XNYS:IGT International Game Technology Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 6/30/2012

Effective Date 6/30/2012

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United States
Securities and Exchange Commission
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q


[X]           QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Quarterly Period Ended June 30, 2012
 
OR

[  ]           TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from ____ to ____

Commission File Number 001-10684
 
International Game Technology
 
Nevada   88-0173041
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
6355 South Buffalo Drive, Las Vegas, Nevada 89113
(Address of principal executive offices)(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (702) 669-7777
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Yes [X] No [   ]
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
Yes [X] No [   ]
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:
 
Large accelerated filer [X]                                                                                                                                  Accelerated filer [   ]
 
Non-accelerated filer [   ] (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)                                                  Smaller reporting company [   ]
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
Yes [   ] No [X]
 
The number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of August 6, 2012:
267.1 million shares of common stock at $.00015625 par value.

 
 

 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS (as used in this document) 3
       
PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION
       
Item 1.   Unaudited Consolidated Interim Financial Statements
       
Item 2.   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations  29
       
Item 3.   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk 41
       
Item 4.   Controls and Procedures  41
       
PART II – OTHER INFORMATION
       
Item 1.   Legal Proceedings 41 
       
Item 1A.    Risk Factors  41
       
Item 2.   Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds  49
       
Item 3.   Defaults Upon Senior Securities  49
       
Item 4.   Mine Safety Disclosures  49
       
Item 5.   Other Information  49
       
Item 6.   Exhibits  50
 
 
2

 
 
 
 
GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS (as used in this document)
 
Fiscal dates--actual:
Fiscal dates--as presented:
 
June 30, 2012
June 30, 2012
 
July 2, 2011
June 30, 2011
 
October 1, 2011
September 30, 2011
 
Abbreviation/term
Definition
Anchor
Anchor Gaming
APIC
additional paid-in-capital
ASP
average sales price (machines)
ASR
accelerated share repurchase transaction
ASU
Accounting Standards Update
5.5% Bonds
5.5% fixed rate notes due 2020
7.5% Bonds
7.5% fixed rate notes due 2019
bps
basis points
CCSC
Colorado Central Station Casino
CEO
chief executive officer
CFO
chief financial officer
CLS
China LotSynergy Holdings, Ltd.
DCF
discounted cash flow
DoubleDown
Double Down Interactive LLC
EBITDA
earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization
Entraction
Entraction Holding AB
EPA
Environmental Protection Agency
EPS
earnings per share
ERISA
Employee Retirement Income Security Act
Exchange Act
Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended
FASB
Financial Accounting Standards Board
GAAP
generally accepted accounting principles
IGT, we, our, the Company
International Game Technology and its consolidated entities
IFRS
International Financial Reporting Standards
IP
intellectual property
IRS
Internal Revenue Service
LatAm
Mexico and South/Central America
LIBOR
London inter-bank offered rate
MDA
management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations
MLD®
Multi-layer-display
Notes
3.25% convertible notes due 2014
OSHA
Occupational Safety & Health Administration
pp
percentage points
R&D
research and development
SEC
Securities and Exchange Commission
SIP
2002 Stock Incentive Plan
UK
United Kingdom
US
United States
UTBs
unrecognized tax benefits
VIE
variable interest entity
VWAP
average daily volume weighted average price
WAP
wide area progressive
*
not meaningful (in tables)

 
3

 
 
PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
Item 1.   Unaudited Consolidated Interim Financial Statements
 
CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENTS
5
       
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
6
       
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
7
       
SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOWS INFORMATION
8
   
NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
9
       
1.   SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES 9
       
2.   VARIABLE INTERESTS AND AFFILIATES 10
       
3.   RECEIVABLES 11
       
4.   CONCENTRATIONS OF CREDIT RISK 12
       
5.   INVENTORIES 13
       
6.   PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT 13
       
7.   GOODWILL AND OTHER INTANGIBLES 13
       
8.   FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS 14
       
9.   FINANCIAL DERIVATIVES 16
       
10.   CREDIT FACILITIES AND INDEBTEDNESS 17
       
11.   CONTINGENCIES 18
       
12.   INCOME TAXES 24
       
13.   EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLANS 24
       
14.   EARNINGS PER SHARE 25
       
15.   OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME 26
       
16.   BUSINESS SEGMENTS 26
       
17.   BUSINESS ACQUISITIONS 27
       
18.   DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS 28
 
See accompanying notes
 
 
4

 
 
CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENTS
 
   
Quarters Ended
June 30,
   
Nine Months Ended
June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2012
   
2011
 
(In millions, except per share amounts)
                       
Revenues
                       
Gaming operations
  $ 301.2     $ 267.4     $ 866.2     $ 790.1  
Product sales
    231.6       221.6       653.4       627.1  
Total revenues
    532.8       489.0       1,519.6       1,417.2  
Costs and operating expenses
                               
Cost of gaming operations
    123.0       102.8       346.0       299.2  
Cost of product sales
    107.2       97.6       305.4       277.4  
Selling, general and administrative
    104.9       82.5       303.8       253.8  
Research and development
    55.1       48.5       157.3       146.1  
Depreciation and amortization
    21.1       16.8       55.8       51.6  
Contingent acquisition related costs
    26.0       -       37.8       -  
Total costs and operating expenses
    437.3       348.2       1,206.1       1,028.1  
Operating income
    95.5       140.8       313.5       389.1  
Other income (expense)
                               
Interest income
    11.0       13.3       33.9       40.0  
Interest expense
    (30.8 )     (30.5 )     (90.9 )     (101.5 )
Other
    (1.6 )     (1.9 )     (6.4 )     1.4  
Total other income (expense)
    (21.4 )     (19.1 )     (63.4 )     (60.1 )
Income from continuing operations before tax
    74.1       121.7       250.1       329.0  
Income tax provision
    27.2       29.9       90.5       96.7  
Income from continuing operations
    46.9       91.8       159.6       232.3  
Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax
    (0.3 )     (4.9 )     (1.8 )     (2.1 )
Net income
  $ 46.6     $ 86.9     $ 157.8     $ 230.2  
                                 
Basic earnings (loss) per share
                               
Continuing operations
  $ 0.16     $ 0.31     $ 0.54     $ 0.78  
Discontinued operations
    -       (0.02 )     (0.01 )     (0.01 )
Net income
  $ 0.16     $ 0.29     $ 0.53     $ 0.77  
                                 
Diluted earnings (loss) per share
                               
Continuing operations
  $ 0.16     $ 0.30     $ 0.54     $ 0.77  
Discontinued operations
    -       (0.01 )     (0.01 )     -  
Net income
  $ 0.16     $ 0.29     $ 0.53     $ 0.77  
                                 
Cash dividends declared per share
  $ 0.06     $ 0.06     $ 0.18     $ 0.18  
                                 
Weighted average shares outstanding
                               
Basic
    292.7       299.2       295.6       298.4  
Diluted
    294.3       300.7       297.2       299.9  
 
See accompanying notes
 
 
5

 
 
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
 
   
June 30,
2012
   
September 30,
2011
 
Assets
           
Current assets
           
Cash and equivalents
  $ 241.3     $ 460.0  
Restricted cash and investment securities
    84.1       89.6  
Restricted cash and investment securities of VIEs
    2.1       2.4  
Jackpot annuity investments
    47.3       48.7  
Jackpot annuity investments of VIEs
    13.6       14.5  
Accounts receivable, net
    270.4       320.1  
Current maturities of contracts and notes receivable, net
    213.0       167.1  
Inventories
    104.0       73.0  
Deferred income taxes
    68.8       97.1  
Other assets and deferred costs
    140.4       137.4  
Total current assets
    1,185.0       1,409.9  
Property, plant and equipment, net
    563.7       552.1  
Jackpot annuity investments
    258.9       271.8  
Jackpot annuity investments of VIEs
    46.5       52.8  
Contracts and notes receivable, net
    140.0       126.4  
Goodwill
    1,463.9       1,231.4  
Other intangible assets, net
    235.7       170.4  
Deferred income taxes
    114.1       84.6  
Other assets and deferred costs
    259.1       255.0  
Total Assets
  $ 4,266.9     $ 4,154.4  
Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity
               
