XNAS:PRXL Parexel International Corp Annual Report 10-K Filing - 6/30/2012

Effective Date 6/30/2012

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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 FORM 10-K
ý
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012
OR
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from             to             

Commission File Number: 000-21244

PAREXEL INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Massachusetts
 
04-2776269
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification Number)
 
 
195 West Street, Waltham, Massachusetts
 
02451
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (781) 487-9900
Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class:
 
Name of each exchange on which registered:
Common Stock, $.01 par value per share
 
Nasdaq Global Select Market
Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ý  No  ¨.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  ý    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. 
Large Accelerated Filer
 
ý
 
Accelerated Filer
 
¨
 
 
 
 
Non-accelerated Filer
 
¨ (Do not check if smaller reporting company)
 
Smaller Reporting Company
 
¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  ý
The aggregate market value of common stock, $.01 par value per share, held by non-affiliates as of December 31, 2011 was approximately $1,196 million based on the closing price of the registrant’s Common Stock as reported on the Nasdaq Global Select Market on December 30, 2011, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter. The registrant has assumed that all holders of 10% or more of its Common Stock, if any, are affiliates solely for purposes of calculating the aggregate market value of Common Stock held by non-affiliates. As of August 22, 2012 there were 60,197,956 shares of common stock, $.01 par value per share, outstanding.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Specified portions of the Registrant’s Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on December 12, 2012 are incorporated by reference into Part III of this report.

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INDEX
 
 
 

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PART I
ITEM 1. BUSINESS
GENERAL
We are a leading biopharmaceutical services company, providing a broad range of expertise in clinical research, medical communications, consulting, commercialization and advanced technology products and services to the worldwide pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device industries. Our primary objective is to provide quality solutions for managing the biopharmaceutical product lifecycle with the goal of reducing the time, risk, and cost associated with the development and commercialization of new therapies. Since our incorporation in 1983, we have developed significant expertise in processes and technologies supporting this strategy. Our product and service offerings include: clinical trials management, observational studies and patient/disease registries, data management, biostatistical analysis, epidemiology, health economics / outcomes research, pharmacovigilance, medical communications, clinical pharmacology, patient recruitment, post-marketing surveillance, regulatory and product development and commercialization consulting, health policy and reimbursement consulting, performance improvement, medical imaging services, ClinPhone® randomization and trial supply management services (“RTSM”), electronic data capture systems (“EDC”), clinical trial management systems (“CTMS”), web-based portals, systems integration, patient diary applications, and other product development services. We believe that our comprehensive services, depth of therapeutic area expertise, global footprint and related access to patients, and sophisticated information technology, along with our experience in global drug development and product launch services, represent key competitive strengths.
Our services complement the research and development (“R&D”) and marketing functions of pharmaceutical, biotechnology, diagnostics, and medical device companies. Through our clinical research and product launch and commercialization services, we seek to help clients maximize the return on their significant investments in research and development by reducing the time, risk, and cost of clinical development and launch of new products. For large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, outsourcing these types of services to us provides those companies with a high-quality, variable cost alternative to the fixed costs associated with internal drug development. In addition, these large companies can benefit from our technical resource pool, broad therapeutic area expertise, other advisory services, and global infrastructure, all of which are designed to expedite parallel, multi-country clinical trials and accelerate time-to-market. For smaller bio-pharma companies, we provide access to expertise and a virtual and global network that enables them to develop their new products. Our vision is to integrate and build critical mass in the complementary businesses of clinical research, medical communications, drug development and process optimization consulting, as well as related information technology products and integration services. Our goal is to provide significant benefits to sponsor clients through this strategy, namely, a faster and less expensive development and launch process, as well as a clinical development strategy and expertise that support the marketing strategy for new medical products. We believe that the outsourcing of these services has increased in the past and should continue to increase in the future because of several factors, which are placing increased pressure on clients. These factors include the need to more tightly manage costs, capacity limitations, reductions in exclusivity periods, the desire to speed up patient recruitment and reduce development time, increased globalization of clinical trials, productivity issues, upcoming patent expirations, more stringent government regulations, and pricing pressure. With increased levels of investment continuing to be required and with development times being extended, we believe these trends will continue to create opportunities for companies like us that are focused on improving the efficiency of the bio-pharma product development process. Moreover, many of our clients are reassessing how they conduct their R&D activities and are now engaging in outsourcing at a more strategic level. One consequence of this reassessment is that they have started to concentrate their outsourced clinical development activities with a smaller number of providers. We believe that our broad range of offerings, our global presence, our information technology solutions, and our expertise in clinical drug development position us well to participate in these strategic partnerships.
We are one of the largest biopharmaceutical services companies in the world, based upon annual service revenue. Headquartered near Boston, Massachusetts, we manage 70 locations and have approximately 12,695 employees throughout 51 countries around the world. We have operations in healthcare markets around the world, including the United States (“U.S.”), Canada, China, Taiwan, Japan, Singapore, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Germany, the United Kingdom (“U.K.”), France, Italy, Spain, Sweden, Australia, South Africa, Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Israel, Norway, Belgium, The Netherlands, Denmark, Finland, India, Russia, Poland, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, Hungary, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, and Ukraine. During Fiscal Year 2012, we derived 41.6% of our service revenue from the U.S. and 58.4% from non-U.S. operations. Breakdowns of service revenue by geographic region for previous years can be found in Note 15 to the consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 of this annual report. PAREXEL was incorporated in 1983 as a regulatory affairs consulting firm and is a Massachusetts corporation. Josef H. von Rickenbach, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of PAREXEL, was a co-founder. Since our inception, we have executed a focused growth strategy embracing internal expansion as well as strategic acquisitions to expand or enhance our portfolio of services, geographic presence, therapeutic area knowledge, information technology capabilities, and client relationships.


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We have completed two acquisitions over the past five fiscal years, including the acquisition of ClinPhone plc (“ClinPhone”) and APEX International Clinical Research Co., Ltd. (“APEX”). ClinPhone’s strong clinical technology offering was combined with our Perceptive Informatics business segment to provide an extensive line of products and services throughout the entire clinical development lifecycle. Biopharmaceutical companies have increasingly requested technology solutions and expertise to support the full range of clinical development activities while improving the speed and efficiency of clinical programs. We believe that the broad technological offering that we provide gives clients a stronger, more comprehensive suite of clinical information technologies. The APEX acquisition strengthened our global capabilities, providing clients with a wider range of clinical research service offerings throughout the Asia-Pacific region, including mainland China, Hong Kong, India, Taiwan, Singapore, Indonesia, South Korea, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, New Zealand, and Australia. Acquisitions have been, and may continue to be, an important component of PAREXEL’s growth strategy.

DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS
We provide a broad range of expertise in clinical research, medical communications, consulting, commercialization and informatics and advanced technology services to the worldwide pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device industries. We have three reporting segments: Clinical Research Services (“CRS”), PAREXEL Consulting and Medical Communications Services (“PCMS”), and Perceptive Informatics (“Perceptive”).
CRS constitutes our core business and includes all phases of clinical research from “first-in-man” trials, where a medicinal entity is tested on human subjects for the first time, through post-marketing studies, following approval by the presiding regulatory body. CRS service offerings include clinical trials management, observational studies, patient/disease registries and post-marketing surveillance, data management and biostatistics, epidemiology and health economics/outcomes research, clinical logistics, pharmacovigilance, and clinical pharmacology, as well as related medical affairs, patient recruitment, and investigator site services.
PCMS provides technical expertise and advice in such areas as drug development, regulatory affairs, and good manufacturing practice (“GMP”) compliance consulting. In addition, PCMS provides a full spectrum of market development, product development, commercialization, and targeted communications services in support of product launch. PCMS consultants also identify alternatives and propose solutions to address clients’ product development, registration, and commercialization issues. Additionally, PCMS provides reimbursement and market access (“RMA”) services.
Perceptive provides information technology solutions designed to improve clients’ product development processes. Perceptive’s portfolio of products and services includes ClinPhone RTSM, medical imaging services, CTMS, EDC, web-based portals, systems integration, and patient diary applications. These solutions are sold individually or in combination, as elements of an eClinical suite.
The revenue generated by each of our business segments for each of the last three fiscal years is described below under the heading for each segment. The gross profit of each segment for each of the last three fiscal years is described in Note 16 to the consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 of this annual report. We have a global infrastructure supporting our business segments and, therefore, assets are not identified by reportable segment.
CLINICAL RESEARCH SERVICES (CRS)
Our CRS business segment generated service revenue of $1,038.7 million, or 74.4%, of our consolidated service revenue in Fiscal Year 2012, $922.8 million, or 76.1%, of our consolidated service revenue in Fiscal Year 2011, and $870.7 million, or 77.0%, of our consolidated service revenue in Fiscal Year 2010.
CRS offers complete services for the design, initiation and management of clinical trials programs, a critical element in obtaining regulatory approval for biopharmaceutical products. We have performed services in connection with clinical trials in most therapeutic areas, including: Oncology, Cardiology, Infectious Diseases, Neurology, Allergy/Immunology, Endocrinology/Metabolism, Gastroenterology, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Orthopedics, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Pulmonology, Rheumatology, Dermatology, Genitourinary, Opthalmology, and Transplantation. Our multi-disciplinary clinical trials group examines a product’s existing preclinical and clinical data to design clinical trials to provide evidence of the product’s safety and efficacy.
CRS can manage many aspects of clinical trials including: study protocol design; Case Report Form (“CRF”) design; paper or electronic questionnaires designed for use in clinical research; site and investigator recruitment; patient enrollment; study monitoring and data collection; data analysis; report writing; and medical services.
Clinical trials and observational studies are monitored and conducted by CRS in adherence with Good Clinical Practice (“GCP”) and Good Pharmacoepidemiological Practice ("GPP"), respectively. The design of efficient CRFs, detailed operations manuals, and site monitoring by our clinical research associates seek to ensure that clinical investigators and their staff follow established study protocols. We have adopted standard operating procedures (“SOPs”) that are intended to satisfy regulatory requirements and serve as a tool for controlling and enhancing the quality of our worldwide clinical services.

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Clinical trials represent one of the most expensive and time-consuming parts of the overall biopharmaceutical product development process. The information generated during these trials is critical to gaining marketing approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration (the “FDA”), the European Medicines Agency (the “EMA”) based on the recommendation of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (the “CHMP”), and other comparable regulatory agencies as well as market acceptance by clinicians, patients, and third-party payors. CRS clinical trial management services involve many phases of clinical trials, including Phases I, II, III, and IV. See “Government Regulations” below for additional information regarding processes involved in clinical trials.
Early Phase – The Early Phase group of CRS encompasses the early stages of clinical testing, when a product is first evaluated to assess the potential safety and efficacy of the product. These tests vary from “first-in-man” to “dose-ranging” to “proof of concept” studies in Phases I and IIa of development. The Early Phase group of CRS offers clients a one-stop service where studies are performed in healthy volunteers as well as in patients of various disease populations. The support services include project and program management, drug development consulting, medical writing, handling of investigational products, data management, biostatistical and bioanalytical services. Our international network of Early Phase operations includes operations in Berlin, Germany; Baltimore, Maryland (U.S.); Glendale, California (U.S.); Bloemfontein, South Africa; and Harrow, U.K. A bioanalytical laboratory, which performs drug analyses in accordance with Good Laboratory Practices (“GLP”), a system of managed controls for laboratory and research organizations to ensure the consistency and reliability of results, is also located in Bloemfontein. With these locations, the Early Phase group offers clinical pharmacology services (including bioanalytical services) with a total of 430 dedicated beds (cooperating partners not included) on three continents.
Phase II-III/PACE – The Phase II-III/Peri Approval Clinical Excellence (“PACE”) group of CRS encompasses the later stages of clinical testing. Through this CRS unit, we assist clients with one or more of the aspects of clinical trials and observational studies described below. CRS performs both full-service and single- or multi-service projects. As a result, our involvement may range from participating in just one aspect of a clinical trial or observational study to all aspects. These services include the following, the majority of which are also provided by our Early Phase group:
Study Protocol Design – The protocol defines, among other things, the medical issues a study seeks to examine and the statistical tests that will be conducted. Accordingly, the protocol specifies the frequency and type of laboratory and clinical measures that are to be tracked and analyzed, the number of patients required to produce a statistically valid result, the period of time over which such patients must be tracked and the frequency and dosage of drug administration.
CRF Design – Once the study protocol has been finalized, a CRF must be developed. The CRF is the critical document for collecting the necessary clinical data as dictated by the study protocol. It may change at different stages of a trial. CRFs for one patient in a given study may consist of 100 or more pages.
Site and Investigator Recruitment – The product under investigation is administered to patients usually by third-party physicians, serving as independent contractors, referred to as investigators, at hospitals, clinics, or other locations, referred to as clinical sites. Medical devices are implemented or tested by investigators in similar settings. Potential investigators may be identified and solicited by the product sponsor. A significant portion of a trial’s success depends on the successful identification and recruitment of experienced investigators with an adequate base of patients who satisfy the requirements of the study protocol. We have access to thousands of investigators who have conducted clinical trials for us. We provide additional services at the clinical site to assist physicians and expedite the clinical research process.
Patient Enrollment – The investigators, usually with our assistance, find and enroll patients suitable for the study. The speed with which trials can be completed is significantly affected by the rate at which patients are enrolled. Prospective patients are required to review information about the clinical test and the investigational product and its possible side effects, and sign an informed consent form to record their knowledge and acceptance of potential side effects. Patients also undergo a medical examination to determine whether they meet the requirements of the study protocol. Patients then receive the investigational product or a control (for example, a placebo) and are examined by the investigator as specified by the study protocol. Investigators are responsible for administering the products to patients, as well as examining patients and conducting necessary tests.
Study Monitoring and Data Collection – As patients are examined and tests are conducted in accordance with the study protocol and applicable regulatory requirements, data are recorded on CRFs, either electronically or paper-based. CRFs are transmitted electronically from study sites or collected by specially trained persons known as clinical monitors. Sites are closely managed over the telephone/internet and monitors visit the sites as needed to ensure that the CRFs are completed correctly and to verify that the study has been conducted in compliance with the protocol and regulatory requirements. We offer several EDC technologies, which significantly enhance both the quality and timeliness of clinical data capture and collection while achieving significant efficiency savings. Our study monitoring and data collection services are designed to comply with the adverse events reporting guidelines and related regulatory

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requirements of the FDA and other relevant regulatory agencies. As many as 90% of new trials are EDC-based.
Data Management – Our data management professionals provide a broad array of services to support the accurate collection, organization, validation, and analysis of clinical data. For instance, they assist in the design of CRFs and investigator training manuals to ensure that data are collected in an organized and consistent format in compliance with the study protocol and all applicable regulatory requirements. Databases are designed according to the analytical specifications of the project and the particular needs of the client. The use of scanning and imaging of the CRFs and the use of EDC technologies to gather and report clinical data expedites data exchange while minimizing data collection errors by permitting the verification of data integrity in a more timely manner. After the data is entered, the data management team performs an array of data abstraction, data review, medical coding, serious adverse event reconciliations, loading of electronic data (such as laboratory data), database verification, and editing and resolution of data problems. The data is then submitted to the sponsor in a customized format prescribed by the sponsor. Our CRS business segment has extensive experience throughout the world in the creation of scientific databases for all phases of the drug development process, including the creation of customized databases to meet client-specific formats, integrated databases to support new drug application (“NDA”) and equivalent submissions and databases created and maintained in compliance with FDA, European, Asian and other regulatory specifications and requirements.
Biostatistics and Programming – Our biostatistics professionals assist clients with all phases of drug development, including biostatistical consulting, database design, data analysis, and statistical reporting. These professionals develop and review protocols, design appropriate analysis plans, and design report formats to address the objectives of the study protocol as well as the client’s individual objectives. Working with programming staff, bisostatisticians/epidemiologists perform appropriate analyses and produce tables, graphs, listings, and other applicable displays of results according to an analysis plan. Our CRS business segment bisostatisticians/epidemiologists may also represent clients during panel hearings at the FDA and other regulatory agencies.
Report Writing – A description of the study conducted, along with the statistical analysis of data collected during the trial and other clinical data are presented and summarized in a final report generated for inclusion in a regulatory document. We assist clients with writing reports for inclusion in these documents.
Medical Services – Throughout the course of a development program, our physicians provide a wide range of medical research and consulting services to improve the efficiency and quality of clinical research, including medical supervision of clinical trials, medical monitoring of patient safety, review and reporting of adverse events, medical writing, and strategy and product development. Our medical services professionals also provide lifecycle drug safety services combining operational pharmacovigilance and pharmacovigilance consulting. Operational pharmacovigilance capabilities cover all phases of clinical development and drug safety for marketed products.
Project Management – Throughout the entire spectrum of activities described above, our CRS segment provides project management services. These services entail providing overall leadership to our project team, acting as the main client liaison, project planning, managing progress against study goals and deliverables, budget management, progress and metrics reporting, and issue resolution. These project management services are offered on all types of trials – single-service, multi-service, or full-service.
Clinical Logistics – In association with the clinical trials we conduct, we offer a full range of clinical logistics services that include coordinating investigational drug supply manufacturing, managing import/export requirements, labeling, warehousing, distribution, and inventory control (including the return and destruction of unused trial medication, laboratory services, and ancillary supplies).
PAREXEL CONSULTING AND MEDICAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES (PCMS)
Service revenue from the PCMS business segment represented $167.1 million, or 12.0%, of consolidated service revenue in Fiscal Year 2012, $129.7 million, or 10.7%, of consolidated service revenue in Fiscal Year 2011, and $121.7 million, or 10.8%, of consolidated service revenue in Fiscal Year 2010.
We conduct our PCMS operations through five groups:
Integrated Product Development Consulting – Our Integrated Product Development (“IPD”) consulting group provides comprehensive product development and regulatory consulting services for pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device companies in major jurisdictions in the U.S., Europe, Japan and emerging markets in Asia, Middle East and North Africa, and Latin America. These services include drug and device development and regulatory strategy design, scientific and technical evaluation, writing and review services, preparation, review and submission of regulatory applications (both for clinical trials and for marketing authorizations) to regulatory authorities in dozens of countries, regulatory training for client personnel, and expert liaison with the FDA, EMA, and other regulatory agencies around the world. Our IPD consulting group works closely with clients to design product development and regulatory strategies and comprehensive registration programs. Our product development and regulatory experts

