XNYS:CLNY Colony Financial Inc Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 6/30/2012

Effective Date 6/30/2012

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Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

(Mark One)

x QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2012

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission file number 001-34456

 

 

COLONY FINANCIAL, INC.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

 

 

Maryland   27-0419483

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

2450 Broadway, 6th Floor

Santa Monica, California

  90404
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)

(310) 282-8820

(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large Accelerated Filer   ¨    Accelerated Filer   x
Non-Accelerated Filer   ¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller Reporting Company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

As of August 8, 2012, 33,113,828 shares of the Registrant’s common stock, par value $0.01 per share, were outstanding.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

COLONY FINANCIAL, INC.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

         Page  
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION   

Item 1.

 

Financial Statements

  
 

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2012 (unaudited) and December 31, 2011

     3   
 

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011 (unaudited)

     4   
 

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011 (unaudited)

     5   
 

Consolidated Statements of Equity for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011 (unaudited)

     6   
 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011 (unaudited)

     7   
 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     8   

Item 2.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     24   

Item 3.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

     43   

Item 4.

 

Controls and Procedures

     44   
PART II. OTHER INFORMATION   

Item 1.

 

Legal Proceedings

     45   

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

     45   

Item 2.

 

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

     45   

Item 3.

 

Defaults Upon Senior Securities

     45   

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

     45   

Item 5.

 

Other Information

     45   

Item 6.

 

Exhibits

     45   

SIGNATURES

     46   

 

2


Table of Contents

PART I—FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. Financial Statements.

COLONY FINANCIAL, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands, except share and per share data)

 

     June 30, 2012
(Unaudited)
    December 31,
2011
 

ASSETS

    

Cash

   $ 8,164      $ 3,872   

Investments in unconsolidated joint ventures

     582,721        443,500   

Loans held for investment, net

     319,312        232,619   

Beneficial interests in debt securities, available-for-sale, at fair value

     32,339        32,427   

Other assets

     28,504        15,101   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 971,040      $ 727,519   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

    

Liabilities:

    

Line of credit

   $ 33,000      $ 69,000   

Secured financing

     117,283        13,845   

Accrued and other liabilities

     13,111        16,304   

Due to affiliates

     4,564        3,788   

Dividends payable

     15,562        11,092   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     183,520        114,029   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 15)

    

Equity:

    

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock, $0.01 par value, 8.5% Series A Cumulative Redeemable Perpetual liquidation preference of $25 per share, 50,000,000 shares authorized, 5,800,000 and no shares issued and outstanding, respectively

     58        —     

Common stock, $0.01 par value, 450,000,000 shares authorized, 33,115,665 and 32,624,889 shares issued and outstanding, respectively

     331        326   

Additional paid-in capital

     742,229        599,470   

Retained earnings

     6,260        5,510   

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     (2,378     (2,330
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

     746,500        602,976   

Noncontrolling interests

     41,020        10,514   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total equity

     787,520        613,490   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and equity

   $ 971,040      $ 727,519   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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Table of Contents

COLONY FINANCIAL, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(In thousands, except share and per share data)

(Unaudited)

 

     Three Months Ended
June  30,
    Six Months Ended
June  30,
 
     2012     2011     2012     2011  

Income

        

Equity in income of unconsolidated joint ventures

   $ 15,994      $ 9,416      $ 31,435      $ 17,900   

Interest income

     9,051        3,508        14,877        5,673   

Other income from affiliates

     569        346        1,119        907   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total income

     25,614        13,270        47,431        24,480   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Expenses

        

Management fees (including $608, $0, $2,364 and $0 of share-based compensation, respectively)

     3,944        2,228        8,464        3,524   

Investment expenses (including $470, $303, $914 and $650 reimbursable to affiliates, respectively)

     1,091        323        1,771        1,010   

Interest expense

     1,829        486        3,323        996   

Administrative expenses (including $583, $484, $1,174 and $874 reimbursable to affiliates, respectively)

     1,478        1,533        3,232        3,048   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total expenses

     8,342        4,570        16,790        8,578   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net unrealized loss on derivatives

     (160     (46     (340     (46

Foreign exchange loss, net of foreign currency hedges

     (116     (90     (164     (144
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     16,996        8,564        30,137        15,712   

Income tax provision (benefit)

     441        226        805        (2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

     16,555        8,338        29,332        15,714   

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests

     1,454        301        1,763        314   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to Colony Financial, Inc.