Liabilities
               
Current liabilities
               
Accounts payable
  $ 100.2     $ 103.0  
Jackpot liabilities, current portion
    146.6       143.0  
Accrued employee benefits
    29.8       38.9  
Accrued income taxes
    10.6       3.2  
Dividends payable
    17.1       17.8  
Other accrued liabilities
    275.5       228.8  
Total current liabilities
    579.8       534.7  
Long-term debt
    1,969.8       1,646.3  
Jackpot liabilities
    338.3       365.4  
Other liabilities
    267.2       163.2  
Total Liabilities
    3,155.1       2,709.6  
Commitments and Contingencies
               
Shareholders' Equity
               
Common stock: $.00015625 par value; 1,280.0 shares authorized; 343.4 and 341.9 issued; 272.8 and 297.4 outstanding
    0.1       0.1  
Additional paid-in capital
    1,497.4       1,542.5  
Treasury stock at cost: 70.6 and 44.4 shares
    (1,252.8 )     (855.2 )
Retained earnings
    868.8       763.8  
Accumulated other comprehensive income
    (1.7 )     (8.8 )
Total IGT Shareholders' Equity
    1,111.8       1,442.4  
Noncontrolling Interests
    -       2.4  
Total Equity
    1,111.8       1,444.8  
Total Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity
  $ 4,266.9     $ 4,154.4  
 
See accompanying notes
 
 
6

 
 
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
 
Nine Months Ended June 30,
 
2012
   
2011
 
(In millions)
           
Operating
 
 
   
 
 
Net income
  $ 157.8     $ 230.2  
Adjustments:
               
Depreciation and amortization
    179.3       167.3  
Contingent earn-out consideration
    11.1       -  
Discounts and deferred issuance costs
    30.6       33.6  
Share-based compensation
    25.4       32.0  
Net loss on disposal and impairment
    1.5       10.7  
Excess tax benefits from employee stock plans
    (2.4 )     (2.9 )
Other non-cash items
    6.9       (8.2 )
Changes in operating assets and liabilities, excluding acquisitions:
               
Receivables
    (24.6 )     15.1  
Inventories
    (14.4 )     (2.3 )
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
    14.5       (46.0 )
Jackpot liabilities
    (38.5 )     (81.0 )
Income taxes, net of employee stock plans
    (4.1 )     73.2  
Other assets and deferred costs
    (16.1 )     27.0  
Net operating cash flows
    327.0       448.7  
Investing
               
Capital expenditures
    (170.8 )     (155.1 )
Proceeds from assets sold
    20.4       14.7  
Jackpot annuity investments, net
    36.7       42.8  
Changes in restricted cash
    6.7       22.9  
Loans receivable cash advanced
    (0.8 )     (0.5 )
Loans receivable payments received
    22.3       24.4  
Proceeds from unconsolidated affiliates
    9.2       16.5  
Business acquisitions, net of cash acquired
    (233.9 )     (105.9 )
Net investing cash flows
    (310.2 )     (140.2 )
Financing
               
Debt proceeds
    280.0       95.0  
Debt repayments
    -       (195.0 )
Debt issuance costs
    -       (4.4 )
Employee stock plan proceeds
    12.7       30.5  
Excess tax benefits from employee stock plans
    2.4       2.9  
Share repurchases and forward contracts
    (475.1 )     (25.0 )
Noncontrolling interest acquired
    (2.5 )     -  
Dividends paid
    (53.5 )     (53.8 )
Net financing cash flows
    (236.0 )     (149.8 )
Foreign exchange rates effect on cash and equivalents
    0.5       (0.8 )
Net change in cash and equivalents
    (218.7 )     157.9  
Beginning cash and equivalents
    460.0       158.4  
Ending cash and equivalents
  $ 241.3     $ 316.3  
 
See accompanying notes
 
 
7

 
 
SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOWS INFORMATION
 
“Depreciation and amortization” reflected in the cash flows statements are comprised of amounts presented separately on the income statements, plus “depreciation and amortization” included in cost of gaming operations, cost of product sales and discontinued operations.
 
Nine Months Ended June 30,
 
2012
   
2011
 
(In millions)
           
Jackpot funding
 
 
   
 
 
Change in jackpot liabilities
  $ (38.5 )   $ (81.0 )
                 
Jackpot annuity purchases
    (8.2 )     (3.9 )
Jackpot annuity proceeds
    44.9       46.7  
Net change in jackpot annuity investments
    36.7       42.8  
Net jackpot funding
  $ (1.8 )   $ (38.2 )
Capital expenditures
               
Property, plant and equipment
  $ (35.3 )   $ (10.8 )
Gaming operations equipment
    (133.2 )     (143.2 )
Intellectual property
    (2.3 )     (1.1 )
Total
  $ (170.8 )   $ (155.1 )
Payments
               
Interest
  $ 59.2     $ 74.1  
Income taxes
    93.3       18.3  
Non-cash investing and financing items:
               
Accrued capital asset additions
  $ 0.7     $ 2.0  
Interest accretion for jackpot annuity investments
    15.0       17.0  
                 
Business acquisitions/purchase price adjustments and VIE deconsolidations
               
Fair value of assets
  $ 350.5     $ 131.1  
Fair value of liabilities
    116.6       25.2  

See accompanying notes
 
 
8

 
 
 
NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
1.             SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
 
Basis of Presentation and Consolidation
 
Our fiscal year is reported on a 52/53-week period ending on the Saturday nearest to September 30. Similarly, our quarters end on the Saturday nearest to the last day of the quarter end month. For simplicity, fiscal periods in this report are presented using the calendar month end as outlined in the table below.
 
   
Period End
   
Actual
 
Presented as
Current quarter
 
June 30, 2012
 
June 30, 2012
Prior year quarter
 
July 2, 2011
 
June 30, 2011
Prior year end
 
October 1, 2011
 
September 30, 2011
 
Our consolidated interim financial statements include the accounts of International Game Technology, including all majority-owned or controlled subsidiaries and VIEs for which we are the primary beneficiary. All inter-company accounts and transactions have been eliminated.
 
Our consolidated interim financial statements for the current quarter ended June 30, 2012 were prepared without audit on a basis consistent with the comparative third quarter and nine months ended June 30, 2011, and as appropriate, with the audited financial statements for the year ended September 30, 2011. Certain information and footnote disclosures have been condensed or omitted in conformity with SEC and US GAAP requirements.
 
Our consolidated interim financial statements include all adjustments of a normal recurring nature necessary to fairly state our consolidated results of operations, financial position, and cash flows for all periods presented. Interim period results are not necessarily indicative of full year results.  This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q should be read in conjunction with our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended September 30, 2011.
 
Unless otherwise indicated in this report:
 
 
·
references to years relate to our fiscal years ending September 30
 
·
dollar amounts in tables are presented in millions, except per share amounts and par value
 
·
current refers to the quarter ended June 30, 2012
 
·
italicized text with an attached superscript trademark or copyright notation indicates trademarks of IGT or its licensors, and additional IGT trademark information is available on our website at www.IGT.com
 
Use of Estimates
 
Our consolidated interim financial statements are prepared in conformity with US GAAP.  Accordingly, we are required to make estimates, judgments and assumptions that we believe are reasonable based on our historical experience, contract terms, observance of known trends in our company and the industry as a whole, and information available from other outside sources. Our estimates affect reported amounts for assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses, and related disclosures. Actual results may differ from initial estimates.
 
Restricted Cash and Investments
 
We are required by gaming regulation to maintain sufficient reserves in restricted accounts to be used for the purpose of funding payments to WAP jackpot winners. Restricted amounts are based primarily on the jackpot meters displayed to slot players and vary by jurisdiction. Compliance with restricted cash and investments requirements for jackpot funding is reported to the gaming authorities in various jurisdictions.
 