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include individuals who have joined us from the biopharmaceutical industry and regulatory agencies such as the FDA and agencies in the UK, Germany, The Netherlands, Sweden, and France. Our experts review existing published literature and regulatory precedents, evaluate the scientific and technical data of a product (Non-Clinical, Clinical, CMC, Regulatory) based on their individual and collective expertise and experience, assess the competitive and regulatory environments in specific relation to our clients’ products and business goals, identify deficiencies in client product documentation (“gap analysis”), and define the steps necessary to obtain regulatory approvals in the most expeditious manner. Through these services, we help our clients obtain regulatory approval for particular products or product lines in markets around the world.
Clinical Trial Regulatory Services – Our Clinical Trial Regulatory Services team helps clients to efficiently submit clinical trial applications (CTAs, INDs) to regulatory authorities throughout the world. We manage successful interactions with regulatory agencies and deliver regulatory submissions in approximately 75 countries throughout the world.
Strategic Compliance Consulting – Our Strategic Compliance group offers a range of specialized clinical and manufacturing consulting services designed to help pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device companies achieve and maintain regulatory compliance, product quality, and process excellence. These services include clinical and manufacturing compliance strategy, assistance with regulatory agency enforcement issues, risk management, GCP, GLP, GTP and current GMP audits, pre-approval inspection readiness, process optimization, organizational alignment, and training. Our Strategic Compliance group offers its clients experienced regulatory and industry professionals – formerly from the FDA, or from the quality departments of major biotech, pharmaceutical, and medical device companies.
Medical Communications Services – Our Medical Communications Services (“MedCom”) group assists biopharmaceutical clients in their efforts to achieve optimal market penetration for their products worldwide through expert medical communications and publications services. MedCom utilizes its expertise in strategic consultancy, market and competitive landscaping, publications planning, scientific writing, managed markets, and regulatory compliance to provide effective and compliant scientific communications to a diverse audience of provider, payer, and patient advocacy group stakeholders. An integrated communications plan can detail external and internal strategies, including communications objectives, target audiences, communications priorities and timing, key messages, key meetings and events, and target publications and media. MedCom supports marketing communication objectives across a broad spectrum of media from publications through interactive technologies. Other services include planning of meetings and exhibits in premier scientific conferences and symposia.
Commercialization Consulting Services – Our Commercialization Consulting Services group provides commercialization strategies and deliverables that address the objectives of commercial stakeholders, such as Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Medical Affairs, Marketing, Reimbursement, and Managed Markets. We offer clients the ability to understand how changing marketplace dynamics may impact product development, product reimbursement, patient access and commercial success. We identify, gather, analyze, and communicate data that is critical to maximizing product value and commercial success. Our services include Commercial & Public, Private, and Managed Markets Access Strategy, Payer Communications and Publications Strategy, and Health Outcomes Analysis, Economic & Budget Impact Modeling. We help our clients better prepare the product for the market, better prepare the market for their product and demonstrate product value in the marketplace.
PERCEPTIVE INFORMATICS (PERCEPTIVE)
Service revenue from our Perceptive business represented $190.7 million, or 13.6%, of consolidated service revenue in Fiscal Year 2012, $159.5 million, or 13.2%, of consolidated service revenue in Fiscal Year 2011, and $138.7 million, or 12.2%, of consolidated service revenue in Fiscal Year 2010.
Perceptive products and services include:
eClinical Suite – Perceptive offers most of our proprietary products and services (described below) as a seamlessly-integrated eClinical suite.
ClinPhone Randomization & Trial Supply Management (ClinPhone RTSM) – Perceptive provides automated randomization and logistics management through its ClinPhone RTSM solutions. Our services include both Interactive Voice Response (“IVR”) and Interactive Web Response (“IWR”) technologies. ClinPhone RTSM solutions have been used in over 2,800 clinical trials, helping our clients achieve treatment group balance, eliminate selection bias, and limit the predictability of treatment allocations. This is all designed to comply with the latest regulatory requirements. ClinPhone RTSM allows effective real-time implementation of randomization algorithm modifications required for adaptive trial designs.
Medical Imaging Services – Perceptive offers products and services that allow our clients to apply and manage

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medical imaging in clinical trials. Clinical study sponsors increasingly rely on imaging as a surrogate endpoint in support of efficacy and safety. Our therapeutic and imaging experts provide a range of capabilities in the application of imaging techniques from early clinical development through peri-approval studies. These services include:
Standardization of imaging and image management at investigative sites
Image collection at a central location
Development of independent review charters for review and approval by regulatory authorities
Employing directly or subcontracting independent reviewers and training these reviewers on the assessment criteria and reviewer roles and responsibilities
Management of the logistical processes involved in the independent review
Clinical Trial Management System (CTMS) – We offer CTMS solutions to assist biopharmaceutical companies with the complex process of planning and managing clinical trials. Our IMPACT® solution provides established global pharmaceutical companies with a flexible options that include hosted or on-premise solutions.
Electronic Data Capture (EDC) – DataLabs® EDC is one of the industry’s first single data management systems that unifies the functionality of paper data entry (PDE) with the flexibility of electronic data capture (EDC). DataLabs EDC is able to combine data collected on paper with data collected electronically into one easy-to-use electronic clinical data management platform. The collected information feeds into a single database providing clients with fully integrated data. With DataLabs EDC, users are able to design a study, collect data using either method and then clean and manage that data using a single system. DataLabs EDC is based on Microsoft® connected technology and servers, providing end-users with an intuitive, familiar, and easy-to-use experience.
Electronic Patient Reported Outcomes (ePRO) – Patient self-reported data is increasingly playing a key part in efficacy and quality of life assessment, patient recruitment, symptom and safety information and medical compliance monitoring. Our ePRO solutions provide the flexibility to choose among the most commonly used ePRO methods, IVR, Web, personal digital assistant (“PDA”), and computer tablet (“Tablet”):
IVR (Interactive Voice Response) – Our leading IVR platform enables ePRO delivery using the subject’s own telephone, making it highly cost-effective and simple to deploy;
Web/IWR (Interactive Web Response) – The Web offers all of the advantages and benefits of IVR as subjects use any PC connected to the Internet to securely access the ePRO application; and
PDA/Tablet – Depending on the specific characteristics of the protocol, a device-based solution may be best suited for a study.
E-Clinical Technology Services (eCTS) – Perceptive provides leading solutions to integrate systems and processes to help companies simplify the concurrent use of the multiple technologies involved in clinical trials. Perceptive’s integrations are delivered by our dedicated eCTS experts who have an in-depth understanding of advanced technologies, clinical development processes and validated system integrations. Perceptive’s integration solutions and services include our Clinical Technology Integration Platform (CTIP), which is a proprietary environment designed to facilitate seamless two-way exchange of data across different systems via reliable and repeatable integrations. Through our CTIP and dedicated eCTS staff, we can support most integration requirements including validated integrations between our hosted products and key third-party hosted technology solutions.
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
We are committed to investing in information technology designed to help us to provide high quality services; competitive and cost-effective client-facing solutions; and well-managed internal resources. We have built our information technology solutions by developing proprietary technology as well as purchasing and integrating commercially available information technology solutions that address critical aspects of our business, such as project proposals/budget generation, time information management, revenue and resource forecasting, clinical data entry and management, clinical trial management, project management, quality management, and procurement/expense processing.
We maintain an internal information technology group that is responsible for technological planning, applications development, program management, technical operations, and management of our worldwide computer infrastructure and voice and data networks. Our information systems are designed to support and reinforce all of our policies and procedures while enabling us to respond to the multiple needs of our different clients and regulatory systems. Our systems also enable us to respond quickly to client inquiries regarding progress on projects and, in some cases, to gain direct access to client data on client owned systems.


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SALES AND MARKETING
Our sales and marketing personnel carry out our global business development activities. In addition to significant selling experience, most of these individuals have technical and/or scientific backgrounds. Our senior executives and project team leaders also participate in maintaining key client relationships and engaging in business development activities.
Each of our three reporting segments has a business development team that focuses on its particular market segment. In many cases, however, the reporting segment selling teams work together in order to provide clients with the most appropriate service offering to meet their needs. Moreover, we have developed strategic account management teams to provide clients with a single point of contact and to facilitate cross-selling opportunities.
Each business development employee is generally responsible for a specific client segment or group of clients and for strengthening and expanding an effective relationship with that client. Each individual is responsible for developing his or her client base on our behalf, responding to client requests for information, developing and defending proposals, and making presentations to clients.
Our business development group is supported by our marketing team. Our marketing activities consist primarily of market information development and analysis, strategic planning, competitive analysis, brand management, collateral development, participation in industry conferences, advertising, e-marketing, publications, and website development and maintenance. The marketing team focuses both on supporting the individual business development teams for their specific market segments as well as promoting an integrated marketing strategy and communications plan for PAREXEL as a whole.
CLIENTS
We have in the past derived, and may in the future derive, a significant portion of our service revenue from a core group of major projects or clients. Concentrations of business in the biopharmaceutical services industry are common and we expect to continue to experience such concentration in future years. Our five largest clients accounted for 41%, 35% and 27% of our consolidated service revenue in aggregate for Fiscal Year 2012, Fiscal Year 2011, and Fiscal Year 2010, respectively. No single client accounted for 10% or more of consolidated service revenue in any of Fiscal Year 2012, Fiscal Year 2011, or Fiscal Year 2010. However, client concentrations may rise in the future in conjunction with our increasing number of strategic partnerships.
BACKLOG
Backlog represents anticipated service revenue from work not yet completed or performed under signed contracts, letters of intent, and pre-contract commitments that are supported by written communications. Once work commences, revenue is generally recognized over the life of the contract as services are provided. Backlog at June 30, 2012 was approximately $4.39 billion, compared with approximately $3.44 billion at June 30, 2011, an increase of 27.6%. Subject to the matters addressed in the following paragraph, we anticipate that approximately $1.5 billion of the backlog will be recognized in Fiscal Year 2013.
We believe that our backlog as of any date is not necessarily a meaningful predictor of future results. Projects included in backlog are subject to cancellation, revision, or delay. As detailed more fully in the “Risk Factors” section of this annual report, clients terminate, delay, or change the scope of projects for a variety of reasons including, among others, the failure of products being tested to satisfy safety requirements, unexpected or undesirable clinical results of the product, client decisions to forego a particular study, insufficient patient enrollment or investigator recruitment, or production problems resulting in shortages of the drug. Additionally, we have been entering into an increasing number of strategic partnerships. As a result, any delay or cancellation related to these partnerships could significantly impact the conversion of backlog into revenue. Generally, our contracts can be terminated upon thirty to sixty days notice by the client. We are typically entitled to receive certain fees and, in some cases, a termination fee for winding down a delayed or terminated project.
COMPETITION
We compete with other biopharmaceutical services companies and other clinical research organizations (“CROs”) that provide one or more of the services currently being offered by us. Some of the larger biopharmaceutical services companies, such as Quintiles Transnational Corporation, Covance Inc., Pharmaceutical Product Development Inc., inVentiv Health, INC Research, and Icon plc, offer services that compete directly with our services at many levels.
We believe that the synergies arising from integrating the products and services offered by our different business units, coupled with our global infrastructure (and resulting rapid access to diverse patient populations and markets), technology products and services, and depth of expertise and experience differentiate us from our competitors. Although there are no guarantees that we will continue to do so, we believe that we compete favorably in all of our business areas and segments, as more fully described below.
CRS
The clinical outsourcing services industry is very fragmented, with several hundred providers offering varying levels of service, skills, and capabilities. Our CRS group primarily competes against in-house departments of pharmaceutical companies, other

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full service biopharmaceutical services companies, small specialty CROs, and to a small extent, universities, teaching hospitals, and other site organizations. The primary competitors for our CRS business include Quintiles Transnational Corporation, Covance Inc., Pharmaceutical Product Development Inc., and Icon plc.
CRS generally competes on the basis of:
a broad international presence with strategically located facilities;
the ability to organize and manage large-scale clinical trials on a global basis;
the ability to recruit investigators and patients expeditiously;
medical and scientific expertise in a specific therapeutic area;
quality of services;
breadth of services;
the ability to integrate information technology with systems to improve the efficiency of clinical research;
previous experience with a client or a specific therapeutic area;
the ability to manage large and complex medical databases;
the ability to provide statistical and regulatory services;
financial strength and stability; and
price.
We believe that the key competitive strengths of our CRS business are its global footprint and related rapid access to diverse patient populations, therapeutic expertise, technological expertise and its experience in global drug development.
PCMS
Our PCMS segment competes with a large and diverse group of specialty service providers, including major consulting firms with pharmaceutical industry practices, large and small biopharmaceutical services companies, individual consultants, specialty medical communications services companies, and medical communication subsidiaries of large international advertising companies.
We believe that a central feature of our PCMS service offering is our combination of scientific, regulatory and business expertise. We consider PCMS’s key competitive strengths to include a combination of deep global expertise in early and late stage drug development, regulatory strategy and submissions, GMP compliance, reimbursement and market access, and global commercialization and communications strategies. We believe that this broad range of capabilities enables us to help our clients in any country get the right product to the correct local and remote markets and the appropriate patients in an efficient and effective manner.
PERCEPTIVE
Our Perceptive business competes primarily with biopharmaceutical services companies, information technology companies, and software companies. Companies in this segment compete based on the strength and usability of their technology offerings, their expertise and experience, and their understanding of the clinical development process. Perceptive’s key competitive strength is its combination of technological expertise and knowledge of clinical development. Additionally, Perceptive’s offerings provide substantial synergies to our CRS services.
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
Our trademark “PAREXEL®” is of material importance to us. This and other trademarks have been registered in the U.S. and many foreign countries. The duration of trademark registrations varies from country to country. However, trademarks generally may be renewed indefinitely as long as they are in use and/or their registrations are properly maintained, and as long as they have not been found to have become generic.
EMPLOYEES
As of June 30, 2012, we had 12,695 full-time equivalent employees. Approximately 27% of our employees are located in the United States and approximately 73% are located internationally. We believe that we have good relationships with our employees.
The success of our business depends upon our ability to attract and retain qualified professional, scientific, and technical staff. The level of competition among employers in the U.S. and overseas for skilled personnel, particularly those with Ph.D., M.D., or equivalent degrees, is high. We believe that our name recognition and our multinational presence, which allows for

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international transfers by employees, are an advantage in attracting qualified candidates. In addition, we believe that the wide range of clinical trials in which we participate allows us to offer broad experience to clinical researchers.
GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS
We provide clinical trial services and diverse consulting solutions to the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device industries worldwide. Lack of success in obtaining approval for the conduct of clinical trials in the countries where we manage clinical trials on behalf of our clients can adversely affect us. We make no guarantees to our clients with regard to successful outcomes of the regulatory process, including the success of clinical trial applications or marketing authorization applications.
Clinical research services provided by PAREXEL in the U.S. are subject to established and evolving FDA regulations. We are obligated to comply with FDA requirements governing activities such as obtaining Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval and patient informed consents, verifying qualifications of investigators, reporting patients’ adverse reactions to products, and maintaining thorough and accurate records. We are also required to ensure that the computer systems we use to process human data from clinical trials are validated in accordance with the FDA’s electronic records regulations, 21 CFR Part 11, which apply to the pharmaceutical and CRO industries when companies choose to use electronic records in lieu of paper records or electronic signatures in lieu of traditional signatures. We must maintain source documents for each study for specified periods, and such documents may be reviewed according to GCP standards by the study sponsors and the FDA and other agencies (for example the EMA, European Medicines Agency, and the PMDA, the Japanese Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency) during audits and inspections. Non-compliance with GCP can result in the disqualification of data collected during a clinical trial and in non-approval or non-clearance of a product application submitted to the FDA or other Regulatory Agencies around the world.
The clinical investigation of new drugs, biologics, and medical devices is highly regulated by government agencies around the world. The standard for the conduct of clinical research and development studies is embodied in GCP, a set of international standards and guidelines, which stipulate procedures designed to ensure the quality and integrity of data obtained from clinical testing, and to protect the rights and safety of clinical trial participants. The FDA and many other regulatory authorities require that study results submitted to such authorities be based on studies conducted in compliance with GCP. Effective May 1, 2004, the European Union (“EU”) enacted the Clinical Trials Directive (the “Directive” or “CTD”) in an attempt to harmonize the regulatory requirements of the member states of the EU for the conduct of clinical trials in its territory. The Directive requires sponsors of clinical trials to submit formal applications to national ethics committees and regulatory authorities prior to the initiation of clinical trials in any of the 27 Member States of the EU. Whereas some Member States, prior to the implementation of the Directive, had minimal requirements for clinical trial initiation, all Member States are now subject to the same stringent requirements of the Directive. As in the United States, clinical trials in the EU are expected to be carried out in compliance with detailed requirements for GCP. The international regulatory approval process, in the EU as well as many other countries, includes all of the risks and potential delays associated with the FDA approval process.
Because the FDA’s regulatory requirements have served as the model for much of the regulation of new drug development worldwide, regulatory requirements similar to those of the FDA exist in the other countries in which we operate. Our regulatory capabilities include knowledge of the specific regulatory requirements of numerous countries. We have managed simultaneous regulatory submissions in more than one country for a number of drug sponsors during each of the past ten years. Beginning in 1990, the FDA and corresponding regulatory agencies of the EU and Japan commenced discussions to develop harmonized standards for preclinical and clinical studies and the format and content of applications for new drug approvals through a process known as the International Conference on Harmonisation (“ICH”) of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human use. Data from multinational studies adhering to GCP are now generally acceptable to the FDA and regulators in Australia, Canada, the EU, Japan and Latin American countries. The ICH process has sanctioned a single common format for drug and biologic marketing authorization applications, known as the Common Technical Document (“CTD”) in the U.S., Europe, Japan and Canada. On July 1, 2003 the CTD format became mandatory in Europe and Japan and highly recommended by the FDA in the U.S. and by the Canadian regulatory authorities. We have developed the expertise to prepare CTDs for our clients in both paper and electronic form.
REGULATION OF DRUGS AND BIOLOGICS
Before a new drug or biologic may be approved and marketed, the drug or biologic must undergo extensive testing and regulatory review in order to determine that the drug or biologic is safe and effective. It is not possible to estimate the time in which preclinical and Phase I, II and III studies will be completed with respect to a given product, although the time period may last many years. Using the U.S. regulatory environment as an example, the stages of this development process are generally as follows:
Preclinical Research (approximately 1 to 3.5 years) – In vitro (“test tube”) and animal studies must be conducted in accordance with GLP to establish the relative toxicity of the drug or biologic over a wide range of doses and to detect any potential to cause a variety of adverse conditions or diseases, including birth defects or cancer. If results warrant continuing development of the drug or biologic, the results of the studies are submitted to the FDA by the manufacturer as part of an

