease agreement

 

Open-cut

 

Bedded ore types classified as per host Archaean or Proterozoic banded iron formation, which are Brockman and Marra Mamba

  Alinta Dewap’s Newman gas-fired power station via Mt Newman JV owned power lines   Primary and secondary crusher are in the commissioning phase (nominal capacity 35 mtpa at full capacity in FY2014)
               

 

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Table of Contents

Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

Wheelarra                
Pilbara region, Western Australia  

Private road

 

Iron ore shipped by Mt Newman JV owned rail to Port Hedland via 32 km spur line linking to Newman main line

 

BHP Billiton 51%

 

ITOCHU Minerals and Energy of Australia 4.8%, Mitsui Iron Ore Corporation 4.2%, Maanshan Iron & Steel Australia 10%, Shagang Australia 10%, Hebei Iron & Steel Australia 10%,

Wugang Australia 10%

Sublease agreement over Wheelarra deposit

 

Operated by

independent

contractors

 

Sublease agreement over the Wheelarra deposit of Jimblebar lease with ITOCHU Minerals and Energy of Australia, Mitsui Iron Ore and four separate subsidiaries of Chinese Steelmakers

As a consequence of this arrangement, we are entitled to 85% of the production from the Wheelarra sublease consistent with BHP Billiton ownership in Mt Newman JV

 

Wheelarra JV produces iron ore from Wheelarra deposit of Jimblebar lease.

 

Ore currently being produced is sold to Mt Newman JV and blended with ore produced from Mt Whaleback and satellite orebodies 18, 23 and 25 to create Mt Newman blend

 

Open-cut

 

Bedded ore types classified as per host Archaean or Proterozoic banded iron formation, which are Brockman and Marra Mamba

  Alinta Dewap’s Newman gas-fired power station via Mt Newman JV owned power lines   Primary crushing plant (nominal capacity 14.5 mtpa)
               
Mt Goldsworthy JV                

Pilbara region, Western Australia

 

Area C Yarrie
Nimingarra

 

Private road

 

Iron ore shipped by Mt Goldsworthy JV owned rail to JV’s Finucane Island and Mt Newman JV’s Nelson Point shipping facilities, Port Hedland

 

Goldsworthy JV railway spur links Area C mine to Newman main line

 

BHP Billiton 85%

 

Mitsui Iron Ore Corporation 7% and ITOCHU Minerals and Energy of Australia 8%

 

BHP Billiton (since October 2011)

 

Previously operated by independent contractors

 

4 mineral leases under the Iron Ore (Mt Goldsworthy) Agreement Act 1964 and the Iron Ore (Goldsworthy –Nimingarra) Agreement Act 1972, expire between 2014 and 2028, with rights to successive renewals of 21 years

 

A number of smaller mining leases granted under the Mining Act 1978 expire in 2026

 

Operations commenced Mt Goldsworthy 1966, at Shay Gap 1973

 

Original Goldsworthy mine closed 1982

 

Associated Shay Gap mine closed 1993

 

Mining at Nimingarra mine ceased 2007, has since continued from adjacent Yarrie area

 

Opened Area C mine in 2003

 

Open-cut mine includes Area C, Yarrie and Nimingarra

 

Bedded ore types classified as per host Archaean or Proterozoic iron formation, which are Brockman, Marra Mamba and Nimingarra

 

Yarrie and Nimingarra: Alinta Dewap’s Port Hedland gas-fired power station under long-term contracts

 

Area C: Alinta Dewap’s Port Newman gas-fired power station under long-term contracts

 

Area C: ore processing plant, primary crusher and overland conveyor

(nominal capacity: 50 mtpa)

 

Yarrie: mobile in-pit crushing plant (nominal capacity: 2 mtpa)

 

Primary crushers at Yarrie and Nimingarra in care and maintenance

               

 

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Table of Contents

Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

POSMAC JV                
Pilbara Region, Western Australia  

Private Road

 

Iron ore on-sold to Goldsworthy JV, it is then transported via Goldsworthy-owned rail to JV’s Finucane Island and Nelson Point shipping facilities, Port Hedland

 

BHP Billiton 65%

 

ITOCHU Minerals and Energy of Australia 8%, Mitsui Iron Ore Corporation 7%,

POSCO 20%

Sublease agreement over POSMAC deposit

 

BHP Billiton (since October 2011)

 

Previously operated by independent contractors

  Sublease over part of the mineral lease held by Mt Goldsworthy JV under the Iron Ore (Mt Goldsworthy) Agreement Act 1964 with rights to successive renewals of 21 years  

Operations commenced October 2003

 

The ore currently being produced is sold to the Goldsworthy JV and blended with Area C ore

 

Open-cut

 

Bedded ore types classified as per host Archaean or Proterozoic iron formation, which are Brockman, Marra Mamba and Nimingarra

  Alinta Dewap’s Newman gas-fired power station under long-term contracts   Mine site
               

Samarco

               
Southeast Brazil  

Public road

 

Conveyor belts transport iron ore to beneficiation plant

 

Two slurry pipelines transport concentrate to pellet plants on coast

 

Iron pellets exported via port facilities

 

BHP Billiton 50%

 

Vale 50%

  Samarco   Mining concessions granted by Brazilian Government as long as Alegria complex mined according to agreed plan  

Production began at Germano mine 1977, at Alegria complex 1992

 

Two expansions completed with a second pellet plant built in 1997 and a third pellet plant, second concentrator and second pipeline built in 2008