Additionally, restricted cash and investments included online player deposits of $11.7 million at June 30, 2012 and $14.5 million at September 30, 2011.
 
 
9

 
 
Recently Adopted Accounting Standards or Updates
 
Fair Value Measurements
 
At the beginning of 2012, we adopted an ASU issued in January 2010 requiring separate disclosure of purchases, sales, issuances, and settlements of fair value instruments within the Level 3 reconciliation. Additionally, in our 2012 second quarter, we adopted an ASU issued in May 2011 amending fair value measurements for US GAAP and IFRS convergence.  The adoption of these ASUs did not have a material impact on our financial statements. See Note 8.
 
Accruals for Casino Jackpot Liabilities
 
At the beginning of 2012, we adopted  an ASU issued in April 2010, clarifying that jackpot liabilities should not be accrued before they are won if the payout can be avoided. This ASU did not have a material impact on our financial statements.  
 
Recently Issued Accounting Standards or Updates—Not Yet Adopted
 
Qualitative Impairment Assessment for Goodwill and Other Indefinite-Lived Intangibles
 
In September 2011, the FASB issued an ASU to simplify the annual goodwill impairment test by allowing an entity to first assess qualitative factors, considering the totality of events and circumstances, to determine that there is a greater than 50% likelihood that the carrying amount of a reporting unit is less than its fair value. If so, then the two-step impairment test is not required. In July 2012, the FASB issued an ASU to simplify the impairment testing for other indefinite-lived intangibles in a similar fashion.  Both ASUs will be effective for our 2013 first quarter and we are currently evaluating whether we will adopt early, as permitted. These ASUs are not expected to have a material impact on our financial statements.
 
Presentation of Other Comprehensive Income
 
In June 2011, the FASB issued an ASU to require other comprehensive income, including income reclassification adjustments, to be presented with net income in one continuous statement or in a separate statement consecutively following net income. In December 2011, the requirement to disclose the income reclassification adjustments by component was deferred indefinitely. This ASU will be effective for our 2013 first quarter and is not expected to have a material impact on our financial statements.
 
Offsetting Assets and Liabilities
 
In December 2011, the FASB issued an ASU to require new disclosures associated with offsetting financial instruments and derivative instruments on the balance sheet that will enable users to evaluate the effect on an entity’s financial position.  This ASU will be effective for our 2014 first quarter and, is not expected to have a material impact on our financial statements.
 
2.             VARIABLE INTERESTS AND AFFILIATES
 
Variable Interest Entities
 
New Jersey Trusts
 
New Jersey regulation requires that annuitized WAP jackpot payments to winners be administered through an individual trust set up for each WAP system. These trusts are VIEs and IGT is the primary consolidating beneficiary, because these VIE trusts are designed for the sole purpose of administering jackpot payments for IGT WAP winners and IGT guarantees all liabilities of the trusts. The assets of these consolidated VIEs can only be used to settle trust obligations and have been segregated on our balance sheet.
 
The consolidation of these VIEs primarily increases jackpot liabilities and related assets, as well as interest income and equivalent offsetting interest expense. Consolidated VIE trust assets and equivalent liabilities totaled $62.2 million at June 30, 2012 and $69.7 million at September 30, 2011.
 
 
10

 
 
Latin America Distributor
 
In March 2012, we contracted with a third party distributor in Latin America to sell IGT products. The distributor is a VIE as it is unable to finance its activities without additional support from IGT; however, the distributor was not consolidated because IGT does not have contractual or implied control. Under the agreement, our maximum exposure consists of note financing of $0.8 million provided for operating costs and contract financing under a revolving line of credit of $13.0 million for IGT product purchases. We recorded $3.1 million of noncurrent contracts and notes receivable and $2.3 million in revenues related to this distributor as of and for the third quarter ended June 30, 2012.
 
Investments in Unconsolidated Affiliates
 
China LotSynergy Holdings, Ltd.
 
During our 2011 first quarter, we recognized gain of $4.3 million on the sale of our CLS stock investment for net proceeds of $16.5 million. In May 2012, we received final payment of $9.2 million on our CLS convertible note and all related derivatives were adjusted to zero. See Note 8 and 9 for additional information about related fair value assumptions and derivatives.
 
3. RECEIVABLES
 
Accounts Receivable
 
Allowances for Credit Losses
 
June 30,
2012
   
September 30,
2011
 
Total
  $ 18.9     $ 17.6  
 
Customer Financing (Contracts and Notes)
 
   
June 30,
2012
   
September 30,
2011
 
Recorded Investment (principal and interest due, net of deferred interest and fees)
       
Individually evaluated for impairment
  $ 131.0     $ 104.2  
Collectively evaluated for impairment
    292.0       260.7  
Total
  $ 423.0     $ 364.9  
                 
Allowances for Credit Losses
               
Individually evaluated for impairment
  $ 57.4     $ 58.6  
Collectively evaluated for impairment
    12.6       12.8  
Total
  $ 70.0     $ 71.4  
 
Reconciliation of Allowances for Credit Losses
 
Periods Ended June 30,
 
   
Quarters
   
Nine Months
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2012
   
2011
 
Beginning balance
  $ 70.5     $ 78.0     $ 71.4     $ 78.4  
Charge-offs
    -       (8.3 )     -       (9.3 )
Recoveries
    -       -       -       0.4  
Provisions
    (0.5 )     (1.6 )     (1.4 )     (1.4 )
Ending balance
  $ 70.0     $ 68.1     $ 70.0     $ 68.1  
Current
  $ 48.1     $ 36.4     $ 48.1     $ 36.4  
Non-current
  $ 21.9     $ 31.7     $ 21.9     $ 31.7  
 
 
11

 
 
Age Analysis of Recorded Investment
 
June 30, 2012
   
September 30, 2011
 
   
Contracts
   
Notes
   
Total
   
Contracts
   
Notes
   
Total
 
Past Due:
                                   
1-29 days
  $ 6.1     $ -     $ 6.1     $ 5.3     $ 2.0     $ 7.3  
30-59 days
    3.3       1.4       4.7       2.0       1.8       3.8  
60-89 days
    2.1       1.4       3.5       1.2       1.8       3.0  
Over 90 days
    6.0       45.7       51.7       6.3       31.0       37.3  
Total past due
  $ 17.5     $ 48.5     $ 66.0     $ 14.8     $ 36.6     $ 51.4  
Total current (1)
    267.7       89.3       357.0       188.1       125.4       313.5  
Grand total
  $ 285.2     $ 137.8     $ 423.0     $ 202.9     $ 162.0     $ 364.9  
                                                 
Over 90 days and accruing interest
  $ 1.5     $ 0.1     $ 1.6     $ 2.6     $ 0.1     $ 2.7  
Nonaccrual status (not accruing interest)
    45.3       84.8       130.1       24.2       84.0       108.2  
 
(1) includes impaired Alabama notes of $37.5 at June 30, 2012 and $48.8 at September 30, 2011
 
Recorded Investment by Credit Quality Indicator Using Credit Profile by Internally Assigned Risk Grade
 
   
June 30, 2012
   
September 30, 2011
 
   
Contracts
   
Notes
   
Total
   
Contracts
   
Notes
   
Total
 
Low
  $ 113.2     $ -     $ 113.2     $ 43.9     $ -     $ 43.9  
Medium
    24.8       6.4       31.2       25.8       0.3       26.1  
High (2)
    147.2       131.4       278.6       133.2       161.7       294.9  
Total recorded investment
  $ 285.2     $ 137.8     $ 423.0     $ 202.9     $ 162.0     $ 364.9  
 