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Investigational New Drug Application (“IND”), which must be reviewed by the FDA before proposed clinical testing can begin. An IND must include, among other things, preclinical data, chemistry, manufacturing and control information, and an investigational plan, and must become effective before such trials may begin. An IND automatically becomes effective 30 days after receipt by the FDA, unless the FDA, within the 30-day time period, raises concerns or questions relating to one or more proposed clinical trials. In such a case, the IND sponsor and the FDA must resolve any outstanding concerns before the clinical trial can begin. In addition, clinical trials cannot begin at a particular study site until approved by the site's Institutional Review Board ("IRB"), which is an independent expert body charged with protecting patient safety. As a result, there can be no assurance that submission of an IND will result in the ability to commence clinical trials.
Clinical Trials (approximately 3.5 to 6 years)
Phase I consists of basic safety and pharmacology testing in approximately 20 to 80 human subjects, usually healthy volunteers or stable patients, and includes studies to evaluate the metabolic and pharmacologic action of the product in humans, how the drug or biologic works, how it is affected by other drugs, how it is tolerated and absorbed, where it goes in the body, how long it remains active, and how it is broken down and eliminated from the body.
Phase II includes basic efficacy (effectiveness) and dose-range testing in a limited patient population (usually 100 to 200 patients) afflicted with a specific disease or condition for which the product is intended for use, further safety testing, evaluation of effectiveness, and determination of optimal dose levels, dose schedules, and routes of administration. If Phase II studies yield satisfactory results and no hold is placed on further studies by the FDA, Phase III studies can commence.
Phase III includes larger scale, multi-center, comparative clinical trials conducted with patients afflicted by a target disease, in order to provide enough data for a valid statistical test of safety and effectiveness required by the FDA and others, and to provide an adequate basis for product labeling.
The FDA receives reports on the progress of each phase of clinical testing and may require the modification, suspension, or termination of clinical trials if, among other things, an unreasonable risk is presented to patients or if the design of the trial is insufficient to meet its stated objective.
NDA or Biologic License Application (“BLA”) Preparation and Submission – Upon completion of Phase III trials, the sponsor assembles the statistically analyzed data from all phases of development, along with the chemistry and manufacturing and pre-clinical data and the proposed labeling, among other things, into a single large document, the NDA (New Drug Application) or BLA in CTD format as of July 1, 2003, which today comprises, on average, roughly 100,000 pages. Typically, an NDA or BLA must be accompanied by payment of a substantial user fee, which is almost $2 million for Fiscal Year 2013.
FDA Review of NDA or BLA – The FDA carefully scrutinizes data from all phases of development to confirm that the manufacturer has complied with regulations and that the drug or biologic is safe and effective for the specific use (or “indication”) under study. The FDA may refuse to accept the NDA or BLA for filing and substantive review if certain administrative and content criteria are not satisfied. Even after accepting the submission for review, the FDA may also require additional testing or information before approval of an NDA or BLA. The FDA must deny approval of an NDA or BLA if applicable regulatory requirements are not satisfied.
Post-Marketing Surveillance and Phase IV Studies – Federal regulation requires the sponsor to collect and periodically report to the FDA additional safety and efficacy data on the drug or biologic for as long as the manufacturer markets the product (post-marketing surveillance). If the product is marketed outside the U.S., these reports must include data from all countries in which the product is sold. Additional studies (Phase IV) may be required by the FDA as a condition of the product’s approval to assess safety or verify clinical benefit or may be voluntarily undertaken after initial approval to find new uses for the product, to test new dosage formulations, or to confirm selected non-clinical benefits, e.g., increased cost-effectiveness or improved quality of life. Product approval may be withdrawn if compliance with regulatory standards is not maintained or if problems occur following initial marketing. In addition, the FDA and other major regulatory agencies ask sponsor companies to prepare risk management plans for approved and marketed drugs and biologics, aimed at assessing areas of drug risk and plans for managing such risks should they materialize. The passage of the FDA Amendments Act of 2007 imposed additional requirements on sponsors to address drug safety (for example, through a plan called Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies or REMS), to conduct post-marketing studies required by the FDA and to submit clinical trial information, including clinical study results, of investigational and marketed drugs (as well as medical devices) to a databank maintained by the National Institutes of Health and accessible to the public on the Internet (www.clinicaltrials.gov). This was done in order to increase the “public transparency” of clinical results.
REGULATION OF MEDICAL DEVICES
Unless a medical device is exempted from pre-market approval or clearance requirements, which are described below, or is eligible for de novo review, FDA approval or clearance of the device is required before the product may be marketed in the United States. In order to obtain pre-market clearance for marketing, a manufacturer must demonstrate substantial equivalence to a similar legally marketed product by submitting a pre-market notification, or 510(k), to the FDA. The FDA may require

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preclinical and clinical data to support a substantial equivalence determination, and there can be no assurance the FDA will find a device substantially equivalent. Clinical trials can take extended periods of time to complete. In addition, if the FDA requires an approved Investigational Device Exemption (“IDE”) before clinical device trials may commence, there can be no guarantee that the agency will approve the IDE. The IDE approval process could also result in significant delays.
After submission of a pre-market notification containing, among other things, any data collected, the FDA may find the device substantially equivalent and the device may be marketed. After a device receives 510(k) clearance, any modification that could significantly affect its safety or effectiveness, or that would constitute a major change in its intended use, requires a new 510(k) clearance or could require approval of a pre-market approval application (“PMA”). If the FDA finds that a device is not substantially equivalent, the manufacturer may request that the FDA make a risk-based classification to place the device in Class I or Class II. However, if a timely request for risk-based classification is not made, or if the FDA determines that a Class III designation is appropriate, a PMA will be required before the device may be marketed.
If there is no legally marketed predicate device, a manufacturer can seek to have a device classified into Class I or Class II through the de novo review process. As a result of statutory revisions made in 2012, the de novo process can be used without first going through the 510(k) process.
The PMA approval process is lengthy, expensive, and typically requires, among other things, extensive data from preclinical testing and a well-controlled clinical trial or trials that demonstrate a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness. There can be no assurance that review will result in timely, or any, PMA approval. There may also be significant conditions associated with the approval, including limitations on labeling and advertising claims and the imposition of post-market testing, tracking, or surveillance requirements. Even after approval, a new PMA or PMA supplement is required in the event of a modification to the device, its labeling or its manufacturing process.
REGULATION OF PATIENT INFORMATION
The confidentiality, security, use and disclosure of patient-specific information are subject to governmental regulation. Regulations to protect the safety and privacy of human subjects who participate in or whose data are used in clinical research generally require clinical investigators to obtain affirmative informed consent from identifiable research subjects before research is undertaken. Under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 ("HIPAA"), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has issued regulations mandating heightened privacy and confidentiality protections for certain types of individually identifiable health information, or protected health information, when used or disclosed by health care providers and other HIPAA-covered entities or business associates that provide services to or perform functions on behalf of these covered entities. HIPAA regulations generally require individuals’ written authorization before identifiable health information may be used for research, in addition to any required informed consent. HIPAA regulations also specify standards for de-identifying health information so that information can be handled outside of the HIPAA requirements and for creating limited data sets that can be used for research purposes under less stringent HIPAA restrictions.
Outside of the United States, many countries have enacted laws to safeguard the privacy and security of personal information, including individually identifiable health information. The member states of the European Union have adopted a rigorous system of data protection regulations, based upon a framework imposed by the 1995 European Commission Directive on Data Protection, or Privacy Directive. These rules provide broad protections for personal information, including, among other things, notice requirements, limits on the scope and duration for which personal information may be maintained and processed, restrictions on disclosures of personal information, standards for providing individuals with control over the manner in which personal information is processed, and restrictions on transfers of such data to the United States and other countries that the European Union finds to lack “adequate” data protection laws of their own. Health-related information is recognized as a special, sensitive category of personal information, which may generally be processed only pursuant to the affirmative, or opt-in, consent of the individual to whom the information pertains. Violations of these data protection regulations are subject to administrative penalties, civil money penalties, and criminal prosecution, including corporate fines and personal liability.
In order to comply with these laws and regulations, we must maintain internal compliance policies and procedures, and we may need to implement new privacy and security measures, which may require us to make substantial expenditures or cause us to limit the products and services we offer. In addition, if we violate applicable laws, regulations, contractual commitments, or other duties relating to the use, privacy or security of health information, we could be subject to civil liability or criminal penalties and it may be necessary to modify our business practices.
POTENTIAL LIABILITIES AND INSURANCE
Our clinical research services focus on the testing of experimental drugs and devices on human volunteers pursuant to study protocols and in accordance with laws and regulations which govern clinical trials. Clinical research involves a risk of liability for personal injury or death to patients due to, among other reasons, possible unforeseen adverse side effects or improper administration of the new drug or medical device. We do not generally provide health care services directly to patients. Rather, our physicians or third party physician investigators are responsible for administering drugs and evaluating the study patients.

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Many of the patients enrolled in clinical trials are already seriously ill and are at risk of further illness or death.
We believe that the risk of liability to patients in clinical trials is mitigated by various regulatory requirements, including the role of IRBs, the need to obtain each patient’s informed consent, and the oversight by applicable regulatory authorities. The FDA, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in the U.K., and regulatory authorities in other countries require each human clinical trial to be reviewed and approved by the IRB at each study site. An IRB is an independent ethics committee that includes both medical and non-medical personnel and is obligated to protect the interests of patients enrolled in the trial. The IRB approves and monitors the protocol and the measures designed to protect patients, such as the requirement to obtain informed consents.
To reduce our potential liability, we generally seek to incorporate indemnity provisions into our contracts with clients to protect us from liability for adverse reactions to the study drug as well as any negligent acts by the study sponsor and/or third party physician investigators. These indemnity provisions do not, however, protect us against certain of our own actions, such as those involving negligence. Moreover, these indemnities are contractual arrangements that are subject to negotiation with individual clients, and the terms and scope of such indemnities can vary from client to client and from study to study. Finally, the financial performance of these indemnities is not secured; therefore we bear the risk that an indemnifying party may not have the financial ability to fulfill its indemnification obligations. We could be materially and adversely affected if we were required to pay damages or incur defense costs in connection with an uninsured claim that is outside the scope of an indemnity or where an indemnification obligation, although applicable, is not performed in accordance with its terms.
We currently maintain a portfolio of insurance coverage, including a professional liability insurance policy, subject to deductibles and coverage limits. There can be no assurance that this insurance coverage will be adequate, or that insurance coverage will continue to be available on terms acceptable to PAREXEL.
AVAILABLE INFORMATION
Our Internet website is http://www.parexel.com. We make available through this website our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed pursuant to Sections 13(a) and 15(d) of the Exchange Act. We make these reports available free of charge through our website as soon as reasonably practicable after they have been electronically filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Any materials we file with the SEC may also be read and copied at the SEC’s public reference room located at 100 F Street, N.E. Washington, D.C. 20549. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information on the public reference room. Our SEC filings are also available to the public on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This Annual Report on Form 10-K and, in particular, the description of our Business set forth in Item 1 and our Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations set forth in Item 7 (“MD&A”) contain or incorporate a number of forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (“the Exchange Act”).
Any statements contained in or incorporated by reference into this report that are not statements of historical fact should be considered forward-looking statements. You can identify these forward-looking statements by use of the words “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “plans,” “may,” “will,” “would,” “intends,” “estimates”, and other similar expressions, whether in the negative or affirmative. These forward-looking statements are based on current expectations, estimates, forecasts and projections about the industry and markets in which we operate and management’s beliefs and assumptions and should be read in conjunction with our MD&A and our consolidated financial statements and notes to consolidated financial statements. We cannot guarantee that we actually will achieve the plans, intentions or expectations disclosed in the forward-looking statements made. There are a number of important risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties include, without limitation, those set forth below under the heading “Risk Factors” as well as risks that emerge from time to time that are not possible for us to predict. Forward-looking statements, like all statements in this report, speak only as of the date of this report (unless another date is indicated). We disclaim any obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
In addition to other information in this report, the following risk factors should be considered carefully in evaluating our company and our business. Additional risks not currently known to us or other factors not perceived by us to present significant risk to our business at this time also may impair our business operations.
Risks Associated with our Business and Operations
The loss, modification, or delay of large or multiple contracts may negatively impact our financial performance.
Our clients generally can terminate their contracts with us upon 30 to 60 days notice or can delay the execution of services. The loss or delay of a large contract or the loss or delay of multiple contracts could adversely affect our operating results, possibly materially. We have in the past experienced large contract cancellations and delays, which have adversely affected our operating results.
Clients may terminate or delay their contracts for a variety of reasons, including:
failure of products being tested to satisfy safety requirements;
failure of products being tested to satisfy efficacy criteria;
products having unexpected or undesired clinical results;
client cost reductions as a result of budgetary limits or changing priorities;
client decisions to forego a particular study, perhaps for economic reasons;
merger or potential merger related activities involving the client;
insufficient patient enrollment in a study;
insufficient investigator recruitment;
clinical drug manufacturing problems resulting in shortages of the product;
product withdrawal following market launch; and
shut down of manufacturing facilities.
The current economic environment may negatively impact our financial performance as a result of client defaults and other factors.
Our ability to attract and retain clients, invest in and grow our business and meet our financial obligations depends on our operating and financial performance, which, in turn, is subject to numerous factors. In addition to factors specific to our business, prevailing economic conditions and financial, business and other factors beyond our control can also affect us, including, but not limited to, the current Greek debt crisis and related European financial restructuring efforts. The world has recently experienced a global macroeconomic downturn, and if global economic and market conditions, or economic conditions in Europe, the United States or other key markets, remain uncertain, persist, or deteriorate further, demand for our services could decline, and we may experience material adverse impacts on our business, operating results, and financial condition. We cannot anticipate all the ways in which the current economic climate and financial market conditions could adversely impact our business.
We are exposed to risks associated with reduced profitability and the potential financial instability of our clients, many of whom may be adversely affected by volatile conditions in the financial markets, the economy in general and disruptions to the demand for health care services and pharmaceuticals. These conditions could cause clients to experience reduced profitability and/or cash flow problems that could lead them to modify, delay or cancel contracts with us, including contracts included in our current backlog.
Some of our clients are not revenue-generating entities at this time and rely upon equity and debt investments and other external sources of capital to meet their cash requirements. Due to the poor condition of the current global economy and other factors outside of our control, these clients may lack the funds necessary to pay outstanding liabilities due to us, despite contractual obligations. For example, in the second quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, one of our biopharma clients informed us that it had encountered funding difficulties when one of its major investors defaulted on a contractual investment commitment, and that, as a result, the client would be unable to make payments due to us in connection with an on-going service contract for a large Phase III clinical trial. Consequently, we recorded approximately $14.0 million in reserves related to this late-stage trial, including $12.3 million in bad debt reserves. In Fiscal Year 2012, we recovered $2.3 million of proceeds from the final bankruptcy settlement. It is possible that similar situations could arise in the future, and such defaults could negatively affect our financial performance, possibly materially.