 

In April 2011, Samarco’s shareholders approved the fourth pellet plant

 

Open-cut

 

Itabirites (metamorphic quartz-hematite rock) and friable hematite ores

 

Samarco holds interests in 2 hydroelectric power plants which supply 18% of its electricity

 

Additional power is acquired in the market

Contracts will expire by the end of 2014 and their extension is under negotiation

  Facilities with capacity to process and pump 24 mtpa ore concentrate and produce and ship 22.2 mtpa pellets (100% basis)
               

 

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Development projects

Western Australia Iron Ore

In March 2011, we announced approval of an additional US$7.4 billion (BHP Billiton share US$6.6 billion) of capital expenditure to continue production growth in our WAIO operations. This investment is the final approval of projects initiated in 2010, with pre-commitment funding of US$2.3 billion (BHP Billiton share US$2.1 billion). It is expected to deliver an integrated operation with a minimum capacity of 220 mtpa (100 per cent basis), with first production expected from Jimblebar early in CY2014.

This additional investment includes:

 

 

US$3.4 billion (BHP Billiton share US$3.3 billion) to develop the Jimblebar mine and rail links, and procure mining equipment and rolling stock to deliver an initial capacity of 35 mtpa, expandable to 55 mtpa. Work on this project was 34 per cent complete as at 30 June 2012;

 

 

US$2.3 billion (BHP Billiton share US$1.9 billion) to further develop Port Hedland, including two additional berths and shiploaders, a car dumper, connecting conveyor routes and associated rail works and rolling stock. Work on this project was 59 per cent complete as at 30 June 2012;

 

 

US$1.7 billion (BHP Billiton share US$1.4 billion) for port blending facilities and rail yards to enable ore blending, expand resource life and establish options for future growth of the business beyond the Inner Harbour. Work on this project was 22 per cent complete as at 30 June 2012.

Western Australia Iron Ore – Dual Harbour Strategy

In February 2012, we announced approval of US$917 million (BHP Billiton share US$779 million) in pre-commitment funding for the construction of an Outer Harbour facility associated with our WAIO operations.

On 24 August 2012, we announced that the Western Australia Minister for Transport and Port Hedland Port Authority has granted WAIO the right, subject to the State approvals processes, to develop two additional berths in the Inner Harbour. We also announced work on the Outer Harbour Development has been slowed while our focus has shifted to maximising our potential capacity from the Inner Harbour. Development of the Outer Harbour remains attractive in the long term.

Western Australia Iron Ore – Orebody 24 mine

In November 2011, we announced approval of a US$822 million (BHP Billiton share US$698 million) investment for the development of the Orebody 24 mine, located approximately 10 kilometres northeast of Newman, Western Australia, Orebody 24 is a sustaining mine to maintain iron ore production output from the Mt Newman JV operations. Orebody 24 is expected to have a capacity of 17 mtpa and will include the construction of an ore crushing plant, train loadout facility, rail spur and other associated support facilities. Initial mining is expected to begin in the second half of CY2012.

Samarco

During FY2011, Samarco shareholders approved a US$3.5 billion (BHP Billiton share US$1.75 billion) expansion project consisting of a fourth pellet plant, a new concentrator and a third slurry pipeline. The project is expected to expand Samarco’s iron ore pellet production capacity from 22.2 mtpa to 30.5 mtpa. First pellet production is expected in the first half of CY2014.

West Africa

We are carrying out exploration activities in Guinea and Liberia, West Africa.

 

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Guinea Iron Ore

BHP Billiton currently has a 41.3 per cent interest in a joint venture that holds the Nimba Mining Concession and four iron ore prospecting permits in southeast Guinea. The joint venture is undertaking a pre-feasibility study for the development of the Concession and associated transport infrastructure. Once developed, it is envisaged that the mine will deliver a high-grade direct shipping ore to market.

Liberia Iron Ore

BHP Billiton currently has a 100 per cent interest in a Mineral Development Agreement with the Government of Liberia. This enables the further exploration and development of our Liberian iron ore mineral leases, each of which are proximate to existing rail and port infrastructure. Exploration and development of these leases continues, with drilling conducted on select targets.

2.2.8    Manganese Customer Sector Group

Our Manganese CSG produces a combination of ores and alloys from sites in South Africa and Australia. We are the world’s largest producer of manganese ore and one of the top global producers of manganese alloy. Manganese alloy is a key input into the steelmaking process. Manganese high-grade ore is particularly valuable to alloy producers because of the value in use differential over low-grade ore, which is the degree to which high-grade ore is proportionately more efficient than low-grade ore in the alloying process.

Our strategy is to focus on upstream resource businesses. Manganese alloy smelters are a key conduit of manganese units into steelmaking and enable us to access markets with an optimal mix of ore and alloy, optimise production to best suit market conditions and give us technical insight into the performance of our ores in smelters.

Approximately 80 per cent of ore production is sold directly to external customers and the remainder is used as feedstock in our alloy smelters.