(2) includes $84.0 of impaired Alabama notes receivable
 
Impaired loans
 
June 30, 2012
   
September 30, 2011
 
   
Contracts
   
Notes
   
Total
   
Contracts
   
Notes
   
Total
 
Recorded investment
  $ 4.5     $ 84.0     $ 88.5     $ 5.2     $ 84.0     $ 89.2  
Unpaid principal face
    4.3       85.2       89.5       5.1       85.2       90.3  
Related allowance
    1.6       55.8       57.4       2.8       55.8       58.6  
Average recorded investment
    4.9       84.0       88.9       8.8       87.6       96.4  
                                                 
Interest income recognized on impaired loans:
                                               
Quarter-to-date
                                               
Total
  $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 0.2     $ -     $ 0.2  
Cash-basis
    -       -       -       -       -       -  
Year-to-date
                                               
Total
  $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 0.6     $ 0.3     $ 0.9  
Cash-basis
    -       -       -       -       0.3       0.3  
 
4.             CONCENTRATIONS OF CREDIT RISK
 
Receivables By Legal Gaming Region At June 30, 2012
Nevada
    9 %
Alabama
    5  
New Jersey
    5  
Oklahoma
    4  
California
    4  
Other (less than 4% individually)
    25  
North America
    52 %
         
Argentina
    23 %
Europe
    6  
Australia
    5  
Mexico
    4  
Other (less than 4% individually)
    10  
International
    48 %
 
 
12

 
 
5.             INVENTORIES
 
   
June 30,
2012
   
September 30,
2011
 
Raw materials
  $ 51.8     $ 44.1  
Work-in-process
    3.5       2.4  
Finished goods
    48.7       26.5  
Total
  $ 104.0     $ 73.0  
 
6.             PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
 
   
June 30,
2012
   
September 30,
2011
 
             
Land
  $ 62.7     $ 62.6  
Buildings
    235.2       232.8  
Leasehold improvements
    16.2       17.3  
Machinery, furniture and equipment
    290.5       248.6  
Gaming operations equipment
    810.1       812.9  
Total
    1,414.7       1,374.2  
Less accumulated depreciation
    (851.0 )     (822.1 )
Property, plant and equipment, net
  $ 563.7     $ 552.1  
 
7.             GOODWILL AND OTHER INTANGIBLES
 
Goodwill
 
 
Activity By Segment For the Nine Months Ended June 30, 2012
 
North
America
   
International
   
Total
 
Beginning balance
  $ 1,042.8     $ 188.6     $ 1,231.4  
Acquisitions (see Note 17)
    232.8       -       232.8  
Foreign currency adjustments
    -       (0.3 )     (0.3 )
Ending balance
  $ 1,275.6     $ 188.3     $ 1,463.9  
 
Other Intangibles
 
Additions For the Nine Months Ended June 30, 2012
 
Business
Combinations
(See Note 17)
   
Other
Additions
   
Weighted
Average Life
(Years)
 
Patents (including capitalized legal costs)
  $ -     $ 1.0       4  
Developed technology
    51.8       -       6  
Customer relationships
    47.3       -       4  
Trademarks
    10.9       -       5  
Reaquired rights
    -       1.3       2  
Total
  $ 110.0     $ 2.3          
 
 
13

 

   
June 30, 2012
   
September 30, 2011
 
Ending Balances
 
Cost
   
Accumulated
Amortization
   
Net
   
Cost
   
Accumulated
Amortization
   
Net
 
Patents
  $ 379.9     $ 288.8     $ 91.1     $ 382.8     $ 270.5     $ 112.3  
Developed technology
    131.1       56.9       74.2       86.9       54.0       32.9  
Contracts
    23.5       20.3       3.2       25.5       19.5       6.0  
Reacquired rights
    14.8       3.2       11.6       13.4       2.1       11.3  
Customer relationships
    60.8       15.5       45.3       14.2       6.9       7.3  
Trademarks
    12.5       2.2       10.3       2.1       1.5       0.6  
Total
  $ 622.6     $ 386.9     $ 235.7     $ 524.9     $ 354.5     $ 170.4  
 
    Periods Ended June 30,        
   
Third Quarter
   
Nine Months
   
Future Annual Estimates
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2012
   
2011
   
2012
   
2013
   
2014
   
2015
   
2016
 
Aggregate Amortization   $ 17.6     $ 11.1     $ 44.8     $ 34.3     $ 62.6     $ 65.2     $ 57.5     $ 42.2     $ 26.8  
 
8.            FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS
 
Financial Assets (Liabilities) Carried at Fair Value
 
   
Fair
Value
   
Level 1
   
Level 2
   
Level 3
 
June 30, 2012
                       
Money market funds
  $ 74.6     $ 74.6     $ -     $ -  
Derivative assets
    108.8       -       108.8       -  
Derivative liabilities
    (111.9 )     -       (111.9 )     -  
Acquisition contingent consideration payable
    (100.0 )     -       -       (100.0 )
                                 
September 30, 2011
                               
Money market funds
  $ 76.9     $ 76.9     $ -     $ -  
Investments in unconsolidated affiliates
    9.3       -       -       9.3  
Derivative assets
    90.8       -       90.8       -  
Derivative liabilities
    (93.2 )     -       (93.2 )     -  
 
Valuation Techniques and Balance Sheet Presentation
 
Money market funds were primarily money market securities valued based on quoted market prices in active markets.
 
Derivative assets and liabilities were valued using quoted forward pricing from bank counterparties, LIBOR credit default swap rates for non-performance risk, and net settlement amounts where appropriate. These are presented primarily as components of other assets, other liabilities, and notes payable. See Note 9.
 
Acquisition contingent consideration payable related to DoubleDown reaching certain earnings targets was valued with a DCF model applied to the expected payments determined based on probability-weighted internal earnings projections. We applied a rate of probability (10% - 79%) to each scenario, as well as a risk-adjusted discount rate of 19%, to derive the estimated fair value at June 30, 2012. Changes in the projections and/or the probabilities are the most significant assumptions and result in directionally similar changes in the fair value.  Discount rate changes cause a directionally opposite change in the fair value. Acquisition contingent consideration payable was presented as a component of other liabilities, $32.0 million current and $68.0 million noncurrent. An increase of $11.1 million to the payable fair value was recorded during the third quarter to contingent acquisition related costs on the income statement along with $14.9 million of accrued retention plan compensation. Changes in fair value were primarily due to the time-value of money and updated probability-weighted internal earnings projections. See Note 17.
 
 
14

 
 
Reconciliation of Items Carried at Fair Value Using Significant Unobservable Inputs (Level 3)
 
Nine Months Ended June 30,
 
2012
   
2011
 
   
Investments
in
Unconsolidated
Affiliates
   
Acquisition
Contingent
Consideration
Payable
   
Investments
in
Unconsolidated
Affiliates
 
Beginning balance
  $ 9.3     $ -     $ 21.3  
Gain (loss) included in:
                       
Other income (expense) - other
    (0.7 )     -       (2.1 )
Other comprehensive income
    -       -       0.6  
Issuances
    -       (88.9 )     -  
Accretion (interest and fair value adjustment)
    0.6       (11.1 )     1.7  
Settlements
    (9.2 )     -       -  
Ending balance
  $ -     $ (100.0 )   $ 21.5  
                         
Net change in unrealized gain (loss) included in earnings related to instruments still held
  $ -     $ -     $ (2.1 )
 
Financial Assets (Liabilities) Not Carried at Fair Value
 
   
Carrying
Value
   
Fair Value
   
Level 1
   
Level 2
   
Level 3
   
Unrealized
Gain (Loss)
 
June 30, 2012
                                   
Jackpot investments
  $ 366.3     $ 434.1     $ 434.1     $ -     $ -     $ 67.8  
Contracts & notes receivable
    353.0       337.5       -       -       337.5       (15.5 )
Jackpot liabilities
    (484.9 )     (510.0 )     -       -       (510.0 )     (25.1 )
Debt
    (1,858.3 )     (2,129.1 )     (1,849.2 )     (279.9 )     -       (270.8 )
                                                 
September 30, 2011
                                               
Jackpot investments
  $ 387.8     $ 458.9     $ 458.9     $ -     $ -     $ 71.1  
Contracts & notes receivable
    293.5       294.6       -       -       294.6       1.1  
Jackpot liabilities
    (508.4 )     (521.6 )     -       -       (521.6 )     (13.2 )
Debt
    (1,553.1 )     (1,879.5 )     (1,879.5 )     -       -       (326.4 )
 
Valuation Techniques and Balance Sheet Presentation
 
Jackpot investments were valued based on quoted market prices.
 