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We face risks arising from the restructuring of our operations.
In October 2009, we adopted a plan to restructure our operations to reduce expenses, better align costs with current and future geographic sources of revenue, and improve operating efficiencies. During Fiscal Year 2010, we recorded $16.8 million in restructuring charges related to this plan, including approximately $11.6 million in employee separation benefits associated with the elimination of 238 managerial and staff positions and $5.2 million in costs related to the abandonment of certain property leases.
In April 2011, we adopted a plan to restructure our operations to reduce expenses, better align costs with current and future geographic sources of revenue, and improve operating efficiencies. The plan focused primarily on the Early Phase business and corporate functions and was completed in the third quarter of Fiscal Year 2012. The total cost of the plan was approximately $15.8 million and included the elimination of approximately 150 managerial and staff positions and the abandonment of certain property leases.
Although we expect that all costs associated with these restructuring plans have been recorded as of June 30, 2012, if we incur additional restructuring charges, our financial condition and results of operations may be adversely impacted.
Restructuring also presents significant potential risks of events occurring that could adversely affect us, including a decrease in employee morale, the failure to achieve targeted cost savings and the failure to meet operational targets and customer requirements due to the loss of employees and any work stoppages that might occur.
The fixed price nature of our contracts could hurt our operating results.
Approximately 90% of our contracts are fixed price. If we fail to accurately price our contracts, or if we experience significant cost overruns that are not recovered from our clients, our gross margins on the contracts would be reduced and we could lose money on contracts. In the past, we have had to commit unanticipated resources to complete projects, resulting in lower gross margins on those projects. We might experience similar situations in the future.
If we are unable to attract suitable investigators and volunteers for our clinical trials, our clinical development business might suffer.
The clinical research studies we run in our CRS segment rely upon the ready accessibility and willing participation of physician investigators and volunteer subjects. Investigators are typically located at hospitals, clinics or other sites and supervise administration of the study drug to patients during the course of a clinical trial. Volunteer subjects generally include people from the communities in which the studies are conducted, and the rate of completion of clinical trials is significantly dependent upon the rate of participant enrollment.
Our clinical research development business could be adversely affected if we were unable to attract suitable and willing investigators or volunteers on a consistent basis. If we are unable to obtain sufficient patient enrollment or investigators to conduct clinical trials as planned, we might need to expend substantial additional funds to obtain access to resources or else be compelled to delay or modify our plans significantly. These considerations might result in our being unable to successfully achieve projected development timelines as agreed with sponsors. In rare cases, it potentially may even lead us to recommend that trial sponsors terminate ongoing clinical trials or development of a product for a particular indication.
If our Perceptive business is unable to maintain continuous, effective, reliable and secure operation of its computer hardware, software and internet applications and related tools and functions, its business will be harmed.
Our Perceptive business involves collecting, managing, manipulating and analyzing large amounts of data, and communicating data via the Internet. In our Perceptive business, we depend on the continuous, effective, reliable and secure operation of computer hardware, software, networks, telecommunication networks, Internet servers and related infrastructure. If the hardware or software malfunctions or access to data by internal research personnel or customers through the Internet is interrupted, our Perceptive business could suffer. In addition, any sustained disruption in Internet access provided by third parties could adversely impact our Perceptive business.
Although the computer and communications hardware used in our Perceptive business is protected through physical and software safeguards, it is still vulnerable to fire, storm, flood, power loss, earthquakes, telecommunications failures, physical or software break-ins, and similar events. And while certain of our operations have appropriate disaster recovery plans in place, we currently do not have redundant facilities everywhere in the world to provide IT capacity in the event of a system failure. In addition, the Perceptive software products are complex and sophisticated, and could contain data, design or software errors that could be difficult to detect and correct. If Perceptive fails to maintain and further develop the necessary computer capacity and data to support the needs of our Perceptive customers, it could result in a loss of or a delay in revenue and market acceptance. Additionally, significant delays in the planned delivery of system enhancements or inadequate performance of the systems once they are completed could damage our reputation and harm our business.
Finally, long-term disruptions in the infrastructure caused by events such as natural disasters, the outbreak of war, the escalation

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of hostilities, and acts of terrorism (particularly in areas where we have offices) could adversely affect our businesses. Although we carry property and business interruption insurance, our coverage may not be adequate to compensate us for all losses that may occur.
Our business is subject to international economic, political, and other risks that could negatively affect our results of operations or financial position.
We provide most of our services on a worldwide basis. Our service revenue from non-U.S. operations represented approximately 58.4% and 63.6% of total consolidated service revenue for Fiscal Year 2012 and Fiscal Year 2011, respectively. More specifically, our service revenue from operations in Europe, Middle East and Africa represented 39.8% and 45.7% of total consolidated service revenue for the corresponding periods. Our service revenue from operations in the Asia/Pacific region represented 14.7% and 14.3% of total consolidated service revenue for the respective periods. Accordingly, our business is subject to risks associated with doing business internationally, including:
changes in a specific country’s or region’s political or economic conditions, including Western Europe, in particular;
potential negative consequences from changes in tax laws affecting our ability to repatriate profits;
difficulty in staffing and managing widespread operations;
unfavorable labor regulations applicable to our European or other international operations;
changes in foreign currency exchange rates; and
the need to ensure compliance with the numerous regulatory and legal requirements applicable to our business in each of these jurisdictions and to maintain an effective compliance program to ensure compliance.
Our operating results are impacted by the health of the North American, European and Asian economies, among others. Our business and financial performance may be adversely affected by current and future economic conditions that cause a decline in business and consumer spending, including a reduction in the availability of credit, rising interest rates, financial market volatility and recession.
If we cannot retain our highly qualified management and technical personnel, our business would be harmed.
We rely on the expertise of our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Josef H. von Rickenbach, and our President and Chief Operating Officer, Mark A. Goldberg, and it would be difficult and expensive to find qualified replacements with the level of specialized knowledge of our products and services and the biopharmaceutical services industry. While we are a party to an employment agreement with Mr. von Rickenbach, it may be terminated by either party upon notice to the counterparty.
In addition, in order to compete effectively, we must attract and retain qualified sales, professional, scientific, and technical operating personnel. Competition for these skilled personnel, particularly those with a medical degree, a Ph.D. or equivalent degrees, is intense. We may not be successful in attracting or retaining key personnel.
Changes to our computer operating systems, programs or software could adversely impact our business.
We may make changes to our existing computer operating systems, programs and/or software in an effort to increase our operating efficiency and/or deliver better value to our clients. Such changes may cause disruptions to our operations and have an adverse impact on our business in the short term.
Risks Associated with our Financial Results
Our operating results have fluctuated between quarters and years and may continue to fluctuate in the future, which could affect the price of our common stock.
Our quarterly and annual operating results have varied and will continue to vary in the future as a result of a variety of factors. For example, our income from operations totaled $25.5 million for the fiscal quarter ended June 30, 2012, $28.2 million for the fiscal quarter ended March 31, 2012, $22.6 million for the fiscal quarter ended December 31, 2011, $12.5 million for the fiscal quarter ended September 30, 2011, and $1.6 million for the fiscal quarter ended June 30, 2011. Factors that cause these variations include:
the level of new business authorizations in particular quarters or years;
the timing of the initiation, progress, or cancellation of significant projects;
exchange rate fluctuations between quarters or years;
restructuring charges;
the mix of services offered in a particular quarter or year;

15



the timing of the opening of new offices or internal expansion;
timing, costs and the related financial impact of acquisitions;
the timing and amount of costs associated with integrating acquisitions;
the timing and amount of startup costs incurred in connection with the introduction of new products, services or subsidiaries;
the dollar amount of changes in contract scope finalized during a particular period; and
the amount of any reserves we are required to record.
Many of these factors, such as the timing of cancellations of significant projects and exchange rate fluctuations between quarters or years, are beyond our control.
If our operating results do not match the expectations of securities analysts and investors, the trading price of our common stock will likely decrease.
Backlog may not result in revenue and the rate at which backlog converts into revenue may be slower than historical conversion rates.
Our backlog is not necessarily a meaningful predictor of future results because backlog can be affected by a number of factors, including the size and duration of contracts, many of which are performed over several years. Additionally, as described above, contracts relating to our clinical development business are subject to early termination by the client, and clinical trials can be delayed or canceled for many reasons, including unexpected test results, safety concerns, regulatory developments or economic issues. Also, the scope of a contract can be reduced significantly during the course of a study. If the scope of a contract is revised, the adjustment to backlog occurs when the revised scope is approved by the client. For these and other reasons, we do not fully realize our entire backlog as net revenue.
In addition, the rate at which our backlog converts into revenue may slow. A slowdown in this conversion rate means that the rate of revenue recognized on contract awards may be slower than what we have experienced in the past, particularly in connection with the ramp-up and initiation of strategic partnerships, which could impact our net revenue and results of operations on a quarterly and annual basis. The rate of conversion of backlog from strategic partnerships into revenue has been slower than that experienced historically from traditional client contracts.
Our revenue and earnings are exposed to exchange rate fluctuations, which has substantially affected our operating results.
We conduct a significant portion of our operations in foreign countries. Because our financial statements are denominated in U.S. dollars, changes in foreign currency exchange rates could have and have had a significant effect on our operating results. For example, as a result of year-over-year foreign currency fluctuation, service revenue for Fiscal Year 2012 was positively impacted by approximately $3.2 million as compared with the same period in the previous year. Exchange rate fluctuations between local currencies and the U.S. dollar create risk in several ways, including:
Foreign Currency Translation Risk. The revenue and expenses of our foreign operations are generally denominated in local currencies, primarily the pound sterling and the Euro, and are translated into U.S. dollars for financial reporting purposes. For Fiscal Year 2012 and Fiscal Year 2011, approximately 19.5% and 24.6% of consolidated service revenue, respectively, was from contracts denominated in Euros and service revenue from contracts denominated in pounds sterling was 3.9% and 5.5%, respectively. Accordingly, changes in exchange rates between foreign currencies and the U.S. dollar will affect the translation of foreign results into U.S. dollars for purposes of reporting our consolidated results.
Foreign Currency Transaction Risk. We may be subjected to foreign currency transaction risk when our foreign subsidiaries enter into contracts or incur liabilities denominated in a currency other than the foreign subsidiary's functional (local) currency. To the extent that we are unable to shift the effects of currency fluctuations to our clients, foreign exchange rate fluctuations as a result of foreign currency exchange losses could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.
Although we try to limit these risks through exchange rate fluctuation provisions stated in our service contracts or by hedging transaction risk with foreign currency exchange contracts, we do not succeed in all cases. Even in those cases where we are successful, we may still experience fluctuations in financial results from our operations outside of the U.S., and we may not be able to favorably reduce the currency transaction risk associated with our service contracts.


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Our effective income tax rate may fluctuate from quarter to quarter, which may affect our earnings and earnings per share.
Our quarterly effective income tax rate is influenced by our annual projected profitability in the various taxing jurisdictions in which we operate. Changes in the distribution of profits and losses among taxing jurisdictions may have a significant impact on our effective income tax rate, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our net income and earnings per share. Factors that affect the effective income tax rate include, but are not limited to:
the requirement to exclude from our quarterly worldwide effective income tax calculations losses in jurisdictions where no tax benefit can be recognized;
actual and projected full year pretax income;
changes in tax laws in various taxing jurisdictions;
audits by taxing authorities; and
the establishment of valuation allowances against deferred tax assets if it is determined that it is more likely than not that future tax benefits will not be realized.
These changes may cause fluctuations in our effective income tax rate that could cause fluctuation in our earnings and earnings per share, which could affect our stock price.
Our results of operations may be adversely affected if we fail to realize the full value of our goodwill and intangible assets.
As of June 30, 2012, our total assets included $325.5 million of goodwill and net intangible assets. We assess the realizability of our indefinite-lived intangible assets and goodwill annually as well as whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that these assets may be impaired. These events or changes in circumstances generally include operating losses or a significant decline in earnings associated with the acquired business or asset. Our ability to realize the value of the goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets will depend on the future cash flows of these businesses. These cash flows in turn depend in part on how well we have integrated these businesses. If we are not able to realize the value of the goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets, we may be required to incur material charges relating to the impairment of those assets.
Our business has experienced substantial expansion in the past and such expansion and any future expansion could strain our resources if not properly managed.
We have expanded our business substantially in the past. For example, in August 2008, we completed the acquisition of ClinPhone, a leading clinical technology organization, for a purchase price of approximately $190 million. Future rapid expansion could strain our operational, human and financial resources. In order to manage expansion, we must:
continue to improve operating, administrative, and information systems;
accurately predict future personnel and resource needs to meet client contract commitments;
track the progress of ongoing client projects; and
attract and retain qualified management, sales, professional, scientific and technical operating personnel.
If we do not take these actions and are not able to manage the expanded business, the expanded business may be less successful than anticipated, and we may be required to allocate additional resources to the expanded business, which we would have otherwise allocated to another part of our business.
If we are unable to successfully integrate an acquired company, the acquisition could lead to disruptions to our business. The success of an acquisition will depend upon, among other things, our ability to:
assimilate the operations and services or products of the acquired company;
integrate acquired personnel;
retain and motivate key employees;
retain customers;
identify and manage risks facing the acquired company; and
minimize the diversion of management’s attention from other business concerns.
Acquisitions of foreign companies may also involve additional risks, including assimilating differences in foreign business practices and overcoming language and cultural barriers.
In the event that the operations of an acquired business do not meet our performance expectations, we may have to restructure the acquired business or write-off the value of some or all of the assets of the acquired business.

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Risks Associated with our Industry
We depend on the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, either or both of which may suffer in the short or long term.
Our revenues depend greatly on the expenditures made by the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries in research and development. In some instances, companies in these industries are reliant on their ability to raise capital in order to fund their research and development projects. Accordingly, economic factors and industry trends that affect our clients in these industries also affect our business. If companies in these industries were to reduce the number of research and development projects they conduct or outsource, our business could be materially adversely affected.
In addition, we are dependent upon the ability and willingness of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to continue to spend on research and development and to outsource the services that we provide. We are therefore subject to risks, uncertainties and trends that affect companies in these industries. We have benefited to date from the tendency of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to outsource clinical research projects, but any downturn in these industries or reduction in spending or outsourcing could adversely affect our business. For example, if these companies expanded upon their in-house clinical or development capabilities, they would be less likely to utilize our services.
Because we depend on a small number of industries and clients for all of our business, the loss of business from a significant client could harm our business, revenue and financial condition.
The loss of, or a material reduction in the business of, a significant client could cause a substantial decrease in our revenue and adversely affect our business and financial condition, possibly materially. In Fiscal Years 2012, 2011, and 2010, our five largest clients accounted for approximately 41%, 35%, and 27% of our consolidated service revenue, respectively. We expect that a small number of clients will continue to represent a significant part of our consolidated revenue. This concentration may increase as a result of the increasing number of strategic partnerships into which we have been entering with sponsors. Our contracts with these clients generally can be terminated on short notice. We have in the past experienced contract cancellations with significant clients.
In addition, the portion of our backlog that consists of large, multi-year awards from strategic partnerships has grown in recent years and this trend may continue in the future. A higher concentration of backlog from strategic partnerships may result in an imbalance across our project portfolio among projects in the start-up phase, which typically generate lower revenue, and projects in later stages, which typically generate higher revenue. This in turn may cause fluctuations in our revenue and profitability from period to period.
We face intense competition in many areas of our business; if we do not compete effectively, our business will be harmed.
The biopharmaceutical services industry is highly competitive and we face numerous competitors in many areas of our business. If we fail to compete effectively, we may lose clients, which would cause our business to suffer.
We primarily compete against in-house departments of pharmaceutical companies, other full service clinical research organizations (“CROs”), small specialty CROs, and, to a lesser extent, universities, teaching hospitals, and other site organizations. Some of the larger CROs against which we compete include Quintiles Transnational Corporation, Covance, Inc., Pharmaceutical Product Development Inc., and Icon plc. In addition, our PCMS business competes with a large and fragmented group of specialty service providers, including advertising/promotional companies, major consulting firms with pharmaceutical industry groups and smaller companies with pharmaceutical industry focus. Perceptive competes primarily with CROs, information technology companies and other software companies. Some of these competitors, including the in-house departments of pharmaceutical companies, have greater capital, technical and other resources than we have. In addition, our competitors that are smaller specialized companies may compete effectively against us because of their concentrated size and focus.
In recent years, a number of the large pharmaceutical companies have established formal or informal alliances with one or more CROs relating to the provision of services for multiple trials over extended time periods. Our success depends in part on successfully establishing and maintaining these relationships. If we fail to do so, our revenue and results of operations could be adversely affected, possibly materially.
If we do not keep pace with rapid technological changes, our products and services may become less competitive or obsolete, especially in our Perceptive business.
The biotechnology, pharmaceutical and medical device industries generally, and clinical research specifically, are subject to increasingly rapid technological changes. Our competitors or others might develop technologies, products or services that are more effective or commercially attractive than our current or future technologies, products or services, or render our technologies, products or services less competitive or obsolete. If our competitors introduce superior technologies, products or services and we cannot make enhancements to our technologies, products and services necessary to remain competitive, our competitive position would be harmed. If we are unable to compete successfully, we may lose clients or be unable to attract

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new clients, which could lead to a decrease in our revenue.
Risks Associated with Regulation or Legal Liabilities
If governmental regulation of the drug, medical device and biotechnology industry changes, the need for our services could decrease.
Governmental regulation of the drug, medical device and biotechnology product development process is complicated, extensive, and demanding. A large part of our business involves assisting pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies through the regulatory approval process. Changes in regulations that, for example, streamline procedures or relax approval standards, could eliminate or reduce the need for our services. If companies regulated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (the “FDA”) or similar foreign regulatory authorities needed fewer of our services, we would have fewer business opportunities and our revenues would decrease, possibly materially.
In the United States, the FDA and the Congress have attempted to streamline the regulatory process by providing for industry user fees that fund the hiring of additional reviewers and better management of the regulatory review process. In Europe, governmental authorities have approved common standards for clinical testing of new drugs throughout the European Union by adopting standards for Good Clinical Practices (“GCP”) and by making the clinical trial application and approval process more uniform across member states. The FDA has had GCP in place as a regulatory standard and requirement for new drug approval for many years and Japan adopted GCP in 1998.
The United States, Europe and Japan have also collaborated for over 15 years on the International Conference on Harmonisation (“ICH”), the purpose of which is to eliminate duplicative or conflicting regulations in the three regions. The ICH partners have agreed upon a common format (the Common Technical Document) for new drug marketing applications that reduces the need to tailor the format to each region. Such efforts and similar efforts in the future that streamline the regulatory process may reduce the demand for our services.
Parts of our PCMS business advise clients on how to satisfy regulatory standards for manufacturing and clinical processes and on other matters related to the enforcement of government regulations by the FDA and other regulatory bodies. Any reduction in levels of review of manufacturing or clinical processes or levels of regulatory enforcement, generally, would result in fewer business opportunities for our business in this area.
If we fail to comply with existing regulations, our reputation and operating results would be harmed.
Our business is subject to numerous governmental regulations, primarily relating to worldwide pharmaceutical and medical device product development and regulatory approval and the conduct of clinical trials. In addition, we may be obligated to comply with or to assist our clients in complying with regulations that apply to our clients, including the Physician Payment Sunshine Act, which will require manufacturers and group purchasing organizations to report all payments or transfers of value to health care providers and teaching hospitals. If we fail to comply with these governmental regulations, such non-compliance could result in the termination of our ongoing research, development or sales and marketing projects, or the disqualification of data for submission to regulatory authorities. We also could be barred from providing clinical trial services in the future or could be subjected to fines. Any of these consequences would harm our reputation, our prospects for future work and our operating results. In addition, we may have to repeat research or redo trials. If we are required to repeat research or redo trials, we may be contractually required to do so at no further cost to our clients, but at substantial cost to us.
We may lose business opportunities as a result of healthcare reform and the expansion of managed-care organizations.
Numerous governments, including the U.S. government, have undertaken efforts to control growing healthcare costs through legislation, regulation and voluntary agreements with medical care providers and drug companies. In March 2010, the United States Congress enacted healthcare reform legislation intended over time to expand health insurance coverage and impose health industry cost containment measures. This legislation may significantly impact the pharmaceutical industry. The U.S. Congress has also considered and may adopt legislation that could have the effect of putting downward pressure on the prices that pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies can charge for prescription drugs. In addition, various state legislatures and European and Asian governments may consider various types of healthcare reform in order to control growing healthcare costs. We are presently uncertain as to the effects of the recently enacted legislation on our business and are unable to predict what legislative proposals will be adopted in the future, if any.
If these efforts are successful, drug, medical device and biotechnology companies may react by spending less on research and development. If this were to occur, we would have fewer business opportunities and our revenue could decrease, possibly materially. In addition, new laws or regulations may create a risk of liability, increase our costs or limit our service offerings.
In addition to healthcare reform proposals, the expansion of managed-care organizations in the healthcare market and managed-care organizations’ efforts to cut costs by limiting expenditures on pharmaceuticals and medical devices could result in pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies spending less on research and development. If this were to occur, we would have fewer business opportunities and our revenue could decrease, possibly materially.