We own and manage all manganese mining operations and alloy plants through joint ventures with Anglo American. We own 60 per cent of the joint ventures. Our joint venture interests are held through Samancor Manganese, which operates our global Manganese assets. In South Africa, Samancor Manganese (Pty) Ltd owns 74 per cent of Hotazel Manganese Mines (Pty) Ltd (HMM) and 100 per cent of the Metalloys division. This gives BHP Billiton an effective interest of 44.4 per cent in HMM and 60 per cent in Metalloys. The remaining 26 per cent of HMM is owned under the terms of South African Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) legislation, which reflects our commitment to economic transformation in South Africa. In Australia, we own 60 per cent of Groote Eylandt Mining Company Pty Ltd (GEMCO) and we have an effective interest of 60 per cent in Tasmanian Electro Metallurgical Company Pty Ltd (TEMCO) through GEMCO, which owns 100 per cent of TEMCO.

In response to challenging market conditions in the manganese alloy industry, we announced the temporary suspension of production at TEMCO, Australia, and the cessation of production of energy-intensive silicomanganese at the Metalloys South plant, South Africa, during the March 2012 quarter. After extensive stakeholder consultation and the identification of significant cost reduction opportunities, in May 2012, we announced our decision to restart TEMCO, which is currently in progress and planned to complete in CY2012.

Mines

HMM

HMM owns the Mamatwan open-cut mine and the Wessels underground mine. Manganese high-grade ore is particularly valuable to alloy producers because of the ‘value in use differential’ over low-grade ore, which is the

 

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degree to which high-grade ore is proportionately more efficient than low-grade ore in the alloying process. The ore from these mines only requires crushing and screening to create saleable product. In FY2012, the total manganese ore production was 3,625 kt, 21 per cent higher than FY2011 production. Wessels has a reserve life of 46 years and Mamatwan has a reserve life of 21 years.

GEMCO

As a result of its location near our port facilities and its simple, open-cut mining operation, GEMCO is one of the world’s lowest-cost manganese ore producers. These simple operations, combined with its high-grade ore and relative proximity to Asian export markets, make GEMCO unique among the world’s manganese mines. FY2012 production of manganese ore was 4,306 kt, five per cent higher than FY2011 production. GEMCO has a reserve life of 12 years.

Alloy Plants

Metalloys

The Samancor Manganese Metalloys alloy plant is one of the largest manganese alloy producers in the world. Due to its size and access to high-quality feedstock from Hotazel operations, it is also one of the lowest-cost alloy producers of medium-carbon ferromanganese. Metalloys only produces high- and medium-carbon ferromanganese, after silicomanganese production ceased due to the permanent closure of the energy intensive Metalloys South plant in January 2012. The annual production capacity of silicomanganese was 120 ktpa.

TEMCO

TEMCO is a medium-sized producer of high-carbon ferromanganese, silicomanganese and sinter using ore shipped from GEMCO, primarily using hydroelectric power.

 

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Information on Manganese mining operations

The following table contains additional details of our mining operations. These tables should be read in conjunction with the production (see section 2.3.2) and reserve tables (see section 2.13.2).

 

Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &

Condition

Manganese ore
Hotazel Manganese Mines (Pty) Ltd (HMM)                

Kalahari Basin, South Africa

 

Mamatwan and

Wessels mines

 

Public road

 

Most ore and sinter products transported by rail

Approximately 33% of ore beneficiated locally, balance exported via Port Elizabeth, Richards Bay, Durban

 

BHP Billiton

44.4%

 

Anglo American 29.6%

Ntsimbintle 9%

NCAB 7%

Iziko 5% HMM Education Trust 5%

  BHP Billiton   Existing New Order Rights valid until 2035  

Mamatwan commissioned 1964

 

Wessels commissioned 1973

 

Mamatwan: open-cut

 

Wessels: underground

 

Banded Iron Manganese ore type

 

Eskom

(national power supplier)

 

Mamatwan beneficiation plant: primary, secondary and tertiary crushing with associated screening plants

 

Dense medium separator and sinter plant (capacity 1 mtpa sinter) (1)

 

Wessels: primary and secondary crushing circuits with associated screening (1)

               

 

(1)        Capacity: Mamatwan – approximately 3.5 mtpa of ore; Wessels – approximately 1 mtpa of ore.

Groote Eylandt Mining Company Pty Ltd (GEMCO)                
Groote Eylandt, Northern Territory, Australia   Ore transported from concentrator by road train to port at Milner Bay  

BHP Billiton 60%

 

Anglo American 40%

  BHP Billiton   All leases on Aboriginal land held under Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 Valid until 2031   Commissioned 1965  

Open-cut

 

Sandstone claystone sedimentary Manganese ore type

  On-site diesel power generation  

Beneficiation process: crushing, screening, washing and dense media separation

 

Produces lump and fines products Capacity: 4.2 wet mtpa

               

 

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Information on Manganese smelters, refineries and processing plants

 

Smelter, Refinery or

Processing Plant

 

Location

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or Options

 

Product

 

Nominal Production
Capacity

 

Power source

Manganese alloy
Metalloys              

Manganese alloy plant

(division of Samancor Manganese (Pty) Ltd)

  Meyerton, South Africa  

BHP Billiton 60%

 

Anglo American 40%

  BHP Billiton   Freehold title over property, plant and equipment   Manganese alloys including high-carbon ferromanganese, refined (medium-carbon ferromanganese) alloy   400 ktpa high-carbon ferromanganese (including hot metal) 90 ktpa medium-carbon ferromanganese  

Eskom

 

30 MW of internal power generated from furnace off-gases

             
             
Tasmanian Electro Metallurgical Company Pty Ltd (TEMCO)              
Manganese alloy plant   Bell Bay, Tasmania, Australia  

BHP Billiton 60%

 