     15,101        8,037        27,569        15,400   

Preferred dividends

     3,082        —          3,458        —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to common stockholders

   $ 12,019      $ 8,037      $ 24,111      $ 15,400   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income per common share:

        

Basic

   $ 0.36      $ 0.25      $ 0.73      $ 0.62   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Diluted

   $ 0.36      $ 0.25      $ 0.73      $ 0.62   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted average number of common shares outstanding:

        

Basic

     32,745,500        31,911,500        32,696,100        24,684,900   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Diluted

     32,806,900        32,199,000        32,731,400        24,972,400   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Dividends declared per common share

   $ 0.35      $ 0.32      $ 0.69      $ 0.64   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

4


Table of Contents

COLONY FINANCIAL, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

(In thousands)

(Unaudited)

 

     Three Months Ended
June  30,
    Six Months Ended
June  30,
 
     2012     2011     2012     2011  

Net income

   $ 16,555      $ 8,338      $ 29,332      $ 15,714   

Other comprehensive income, net of tax:

        

Equity in other comprehensive income (loss) of unconsolidated joint ventures

     534        (211     254        (64

Unrealized gain on beneficial interests in debt securities

     538        —          228        —     

Change in fair value of derivative instruments designated as hedges

     943        (79     223        (609

Foreign currency translation adjustments

     (1,250     518        (880     1,620   

Realized foreign exchange loss (gain) reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income

     116        (92     135        (29
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income (loss)

     881        136        (40     918   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive income

     17,436        8,474        29,292        16,632   

Comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interests

     1,471        297        1,771        313   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive income attributable to stockholders

   $ 15,965      $ 8,177      $ 27,521      $ 16,319   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

5


Table of Contents

COLONY FINANCIAL, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EQUITY

(In thousands, except share and per share data)

(Unaudited)

 

    

 

Preferred Stock

     Common Stock      Additional
Paid-in
Capital
    Retained
Earnings
    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
    Total
Stockholders’
Equity
    Noncontrolling
Interests
    Total
Equity
 
     Shares      Amount      Shares      Amount               

Balance at December 31, 2010

     —         $ —           17,384,000       $ 174       $ 330,777      $ 1,152      $ 936      $ 333,039      $ 240      $ 333,279   

Net income

     —           —           —           —           —          15,400        —          15,400        314        15,714   

Other comprehensive income (loss)

     —           —           —           —           —          —          919        919        (1     918   

Common stock offering

     —           —           15,350,000         153         283,822        —          —          283,975        —          283,975   

Underwriting and offering costs

     —           —           —           —           (12,268     —          —          (12,268     —          (12,268

Anti-dilution purchase price adjustment

     —           —           175,000         2         (164     —          —          (162     —          (162

Share-based payments

     —           —           —           —           59        —          —          59        —          59   

Contributions from noncontrolling interests

     —           —           —           —           —          —          —          —          10,140        10,140   

Distributions to noncontrolling interests

     —           —           —           —           —          —          —          —          (384     (384

Common stock dividends declared ($0.64 per share)

     —           —           —           —           —          (16,094     —          (16,094     —          (16,094
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2011

     —         $ —           32,909,000       $ 329       $ 602,226      $ 458      $ 1,855      $ 604,868      $ 10,309      $ 615,177   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2011

     —         $ —           32,624,889       $ 326       $ 599,470      $ 5,510      $ (2,330   $ 602,976      $ 10,514      $ 613,490   

Net income

     —           —           —           —           —          27,569        —          27,569        1,763        29,332   

Other comprehensive income (loss)

     —           —           —           —           —          —          (48     (48     8        (40

Issuance of 8.5% Series A Cumulative Redeemable Perpetual Preferred Stock

     5,800,000         58         —           —           144,942        —          —          145,000        —          145,000   