Contracts and notes receivable were valued using DCF, incorporating expected payments and market interest rates relative to the credit risk of each customer (low 7.5%, medium 8%, high 9.5% - 11%). Credit risk is determined on a number of factors, including customer size, type, financial condition, historical collection experience, account aging, and credit ratings derived from credit reporting agencies and other industry trade reports. Contracts are secured by the underlying assets sold and notes are secured by the developed property and/or other assets. The high risk category includes most of our development financing loans in new markets and customers in regions with a history of currency or economic instability, such as South/Central America. See Notes 3 and 4.
 
Jackpot liabilities were valued using DCF, incorporating expected future payment timing, estimated funding rates based on the treasury yield curve, and IGT's nonperformance credit risk. Expected annuity payments over 1-25 years (average 10 years) were discounted using the 10-year treasury yield curve rate (1.65%) for the estimated funding rate and the 10-year credit default swap rate (1.80%) for nonperformance risk. The present value (carrying value) of the expected lump sum payments were discounted using the 3-month treasury yield curve rate (.08%) with the 1-year credit default swap rate (.48%) for the current amounts and the 1-year treasury yield curve rate (.21%) with the 2-year credit default swap rate (.77%) for noncurrent amounts. Significant increases (decreases) in any of these inputs in isolation would result in a lower (higher) fair value measurement. Generally, changes in the estimated funding rates do not correlate with changes in nonperformance credit risk.
 
 
15

 
 
The majority of our debt was level 1 and valued using quoted market prices or dealer quotes for the identical financial instrument when traded as an asset in an active market. Outstanding borrowings under our revolving credit facility were level 2 and fair value was determined using DCF of expected payments at current borrowing rates. Carrying values in the table excluded swap adjustments and equity components of convertible debt.
 
Level 3 Valuation Process
 
Our valuation policies and procedures are determined by the Accounting Department, which ultimately reports to the Chief Financial Officer, in coordination with appropriate business asset owners and third-party valuation services when needed. Changes in fair value and methods for calibration, back testing, and other testing procedures of pricing models are evaluated through analytical review by managers of the responsible Accounting Department quarterly, by the Global Controller at inception and periodically with significant changes. Material valuations are discussed with the Audit Committee at inception and periodically if changes are significant or if impairment charges are recorded. Third-party information is evaluated for consistency with the FASB ASC for fair value measurement through analytical review and in-depth discussions with a variety of valuation experts.
 
Unobservable inputs are used only to the extent that observable inputs are not available and reflect management assumptions that cannot be corroborated with observable market data about what market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability, including assumptions about risk. Our unobservable inputs consist primarily of expected cash flows, stock price volatility, and other rates derived through extrapolation or interpolation. These inputs are developed based on the best information available, including trends deduced from available historical information and future expectations, using company specific data and market or industry published data. These inputs are validated for reasonableness by analytic comparison to other relevant valuation statistics whenever possible. Unobservable inputs depend on the facts and circumstances specific to a given asset or liability and require significant professional judgment.
 
9.              FINANCIAL DERIVATIVES
 
Foreign Currency Hedging
 
The notional amount of foreign currency contracts hedging our exposure related to monetary assets and liabilities denominated in nonfunctional currency totaled $19.1 million at June 30, 2012 and $13.9 million at September 30, 2011.
 
In May 2007, we executed five-year forward contracts designated as fair value hedges to protect a portion of the US dollar value of our Hong Kong dollar investment in the CLS convertible note (See Note 2). In conjunction with the early redemption of this CLS investment negotiated in September 2010, we executed additional contracts which effectively reduced the cumulative amount of forward contracts. These contracts were terminated in May 2012 with the final payment received on the CLS convertible note.
 
Interest Rate Management
 
In conjunction with our 7.5% Bonds issued in June 2009, we executed $250.0 million notional value of interest rate swaps that exchange 7.5% fixed interest payments for variable rate interest payments, at one-month LIBOR plus 342 bps, reset two business days before the 15th of each month. In April 2011, we additionally executed $250.0 million notional value interest rate swaps that exchange the remaining fixed interest payments on these bonds for variable rate interest payments, based on six-month LIBOR plus 409 bps, reset in arrears two business days before June 15 and December 15 each year. All of these swaps terminate on June 15, 2019.
 
In conjunction with our 5.5% Bonds issued in June 2010, we executed $300.0 million notional value of interest rate swaps that terminate on June 15, 2020. These swaps effectively exchange 5.5% fixed interest payments for variable rate interest payments, based on the six-month LIBOR plus 186 bps, reset in arrears two business days before June 15 and December 15 each year. These swaps terminate on June 15, 2020.
 
All of our interest rate swaps are designated fair value hedges against changes in the fair value of a portion of their related bonds. Net amounts receivable or payable under our swaps settle semiannually on June 15 and December 15. Our assessments have determined that these interest rate swaps are highly effective.
 
 
16

 
 
Presentation of Derivative Amounts
 
Balance Sheet Location and Fair Value
 
June 30,
2012
   
September 30,
2011
 
Non-designated Hedges
           
Foreign currency contracts: Other assets and deferred costs (current)
  $ 0.1     $ 0.4  
Foreign currency contracts: Other accrued liabilities
    0.4       -  
Designated Hedges
               
Interest rate swaps: Other assets and deferred costs (noncurrent)
    108.7       90.4  
Interest rate swaps: Long-term debt
    111.5       93.2  
 
   
Periods Ended June 30,
 
   
Quarters
   
Nine Months
 
Income Statement Location and Gain (loss)
 
2012
   
2011
   
2012
   
2011
 
Non-designated Hedges
                       
Foreign currency contracts: Other income (expense)
  $ -     $ 1.5     $ 0.6     $ 2.8  
Designated Hedges
                               
Interest rate swap - ineffectiveness: Other income (expense)
  $ (0.8 )   $ (2.3 )   $ 0.1     $ (2.6 )
Interest rate swap - effectiveness: Interest expense
    5.6       6.3       17.8       15.7  
 
10.          CREDIT FACILITIES AND INDEBTEDNESS
 
Total Outstanding debt
 
   
June 30,
2012
   
September 30,
2011
 
Credit facilities
  $ 280.0     $ -  
3.25% Convertible Notes
    850.0       850.0  
7.5% Bonds
    500.0       500.0  
5.5% Bonds
    300.0       300.0  
Total principal debt obligations
    1,930.0       1,650.0  
Discounts:
               
3.25% Convertible Notes
    (68.6 )     (93.5 )
7.5% Bonds
    (2.1 )     (2.3 )
5.5% Bonds
    (1.0 )     (1.1 )
Swap fair value adjustments:
               
7.5% Bonds
    72.1       61.8  
5.5% Bonds
    39.4       31.4  
Total outstanding debt, net
  $ 1,969.8     $ 1,646.3  
 
IGT was compliant with all covenants and embedded features required no bifurcation at June 30, 2012.
 
Credit Facilities
 
At June 30, 2012, $280.0 million was outstanding under our domestic credit facility, $446.5 million was available, and $23.5 million was reserved for letters of credit and performance bonds. Our foreign credit facility in Australia was terminated in April 2012.
 