Anglo American 40%

  BHP Billiton   Freehold title over property, plant and equipment   Ferroalloys, including high-carbon ferromanganese, silicomanganese and sinter   130 ktpa high-carbon ferromanganese 125 ktpa silicomanganese 350 ktpa sinter   Aurora Energy On-site energy recovery unit generates 11 MW for internal use

 

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Development projects

GEMCO expansion

The partners in Samancor Manganese approved the second expansion of the GEMCO Operation in the Northern Territory of Australia in July 2011. This follows the successful commissioning of the GEMCO expansion phase 1 (GEEP1) project in April 2009. The US$279 million GEEP2 project (BHP Billiton share US$167 million) has commenced and will increase GEMCO’s beneficiated product capacity from 4.2 mtpa to 4.8 mtpa through the introduction of a dense media circuit by-pass facility. The project is expected to be completed in late CY2013. The expansion will also address infrastructure constraints by increasing road and port capacity to 5.9 mtpa, creating 1.1 mtpa of additional capacity for future expansions.

HMM

Due to subsurface challenges experienced, which impacted progress and budget, the central block development project at Wessels was re-phased. The US$92 million Phase 1 project will be completed in FY2014. It will comprise the construction of the ventilation shaft and development of the associated underground ventilation network. Phase 2 of the project is in the feasibility phase and will comprise the completion of the underground crusher and mobile workshops. Upon completion of Phases 1 and 2, the Wessels mine capacity will increase from 1 mtpa to 1.5 mtpa.

Metalloys

The High-Carbon Ferromanganese (HCFeMn) furnace M14 at the Metalloys West Plant was approved for execution in November 2010 with a total approved investment of US$91 million (US$54.6 million BHP Billiton share). This furnace will add an additional 130 ktpa capacity (100 per cent or about 78 ktpa BHP Billiton share) of HCFeMn and replace the closed South Plant silicomanganese (capacity of 120 ktpa), to take Metalloys capacity to 500 ktpa. The M14 furnace will contribute to power efficiency at the Metalloys site as it will add to the site’s own generation capacity utilising the furnace off-gases. Completion of the furnace is expected during FY2013.

Samancor Gabon Manganese project

A feasibility study for the establishment of a new 300 ktpa mine in Franceville, Gabon, commenced in July 2010. The project has experienced delays in concluding key agreements and has been placed under review.

2.2.9    Metallurgical Coal Customer Sector Group

Our Metallurgical Coal CSG is the world’s largest supplier of seaborne metallurgical coal. Metallurgical coal, along with iron ore and manganese, is a key input in the production of steel.

Our export customers are steel producers around the world. In FY2012, most of our contracts were annual or long-term volume contracts with prices largely negotiated on a quarterly or monthly basis.

We have assets in two major resource basins: the Bowen Basin in Central Queensland, Australia, and the Illawarra region of New South Wales, Australia.

Bowen Basin

The Bowen Basin is well positioned to supply the seaborne market because of its high-quality metallurgical coals, which are ideally suited to efficient blast furnace operations, and its geographical proximity to Asian customers.

 

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We also have access to key infrastructure, including a modern, integrated electric rail network and our own coal loading terminal at Hay Point, Mackay. This infrastructure enables us to maximise throughput and blending of products from multiple mines to optimise the value of our production and satisfy customer requirements.

Our Bowen Basin mines are owned through a series of joint ventures. We share 50–50 ownership with Mitsubishi Development Pty Ltd in BHP Billiton Mitsubishi Alliance (BMA), which operates the Goonyella Riverside, Broadmeadow, Peak Downs, Saraji, Norwich Park (production ceased), Blackwater and Gregory Crinum mines, together with the Hay Point Coal terminal through the Central Queensland Coal Associates (CQCA) joint venture and the Gregory joint venture. Our BHP Billiton Mitsui Coal (BMC) asset operates South Walker Creek and Poitrel mines. BMC is owned by BHP Billiton (80 per cent) and Mitsui and Co (20 per cent).

The reserve lives of our mines range from four years at Gregory Crinum to 40 years at Saraji. Total attributable production in FY2012 was approximately 25.3 Mt compared with 25.7 Mt in FY2011. Production in FY2012 was largely constrained by industrial action and severe wet weather. Additionally, in April 2012, BMA announced the intention to cease production at Norwich Park mine indefinitely, following a review of the mine’s viability. On 10 September 2012, BMA announced its intention to cease production at its Gregory open-cut mine, part of the Gregory Crinum complex, from 10 October 2012.

Production figures for the Bowen Basin include some energy coal (less than five per cent).

Illawarra

We own and operate three underground coal mines in the Illawarra region of New South Wales, which supply metallurgical coal to the nearby BlueScope Port Kembla steelworks, and other domestic and export markets. Total production in FY2012 was approximately 7.9 Mt compared with 6.9 Mt in FY2011. The reserve lives of our mines range from four years at West Cliff to 31 years at Appin.

Production figures for Illawarra include some energy coal (less than 17 per cent).

 

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Information on Metallurgical Coal mining operations

The following table contains additional details of our mining operations. The tables should be read in conjunction with the production (see section 2.3.2) and reserves tables (see section 2.13.2).