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We may have substantial exposure to payment of personal injury claims and may not have adequate insurance to cover such claims.
Our CRS business primarily involves the testing of experimental drugs and medical devices on consenting human volunteers pursuant to a study protocol. Clinical research involves a risk of liability for a number of reasons, including, but not limited to:
personal injury or death to patients who participate in the study or who use a product approved by regulatory authorities after the clinical research has concluded;
general risks associated with clinical pharmacology facilities, including professional malpractice of clinical pharmacology medical care providers; and
errors and omissions during a trial that may undermine the usefulness of a trial or data from the trial or study.
In order to mitigate the risk of liability, we seek to include indemnification provisions in our CRS contracts with clients and with investigators. However, we are not able to include indemnification provisions in all of our contracts. In addition, even if we are able to include an indemnification provision in our contracts, the indemnification provisions may not cover our exposure if:
we had to pay damages or incur defense costs in connection with a claim that is outside the scope of an indemnification agreement; or
a client failed to indemnify us in accordance with the terms of an indemnification agreement because it did not have the financial ability to fulfill its indemnification obligation or for any other reason.
In addition, contractual indemnifications generally do not protect us against liability arising from certain of our own actions, such as negligence or misconduct.
We also carry insurance to cover our risk of liability. However, our insurance is subject to deductibles and coverage limits and may not be adequate to cover claims. In addition, liability coverage is expensive. In the future, we may not be able to maintain or obtain the same levels of coverage on reasonable terms, at a reasonable cost, or in sufficient amounts to protect us against losses due to claims.
Existing and proposed laws and regulations regarding confidentiality of patients’ and other individuals’ personal information could result in increased risks of liability or increased cost to us or could limit our product and service offerings.
The confidentiality, security, use and disclosure of patient-specific information are subject to governmental regulation. Regulations to protect the safety and privacy of human subjects who participate in or whose data are used in clinical research generally require clinical investigators to obtain affirmative informed consent from identifiable research subjects before research is undertaken. Under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 ("HIPAA"), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has issued regulations mandating privacy and security protections for certain types of individually identifiable health information, or protected health information, when used or disclosed by health care providers and other HIPAA-covered entities or business associates that provide services to or perform functions on behalf of these covered entities. HIPAA regulations generally require individuals’ written authorization before identifiable health information may be used for research, in addition to any required informed consent. HIPAA regulations also specify standards for de-identifying health information so that information can be handled outside of the HIPAA requirements and for creating limited data sets that can be used for research purposes under less stringent HIPAA restrictions. The European Union and its member states, as well as other countries, such as Canada, Argentina, Japan and other Asian countries, and state governments in the United States, have adopted and continue to issue new medical privacy and general data protection laws and regulations. In those countries, collecting, processing, using and transferring an individual’s personal data is subject to specific requirements, such as obtaining explicit consent, processing the information for limited purposes and restrictions with respect to cross-border transfers. Many countries and almost all states in the United States have adopted stringent data security breach laws that require the user of such data to inform the affected individuals and the authorities of security breaches. In order to comply with these laws and regulations and corresponding contractual demands from our clients, we must maintain internal compliance policies and procedures, and we may need to implement new privacy and security measures, which may require us to make substantial expenditures or cause us to limit the products and services we offer. In addition, if we violate applicable laws, regulations, contractual commitments, or other duties relating to the use, privacy or security of health information, we could be subject to civil liability or criminal penalties and it may be necessary to modify our business practices.

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Failure to achieve and maintain effective internal controls in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and delays in completing our internal controls and financial audits, could have a material adverse effect on our business and stock price.
If we fail to achieve and maintain effective internal controls, we will not be able to conclude that we have effective internal controls over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Failure to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment, and delays in completing our internal controls and financial audits, could cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information and PAREXEL, which could result in a decline in the market price of our common stock, and cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations in the future, which in turn could impact our ability to raise equity financing if needed in the future. Our Fiscal Year 2009 management assessment revealed a material weakness in our internal controls over financial reporting due to insufficient controls associated with accounting for the ClinPhone business combination, specifically the adoption by ClinPhone of an accounting policy for revenue recognition in accordance with U.S. GAAP for interactive voice response ("IVR") sales contracts with multiple revenue elements and the determination of the fair value of deferred revenue assumed in the business combination. We have since changed our internal controls to address this material weakness, but we have not yet tested the effectiveness of our remediation since we have not completed any further acquisitions. There can be no assurance that our remediation will be successful. During the course of our continued testing, we also may identify other significant deficiencies or material weaknesses, in addition to the ones already identified, which we may not be able to remediate in a timely manner or at all.
We operate in many different jurisdictions and we could be adversely affected by violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar worldwide anti-corruption laws.
The U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and similar worldwide anti-corruption laws, including the U.K. Bribery Act of 2010, generally prohibit companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments to foreign officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Our internal policies mandate compliance with these anti-corruption laws. We operate in many parts of the world that have experienced governmental corruption to some degree, and in certain circumstances, anti-corruption laws have appeared to conflict with local customs and practices. Despite our training and compliance programs, we cannot assure that our internal control policies and procedures always will protect us from reckless or criminal acts committed by persons associated with PAREXEL. Our continued global expansion, including in developing countries, could increase such risk in the future. Violations of these laws, or even allegations of such violations, could disrupt our business and result in a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition.
Risks Associated with Leverage
Our indebtedness may limit cash flow available to invest in the ongoing needs of our business.
As of June 30, 2012, we had $220.0 million principal amount of debt outstanding and remaining borrowing availability of $175.0 million under our lines of credit. We may incur additional debt in the future. Our leverage could have significant adverse consequences, including:
requiring us to dedicate a substantial portion of any cash flow from operations to the payment of interest on, and principal of, our debt, which will reduce the amounts available to fund working capital and capital expenditures, and for other general corporate purposes;
increasing our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions;
limiting our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industry in which we compete; and
placing us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that have less debt.
Under the terms of our various credit facilities, interest rates are fixed based on market indices at the time of borrowing and, depending upon the interest mechanism selected by us, may float thereafter. Some of our other smaller credit facilities also bear interest at floating rates. As a result, the amount of interest payable by us on our borrowings may increase if market interest rates change.
We may not have sufficient funds or may be unable to arrange for additional financing to pay the amounts due under our existing or any future debt. In addition, a failure to comply with the covenants under our existing debt instruments could result in an event of default under those instruments. In the event of an acceleration of amounts due under our debt instruments as a result of an event of default, we may not have sufficient funds or may be unable to arrange for additional financing to repay our indebtedness or to make any accelerated payments.
In addition, the terms of the 2011 Credit Agreement provide that upon the occurrence of a change in control, as defined in the credit facility agreement, all outstanding indebtedness under the facility would become due. This provision may delay or prevent a change in control that stockholders may consider desirable.

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Our existing debt instruments contain covenants that limit our flexibility and prevent us from taking certain actions.
The agreements in connection with our 2011 Credit Agreement include a number of significant restrictive covenants. These covenants could adversely affect us by limiting our ability to plan for or react to market conditions, meet our capital needs and execute our business strategy. These covenants, among other things, limit our ability and the ability of our restricted subsidiaries to:
incur additional debt;
make certain investments;
enter into certain types of transactions with affiliates;
make specified restricted payments; and
sell certain assets or merge with or into other companies.
These covenants may limit our operating and financial flexibility and limit our ability to respond to changes in our business or competitive activities. Our failure to comply with these covenants could result in an event of default, which, if not cured or waived, could result in our being required to repay these borrowings before their scheduled due date.
Risks Associated with our Common Stock
Our corporate governance structure, including provisions of our articles of organization, by-laws, shareholder rights plan, as well as Massachusetts law, may delay or prevent a change in control or management that stockholders may consider desirable.
Provisions of our articles of organization, by-laws and our shareholder rights plan, as well as provisions of Massachusetts law, may enable our management to resist acquisition of us by a third party, or may discourage a third party from acquiring us. These provisions include the following:
we have divided our board of directors into three classes that serve staggered three-year terms;
we are subject to Section 8.06 of the Massachusetts Business Corporation Law, which provides that directors may only be removed by stockholders for cause, vacancies in our board of directors may only be filled by a vote of our board of directors, and the number of directors may be fixed only by our board of directors;
we are subject to Chapter 110F of the Massachusetts General Laws, which may limit the ability of some interested stockholders to engage in business combinations with us;
our stockholders are limited in their ability to call or introduce proposals at stockholder meetings; and
our shareholder rights plan would cause a proposed acquirer of 20% or more of our outstanding shares of common stock to suffer significant dilution.
These provisions could have the effect of delaying, deferring, or preventing a change in control of us or a change in our management that stockholders may consider favorable or beneficial. These provisions could also discourage proxy contests and make it more difficult for stockholders to elect directors and take other corporate actions. These provisions could also limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our stock.
In addition, our board of directors may issue preferred stock in the future without stockholder approval. If our board of directors issues preferred stock, the rights of the holders of common stock would be subordinate to the rights of the holders of preferred stock. Our board of directors’ ability to issue the preferred stock could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire, or discourage a third party from acquiring, a majority of our stock.
Our stock price has been, and may in the future be volatile, which could lead to losses by investors.
The market price of our common stock has fluctuated widely in the past and may continue to do so in the future. On August 14, 2012, the closing sales price of our common stock on the Nasdaq Global Select Market was $26.98 per share. During the period from June 30, 2007 to June 30, 2012, our common stock traded at prices ranging from a high of $36.16 per share to a low of $6.11 per share. Investors in our common stock must be willing to bear the risk of such fluctuations in stock price and the risk that the value of an investment in our stock could decline.
Our stock price can be affected by quarter-to-quarter variations in a number of factors including, but not limited to:
operating results;
earnings estimates by analysts;
market conditions in our industry;

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prospects of healthcare reform;
changes in government regulations;
general economic conditions, and
our effective income tax rate.
In addition, the stock market has from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are not related to the operating performance of particular companies. These market fluctuations may adversely affect the market price of our common stock. Although our common stock has traded in the past at a relatively high price-earnings multiple, due in part to analysts’ expectations of earnings growth, the price of the stock could quickly and substantially decline as a result of even a relatively small shortfall in earnings from, or a change in, analysts’ expectations.

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
As of June 30, 2012, we occupied approximately 2,347,000 square feet of building space, primarily office space, in 70 locations in 51 countries under various leases that expire between 2012 and 2035. Total square feet by region is summarized below:
 
Region
Square Feet
The Americas
749,000

Europe, Middle East & Africa
1,082,000

Asia/Pacific
516,000

Total
2,347,000

Our largest facilities are located in (a) the United States, where we occupy approximately 684,000 square feet, (b) Germany, where we occupy approximately 434,000 square feet, (c) the United Kingdom, where we occupy approximately 277,000 square feet, (d) India, where we occupy approximately 277,000 square feet, and (e) South Africa, where we occupy approximately 129,000 square feet. Our principal facilities are set forth below:
Facility
 
Sq. Ft.
 
Use of Facility
 
Lease Expirations
Headquarters in Waltham, MA            
 
64,000
 
CRS, PCMS and Corporate
 
2019
Berlin, Germany
 
382,000
 
All Business Segments and General & Administrative
 
2016 - 2035
Billerica, MA
 
246,000
 
All Business Segments and General & Administrative
 
2018 - 2025
Hyderabad, India
 
262,000
 
All Business Segments and General & Administrative
 
2013 - 2017
Uxbridge, UK
 
87,000
 
CRS, PCMS and General & Administrative
 
2013 - 2017
Nottingham, UK
 
80,000
 
Perceptive and General & Administrative
 
2012 - 2015
We believe that our facilities are adequate for our operations and that additional space will be available at satisfactory terms, if needed.

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
PAREXEL periodically becomes involved in various legal proceedings and claims that arise in the ordinary course of business. We believe that no matters currently pending would, in the event of an adverse outcome, have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations, or liquidity but there can be no assurance that such matters would not, in the event of an adverse outcome, have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations, or liquidity.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.

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PART II
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS, AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
MARKET INFORMATION AND HOLDERS
Our common stock is traded on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol “PRXL.” The table below shows the high and low sales prices of the common stock for each quarter of the Fiscal Years 2012 and 2011, respectively.
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
 
High
 
Low
 
High
 
Low
First Quarter
 
$24.24
 
$15.26
 
$24.63
 
$19.52
Second Quarter
 
$22.99
 
$17.99
 
$23.25
 
$16.80
Third Quarter
 
$28.74
 
$20.11
 
$25.21
 
$19.66
Fourth Quarter
 
$28.93
 
$23.75
 
$27.91
 
$21.38
As of August 22, 2012, there were approximately 140 stockholders of record of our common stock. The number does not include stockholders for which shares were held in a “nominee” or “street” name.
DIVIDENDS
We have never declared or paid any cash dividends on our capital stock, nor do we anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. We intend to retain future earnings for the development and expansion of our business.
Under the terms of the 2011 Credit Agreement, which is described in “Lines of Credit” in Item 7 of this annual report, neither we nor any of our subsidiaries may pay any dividend or make any other distribution with respect to any shares of capital stock except that (a) we and our subsidiaries may declare and pay dividends with respect to equity interests payable solely in additional shares of its common stock, (b) our subsidiaries may declare and pay dividends and other distributions ratably with respect to their equity interests, (c) we may make restricted payments pursuant to and in accordance with stock option plans or other benefit plans for management or employees of PAREXEL and our subsidiaries, and (d) we may make certain permitted stock repurchases.
STOCK REPURCHASE PROGRAM
On August 8, 2012, our Board of Directors approved a stock repurchase program authorizing the repurchase of up to $200 million of our common stock. There is no set expiration date for the program. The timing and amount of repurchases will be determined by certain members of our management team based on a variety of factors such as trading price, corporate requirements, and overall market conditions, and will be subject to applicable legal requirements including federal and state securities laws. Purchases may be made in open market transactions effected through a broker dealer at prevailing market prices, in block trades, in accelerated share repurchase transactions, or in privately negotiated transactions. Shares may also be purchased pursuant to a trading plan meeting the requirements of Rule 10b5-1 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, which would permit shares to be repurchased when we might otherwise be precluded from doing so under insider trading laws. We intend to use cash on hand, cash generated from operations, existing credit facilities, or other financing to fund the share repurchase program. We had approximately $6 million remaining under a previous stock repurchase program, which has now been canceled.

24



COMPANY STOCK PERFORMANCE GRAPH
Our common stock is listed for trading on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol “PRXL.” The Stock Price Performance Graph set forth below compares the cumulative total stockholder return on our common stock for the period from June 30, 2007 through June 30, 2012, with the cumulative total return of the Nasdaq U.S. Stock Index and the Nasdaq Health Services Index over the same period. The comparison assumes $100 was invested on June 30, 2007 in PAREXEL’s common stock, in the Nasdaq U.S. Stock Index, and in the Nasdaq Health Services Index and assumes reinvestment of dividends, if any.
 
 
Fiscal Years Ended June 30,
Total Return Index For:
 
2007
 
2008
 
2009
 
2010
 
2011
 
2012
PAREXEL International Stock
 
$100
 
$125
 
$68
 
$103
 
$112
 
$134
Nasdaq U.S. Stock Index
 
$100
 
$87
 
$72
 
$83
 
$111
 
$121
Nasdaq Health Services Index
 
$100
 
$92
 
$87
 
$113
 
$141
 
$151
The stock price performance shown on the graph above is not necessarily indicative of future price performance. Information used in the graph was obtained from The Nasdaq Stock Market, a source believed to be reliable, but we are not responsible for any errors or omissions in such information.
The information included under the heading “Company Stock Performance Graph” is “furnished” and not “filed” for purposes of Section 18 of the Exchange Act, or otherwise subject to the liabilities of that section, nor shall it be deemed to be “soliciting material” subject to Regulation 14A or incorporated by reference in any filing under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.


25



ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
The following selected consolidated financial data of PAREXEL for the five years ended June 30, 2012 are derived from our consolidated financial statements. The information set forth below should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included as Item 7 in this annual report and the consolidated financial statements and related footnotes included as Item 8 in this annual report.
 