 
17

 
 
3.25% Convertible Notes
 
   
Periods Ended June 30,
 
   
Quarters
   
Nine Months
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2012
   
2011
 
Contractual interest expense
  $ 6.9     $ 6.9     $ 20.7     $ 20.7  
Discount amortization
    8.5       7.7       24.9       22.8  
Remaining discount amortization period    
1.9 years
                         
 
Bonds
 
Interest rate swaps executed in conjunction with our bonds are described in Note 9.
 
11.           CONTINGENCIES
 
Litigation
 
From time to time, in the normal course of its operations, the Company is a party to litigation matters and claims. Litigation can be expensive and disruptive to normal business operations.  Moreover, the results of complex legal proceedings are difficult to predict and the Company’s view of these matters may change in the future as the litigation and events related thereto unfold. The Company expenses legal fees as incurred.  The Company records a provision for contingent losses when it is both probable that a liability will be incurred and the amount or range of the loss can be reasonably estimated. Except as otherwise stated below, we have concluded that we cannot estimate the reasonably possible loss or range of loss, including reasonably possible losses in excess of amounts already accrued, for each specific matter disclosed below. An unfavorable outcome to any legal matter, if material, could have an adverse effect on the Company’s operations or its financial position, liquidity or results of operations.
 
Bally
 
2004 Federal District Court of Nevada
 
On December 7, 2004, IGT filed a complaint in US District Court for the District of Nevada, alleging that defendants Alliance Gaming Corp., Bally Gaming Int'l, Inc., and Bally Gaming, Inc. infringed six US patents held by IGT: US Patent Nos. 6,827,646; 5,848,932; 5,788,573; 5,722,891; 6,712,698; and 6,722,985. On January 21, 2005, defendants filed an answer denying the allegations in the complaint and raising various affirmative defenses to IGT's asserted claims. Defendants also asserted fourteen counterclaims against IGT, including counterclaims for a declaratory judgment of non-infringement, invalidity, and unenforceability of the asserted patents, and for antitrust violations and intentional interference with prospective business advantage. IGT successfully moved for partial summary judgment on defendants’ counterclaims for intentional interference with prospective business advantage and defendants’ antitrust allegations related to the gaming machine market. IGT denied the remaining allegations.
 
On May 9, 2007, the Court issued an order construing disputed terms of the asserted patent claims. On October 16, 2008, the Court issued summary judgment rulings finding certain of IGT’s patents, including patents that IGT believes cover bonus wheel gaming machines, invalid as obvious. The rulings also found that Bally was not infringing certain patents asserted by IGT. Bally’s antitrust and unfair competition counterclaims remained pending. On November 7, 2008, the Court issued an order staying the proceedings and certifying the summary judgment and claim construction rulings for immediate appeal. On December 1, 2008, IGT appealed the rulings to the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. On October 22, 2009, the Federal Circuit affirmed the District Court’s summary judgment rulings.
 
On December 7, 2009, Bally filed a motion to lift the stay and schedule a trial on the remaining issues. At a February 1, 2010 hearing on the motion, the Court indicated that it would revisit earlier motions for summary judgment on the issues not addressed on appeal, including IGT’s motions for summary judgment on Bally’s antitrust and unfair competition counterclaims. On November 29, 2010, the Court granted summary judgment in favor of IGT on all antitrust and unfair competition counterclaims by Bally and dismissed all other remaining claims. Bally has appealed the grant of summary judgment.
 
 
18

 
 
2006 Federal District Court of Delaware
 
On April 28, 2006, IGT filed a complaint in US District Court for the District of Delaware, alleging that defendants Bally Technologies, Inc., Bally Gaming Int'l, Inc., and Bally Gaming, Inc. infringed nine US patents held by IGT: US Patent Nos. RE 38,812; RE 37,885; 6,832,958; 6,319,125; 6,244,958; 6,431,983; 6,607,441; 6,565,434; and 6,620,046. The complaint alleged that the “BALLY POWER BONUSING™” technology infringed one or more of the claims of the asserted IGT patents. On June 30, 2006, defendants filed an answer denying the allegations in the complaint and raising various affirmative defenses to IGT’s asserted claims. Defendants also asserted twelve counterclaims against IGT, including counterclaims for a declaratory judgment of non-infringement, invalidity, and unenforceability of the asserted patents, antitrust violations, unfair competition, and intentional interference with prospective business advantage. IGT denied these allegations. Pursuant to stipulation of the parties, all claims and counterclaims, except those relating to US Patent Nos. RE 37,885 ("the '885 patent"), RE 38,812 ("the '812 patent"), and 6,431,983 (“the ‘983 patent”), were dismissed. All proceedings relating to Bally’s antitrust, unfair competition, and intentional interference counterclaims were stayed.
 
On April 28, 2009, the court issued a summary judgment ruling finding the '885 and '812 patents valid. The court also ruled that Bally's "Power Rewards" and "ACSC Power Winners" products infringe certain claims of the '885 and '812 patents. The court granted Bally's motion for summary judgment that Bally's "SDS Power Winners" does not infringe the '885 patent and "Power Bank" and "Power Promotions" do not infringe the '983 patent. The court denied Bally's motion for summary judgment that the '983 patent is invalid. The parties agreed that Bally's counterclaim for a declaratory judgment on invalidity of the '983 patent would be dismissed without prejudice. IGT’s motion for a permanent injunction against Bally’s infringing products was denied.
 
On April 28, 2010, the court entered an order dismissing without prejudice Bally’s remaining counterclaims (antitrust, unfair competition and intentional interference with business relationships) and entered final judgment in favor of IGT and against the Bally defendants and Bally appealed. On October 6, 2011, the United States Federal Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the judgment in favor of IGT and against Bally.
 
A trial to determine the amount of damages incurred by IGT, and related matters, as a result of Bally's infringement has been scheduled for November 2012.
 
Aristocrat
 
2006 Northern Federal District Court of California
 
On June 12, 2006, Aristocrat Technologies Australia PTY Ltd. and Aristocrat Technologies, Inc. filed a patent infringement lawsuit against IGT. Aristocrat alleged that IGT willfully infringed US Patent No. 7,056,215 (the “’215 patent”), which issued on June 6, 2006. On December 15, 2006, Aristocrat filed an amended complaint, adding allegations that IGT willfully infringed US Patent No. 7,108,603, which issued on September 19, 2006. The IGT products named in the original and amended complaints were the Fort Knox® mystery progressive slot machines. On June 13, 2007, the US District Court for the Northern District of California entered an order granting summary judgment in favor of IGT declaring both patents invalid. The US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit reversed this decision on September 22, 2008. IGT’s request for a rehearing was denied on November 17, 2008.
 
This case recommenced in the District Court and on May 13, 2010, the District Court entered an order granting IGT’s motion for summary judgment of non-infringement. Aristocrat appealed this judgment.  Proceedings on IGT’s claim that Aristocrat committed inequitable conduct in reviving the ‘215 patent application continued in the District Court.  A trial was held the week of April 4, 2011 on that inequitable conduct issue, and that claim was dismissed on May 6, 2011.
 
IGT and Aristocrat entered into an agreement, effective September 30, 2011, settling the lawsuit. On October 6, 2011, the parties filed a letter with the court advising the court that, in accordance with the parties’ resolution of several disputes between them, the case will be concluded by dismissal with prejudice following the final resolution of the pending appeal of the judgment of non-infringement.  In connection with the settlement, IGT was granted an irrevocable paid-up license to the Aristocrat patents that were the subject of the litigation and related patents.
 
 
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2010 Central Federal District Court of California
 
On November 15, 2010, IGT filed a complaint in the US District Court for the Central District of California against Aristocrat Leisure Limited of Australia and its US affiliate Aristocrat Technologies, Inc. (collectively “Aristocrat”) seeking a preliminary and permanent injunction and damages for the infringement of US Patent No. 6,620,047 (the “’047 patent”) and US Patent No. RE 39,370 (the “’370 patent”) in violation of 35 U.S.C. section 271.
 