 

Mine & Location

 

Means of
Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or

Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation
Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

Metallurgical coal

Central Queensland Coal Associates (CQCA) joint venture                

Bowen Basin, Queensland, Australia

 

Goonyella Riverside, Peak Downs, Saraji, Norwich Park, Blackwater and Broadmeadow mines

 

Public road

 

Coal transported by rail to Hay Point and Gladstone ports

 

BHP Billiton 50%

 

Mitsubishi Development 50%

  BMA  

Mining leases, including undeveloped tenements, expire between 2012–2037, renewable for further periods as Queensland Government/legislation allows

 

Mining is permitted to continue under the legislation during the renewal application period. Applications have been lodged to renew mining leases expiring in 2012

 

Goonyella mine commenced 1971, merged with adjoining Riverside mine 1989 Operates as Goonyella Riverside

 

Production commenced:

Peak Downs 1972 Saraji 1974 Norwich Park 1979

Blackwater 1967

 

Broadmeadow (longwall operations) 2005

 

All open-cut except Broadmeadow: longwall underground

 

Bituminous coal is mined from the Permian Moranbah and Rangal Coal measures

 

Products range from premium-quality, low volatile, high vitrinite, hard coking coal to medium volatile hard coking coal, to weak coking coal, and some medium ash thermal coal as a by-product

  Queensland electricity grid  

On-site beneficiation facilities

 

Combined nominal capacity: in excess of 53.5 mtpa

 

Hay Point Coal terminal

               

 

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Mine & Location

 

Means of
Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or

Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation
Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

Gregory joint venture                

Bowen Basin, Queensland, Australia

 

Gregory and Crinum mines

 

Public road

 

Coal transported by rail to Hay Point and Gladstone ports

 

BHP Billiton 50%

 

Mitsubishi Development 50%

  BMA   Mining leases including undeveloped tenements, expire between 2014 – 2027, renewable for further periods as Queensland Government/legislation allows  

Production commenced:

Gregory 1979

Crinum mine (longwall) 1997

 

Production at Gregory mine to cease from 10 October 2012

 

Gregory: open-cut

 

Crinum: longwall underground

 

Bituminous coal is mined from the Permian German Creek Coal measures

 

Product is a high volatile, low ash hard coking coal, and a medium ash thermal coal

  Queensland electricity grid  

On-site beneficiation processing facility

 

Nominal capacity: in excess of 5 mtpa

               
BHP Billiton Mitsui Coal Pty Limited                

Bowen Basin, Queensland, Australia

 

South Walker Creek and Poitrel mines

 

Public road

 

Coal transported by rail to Hay Point port

 

BHP Billiton 80%

 

Mitsui and Co 20%

  BMC   Mining leases, including undeveloped tenements expire in 2020, renewable for further periods as Queensland Government/legislation allows  

South Walker Creek commenced 1996

Poitrel commenced 2006

 

Open-cut

 

Bituminous coal is mined from the Permian Rangal Coal measures

 

Produces a range of coking coal, pulverised coal injection (PCI) coal, and thermal coal products with medium to high phosphorus and ash properties

  Queensland electricity grid  

South Walker Creek coal beneficiated on-site

 

Nominal capacity: in excess of 3.5 mtpa

 

Poitrel mine has Red Mountain joint venture with adjacent Millennium Coal mine to share processing and rail loading facilities

 

Nominal capacity: in excess of 3 mtpa

               

 

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Mine & Location

 

Means of
Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or

Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation
Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

Illawarra Coal                

Illawarra, New South Wales, Australia

 

Dendrobium, Appin and West Cliff mines

 

Public road

 

Coal transported by road or rail to BlueScope Steel’s Port Kembla steelworks or Port Kembla for export

  100%   BHP Billiton  

Mining leases expire between 2012–2026, renewable for further periods as NSW Government/legislation allows

 

Mining is permitted to continue under the legislation during the application period

Applications lodged to renew mining leases expiring in 2012 and 2013

 

Production commenced:

Appin 1962 (longwall operations 1969)

West Cliff 1976

Dendrobium 2005

 

Underground

 

Bituminous coal is mined from the Permian Illawarra Coal Measures

 

Produces premium-quality hard coking coal and some thermal coal from the Wongawilli and Bulli seams

  New South Wales electricity grid  

2 beneficiation facilities

 

Nominal capacity: approximately 9 mtpa

               

 

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Development projects

Bowen Basin Expansions

In November 2011, approval was given for the development of the Caval Ridge mine project and expansion of the Peak Downs mine in the Bowen Basin in Central Queensland, Australia. In response to the challenging external environment, the Group has chosen to delay indefinitely the 2.5 mtpa (100 per cent basis) expansion of Peak Downs that is associated with the Caval Ridge mine development. The 5.5 mtpa (100 per cent basis) Caval Ridge mine remains on schedule to deliver first production in CY2014.

The Caval Ridge mine will be an open-cut dragline and truck and shovel operation, with coal railed to the BMA Hay Point Coal terminal.

In March 2011, approval was given for three key metallurgical coal projects located in the Bowen Basin in Central Queensland, Australia. The projects are expected to add 4.9 Mt of annual mine capacity (100 per cent basis) through development of the Daunia Operation and a new mining area at Broadmeadow. In addition, 11 Mt of annual port capacity (100 per cent basis) will be developed at the Hay Point Coal terminal. These projects are ongoing with first coal expected from the Daunia mine in 2013, completion of the Broadmeadow expansion expected in 2013 and the first shipments from the expanded terminal expected in FY2015.