 
For the fiscal years ended June 30,
(in thousands, except per share data and number of employees)
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
OPERATIONS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Service revenue
 
$
1,396,508

 
$
1,212,099

 
$
1,131,039

 
$
1,050,755

 
$
964,283

 
Income from operations (1)
 
$
88,802

 
$
81,630

 
$
83,109

 
$
75,644

 
$
86,666

 
Net income
 
$
63,158

 
$
48,786

 
$
41,542

 
$
39,307

 
$
64,640

 
Basic earnings per share
 
$
1.06

 
$
0.83

 
$
0.72

 
$
0.68

 
$
1.16

 
Diluted earnings per share
 
$
1.05

 
$
0.81

 
$
0.71

 
$
0.68

 
$
1.12

FINANCIAL POSITION
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash and marketable securities
 
$
213,579

 
$
89,056

 
$
107,413

 
$
96,352

 
$
51,918

 
Working capital
 
$
349,204

 
$
317,298

 
$
167,498

 
$
191,705

 
$
146,535

 
Total assets
 
$
1,535,372

 
$
1,429,483

 
$
1,220,710

 
$
1,224,461

 
$
948,071

 
Short-term debt
 
$
5,003

 
$
5,867

 
$
32,082

 
$
32,090

 
$
66,474

 
Long-term debt
 
$
215,000

 
$
240,102

 
$
183,707

 
$
247,083

 
$
3,465

 
Stockholders’ equity
 
$
609,675

 
$
566,004

 
$
439,555

 
$
414,745

 
$
428,091

OTHER DATA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Purchases of property and equipment
 
$
74,403

 
$
60,153

 
$
78,959

 
$
75,181

 
$
67,067

 
Depreciation and amortization
 
$
66,172

 
$
65,480

 
$
60,320

 
$
52,928

 
$
37,686

 
Number of employees
 
12,695

 
10,550

 
9,720

 
9,275

 
8,050

 
Weighted average shares
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
59,464

 
58,634

 
58,062

 
57,538

 
55,896

 
Diluted
 
60,426

 
59,874

 
58,756

 
57,847

 
57,461

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1)
The year ended June 30, 2012 includes restructuring charges consisting of $4.3 million in severance costs, $1.9 million of facility-related costs and $0.6 million of legal charges in conjunction with an adverse judgment related to an exited facility.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The year ended June 30, 2011 includes restructuring charges consisting of $4.1 million of facility-related costs, $1.3 million in severance costs, and $3.1 million in impairment charges related to exited facilities.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The year ended June 30, 2010 includes restructuring charges consisting of $0.5 million related to accelerated depreciation, $5.2 million of facility-related costs and $11.6 million in severance costs; $4.3 million in legal settlement costs related to a small acquisition which was completed several years ago; and the release of $1.1 million in certain reserves due to lower than expected wind-down costs related to the $15 million accrual established in the second quarter of Fiscal Year 2009 for a client contract default (see next paragraph).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The year ended June 30, 2009 includes $15.0 million in other charges ($12.3 million for bad debt expense and $2.7 million in anticipated wind-down costs and related expenses for service fees, pass-through costs, and investigator fees).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The year ended June 30, 2008, includes a $0.9 million benefit from changes in restructuring charges related to facilities and severance expenses.



26



ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

OVERVIEW
We are a leading biopharmaceutical services company, providing a broad range of expertise in clinical research, medical communications services, consulting and informatics and advanced technology products and services to the worldwide pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device industries. Our primary objective is to provide solutions for managing the biopharmaceutical product lifecycle with the goal of reducing the time, risk, and cost associated with the development and commercialization of new therapies. Since our incorporation in 1983, we have developed significant expertise in processes and technologies supporting this strategy. Our product and service offerings include: clinical trials management, data management, biostatistical analysis, medical communications, clinical pharmacology, patient recruitment, regulatory and product development consulting, health policy and reimbursement, performance improvement, medical imaging services, ClinPhone® RTSM, IMPACT® CTMS, DataLabs® EDC, web-based portals, systems integration, ePRO, and other drug development consulting services. We believe that our comprehensive services, depth of therapeutic area expertise, global footprint and related access to patients, and sophisticated information technology, along with our experience in global drug development and product launch services, represent key competitive strengths.
We are managed through three business segments: Clinical Research Services (“CRS”), PAREXEL Consulting and MedCom Services (“PCMS”) and Perceptive Informatics, Inc. (“Perceptive”).
CRS constitutes our core business and includes all phases of clinical research from Early Phase (encompassing the early stages of clinical testing that range from first-in-man through proof-of-concept studies) to Phase II-III and Phase IV, which we call Peri Approval Clinical Excellence (“PACE”). Our services include clinical trials management and biostatistics, data management and clinical pharmacology, as well as related medical advisory, patient recruitment, clinical supply and drug logistics, pharmacovigilance, and investigator site services.
PCMS provides technical expertise and advice in such areas as drug development, regulatory affairs, and biopharmaceutical process and management consulting. PCMS also provides a full spectrum of market development, product development, and targeted communications services in support of product launch. PCMS consultants identify alternatives and propose solutions to address clients’ product development, registration, and commercialization issues. In addition, PCMS provides health policy consulting, as well as reimbursement and market access (“RMA”) services.
Perceptive provides information technology solutions designed to help improve clients’ product development processes. Perceptive offers a portfolio of products and services that includes medical imaging services, ClinPhone® RTSM, IMPACT® CTMS, DataLabs® EDC, web-based portals, systems integration, and ePRO.
We conduct a significant portion of our operations in foreign countries. Approximately 58.4% and 63.6% of our consolidated service revenue for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2012 and June 30, 2011, respectively, were from non-U.S. operations. Because our financial statements are denominated in U.S. dollars, changes in foreign currency exchange rates can have a significant effect on our operating results. For the Fiscal Year 2012, approximately 19.5% of total consolidated service revenue was from Euro-denominated contracts and approximately 3.9% of total consolidated service revenue was from pounds sterling-denominated contracts. For the Fiscal Year 2011, approximately 24.6% of total consolidated service revenue was from Euro-denominated contracts and approximately 5.5% of total consolidated service revenue was from pounds sterling-denominated contracts.
Approximately 90% of our contracts are fixed price, with some variable components, and range in duration from a few months to several years. Cash flows from these contracts typically consist of a down payment required at the time of contract execution with the balance due in installments over the contract’s duration, usually on a milestone achievement basis. Revenue from these contracts is recognized generally as work is performed. As a result, the timing of client billing and cash receipts do not necessarily correspond to costs incurred and revenue recognized on contracts.
Generally, our clients can either terminate their contracts with us upon thirty to sixty days notice or delay execution of services. Clients may terminate or delay contracts for a variety of reasons, including: merger or potential merger-related activities involving the client, the failure of products being tested to satisfy safety requirements or efficacy criteria, unexpected or undesired clinical results of the product, client cost reductions as a result of budgetary limits or changing priorities, the client’s decision to forego a particular study, insufficient patient enrollment or investigator recruitment, or clinical drug manufacturing problems resulting in shortages of the product.

27



CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES
This discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based on our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses, and other financial information. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates and judgments. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other factors that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.
We regard an accounting estimate underlying our financial statements as a “critical accounting estimate” if the nature of the estimate or assumption is material due to the level of subjectivity and judgment involved, or the susceptibility of such matter to change, and if the impact of the estimate or assumption on financial condition or operating performance is material. We believe that the following accounting policies are most critical to aid in fully understanding and evaluating our reported financial results:
REVENUE RECOGNITION
We derive revenue from the delivery of service or software solutions to clients in the worldwide pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical device industries. In general, we recognize revenue as services are performed when all of the following conditions are satisfied: (1) there is persuasive evidence of an arrangement; (2) the service offering has been delivered to the client; (3) the collection of fees is probable; and (4) the amount of fees to be paid by the client is fixed or determinable.
Our client arrangements in CRS generally involve multiple service deliverables, where bundled service deliverables are accounted for in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 605-25, “Multiple-Element Arrangements.” We determined that each of our service deliverables has standalone value and base the selling price upon third-party evidence (TPE). TPE is established for each of our arrangement deliverables based on the price we charge for equivalent services when sold to other similar customers as well as our knowledge of market-pricing from the competitive bidding process for customer contracts offering similar services to comparably situated customers.
Within Perceptive’s Clinphone® RTSM business, we offer selected software solutions through a hosted application delivered through a standard web-browser. We recognize revenue from application hosting services in accordance with ASC 985-605, “Revenue Recognition in the Software Industry” and ASC 605-25 as our customers do not have the right to take possession of the software. Revenue resulting from these hosting services consists of three stages: set-up (client specification and workflow), hosting and support services, and closeout reporting.
Critical management estimates may be involved in the determination of “hosting period,” and other revenue elements. Changes to these elements could affect the amount and timing of revenue recognition.
BILLED AND UNBILLED ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE
Billed accounts receivable represent amounts for which invoices have been sent to clients based upon contract terms. Unbilled accounts receivable represent amounts recognized as revenue for which invoices have not yet been sent to clients. We maintain a provision for losses on receivables based on historical collectability and specific identification of potential problem accounts. Critical management estimates may be involved in the determination of “collectability” and the amounts required to be recorded as provisions for losses on receivables.
INCOME TAXES
Our global provision for corporate income taxes is determined in accordance with ASC 740, “Income Taxes,” which requires that deferred tax assets and liabilities be recognized for the effect of temporary differences between the book and tax basis of recorded assets and liabilities. A valuation allowance is established if it is more likely than not that future tax benefits from the deferred tax assets will not be realized. Income tax expense is based on the distribution of profit before tax among the various taxing jurisdictions in which we operate, adjusted as required by the tax laws of each taxing jurisdiction. Changes in the distribution of profits and losses among taxing jurisdictions may have a significant impact on our effective tax rate.
We account for uncertain tax positions in accordance with the provisions of ASC 740, which requires financial statement reporting of the expected future tax consequences of uncertain tax return reporting positions on the presumption that all relevant tax authorities possess full knowledge of those tax reporting positions, as well as all of the pertinent facts and circumstances. In addition, ASC 740 requires financial statement disclosure about uncertainty in income tax reporting positions.
We are subject to ongoing audits by federal, state and foreign tax authorities that may result in proposed assessments. Our estimate of the potential outcome for any uncertain tax issue is based on judgment. We believe we have adequately provided for any uncertain tax positions. However, future results may include favorable or unfavorable adjustments to our estimated tax liabilities in the period assessments are made or resolved or when statutes of limitation on potential assessments expire.

28



GOODWILL AND INDEFINITE-LIVED INTANGIBLES
Goodwill represents the excess of the cost of an acquired business over the fair value of the related net assets at the date of acquisition and is subject to annual impairment testing or more frequent testing if an event occurs or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce the fair value below its carrying value. Our impairment testing for goodwill involves assessment of qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not (a likelihood of more than 50%) that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, including goodwill. This assessment requires management judgment on the potential impact of each qualitative factor. Our impairment testing for our indefinite-lived intangible, the ClinPhone tradename, requires management judgment and the use of estimates in our royalty-relief methodology used in estimating fair value. These estimates include future growth rates and discount factors. Based on our Fiscal Year 2012 qualitative assessment of impairment for goodwill and our quantitative royalty-relief fair value assessment for our tradename, we concluded that neither were impaired.

29



RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
Note 19 to our consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K provides a summary of our unaudited quarterly results of operations for the years ended June 30, 2012 and 2011.
ANALYSIS BY SEGMENT
We evaluate our segment performance and allocate resources based on service revenue and gross profit (service revenue less direct costs), while other operating costs are allocated and evaluated on a geographic basis. Accordingly, we do not include the impact of selling, general, and administrative expenses, depreciation and amortization expense, interest income (expense), other income (loss), and income tax expense (benefit) in segment profitability. We attribute revenue to individual countries based upon the cost of services performed in the respective countries and inter-segment transactions are not included in service revenue. Furthermore, we have a global infrastructure supporting our business segments and therefore, assets are not identified by reportable segment. Service revenue, direct costs, and gross profit on service revenue for Fiscal Years 2012, 2011, and 2010 were as follows:
(in thousands)
 
Twelve Months Ended*
 
Increase
(Decrease)
 
%
 
 
June 30, 2012
 
June 30, 2011
 
Service revenue
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CRS
 
$
1,038,705

 
$
922,827

 
$
115,878

 
12.6
 %
PCMS
 
167,125

 
129,728

 
37,397

 
28.8
 %
Perceptive
 
190,678

 
159,544

 
31,134

 
19.5
 %
Total service revenue
 
$
1,396,508

 
$
1,212,099

 
$
184,409

 
15.2
 %
Direct costs
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CRS
 
$
759,539

 
$
628,627

 
$
130,912

 
20.8
 %
PCMS
 
97,560

 
77,679

 
19,881

 
25.6
 %
Perceptive
 
114,730

 
91,478

 
23,252

 
25.4
 %
Total direct costs
 
$
971,829

 
$
797,784

 
$
174,045

 
21.8
 %
Gross profit
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CRS
 
$
279,166

 
$
294,200

 
$
(15,034
)
 
(5.1
)%
PCMS
 
69,565

 
52,049

 
17,516

 
33.7
 %
Perceptive
 
75,948

 
68,066

 
7,882

 
11.6
 %
Total gross profit
 
$
424,679

 
$
414,315

 
$
10,364

 
2.5
 %
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(in thousands)
 
Twelve Months Ended*
 
Increase
(Decrease)
 
%
 
 
June 30, 2011
 
June 30, 2010
 
Service revenue
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CRS
 
$
922,827

 
$
870,721

 
$
52,106

 
6.0
 %
PCMS
 
129,728

 
121,652

 
8,076

 
6.6
 %
Perceptive
 
159,544

 
138,666

 
20,878

 
15.1
 %
Total service revenue
 
$
1,212,099

 
$
1,131,039

 
$
81,060

 
7.2
 %
Direct costs
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CRS
 
$
628,627

 
$
569,949

 
$
58,678

 
10.3
 %
PCMS
 
77,679

 
75,266

 
2,413

 
3.2
 %
Perceptive
 
91,478

 
80,794

 
10,684

 
13.2
 %
Total direct costs
 
$
797,784

 
$
726,009

 
$
71,775

 
9.9
 %
Gross profit
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CRS
 
$
294,200

 
$
300,772

 
$
(6,572
)
 
(2.2
)%
PCMS
 
52,049

 
46,386

 
5,663

 
12.2
 %
Perceptive
 
68,066

 
57,872

 
10,194

 
17.6
 %
Total gross profit
 
$
414,315

 
$
405,030

 
$
9,285

 
2.3
 %
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
*Effective July 1, 2011, $11.9 million and $7.2 million of selling, general and administrative expenses for Fiscal Year 2011 and Fiscal Year 2010, respectively, were reclassified as CRS direct costs to conform to the presentation for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. These changes had no impact on total revenue, total expenses, operating income, net income, earnings per share or the balance sheet.


30



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012 COMPARED WITH THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2011
Revenue
Service revenue increased by $184.4 million, or 15.2%, to $1,396.5 million for Fiscal Year 2012 from $1,212.1 million for Fiscal Year 2011. On a geographic basis, service revenue was distributed as follows (in millions):
 
 
Fiscal Year 2012
 
Fiscal Year 2011
Region
 
Service Revenue
 
% of Total
 
Service Revenue
 
% of Total
The Americas
 
$
635.3

 
45.5
%
 
$
484.7

 
40.0
%
Europe, Middle East & Africa
 
$
555.5

 
39.8
%
 
$
553.8

 
45.7
%
Asia/Pacific
 
$
205.7

 
14.7
%
 
$
173.6

 
14.3
%
For Fiscal Year 2012 compared with Fiscal Year 2011, service revenue in The Americas increased by $150.6 million, or 31.1%; Europe, Middle East & Africa service revenue increased by $1.7 million, or 0.3%; and Asia/Pacific service revenue increased by $32.1 million, or 18.5%. The increases were due primarily to strong new business growth across all segments, especially in the Americas, where growth was largely due to our strategic partnerships. Furthermore, service revenue in Europe, Middle East & Africa was negatively impacted by foreign currency exchange fluctuations of approximately $3.4 million.
On a segment basis, CRS service revenue increased by $115.9 million, or 12.6%, to $1,038.7 million for Fiscal Year 2012 from $922.8 million for Fiscal Year 2011. The increase was attributable to a $132.2 million improvement in our Phase II-III/PACE business, partly offset by a $14.1 million decrease in Early Phase (including a $4.4 million decrease due to the disposition of two South African facilities). The increase in Phase II-III/PACE was due to our success in winning new business awards and the continued positive impact of strategic partnerships. The decrease in Early Phase was due to weakening demand, which led, in part, to our restructuring efforts in this business unit announced in April 2011, including the disposition of the two South African facilities.
PCMS service revenue increased by $37.4 million, or 28.8%, to $167.1 million for Fiscal Year 2012 from $129.7 million for Fiscal Year 2011. The increase was due primarily to a $45.1 million increase in consulting services associated with growth in start-up Phase II-III activities and growth in strategic compliance work. These increases were partly offset by a $7.4 million decrease in our medical communications business due to lower demand.
Perceptive service revenue increased by $31.1 million, or 19.5%, to $190.7 million for Fiscal Year 2012 from $159.5 million for Fiscal Year 2011. The growth was due primarily to a $16.8 million increase in ClinPhone RTSM services, a $12.4 million increase in Medical Imaging, and $2.6 million in other eClinical services. The continued growth in Perceptive service revenue was due to higher demand for technology usage in clinical trials and the positive impact of strategic partnerships.
Reimbursement revenue consists of reimbursable out-of-pocket expenses incurred on behalf of and reimbursable by clients. Reimbursement revenue does not yield any gross profit to us, nor does it have an impact on net income.
Direct Costs
Direct costs increased by $174.0 million, or 21.8%, to $971.8 million for Fiscal Year 2012 from $797.8 million for Fiscal Year 2011. As a percentage of total service revenue, direct costs increased to 69.6% from 65.8% for the respective periods.
On a segment basis, CRS direct costs increased by $130.9 million, or 20.8%, to $759.5 million for Fiscal Year 2012 from $628.6 million for Fiscal Year 2011. This increase resulted primarily from increased labor costs to support higher levels of project activity, and the short-term impact of the transition to an increasing number of strategic partnerships. As a percentage of service revenue, CRS direct costs increased to 73.1% for Fiscal Year 2012 from 68.1% for Fiscal Year 2011 due primarily to the need to hire staff in advance of the revenue curve from continued strength in new business wins.
PCMS direct costs increased by $19.9 million, or 25.6%, to $97.6 million for Fiscal Year 2012 from $77.7 million for Fiscal Year 2011. This increase was primarily from higher labor costs in our consulting services unit due to increased demand related to growth in start-up Phase II-III activities and strategic compliance work. Offsetting this increase was a $5.5 million decline in labor costs within the medical communications business. As a percentage of service revenue, PCMS direct costs decreased to 58.4% from 59.9% for the respective periods as a result of a more favorable revenue mix and improved productivity and efficiency.
Perceptive direct costs increased by $23.3 million, or 25.4%, to $114.7 million for Fiscal Year 2012 from $91.5 million for Fiscal Year 2011. This increase was due primarily to higher labor costs and additional expenses in medical imaging, as a result of investments related to movement of work to low-cost locations. As a percentage of service revenue, Perceptive direct costs increased to 60.2% for Fiscal Year 2012 from 57.3% for Fiscal Year 2011. This increase was largely due to investments in the business to build our capabilities in low-cost locations, increased hiring related to new strategic partnership support, a change