On January 28, 2011, IGT asserted an additional claim against Aristocrat for infringement of US Patent No 7,063,615 (the “’615 patent”) seeking similar relief. IGT asserted that Aristocrat infringes on the ‘047, the ‘370, and the ‘615 patents in connection with the sale and distribution of gaming devices, including the Viridian WS slot machine, without authorization or license from IGT. Aristocrat has denied infringement, filed various affirmative defenses and counterclaimed for patent invalidity.
 
IGT and Aristocrat entered into an agreement, effective September 30, 2011, settling the lawsuit and on October 4, 2011, the court entered an order dismissing the lawsuit.  In connection with the settlement, IGT granted Aristocrat a non-exclusive license to certain IGT patents. IGT and Aristocrat subsequently entered into an arbitration proceeding regarding Aristocrat’s payment of royalties under the license agreement, which was concluded in IGT’s favor in June 2012.
 
Rice (formerly Piercey) v Atlantic Lotteries
 
On May 11, 2010, Atlantic Lottery Corporation commenced an action against International Game Technology, VLC, Inc. and IGT-Canada, wholly-owned subsidiaries of International Game Technology, and other manufacturers of video lottery machines in the Supreme Court of New Foundland and Labrador seeking indemnification for any damages that may be awarded against Atlantic Lottery Corporation in a class action suit also filed in the Supreme Court of New Foundland and Labrador.  In December 2011, the plaintiff filed a motion seeking leave to substitute a new plaintiff in place of Rice and to make certain amendments to plaintiff’s statement of claim.  In January 2012, Atlantic Lottery Corporation filed a motion to dismiss the action for abuse of process. By a decision, dated April 5, 2012, the Court granted defendants’ motion to strike plaintiff’s statement of claim, terminating the action.
 
Shareholder Actions
 
Securities Class Action
 
On July 30, 2009, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 697 filed a putative securities fraud class action in the US District Court for the District of Nevada, alleging causes of action under Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Exchange Act against IGT and certain of its current and former officers and directors. The complaint alleges that between November 1, 2007 and October 30, 2008, the defendants inflated IGT's stock price through a series of materially false and misleading statements or omissions regarding IGT's business, operations, and prospects. In April 2010, plaintiffs filed an amended complaint.  In March 2011, defendants’ motion to dismiss that complaint was granted in part and denied in part. The Court found that the allegations concerning statements about the seasonality of game play levels and announcements of projects with Harrah’s and City Center were sufficient to state a claim.  Plaintiffs did not state a claim based on the remaining statements about earnings, operating expense, or forward-looking statements about play levels and server-based technology.
 
The parties have settled this action.  On February 1, 2012, at the direction of the Court, the plaintiffs filed a Notice of Pending Settlement. On March 28, 2012, the parties submitted to the Court a stipulation to settle the litigation for a payment of $12.5 million. On March 30, 2012 the Court issued an order of preliminary approval and the settlement was paid into escrow by insurance in April 2012. A hearing for final approval of the settlement by the Court has been scheduled for October 4, 2012.
 
Derivative Actions
 
Between August 20, 2009 and September 17, 2009, the Company was nominally sued in a series of derivative lawsuits filed in the US District Court for the District of Nevada, captioned Fosbre v. Matthews et al., Case No. 3:09-cv-00467; Calamore v. Matthews et al., Case No. 3:09-cv-00489; Israni v. Bittman, et al., Case No. 3:09-cv-00536; and Aronson v. Matthews et al., Case No. 3:09-cv-00542. Plaintiffs purportedly brought their respective actions on behalf of the Company. The complaints asserted claims against various current and former officers and directors of the Company, for breaches of fiduciary duties, unjust enrichment, abuse of control, gross mismanagement, waste of corporate assets, and contribution and indemnification. The complaints sought an unspecified amount of damages and alleged similar facts as the securities class action lawsuit.
 
 
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The complaints additionally alleged that certain individual defendants engaged in insider trading and that the director defendants improperly handled Thomas J. Matthews’ resignation as Chief Executive Officer of the Company. The actions were consolidated and subsequently a consolidated derivative complaint was filed in December 2009. Defendants moved to dismiss that complaint. On July 6, 2010, the Court granted the defendants’ motion to dismiss, with leave to amend.  After plaintiffs elected not to amend, the court entered judgment in favor of the defendants.  The plaintiff in Israni v. Bittman, et al. appealed to the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. On April 2, 2012, the appeals court affirmed the district court’s decision dismissing the action.
 
In a letter dated October 7, 2009 to the Company’s Board of Directors, a shareholder made factual allegations similar to those set forth in the above derivative and securities class actions and demanded that the Board investigate, address and remedy the harm allegedly inflicted on IGT. In particular, the letter alleged that certain officers and directors grossly mismanaged the Company by overspending in the area of R&D of server-based game technology despite a looming recession to which the Company was particularly vulnerable; by making or allowing false and misleading statements regarding the Company’s growth prospects and earnings guidance; and by wasting corporate assets by causing the Company to repurchase Company stock at inflated prices. The letter asserts that this alleged conduct resulted in breaches of fiduciary duties and violations of Section 10(b) of the Exchange Act and SEC Rule 10b-5. On July 9, 2010, the shareholder filed a derivative lawsuit in the US District Court for the District of Nevada, captioned Sprando v. Hart, et al., Case No. 3:10-cv-00415 and asserting claims similar to those described above. No claims were asserted against the Company, which is a nominal defendant.  On July 25, 2011, the Court granted the Company’s motion to dismiss with prejudice. Plaintiff then appealed to the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.
 
In February 2011, another shareholder sent a letter to the Company’s Board of Directors requesting that the Board investigate allegations similar to those set forth in the derivative actions described above and bring a lawsuit against various of the Company’s current or former officers and directors. In response the Board of Directors formed a litigation committee comprised of disinterested outside directors and assisted by outside counsel to investigate and evaluate the allegations raised in this letter. At the conclusion of this investigation, the committee concluded and recommended that it would not be in the best interests of the Company or its shareholders to pursue the proposed claims. The Board considered and accepted this recommendation and the Company informed the shareholder of the Board’s resolution in September 2011. On March 15, 2012, the shareholder filed a derivative action in state court in Reno, Nevada (Gusinsky v. Thomas J. Matthews, et. al.), Second Judicial Court of the State of Nevada.
 
On April 8, 2011, the Company was nominally sued in a derivative complaint filed in the US District Court for the District of Nevada, captioned Arduini v. Hart, et al., Case No. 3:11-cv-00255.  The claims and allegations in this complaint are similar to those asserted in the securities class action and derivative actions described above.  A motion to dismiss has been filed. On March 14, 2012, defendants’ motion to dismiss the action was granted. On April 3, 2012, the plaintiff appealed to the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.
 
ERISA Actions
 
On October 2, 2009, two putative class action lawsuits were filed on behalf of participants in the Company’s employee pension plans, naming as defendants the Company, the IGT Profit Sharing Plan Committee, and several current and former officers and directors. The actions, filed in the US District Court for the District of Nevada, are captioned Carr et al. v. International Game Technology et al., Case No. 3:09-cv-00584, and Jordan et al. v. International Game Technology et al., Case No. 3:09-cv-00585. The actions were consolidated.  The consolidated complaint (which seeks unspecified damages) asserts claims under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, 29 U.S.C §§ 1109 and 1132.
 
The consolidated complaint is based on allegations similar to those in the securities and derivative lawsuits described above, and further alleges that the defendants breached fiduciary duties to plan participants by failing to disclose material facts to plan participants, failing to exercise their fiduciary duties solely in the interest of the participants, failing to properly manage plan assets, and permitting participants to elect to invest in Company stock. In March 2011, defendants’ motion to dismiss the consolidated complaint was granted in part and denied in part.  On March 16, 2012, the Court denied plaintiff’s motion for class certification.
 