Underwriting and offering costs

     —           —           —           —           (4,937     —          —          (4,937     —          (4,937

Issuance of common stock for incentive fees

     —           —           8,777         —           150        —          —          150        —          150   

Share-based payments

     —           —           481,999         5         2,604        —          —          2,609        —          2,609   

Contributions from noncontrolling interests

     —           —           —           —           —          —          —          —          36,376        36,376   

Distributions to noncontrolling interests

     —           —           —           —           —          —          —          —          (7,641     (7,641

Preferred stock dividends

     —           —           —           —           —          (3,971     —          (3,971     —          (3,971

Common stock dividends declared ($0.69 per share)

     —           —           —           —           —          (22,848     —          (22,848     —          (22,848
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2012

     5,800,000       $ 58         33,115,665       $ 331       $ 742,229      $ 6,260      $ (2,378   $ 746,500      $ 41,020      $ 787,520   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

6


Table of Contents

COLONY FINANCIAL, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(In thousands)

(Unaudited)

 

     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
     2012     2011  

Cash Flows from Operating Activities

    

Net income

   $ 29,332      $ 15,714   

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

    

Amortization of discount and net origination fees on purchased and originated loans

     (989     (1,010

Paid-in-kind interest added to loan principal

     (414     (202

Amortization of deferred financing costs

     873        440   

Equity in income of unconsolidated joint ventures

     (31,435     (17,900

Distributions of income from unconsolidated joint ventures

     30,702        8,992   

Share-based payments

     2,759        59   

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

    

Increase in other assets

     (2,331     (581

(Decrease) increase in accrued and other liabilities

     (284     142   

Increase in due to affiliates

     776        849   

Other adjustments, net

     685        190   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

     29,674        6,693   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash Flows from Investing Activities

    

Contributions to unconsolidated joint ventures

     (172,250     (96,384

Distributions from unconsolidated joint ventures

     62,620        1,847   

Investments in purchased loans receivable, net of seller financing

     (56,427     (38,513

Repayments of principal on loans receivable

     3,237        106   

Net disbursements on originated loans

     —          (60,000

Proceeds from sales of loans receivable

     30,159        —     

Acquisition of beneficial interests in debt securities

     —          (28,000

Investment deposits

     (1,825     (15,000

Other investing activities, net

     (29     (327
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

     (134,515     (236,271
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash Flows from Financing Activities

    

Proceeds from issuance of preferred stock, net

     140,432        —     

Proceeds from issuance of common stock, net

     —          272,261   

Dividends paid to common stockholders

     (22,349     (11,647

Line of credit borrowings

     85,000        —     

Line of credit repayments

     (121,000     (20,000

Payment of deferred financing costs

     (1,005     —     

Payment of offering costs

     (83     (554

Contributions from noncontrolling interests

     36,376        10,140   

Distributions to noncontrolling interests

     (7,641     (384

Other financing activities, net

     (597     (344
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

     109,133        249,472   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Effect of exchange rates on cash

     —          7   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net increase in cash

     4,292        19,901   

Cash, beginning of period

     3,872        66,245   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash, end of period

   $ 8,164      $ 86,146   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION:

    

Cash paid for interest

   $ 2,205      $ 503   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash paid for income taxes

   $ 2,979      $ 255   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF NONCASH INVESTING AND FINANCING ACTIVITIES:

    

Dividends payable

   $ 15,562      $ 10,531   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Seller-provided secured financing on purchased loan

   $ 103,524      $ —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Interest reserve for seller financing funded by borrower of purchased loan (Note 7)

   $ 9,984      $     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Assignment of loans receivable and related liabilities to investment in unconsolidated joint ventures

   $ 29,427      $ —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Offering costs included in accrued and other liabilities

   $ 252      $ —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Deferred payment on investment in unconsolidated joint venture

   $ —        $ 150   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

7


Table of Contents

COLONY FINANCIAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

June 30, 2012

(Unaudited)

1. Organization

Colony Financial, Inc. (the “Company”) was organized on June 23, 2009 as a Maryland corporation for the purpose of acquiring, originating and managing commercial mortgage loans, which may be performing, sub-performing or non-performing loans (including loan-to-own strategies), and other commercial real estate-related debt and equity investments. The Company has also acquired and is expected to continue to acquire other real estate and real estate-related assets. The Company is managed by Colony Financial Manager, LLC (the “Manager”), a Delaware limited liability company, and an affiliate of the Company. The Company elected to be taxed as a real estate investment trust (“REIT”) under the Internal Revenue Code commencing with its first taxable year ended December 31, 2009.