31



in revenue mix, and higher compensation costs.
Selling, General and Administrative
Selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expense increased by $4.4 million, or 1.7%, to $263.5 million for Fiscal Year 2012 from $259.1 million for Fiscal Year 2011. This increase was primarily due to a $5.5 million increase in rent (due to increased space requirements) and other facilities costs (such as telecommunications and utilities, due to an increase in overall headcount). As a percentage of service revenue, SG&A decreased to 18.9% in Fiscal Year 2012 from 21.4% in Fiscal Year 2011 due to revenue growth and an intensified focus on controlled spending.
Depreciation and Amortization
Depreciation and amortization (“D&A”) expense increased slightly by $0.7 million, or 1.1%, to $66.2 million for Fiscal Year 2012 from $65.5 million for Fiscal Year 2011. As a percentage of service revenue, D&A decreased to 4.7% for Fiscal Year 2012 from 5.4% for Fiscal Year 2011 mainly due to revenue growth.
Restructuring Charge
For Fiscal Year 2012, we recorded $6.2 million in restructuring charges under our restructuring plans, including $4.3 million in employee separation benefits and $1.9 million of facility-related costs.
For Fiscal Year 2011, we recorded $8.1 million in restructuring charges under our restructuring plans, including approximately $3.7 million of facility-related costs, $1.8 million in employee separation benefits associated with the elimination of 54 managerial and staff positions, and $3.1 million in impairment charges related to exited facilities associated with the 2011 Restructuring Plan, offset by $0.5 million of net benefit due to adjustments in previous restructuring plans.
Income from Operations
Income from operations increased to $88.8 million for Fiscal Year 2012 from $81.6 million for Fiscal Year 2011 due to the factors described above. Income from operations as a percentage of service revenue ("operating margin") decreased to 6.4% from 6.7% for the respective periods. This decrease in operating margin was due primarily to the increases in direct costs described above.
Other Expense, Net
We recorded net other expense of $9.1 million for Fiscal Year 2012 compared with $23.0 million for Fiscal Year 2011. The $13.9 million decrease was due primarily to a $4.6 million decrease in interest expense and a $9.1 million decrease in miscellaneous expense.
Miscellaneous expense for Fiscal Year 2012 of $2.1 million was primarily attributable to $6.3 million of unrealized losses related to derivatives contracts and $2.4 million of losses from asset disposals and loan write-offs, partly offset by $6.6 million in foreign exchange gains from certain foreign-denominated assets and liabilities.
Miscellaneous expense for Fiscal Year 2011 of $11.2 million was primarily attributable to $17.1 million of losses in foreign exchange from certain foreign-denominated assets and liabilities and a $1.2 million charge for the impairment of certain long-lived assets, partly offset by $6.7 million of unrealized gains related to derivatives contracts. The higher-than-anticipated net loss was caused, in part, by short-term disruptions associated with the implementation of our new project accounting and billing system which adversely impacted cash flow and delayed the settlement of certain intercompany transactions.
Taxes
For Fiscal Year 2012 and Fiscal Year 2011, we had effective income tax rates of 20.8% and 16.8%, respectively. The low tax rate for Fiscal Year 2012 was primarily the result of the release of income tax reserves and associated accruals for interest and penalties resulting from settlements with tax authorities and the expiration of statutes of limitations in Europe. The low tax rate for Fiscal Year 2011 was primarily attributable to reductions in valuation allowances resulting from profitability improvements in the United States and the United Kingdom.


32



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2011 COMPARED WITH THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2010
Revenue
Service revenue increased by $81.1 million, or 7.2%, to $1,212.1 million for Fiscal Year 2011 from $1,131.0 million for Fiscal Year 2010. On a geographic basis, service revenue was distributed as follows (in millions):
 
 
Fiscal Year 2011
 
Fiscal Year 2010
Region
 
Service Revenue
 
% of Total
 
Service Revenue
 
% of Total
The Americas
 
$
484.7

 
40.0
%
 
$
449.3

 
39.7
%
Europe, Middle East & Africa
 
$
553.8

 
45.7
%
 
$
548.4

 
48.5
%
Asia/Pacific
 
$
173.6

 
14.3
%
 
$
133.3

 
11.8
%
For Fiscal Year 2011 compared with the same period in 2010, service revenue in The Americas increased by $35.3 million, or 7.9%; Europe, Middle East & Africa service revenue increased by $5.4 million, or 1.0%; and Asia/Pacific service revenue increased by $40.4 million, or 30.3%. The increases were due primarily to strong new business growth in CRS, especially in the Asia/Pacific region. Growth in The Americas was also due to a change in internal contractual arrangements that determine how revenue from client contracts is attributed to respective PAREXEL legal entities. In the past, we recognized revenue in respective regions based upon the work performed therein.
On a segment basis, CRS service revenue increased by $52.1 million, or 6.0%, to $922.8 million for Fiscal Year 2011 from $870.7 million for Fiscal Year 2010. The increase was attributable to a $51.5 million improvement in our Phase II-III/PACE business and $2.7 million related to the positive impact of foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations; partly offset by a decrease in Early Phase. The growth is a result of successful sales efforts over the past year and the continued positive impact of strategic partnerships. However, it has taken longer for backlog related to strategic partnerships to convert into revenue than work awarded to us by traditional clients.
PCMS service revenue increased by $8.1 million, or 6.6%, to $129.7 million for Fiscal Year 2011 from $121.7 million for the same period in 2010. The increase was due primarily to a $9.5 million increase in strategic compliance-related services due to increased regulatory challenges that our clients have encountered. This increase was partially offset by a $1.5 million decrease in other parts of the business.
Perceptive service revenue increased by $20.8 million, or 15.1%, to $159.5 million for Fiscal Year 2011 from $138.7 million for Fiscal Year 2010. The increase was due primarily to an $8.7 million increase in the ClinPhone RTSM business, a $7.6 million increase in Medical Imaging, and a $5.2 million increase in revenue from other business lines. The growth in Perceptive can be attributed to increasing usage of technology in clinical trials and the successful implementation of our technology strategy.
Reimbursement revenue consists of reimbursable out-of-pocket expenses incurred on behalf of and reimbursable by clients. Reimbursement revenue does not yield any gross profit to us, nor does it have an impact on net income.
Direct Costs
Direct costs increased by $71.8 million, or 9.9%, to $797.8 million for Fiscal Year 2011 from $726.0 million for Fiscal Year 2010. As a percentage of total service revenue, direct costs increased slightly to 65.8% from 64.2% for the respective periods.
On a segment basis, CRS direct costs increased by $58.7 million, or 10.3%, to $628.6 million for Fiscal Year 2011 from $569.9 million for Fiscal Year 2010. This increase resulted from higher levels of project activity and increased labor costs and the $6.8 million negative impact of foreign exchange rate fluctuations. As a percentage of service revenue, CRS direct costs increased to 68.1% for Fiscal Year 2011 from 65.5% for Fiscal Year 2010 due primarily to increased headcount and a slower-than-expected realization of revenue from strategic partnership-related projects.
PCMS direct costs increased by $2.4 million, or 3.2%, to $77.7 million for Fiscal Year 2011 from $75.3 million for Fiscal Year 2010. This increase was due primarily to a $5.5 million increase in strategic compliance-related service costs; partially offset by a $3.0 million decrease in other business lines (due to lower levels of business activity). As a percentage of service revenue, PCMS direct costs decreased to 59.9% from 61.9% for the respective periods as a result of improved productivity and efficiency.
Perceptive direct costs increased by $10.7 million, or 13.2%, to $91.4 million for Fiscal Year 2011 from $80.8 million for Fiscal Year 2010. This increase was due primarily to higher RTSM business volume. As a percentage of service revenue, Perceptive direct costs decreased to 57.3% for Fiscal Year 2011 from 58.3% for Fiscal Year 2010. This decrease was due primarily to improved utilization rates and higher revenue growth.


33



Selling, General and Administrative
SG&A expense increased by $13.2 million, or 5.4%, to $259.1 million for Fiscal Year 2011 from $245.9 million for Fiscal Year 2010. This increase was primarily due to a $10.2 million increase in rent (due to increased rental space requirements) and other facilities costs (such as telecommunications and utilities, due to an 8.5% increase in overall headcount) and a $7.6 million increase in labor costs. As a percentage of service revenue, SG&A was flat at 21.4% and 21.7% for Fiscal Years 2011 and 2010, respectively.
Depreciation and Amortization
D&A expense increased by $5.2 million, or 8.6%, to $65.5 million for Fiscal Year 2011 from $60.3 million for Fiscal Year 2010, primarily due to additional depreciation expense from increased capital expenditures over the last several quarters, including the implementation of our new project accounting and billing system. As a percentage of service revenue, D&A was 5.4% for Fiscal Year 2011 versus 5.3% for the same period in 2010.
Other (Benefit) Charge
For Fiscal Year 2010, we released $1.1 million of reserves to reflect lower-than-anticipated close-out costs that were related to a biopharma client that filed for bankruptcy protection in Fiscal Year 2009.
Restructuring Charge (Benefit)
For Fiscal Year 2011, we recorded $8.1 million in restructuring charges in association with our restructuring plans, including approximately $3.7 million of facility-related costs, $1.8 million in employee separation benefits associated with the elimination of 54 managerial and staff positions, and $3.1 million in impairment charges related to exited facilities associated with the 2011 Restructuring Plan; offset by $0.5 million of net benefit due to adjustments in previous plans.
For Fiscal Year 2010, we recorded $16.8 million in restructuring charges in association with the 2010 Restructuring Plan, including approximately $11.6 million in employee separation benefits associated with the elimination of 238 managerial and staff positions and $5.2 million in costs related to the abandonment of certain property leases.
Income from Operations
Income from operations decreased to $81.6 million for Fiscal Year 2011 from $83.1 million for the same period in 2010 due to the factors described above. Operating margin decreased to 6.7% from 7.3% for the respective periods. This decrease in operating margin was due primarily to increases in direct costs described above.
Other Expense, Net
We recorded net other expense of $23.0 million for Fiscal Year 2011 compared with $19.9 million for Fiscal Year 2010. The $3.1 million increase was due to a $1.6 million increase in interest expense, including $1.1 million of accelerated financing fees from the refinancing of our debt, and a $1.5 million increase in miscellaneous expense.
Miscellaneous expense for Fiscal Year 2011 of $11.2 million was primarily attributable to $17.1 million of losses on certain foreign denominated assets and liabilities and a $1.2 million charge for the impairment of certain long-lived assets in France; partly offset by $6.7 million of unrealized gains related to derivatives contracts. The higher-than-anticipated net loss was caused, in part, by short-term disruptions associated with the implementation of our new project accounting and billing system which adversely impacted cash flow and delayed the settlement of certain intercompany transactions.
Miscellaneous expense for Fiscal Year 2010 of $9.6 million included $7.0 million of losses related to derivatives contracts, a $6.1 million reserve for an impaired investment in a French laboratory that filed for bankruptcy protection, and a $0.4 million asset impairment charge; partly offset by $4.4 million in gains on the revaluation of foreign denominated assets/liabilities.
Taxes
For Fiscal Year 2011 and Fiscal Year 2010, we had effective income tax rates of 16.8% and 34.2%, respectively. The decrease in tax rate is primarily attributable to the favorable impact of a change in the geographic distribution of earnings, a reduction in non-deductible expenses outside of the United States, and a reduction in valuation reserves in the United Kingdom and the United States.



34



LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
Since our inception, we have financed our operations and growth with cash flow from operations, proceeds from the sale of equity securities, and credit facilities to fund business acquisitions and working capital. Investing activities primarily reflect capital expenditures for information systems enhancements and leasehold improvements. As of June 30, 2012, we had cash and cash equivalents of approximately $213.6 million, of which the majority is held in foreign countries since excess cash generated in the U.S. is primarily used to repay our debt obligations. Foreign cash balances include unremitted foreign earnings, which are invested indefinitely outside of the U.S. Our cash and cash equivalents are held in deposit accounts and money market funds, which provide us with immediate and unlimited access to the funds. Repatriation of funds to the U.S. from non-U.S. entities may be subject to taxation or certain legal restrictions. Nevertheless, most of our cash resides in countries with few or no such restrictions.
DAYS SALES OUTSTANDING
Our operating cash flow is heavily influenced by changes in the levels of billed and unbilled receivables and deferred revenue. These account balances as well as days sales outstanding (“DSO”) in accounts receivable, net of deferred revenue, can vary based on contractual milestones and the timing and size of cash receipts. We calculate DSO by adding the end-of-period balances for billed and unbilled account receivables, net of deferred revenue (short-term and long term) and the provision for losses on receivables, then dividing the resulting amount by the sum of total revenue plus investigator fees billed for the most recent quarter, and multiplying the resulting fraction by the number of days in the quarter. The following table presents the DSO, account receivables balances, and deferred revenue as of June 30, 2012 and June 30, 2011.
(in millions)
 
June 30, 2012
 
June 30, 2011
Billed accounts receivable, net
 
$
397.4

 
$
341.3

Unbilled accounts receivable, net
 
251.8

 
308.4

Total accounts receivable
 
649.2

 
649.7

Deferred revenue
 
359.7

 
332.7

Net receivables
 
$
289.5

 
$
317.0

 
 
 
 
 
DSO ( in days)
 
49

 
69

The decrease in DSO for the quarter ended June 30, 2012 compared to the quarter ended June 30, 2011, was due primarily to improvements in billing and collections.
CASH FLOWS
Net cash provided by operating activities was $234.5 million for Fiscal Year 2012 as compared to net cash used in operating activities of $1.5 million for Fiscal Year 2011. The $235.9 million increase in operating cash flows primarily reflects the effects of improved customer billings and collections, increased client advances, and other changes to working capital requirements.
Net cash used in investing activities was $76.5 million for Fiscal Year 2012 as compared to $45.7 million for Fiscal Year 2011. The increase of $30.8 million was due primarily to capital expenditures for computer hardware and software and less proceeds from the sale of marketable securities.
Net cash used in financing activities was $8.6 million for Fiscal Year 2012 as compared to net cash provided by financing activities of $36.6 million for Fiscal Year 2011. The $45.1 million decrease was due primarily to net repayments of debt in Fiscal Year 2012 compared to net borrowing in Fiscal Year 2011, as a result of strong collections.
LINES OF CREDIT
2011 Credit Agreement
On June 30, 2011, we entered into an unsecured senior credit facility (the “2011 Credit Agreement”) providing for a five-year term loan of $100.0 million and a revolving credit facility in the principal amount of up to $300.0 million. The borrowings all carry a variable interest rate based on LIBOR, prime, or a similar index, plus a margin (margin not to exceed a per annum rate of 1.75%).
In September 2011, we entered into an interest rate swap and an interest rate cap agreement. These interest rate hedges were deemed to be fully effective in accordance with ASC 815, “Derivatives and Hedging,” and, as such, unrealized gains and losses related to these derivatives are recorded as other comprehensive income. Principal in the amount of $100.0 million under the 2011 Credit Agreement has been hedged with an interest rate swap agreement and carries a fixed interest rate of 1.30% plus an applicable margin. Principal in the amount of $50.0 million has been hedged with an interest rate cap arrangement with an interest rate cap of 2.00% plus an applicable margin.