IndoMet Coal Project (Indonesia)

IndoMet Coal comprises seven coal contracts of work (CCoWs) covering a large metallurgical coal resource in Kalimantan, Indonesia, which was discovered by BHP Billiton in the 1990s. Following an assessment of the importance of local participation in developing the project in 2010, we sold a 25 per cent interest in the project to a subsidiary of PT Adaro Energy TBK. We retain 75 per cent of the project and hold management responsibility for the project.

Study work is underway to identify development options across our CCoWs and early work on infrastructure development has commenced.

Appin Area 9 Project

In June 2012, approval was given to invest US$845 million to sustain operations at Illawarra Coal, in southern New South Wales, Australia, by establishing a replacement mining area at Appin mine. The replacement area will have a production capacity of 3.5 mtpa and will sustain Illawarra Coal’s production capacity at 9 mtpa. Appin Area 9 will be operational in 2016 and will replace production at the West Cliff mine. The project includes roadway development, new ventilation infrastructure, new and reconfigured conveyors and other mine services.

2.2.10    Energy Coal Customer Sector Group

Our Energy Coal CSG is one of the world’s largest producers and marketers of export energy coal (also known as thermal or steaming coal) and is also a domestic supplier to the electricity generation industry in Australia, South Africa and the United States. Our global portfolio of energy coal assets and our insights into the broader energy market through our sales of other fuels (gas, uranium and oil) provide our business with substantial advantages as a supplier. We generally make our domestic sales under long-term fixed price or cost plus contracts with nearby power stations. We make export sales to power generators and some industrial users in Asia, Europe and the United States, usually under contracts for delivery of a fixed volume of coal. Pricing is index-linked or fixed; where pricing is fixed, financial instruments are used to swap exposure to market index basis.

We operate three assets: a group of mines and associated infrastructure collectively known as BHP Billiton Energy Coal South Africa; our New Mexico Coal operations in the United States; and our New South Wales Energy Coal operations in Australia. We also own a 33.33 per cent share of the Cerrejón Coal Company, which operates a coal mine in Colombia.

 

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BHP Billiton Energy Coal South Africa

BHP Billiton Energy Coal South Africa (BECSA) operates four coal mines being Khutala, Klipspruit, Middelburg and Wolvekrans in the Witbank region of Mpumalanga province of South Africa, which in FY2012 produced approximately 33 Mt. The reserve lives of our mines range from eight years at Khutala and Klipspruit to 29 years at Middelburg.

In FY2012, BECSA sold approximately 57 per cent of its production to Eskom, the government-owned electricity utility in South Africa and exported the rest via the Richards Bay Coal Terminal (RBCT), in which we own a 22 per cent share.

During FY2012, BECSA entered into an empowerment transaction with a black-owned consortium, which will effectively hold an eight per cent equity interest in BECSA once the transaction is completed. The shareholders of BECSA have also approved the implementation of an Employee Share Ownership Plan (ESOP) in which participating employees will hold a beneficial interest of two per cent equity in BECSA for a vested period. The empowerment transaction and the introduction of the ESOP are expected to be completed in FY2013.

New Mexico Coal

We own and operate the Navajo mine, located on Navajo Nation land in New Mexico, and the nearby San Juan mine located in the state of New Mexico. Each mine transports its production directly to a nearby power station. The reserve lives of our mines are four years at Navajo mine and six years at San Juan Mine, being the life of the current customer contracts. New Mexico Coal produced approximately 9.4 Mt in FY2012.

New South Wales Energy Coal

New South Wales Energy Coal’s operating asset is the Mt Arthur Coal open-cut mine in the Hunter Valley region of New South Wales, which produced approximately 17 Mt in FY2012 and has a reserve life of 45 years. In FY2012, we delivered approximately 10 per cent of Mt Arthur’s production to a local power station and exported the rest via the port of Newcastle. During FY2012, the RX1 project achieved first production ahead of schedule. This project is expected to increase run-of-mine thermal coal production by approximately four mtpa. We are a 35.5 per cent shareholder in Newcastle Coal Infrastructure Group, a jointly controlled entity that is operating the Newcastle Third Port export coal loading facility and currently has a project in execution (see Development projects below). We also have a 1.75 per cent interest in Port Waratah Coal Services Limited which operates two coal loading facilities at the port of Newcastle.

Cerrejón Coal Company

We have a one-third interest in Cerrejón Coal Company, which owns and operates one of the largest open-cut export coal mines in the world in La Guajira province of Colombia, as well as integrated rail and port facilities through which the majority of production is exported to European, Middle Eastern, North American and Asian customers. In FY2012, Cerrejón commenced its expansion project (P40), which will increase BHP Billiton’s share of saleable production from 10.7 mtpa to 13.3 mtpa (see Development projects below). Cerrejón has a current production capacity of 32 mtpa (100 per cent terms) and has a reserve life of 21 years.

 

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Information on Energy Coal mining operations

The following table contains additional details of our mining operations. The table should be read in conjunction with the production (see section 2.3.2) and reserves tables (see section 2.13.2).