 
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Environmental Matters
 
CCSC, a casino operation sold by IGT in April 2003, is located in an area that has been designated by the EPA as an active Superfund site because of contamination from historic mining activity in the area. In order for Anchor Coin, an entity IGT acquired in December 2001, to develop the CCSC site, it voluntarily entered into an administrative order of consent with the EPA to conduct soil removal and analysis (a requirement imposed on similarly situated property developers within the region) in conjunction with re-routing mine drainage. The work and obligations contemplated by the agreement were completed by Anchor in June 1998, and the EPA subsequently issued a termination of the order.
 
The EPA, together with other property developers excluding CCSC, continues remediation activities at the site. While we believe our remediation obligations are complete, it is possible that additional contamination may be identified and we could be obligated to participate in remediation efforts. Under accounting guidance for environmental remediation liabilities, we determined the incurrence of additional remediation costs is neither probable nor reasonably estimable and no liability has been recorded.
 
OSHA / Wrongful Termination Matter
 
On July 8, 2004, two former employees filed a complaint with the US Department of Labor, OSHA alleging retaliatory termination in violation of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. The former employees allege that they were terminated in retaliation for questioning whether Anchor and its executives failed to properly disclose information allegedly affecting the value of Anchor's patents in connection with IGT's acquisition of Anchor in December 2001. The former employees also allege that the acquired patents were overvalued on the financial statements of IGT. Outside counsel, retained by an independent committee of our Board of Directors, reviewed the allegations and found them to be entirely without merit.
 
In conjunction with the Anchor acquisition purchase price allocation as of December 31, 2001, IGT used the relief of royalty valuation methodology to estimate the fair value of the patents at $164.4 million. The carrying value of the patents at June 30, 2012 totaled $19.6 million.
 
On November 10, 2004, the employees withdrew their complaint filed with OSHA and filed a notice of intent to file a complaint in federal court. On December 1, 2004, a complaint was filed under seal in the US District Court for the District of Nevada, based on the same facts set forth above regarding their OSHA complaint. IGT filed a motion for summary judgment as to all claims in plaintiffs’ complaint. On June 14, 2007, the US District Court for the District of Nevada entered an order granting summary judgment in favor of IGT as to plaintiffs’ Sarbanes-Oxley whistle-blower claims and dismissed their state law claims without prejudice. Plaintiffs’ motion for reconsideration of the District Court’s decision was denied.
 
Plaintiffs appealed to the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Oral argument was heard on March 12, 2009, and on August 3, 2009, the Ninth Circuit reversed the District Court’s decision. IGT’s motion for summary judgment on plaintiffs’ state law claims was argued on October 22, 2009 and granted in IGT’s favor on December 8, 2009. On April 13, 2010, the District Court granted IGT’s motion to strike the plaintiffs’ jury demand and granted IGT’s motion to retax costs and fees. It denied plaintiffs’ motion for certification and/or reconsideration.
 
On February 8, 2011, a jury verdict was entered in favor of the plaintiffs as to their Sarbanes-Oxley claims and plaintiffs were awarded damages in an amount equal to approximately $2.2 million.  On March 9, 2011, IGT filed a Renewed Motion for Judgment as a Matter of Law and Motion for a New Trial or for Remittitur.  On May 24, 2011, the Court denied these motions, and on May 27, 2011, the Court entered an amended judgment for prejudgment interest of approximately $1.3 million, attorneys’ fees of approximately $1.0 million, and court costs of approximately $132,000.  IGT filed a notice of appeal to the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit on June 21, 2011, which is pending. On July 1, 2011 plaintiffs filed a notice of cross appeal.
 
 
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Arrangements with Off-Balance Sheet Risks
 
In the normal course of business, we are party to financial instruments with off-balance sheet risk, such as performance bonds not reflected in our balance sheet. We do not expect any material losses to result from these arrangements and are not dependent on off-balance sheet financing arrangements to fund our operations.
 
Performance Bonds
 
Performance bonds outstanding related to certain gaming operations equipment totaled $14.6 million at June 30, 2012. We are liable to reimburse the bond issuer in the event of exercise due to our nonperformance.
 
Letters of Credit
 
Outstanding letters of credit issued under our domestic credit facility to ensure payment to certain vendors and governmental agencies totaled $8.9 million at June 30, 2012.
 
IGT Licensor Arrangements
 
Our sales agreements that include software and IP licensing arrangements may require IGT to indemnify the third-party licensee against liability and damages (including legal defense costs) arising from any claims of patent, copyright, trademark infringement, or trade secret misappropriation. Should such a claim occur, we could be required to make payments to the licensee for any liabilities or damages incurred. Historically, we have not incurred any significant settlement costs due to infringement claims. As we consider the likelihood of incurring future costs to be remote, no liability has been recorded.
 
Self-Insurance
 
We are self-insured for various levels of workers’ compensation, directors’ and officers’ liability, and electronic errors and omissions liability, as well as employee medical, dental, prescription drug, and disability coverage. We purchase stop loss coverage to protect against unexpected claims. Accrued insurance claims and reserves include estimated settlements for known claims, and actuarial estimates for claims incurred but not reported.
 
State and Federal Taxes
 
We are subject to sales, use, income, gaming and other tax audits and administrative proceedings in various US federal, state, local, and foreign jurisdictions. While we believe we have properly reported our tax liabilities in each jurisdiction, we can give no assurance that taxing authorities will not propose adjustments that increase our tax liabilities.
 
Product Warranties
 
The majority of our products are generally covered by a warranty for periods ranging from 90 days to one year. We estimate accrued warranty costs in the table below based on historical trends in product failure rates and expected costs to provide warranty services.
 
Nine Months Ended June 30,
 
2012
   
2011
 
Beginning balance
  $ 6.2     $ 9.3  
Reduction for payments made
    (4.7 )     (5.1 )
Accrual for new warranties issued
    6.4       6.5  
Adjustments for pre-existing warranties
    (3.3 )     (2.8 )
Ending balance
  $ 4.6     $ 7.9  
 
 
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12.           INCOME TAXES
 
Our provision for income taxes is based on an estimated effective annual income tax rate, as well as the impact of discrete items, if any, occurring during the period. The provision differs from income taxes currently payable because certain items of income and expense are recognized in different periods for financial statement purposes than for tax return purposes. We reduce deferred tax assets by a valuation allowance when it is more likely than not that some or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.
 
Our effective tax rate for the nine months ended June 30, 2012 increased to 36.2% from 29.4% for the same prior year period. The prior year effective tax rate was positively impacted by the reduction in UTB interest and penalties, an increase in the manufacturing deduction, and the retroactive reinstatement of the R&D tax credit. The current year effective tax rate was negatively impacted by losses in foreign jurisdictions for which there are no associated tax benefits and the expiration of the R&D tax credit partially offset by a reduction in transfer pricing reserves.
 
At June 30, 2012, our gross UTBs totaled $111.0 million, excluding related accrued interest and penalties of $21.8 million. At June 30, 2012, $76.5 million of our UTBs, including related accrued interest and penalties, would affect our effective tax rate if recognized. During the nine months ended June 30, 2012, our UTBs decreased $5.4 million and related interest and penalties increased $1.7 million.
 
We are currently under audit by the IRS for amended returns filed for 1999, 2006 and 2007 as well as both the originally filed and amended returns for 2008 and 2009. We are also subject to examination in various state and foreign jurisdictions. We believe we have recorded all appropriate provisions for outstanding issues for all jurisdictions and open years. However, we can give no assurance that taxing authorities will not propose adjustments that increase our tax liabilities.
 
13.           EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLANS
 
Share-based Compensation
 
SIP As Of And For The Nine Months Ended June 30, 2012
 
         
Weighted Average
       
Options
 
Shares
   
Exercise
Price
   
Remaining
Contractual
Term
   
Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value
 
   
(thousands)
   
(per share)
   
(years)
   
(millions)
 
Outstanding at beginning of fiscal year
    15,245     $ 18.85              
Granted
    294       16.21              
Exercised
    (770 )     12.11              
Forfeited
    (550 )     16.50              
Expired
    (1,555 )     27.35              
Outstanding at end of