35



As of June 30, 2012, we had $125.0 million of principal borrowed under the revolving credit facility, $95.0 million of principal borrowed under the term loan, and borrowing availability of $175.0 million under the revolving credit facility. Our debt under the 2011 Credit Agreement, including the $100.0 million of principal hedged with an interest swap agreement, carried an average annualized interest rate of 1.90%.
During the twelve months ended June 30, 2012, we made principal payments of $5.0 million on the term loan. The remaining term loan scheduled repayments under the 2011 Credit Agreement increase over time: $5.0 million in Fiscal Year 2013, $10.0 million in Fiscal Year 2014, $20.0 million in Fiscal Year 2015, and $60.0 million in Fiscal Year 2016.
Additional Lines of Credit
We have an unsecured line of credit with JP Morgan UK in the amount of $4.5 million that bears interest at an annual rate ranging between 2.00% and 4.00%. We entered into this line of credit to facilitate business transactions. At June 30, 2012, we had $4.5 million available under this line of credit.
We have a cash pool facility with RBS Nederland, NV in the amount of 5.0 million Euros that bears interest at an annual rate ranging between 2.00% and 4.00%. We entered into this line of credit to facilitate business transactions. At June 30, 2012, we had 5.0 million Euros available under this line of credit.
We have a cash pooling arrangement with RBS Nederland, NV. Pooling which occurs when debit balances are offset against credit balances and the overall net position is used as a basis by the bank for calculating the overall pool interest amount. Each legal entity owned by us and party to this arrangement remains the owner of either a credit (deposit) or a debit (overdraft) balance. Therefore, interest income is earned by legal entities with credit balances, while interest expense is charged to legal entities with debit balances. Based on the pool’s aggregate balance, the bank then (1) recalculates the overall interest to be charged or earned, (2) compares this amount with the sum of previously charged/earned interest amounts per account and (3) additionally pays/charges the difference. The gross overdraft balance related to this pooling arrangement was $63.4 million and $50.2 million at June 30, 2012 and June 30, 2011, respectively, and was included in cash and cash equivalents.
FINANCING NEEDS
Our primary cash needs are for operating expenses, such as salaries and fringe benefits, hiring and recruiting, business development and facilities, business acquisitions, capital expenditures, and repayment of principal and interest on our borrowings. Our requirements for cash to pay principal and interest on our borrowings will increase significantly in future periods because we borrowed $245 million in Fiscal Year 2011 under the 2011 Credit Agreement to refinance our prior debt facilities and to provide working capital. Our primary committed external source of funds is under the 2011 Credit Agreement, described above. Our principal source of cash is from the performance of services under contracts with our clients. If we were unable to generate new contracts with existing and new clients or if the level of contract cancellations increased, our revenue and cash flow would be adversely affected (see “Part I, Item 1A—Risk Factors” for further detail). Absent a material adverse change in the level of our new business bookings or contract cancellations, we believe that our existing capital resources together with cash flow from operations and borrowing capacity under existing lines of credit will be sufficient to meet our foreseeable cash needs over the next twelve months and on a longer term basis. Depending upon our revenue and cash flow from operations, it is possible that we will require external funds to repay amounts outstanding under our 2011 Credit Agreement upon maturity in 2016.
We expect to continue to acquire businesses to enhance our service and product offerings, expand our therapeutic expertise, and/or increase our global presence. Depending on their size, any future acquisitions may require additional external financing, and we may from time to time seek to obtain funds from public or private issuances of equity or debt securities. We may be unable to secure such financing at all or on terms acceptable to us, as a result of our outstanding borrowings under the 2011 Credit Agreement. In addition, under the terms of the 2011 Credit Agreement, interest rates are fixed based on market indices at the time of borrowing and, depending upon the interest mechanism selected by us, may float thereafter. As a result, the amount of interest payable by us on our borrowings may increase if market interest rates change. However, we expect to mitigate the risk of increasing market interest rates with our hedging programs described below.
We made capital expenditures of $74.4 million during the Fiscal Year 2012, primarily for computer software, hardware, and leasehold improvements. We expect capital expenditures to total approximately $75.0 million to $80.0 million in Fiscal Year 2013, primarily for computer software and hardware and leasehold improvements.
On August 8, 2012, our Board of Directors approved a stock repurchase program authorizing the repurchase of up to $200 million of our common stock. There is no set expiration date for the program. The timing and amount of repurchases will be determined by certain members of our management team based on a variety of factors such as trading price, corporate requirements, and overall market conditions, and will be subject to applicable legal requirements including federal and state securities laws. Purchases may be made in open market transactions effected through a broker dealer at prevailing market prices, in block trades, in accelerated share repurchase transactions, or in privately negotiated transactions. Shares may also be purchased pursuant to a trading plan meeting the requirements of Rule 10b5-1 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amen

36



ded, which would permit shares to be repurchased when we might otherwise be precluded from doing so under insider trading laws. We intend to use cash on hand, cash generated from operations, existing credit facilities, or other financing to fund the share repurchase program. We had approximately $6 million remaining under a previous stock repurchase program, which has now been canceled.
DEBT, CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS, CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AND GUARANTEES
The following table summarizes our contractual obligations at June 30, 2012:
(in thousands)
 
Less than
1 year
 
1-2 years
 
3-5 years
 
More than
5 years
 
Total
Debt obligations (principal)
 
$
5,003

 
$
30,000

 
$
185,000

 
$

 
$
220,003

Operating leases
 
49,034

 
72,838

 
51,886

 
99,787

 
273,545

Purchase obligations*
 
29,490

 
11,940

 
3,568

 
1,731

 
46,729

Total
 
$
83,527

 
$
114,778

 
$
240,454

 
$
101,518

 
$
540,277

*includes commitments to purchase software, hardware, and services.
The above table does not include approximately $53.8 million of potential tax liabilities from unrecognized tax benefits related to uncertain tax positions. See Note 13 to our consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for more information.
We have letter-of-credit agreements with banks, totaling approximately $8.9 million, guaranteeing performance under various operating leases and vendor agreements. Borrowings under the 2011 Credit Agreement are guaranteed by certain of our U.S. subsidiaries.
We periodically become involved in various claims and lawsuits that are incidental to our business. We believe, after consultation with counsel, that no matters currently pending would, in the event of an adverse outcome, either individually or in the aggregate, have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations, or liquidity.
OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS
We have no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial position, changes in financial position, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that are material to our investors.
RESTRUCTURING PLANS
In April 2011, we adopted a plan to restructure our operations to reduce expenses, better align costs with current and future geographic sources of revenue, and improve operating efficiencies (the “2011 Restructuring Plan”). During Fiscal Year 2011, we recorded $8.5 million in restructuring charges relating the the plan, including approximately $1.8 million in employee separation benefits, $3.6 million in costs related to the abandonment of certain property leases, and $3.1 million in impairment charges related to exited facilities. During Fiscal Year 2012, we recorded $7.3 million in restructuring charges related to the 2011 Restructuring Plan, including $5.3 million in severance costs and $2.0 million in facility-related costs. The total cost of the 2011 Restructuring Plan was approximately $15.8 million and included the elimination of approximately 150 managerial and staff positions and costs related to the abandonment of certain property leases.
In October 2009, we adopted a plan to restructure our operations to reduce expenses, better align costs with current and future geographic sources of revenue, and improve operating efficiencies. During Fiscal Year 2010, we recorded $16.8 million in restructuring charges related to this plan, including approximately $11.6 million in employee separation benefits associated with the elimination of 238 managerial and staff positions and $5.2 million in costs related to the abandonment of certain property leases. During Fiscal Year 2011, we recorded $1.4 million of provision adjustments, related primarily to employee severance costs. We believe that all costs associated with this restructuring plan have been recorded as of June 30, 2011.
For restructuring plans established prior to Fiscal Year 2010, we recorded $1.0 million of restructuring charges in Fiscal Year 2011, primarily for a change in estimate for our ability to sub-lease certain abandoned properties.
INFLATION
We believe the effects of inflation generally do not have a material adverse impact on our operations or financial condition.


37



RECENTLY ISSUED ACCOUNTING STANDARDS
In June 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued ASU No. 2011-05, “Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Presentation of Comprehensive Income.” ASU 2011-05 eliminates the option to present components of other comprehensive income as part of the statement of changes in stockholders’ equity and requires that all non-owner changes in stockholders’ equity be presented either in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. ASU 2011-05 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011. In December 2011, the FASB issued ASU No. 2011-12, “Deferral of the Effective Date for Amendments to the Presentation of Reclassifications of Items Out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income in Accounting Standards Update No. 2011-05,” which deferred the guidance requiring entities to present reclassification adjustments out of accumulated other comprehensive income by component in both the statement where net income is presented and the statement where other comprehensive income is presented for both interim and annual financial statements. ASU 2011-12 reinstated the requirements for the presentation of reclassifications that were in place prior to the issuance of ASU 2011-05 and did not change the effective date for ASU 2011-05. We do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.
In December 2011, the FASB issued ASU No. 2011-11, “Balance Sheet (Topic 210): Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities.” ASU 2011-11 requires companies to disclose information about offsetting and related arrangements to enable readers of their financial statements to understand the effects of those arrangements on its financial position. ASU 2011-11 is effective for fiscal years beginning after January 1, 2013. We do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.
In July 2012, the FASB issued ASU No. 2012-02, “Intangibles—Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Testing Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets for Impairment.” ASU 2012-02 amends Topic 350 to allow a company to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of an indefinite-lived intangible asset is less than its carrying value. A company would not be required to determine the fair value of the indefinite-lived intangible unless the entity determines, based on the qualitative assessment, that it is more likely than not that its fair value is less than the carrying value. ASU 2012-02 is effective for annual and interim impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after September 15, 2012 and early adoption is permitted. We do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.


38



ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
MARKET RISK
Market risk is the potential loss arising from adverse changes in market rates and prices, such as foreign currency exchange rates, interest rates, and other relevant market rates or price changes. In the ordinary course of business, we are exposed to market risk resulting from changes in foreign currency exchange rates and interest rates, and we regularly evaluate our exposure to such changes. Our overall risk management strategy seeks to balance the magnitude of the exposure and the costs and availability of appropriate financial instruments.
FOREIGN CURRENCY EXCHANGE RATES AND INTEREST RATES
We derived approximately 58.4% of our consolidated service revenue for the twelve months ended June 30, 2012 from operations outside of the United States and 63.6% of our consolidated service revenue for the twelve months ended June 30, 2011 from operations outside of the United States. In addition, 19.5% was denominated in Euros and 3.9% was denominated in pounds sterling for the twelve months ended June 30, 2012 while 24.6% was denominated in Euros and 5.5% was denominated in pounds sterling for the twelve months ended June 30, 2011. We have no significant operations in any country in which the economy is considered to be highly inflationary. Our financial statements are denominated in U.S. dollars. Accordingly, changes in exchange rates between foreign currencies and the U.S. dollar will affect the translation of financial results into U.S. dollars for purposes of reporting our consolidated financial results.
It is our policy to mitigate the risks associated with fluctuations in foreign exchange rates and interest rates. Accordingly, we have instituted foreign currency hedging programs and an interest rate swap/cap program. See Note 3 to our consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for more information on our hedging programs and interest rate swap program.
As of June 30, 2012, the programs with derivatives designated as hedging instruments under ASC 815 were deemed effective and the notional values of the derivatives were approximately $175.1 million, including interest rate swap and interest rate cap agreements with a total notional value of $150.0 million executed in connection with the borrowings under our 2011 Credit Agreement. Under certain circumstances, such as the occurrence of significant differences between actual cash receipts and forecasted cash receipts, the ASC 815 programs could be deemed ineffective. In that event, the unrealized gains and losses related to these derivatives, which are currently reported in accumulated other comprehensive income, would be recognized in earnings. As of June 30, 2012, the estimated amount that could be recognized in earnings was a loss of approximately $1.5 million, net of tax.
As of June 30, 2012, the notional value of derivatives that were not designated as hedging instruments under ASC 815 was approximately $144.2 million.
During the twelve months ended June 30, 2012 and June 30, 2011, we recorded foreign currency exchange losses of $0.3 million and $10.4 million, respectively. We also have exposure to additional foreign exchange risk as it relates to assets and liabilities that are not part of the economic hedge or designated hedging programs, but quantification of this risk is difficult to assess at any given point in time.
Our exposure to interest rate changes relates primarily to the amount of our short-term and long-term debt. Short-term debt was $5.0 million at June 30, 2012 and $5.9 million at June 30, 2011. Long-term debt was $215.0 million at June 30, 2012 and $240.1 million million at June 30, 2011. Based on average short-term and long-term debt for the twelve months ended June 30, 2012, an increase in the average interest rate of 100 basis points would decrease our pre-tax earnings and cash flows by approximately $1.5 million on an annual basis.


39



Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
PAREXEL INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(in thousands, except per share data)
 
 
For the years ended June 30,
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Service revenue
 
$
1,396,508

 
$
1,212,099

 
$
1,131,039

Reimbursement revenue
 
221,726

 
210,326

 
204,836

Total revenue
 
1,618,234

 
1,422,425

 
1,335,875

Costs and expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Direct costs
 
971,829

 
797,784

 
726,009

Reimbursable out-of-pocket expenses
 
221,726

 
210,326

 
204,836

Selling, general and administrative
 
263,462

 
259,099

 
245,935

Depreciation
 
57,419

 
55,549

 
49,943

Amortization
 
8,753

 
9,931

 
10,377

Other benefit
 

 

 
(1,144
)
Restructuring charge
 
6,243

 
8,106

 
16,810

Total costs and expenses
 
1,529,432

 
1,340,795

 
1,252,766

Income from operations
 
88,802

 
81,630

 
83,109

Interest income
 
5,381

 
5,167

 
5,077

Interest expense
 
(12,384
)
 
(17,010
)
 
(15,403
)
Miscellaneous expense, net
 
(2,093
)
 
(11,153
)
 
(9,608
)
Total other expense, net
 
(9,096
)
 
(22,996
)
 
(19,934
)
Income before provision for income taxes
 
79,706

 
58,634

 
63,175

Provision for income taxes
 
16,548

 
9,848

 
21,633

Net income
 
$
63,158

 
$
48,786

 
$
41,542

Earnings per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
$
1.06

 
$
0.83

 
$
0.72

Diluted
 
$
1.05

 
$
0.81

 
$
0.71

Weighted average shares:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
59,464

 
58,634

 
58,062

Diluted
 
60,426

 
59,874

 
58,756

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.


40



PAREXEL INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(in thousands)
 
 
June 30, 2012
 
June 30, 2011
ASSETS
 
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
213,579

 
$
89,056

Billed and unbilled accounts receivable, net
 
649,217

 
649,643

Prepaid expenses
 
20,657

 
21,336

Deferred tax assets
 
26,773

 
17,817

Income taxes receivable
 

 
6,347

Other current assets
 
22,352

 
23,379

Total current assets
 
932,578

 
807,578

Property and equipment, net
 
207,778

 
201,342

Goodwill
 
255,455

 
262,313

Other intangible assets, net
 
70,004

 
79,958

Non-current deferred tax assets
 
24,271

 
31,434

Long-term income taxes receivable
 
15,585

 
20,222

Other assets
 
29,701

 
26,636

Total assets
 
$
1,535,372

 
$
1,429,483

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
 
 
 
 
Current liabilities:
 
 
 
 
Notes payable and current portion of long-term debt
 
$
5,003

 
$
5,867

Accounts payable
 
50,783

 
31,724

Deferred revenue
 
331,488

 
311,896

Accrued expenses
 
41,008

 
35,949

Accrued restructuring charges, current portion
 
3,772

 
4,689

Accrued employee benefits and withholdings
 
120,368

 
79,542

Current deferred tax liabilities
 
14,998

 
17,216

Income taxes payable
 
3,644

 

Other current liabilities
 
12,310

 
3,397

Total current liabilities
 
583,374

 
490,280

Long-term debt, net of current portion
 
215,000

 
240,102

Non-current deferred tax liabilities
 
24,678

 
30,987

Long-term accrued restructuring charges, less current portion
 
4,002

 
4,709

Long-term income tax liabilities
 
50,008

 
57,816

Long-term deferred revenue
 
28,226

 
20,766

Other liabilities
 
20,409

 
18,819

Total liabilities
 
925,697

 
863,479

Stockholders’ equity:
 
 
 
 
Preferred stock - $0.01 par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized, 0 shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2012 and June 30, 2011, respectively.
 

 

Common stock - $0.01 par value; 75,000,000 shares authorized; 60,147,007 and 59,004,028 shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2012 and June 30, 2011, respectively.
 
601

 
584

Additional paid-in capital
 
279,535

 
251,045

Retained earnings
 
358,678

 
295,520

Accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income
 
(29,139
)
 
18,855

Total stockholders’ equity
 
609,675

 
566,004

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
 
$
1,535,372

 
$
1,429,483

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.
PAREXEL INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(in thousands)

 
For the years ended June 30,
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Cash flow from operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
 
$
63,158

 
$
48,786

 
$
41,542

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
 
66,172

 
65,480

 
60,320

Stock-based compensation
 
11,131

 
10,162

 
7,017

Loss (gain) on disposal of assets
 
1,119

 
289

 
(719
)
Deferred income taxes
 
(9,754
)
 
(14,462
)
 
(11,168
)
Impairment charges
 
1,150

 
4,245

 
6,513

Provision for losses on receivables, net
 
818

 
1,783

 
2,566

Changes in assets and liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Billed and unbilled accounts receivable
 
(20,083
)
 
(142,051
)
 
(20,873
)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
 
(1,593
)
 
(1,719
)
 
(1,746
)
Other assets
 
(5,460
)
 
(8,564
)
 
(11,510
)
Accounts payable
 
20,202

 
(4,786
)
 
3,908

Deferred revenue
 
35,940

 
55,792

 
8,567

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities
 
63,303

 
(37,741
)
 
52,354

Long-term income taxes payable, net of long-term income taxes receivable
 
6,702

 
16,169

 
15,165

Other liabilities
 
1,652

 
5,162

 
5,760

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
 
234,457

 
(1,455
)
 
157,696

Cash flow from investing activities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Purchases of marketable securities
 
(53,647
)
 

 
(13,724
)
Proceeds from sale of marketable securities
 
51,529

 
13,058

 

Purchases of property and equipment
 
(74,403
)
 
(60,153
)
 
(78,959
)
Acquisition of businesses
 

 

 
(32
)
Proceeds from sale of assets
 

 
1,394

 
394

Net cash used in investing activities
 
(76,521
)
 
(45,701
)
 
(92,321
)
Cash flow from financing activities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Proceeds from issuance of common stock
 
12,120

 
7,686

 
6,817

Excess tax benefit - stock options
 
5,256

 

 

Borrowings under credit agreement/facility
 
268,000

 
440,000

 
52,000

Repayments under credit agreement/facility
 
(293,000
)
 
(407,500
)
 
(113,000
)
Repayments under other debt
 
(943
)
 
(2,071
)
 
(2,377
)
Purchase of non-controlling interests
 

 
(1,550
)
 

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities
 
(8,567
)
 
36,565

 
(56,560
)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
 
(24,846
)
 
4,477

 
(9,997
)
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
 
124,523

 
(6,114
)
 
(1,182
)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year
 
89,056

 
95,170

 
96,352

Cash and cash equivalents at end of year
 
$
213,579

 
$
89,056

 
$
95,170

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net cash paid during year for:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest paid
 
$
10,802

 
$
17,535

 
$
14,942

Income taxes, net of refunds
 
$
9,709

 
$
31,947

 
$
21,599

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

41



PAREXEL INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
(in thousands)
 
 
Common Stock
 
Retained
Earnings
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
 
Total
Stockholders’
Equity
 
Comprehensive
Income
(Loss)
 
 
Number
of Shares
 
Par
Value
 
Additional
Paid-in
Capital
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Balance at June 30, 2009
 
57,783

 
$
572

 
$
219,849

 
$
205,192

 
$
(10,868
)
 
$
414,745

 
 
Shares issued under stock option/restricted stock/employee stock purchase plans
 
651

 
6

 
6,811

 
 
 
 
 
6,817

 
 
Stock-based compensation
 
 
 
 
 
7,017

 
 
 
 
 
7,017

 
 
Unrealized loss on derivative instruments, net of taxes
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(6,889
)
 
(6,889
)
 
$
(6,889
)
Foreign currency translation adjustment
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(23,677
)
 
(23,677
)
 
(23,677
)
Net income
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
41,542

 
 
 
41,542

 
41,542

Total comprehensive income
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
10,976

Balance at June 30, 2010
 
58,434

 
$
578

 
$
233,677

 
$
246,734

 
$
(41,434
)
 
$
439,555

 
 
Shares issued under stock option/restricted stock/employee stock purchase plans
 
570

 
6

 
7,680