 

Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation
Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

South Africa Khutala                

100 km east of Johannesburg, Gauteng Province,

South Africa

 

Public road

 

Domestic coal transported by overland conveyor to Kendal Power Station

  100%   BHP Billiton   BECSA holds a 100% share of Converted Mining Right, which was granted on 11 October 2011  

Production commenced 1984

 

Open-cut operations 1996

 

Commenced mining thermal/metallurgical coal for domestic market 2003

 

Combination open-cut and underground

 

Produces a medium rank bituminous thermal coal (non-coking)

  Eskom (national power supplier) under long-term contracts  

Crushing plant for energy coal

 

Nominal capacity: 18 mtpa

 

Smaller crusher and wash plant to beneficiate metallurgical coal Nominal capacity: 0.6 mtpa

Middelburg/Wolvekrans                
20 km southeast of Witbank, Mpumalanga Province, South Africa  

Public road

 

Export coal transported to RBCT by rail

 

Domestic coal transported by conveyor to Duvha Power Station

 

100%

 

Previous JV (84:16) with

Xstrata Plc (through Tavistock Collieries Pty Limited) was amended in February 2008

  BHP Billiton  

BECSA and Tavistock are joint holders of 3 Converted Mining Rights in the previous JV ratio (84:16).

BECSA is the 100% holder of a fourth Converted Mining Right

All 4 Rights comprise the Middelburg Mine Complex (1)

The Converted Mining Rights were granted during October and December 2011 (2)

 

Production commenced 1982

 

Middelburg Mine Services (MMS) and Duvha Opencast became one operation in 1995

 

Douglas-Middelburg Optimisation project completed in July 2010

 

During FY2011 the mine was split into Middelburg and Wolvekrans

 

Open-cut

 

Produces a medium rank bituminous thermal coal, most of which can be beneficiated for the European or Asian export markets

  Eskom under long-term contracts  

Beneficiation facilities: tips and crushing plants, 2 export wash plants, middlings wash plant, de-stone plant

 

Nominal capacity: 43.3 mtpa

               

 

(1)          This includes the Wolvekrans and Middelburg collieries and excludes the portion Tavistock obtained as a result of the amendment of the Douglas-Tavistock Joint Venture agreement.

 

(2)          JV agreement has been amended such that upon the Department of Mineral Resources amending the Converted Mining Rights, the mining area will be divided into an area wholly owned and operated by Tavistock and an area wholly owned and operated by BECSA as the new Douglas-Middelburg mine.

 

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Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

Klipspruit                

30 km west of Witbank,

Mpumalanga Province, South Africa

 

Public road

 

Export coal transported to RBCT by rail

 

100%

 

50% of Phola Coal Plant in JV with Anglo Inyosi Coal

  BHP Billiton   BECSA holds a Converted Mining Right, which was granted on 11 October 2011  

Production commenced 2003

 

Expansion project completed FY2010, includes 50% share in Phola

Coal Plant

 

Expected ROM capacity: 8.0 mtpa at full ramp-up

 

Open-cut

 

Produces a medium rank bituminous thermal coal, most of which can be beneficiated for the European or Asian export markets

  Eskom, under long-term contracts  

Beneficiation facilities: tip and crushing plant, export wash plant

 

Nominal capacity Phola Coal Processing Plant: 16 mtpa

Australia
Mt Arthur Coal              

Approximately 125 km from Newcastle,

New South Wales, Australia

 

Public road

 

Domestic coal transported by conveyor to Bayswater Power Station

 

Export coal transported by rail to Newcastle port

  100%   BHP Billiton  

Various mining leases and licences expire 2010–2032

 

Renewal is being sought for expired mining leases

 

The original approvals permit mining and other activities to continue during renewal application

 

Production commenced 2002

 

Government approval permits extraction of up to 36 Mt of run of mine coal from underground and open-cut operations, with open-cut extraction limited to 32 mtpa

 

Open-cut

 

Produces a medium rank bituminous thermal coal (non- coking)

  Local energy providers  

Beneficiation facilities: coal handling, preparation, washing plants

 

Nominal capacity: in excess of 16 mtpa

US
Navajo                
30 km southwest of Farmington, New Mexico, US  

Public road

 

Coal transported by rail to Four Corners Power Plant (FCPP)

  100%   BHP Billiton   Long-term lease from Navajo Nation continues for as long as coal can be economically produced and sold in paying quantities   Production commenced 1963  

Open-cut

 

Produces a medium rank bituminous thermal coal (non-coking suitable for the domestic market only)

  Four Corners Power Plant  

Stackers and reclaimers used to size and blend coal to contract specifications

 

Nominal capacity: 7.4 mtpa

 

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Mine & Location

 

Means of

Access

 

Ownership

 

Operator

 

Title, Leases or
Options

 

History

 

Mine Type &
Mineralisation

Style

 

Power

Source

 

Facilities, Use &
Condition

San Juan                
25 km west of Farmington, New Mexico, US  

Public road

 

Coal transported by truck and conveyor to San Juan Generating Station (SJGS)

  100%   BHP Billiton  

Mining leases from federal and state governments

 

Leases viable as long as minimum production criteria achieved

 

Surface mine operations commenced 1973

 

Development of underground mine to replace open-cut mine approved 2000

 

Underground

 

Produces a medium rank bituminous thermal coal (non-coking suitable for the domestic market only)

  San Juan Generation Station  

Coal sized and blended to contract specifications using stockpiles

 

Nominal capacity: 5.6 mtpa

Colombia
Cerrejón Coal Company                
La Guajira province, Colombia  

Public road

 

Coal exported by rail to Puerto Bolivar

 

BHP Billiton 33.33%

 

Anglo American 33.33%

 

Xstrata 33.33%

  Cerrejón Coal Company   Mining leases expire 2034  

Original mine began producing in 1976

 

BHP Billiton interest acquired in 2000

 

Open-cut

 

Produces a medium rank bituminous thermal coal (non-coking, suitable for the export market)

  Local Colombian power system  

Beneficiation facilities: crushing plant with capacity of 32 mtpa and washing plant

Nominal capacity: 3 mtpa

 

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Development projects

Cerrejón Coal P40 Project

On 18 August 2011, we announced a US$437 million (BHP Billiton share) investment in the expansion of Cerrejón Coal, known as the P40 Project, which will enable Cerrejón Coal’s saleable thermal coal production to increase by 8.0 mtpa to approximately 40 mtpa. We have a one-third interest in Cerrejón Coal. The expansion project is expected to increase our share of saleable production from 10.7 mtpa to 13.3 mtpa. Construction commenced in CY2011 with completion expected in CY2013. The project scope includes a second berth and dual quadrant ship loader at Cerrejón’s 100 per cent owned and operated Puerto Bolivar, along with necessary mine, rail and associated supply chain infrastructure.

Newcastle Port Third Phase Expansion

On 31 August 2011, we announced a US$367 million (BHP Billiton share) investment in the third stage development of the Newcastle Coal Infrastructure Group’s coal handling facility in Newcastle, Australia. The port expansion project will increase total capacity at the coal terminal from 53 mtpa to 66 mtpa. This will increase New South Wales Energy Coal’s allocation by a further 4.6 mtpa to 19.2 mtpa. First coal is scheduled to occur in FY2014, with the terminal expected to operate at full capacity within the following 12 months.

 

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2.3    Production

2.3.1    Petroleum

The table below details Petroleum’s historical net crude oil and condensate, natural gas and natural gas liquids production, primarily by geographic segment, for each of the three years ended 30 June 2012, 2011 and 2010. We have shown volumes of marketable production after deduction of applicable royalties, fuel and flare. We have included in the table average production costs per unit of production and average sales prices for oil and condensate and natural gas for each of those periods.

 

    BHP Billiton Group share of production
Year ended 30 June
 
        2012             2011             2010      

Production volumes

     

Crude oil and condensate (’000 of barrels)

     

Australia

    31,145        40,447        31,540   

United States

    30,824        30,157        41,522   

Other

    9,232        9,987        11,325   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total crude oil and condensate

    71,201        80,591        84,387   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Natural gas (billion cubic feet)

     

Australia

    249.97        274.74        259.65   

United States

    456.69        49.09        17.68   

Other

    115.60        81.23        91.24   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total natural gas

    822.26        405.06        368.57   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Natural Gas Liquids (1) (’000 of barrels)

     

Australia

    7,943        7,962        8,652   

United States

    5,744        1,980        2,545   

Other

    398        1,341        1,552   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total NGL (1)

    14,085        11,283        12,749   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total petroleum products production (million barrels of oil equivalent) (2)

     

Australia

    80.75        94.20        83.47   

United States

    112.69        40.32        47.01   

Other

    28.90        24.86        28.08   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total petroleum products production (million barrels of oil equivalent) (2)

    222.34        159.38        158.56   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Average sales price

     

Crude oil and condensate (US$ per barrel)

     

Australia

    114.33        96.32        74.12   

United States

    106.22        90.01        71.55   

Other

    113.26        90.69        75.57   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total crude oil and condensate

    110.66        93.29        73.05   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Natural gas (US$ per thousand cubic feet)

     

Australia

    4.62        4.21        3.52   

United States

    2.82        3.48        4.80   

Other

    4.13        3.92        3.05   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total natural gas

    3.40        4.00        3.43   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Natural Gas Liquids (US$ per barrel)

     

Australia

    61.61        58.05        48.20   

United States

    45.72        49.79        39.51   

Other

    55.06        59.54        49.40   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total NGL

    54.85        56.77        46.47   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total average production cost (US$ per barrel of oil equivalent) (3)

     

Australia

    7.95        5.75        5.59   

United States

    5.91        6.45        5.62   

Other

    7.84        8.39        7.48   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total average production cost (US$ per barrel of oil equivalent) (3)

    6.90        6.34        5.93   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

79


Table of Contents

 

(1) 

LPG and ethane are reported as Natural Gas Liquids (NGL).

 

(2)

Total barrels of oil equivalent (boe) conversion is based on the following: 6,000 scf of natural gas equals 1 boe.

 

(3) 

Average production costs include direct and indirect costs relating to the production of hydrocarbons and the foreign exchange effect of translating local currency denominated costs into US dollars but excludes ad valorem and severance taxes.

2.3.2    Minerals

The table below details our mineral and derivative product production for all CSGs except Petroleum for the three years ended 30 June 2012, 2011 and 2010. Production shows our share unless otherwise stated. For discussion of minerals pricing during the past three years, refer to section 3.4.1.

 

     BHP Billiton
Group interest
%
     BHP Billiton Group share of production
Year ended 30 June
 
            2012              2011              2010      

Aluminium

           

Alumina

           

Production (’000 tonnes)

           

Worsley, Australia

     86.0         2,917         2,902         3,054   

Paranam, Suriname (1)

     45.0                         78   

Alumar, Brazil

     36.0         1,235         1,108         709   
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total alumina

        4,152         4,010         3,841   
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Aluminium

           

Production (’000 tonnes)

           

Hillside, South Africa

     100.0         621         711         710   

Bayside, South Africa

     100.0         98         97         98   

Alumar, Brazil

     40.0         170         174         174