2. Significant Accounting Policies

Principles of Consolidation and Basis of Presentation

The accompanying unaudited interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all information and footnotes required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) for complete financial statements. These statements reflect all normal and recurring adjustments which, in the opinion of management, are necessary to present fairly the financial position, results of operations and cash flows of the Company for the interim periods presented. However, the results of operations for the interim period presented are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2012 or any other future period. These interim financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011.

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its majority-owned subsidiaries. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated.

The Company consolidates entities in which it retains a controlling financial interest or entities that meet the definition of a variable interest entity (“VIE”) for which the Company is deemed to be the primary beneficiary. In performing its analysis of whether it is the primary beneficiary, at initial investment and at each quarterly reporting period, the Company considers whether it individually has the power to direct the activities of the VIE that most significantly affect the entity’s performance and also has the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive benefits of the VIE that could potentially be significant to the VIE. The Company also considers whether it is a member of a related party group that collectively meets the power and benefits criteria and, if so, whether the Company is most closely associated with the VIE. In making that determination, the Company considers both qualitative and quantitative factors, including, but not limited to: the amount and characteristics of its investment relative to other investors; the obligation or likelihood for the Company or other investors to fund operating losses of the VIE; the Company’s and the other investors’ ability to control or significantly influence key decisions for the VIE, and the similarity and significance of the VIE’s business activities to those of the Company and the other investors. The determination of whether an entity is a VIE, and whether the Company is the primary beneficiary, involves significant judgments, including the determination of which activities most significantly affect the entities’ performance, estimates about the current and future fair values and performance of assets held by the VIE and/or general market conditions.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of income and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Investments in Unconsolidated Joint Ventures

The Company holds ownership interests in certain joint ventures. The Company evaluates its interest in these entities to determine whether they meet the definition of a VIE and whether the Company is required to consolidate these entities. In each case, the Company has determined that (1) the entity is not a VIE and the Company does not have a controlling financial interest, or (2) the entity is a VIE but the Company is not the primary beneficiary. Since the Company is not required to consolidate these entities but has significant influence over operating and financial policies, it accounts for its investments in joint ventures using the equity method. Under the equity method, the Company initially records its investments at cost and adjusts for the Company’s proportionate share of net earnings or losses and other comprehensive income or loss, cash contributions made and distributions received, and other adjustments, as appropriate. Distributions of operating profit from the joint ventures are reported as part of operating cash flows. Distributions related to a capital transaction, such as a refinancing transaction or sale, are reported as investing activities.

 

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The Company performs a quarterly evaluation of its investments in unconsolidated joint ventures to determine whether the fair value of each investment is less than the carrying value, and, if such decrease in value is deemed to be other-than-temporary, writes down the investment to fair value.

Loans Receivable

The Company and its unconsolidated joint ventures originate and purchase loans receivable. Originated loans are recorded at amortized cost, or the outstanding unpaid principal balance (“UPB”) less net deferred loan fees. Net deferred loan fees include unamortized origination and other fees charged to the borrower less direct incremental loan origination costs incurred by the Company. Purchased loans are recorded at amortized cost, or the UPB less unamortized purchase discount. Costs to purchase loans are expensed as incurred. Interest income is recognized based upon the contractual rate and the outstanding principal balance of the loans. Purchase discount or net deferred loan fees are amortized over the expected life of the loans using the effective yield method except on revolving loans, for which the straight-line method is used. Loans that the Company has the intent and ability to hold for the foreseeable future are classified as held-for-investment.

Loans Held for Sale—Loans held for sale are loans that the Company intends to sell or liquidate in the foreseeable future and are carried at the lower of amortized cost or fair value.

Past Due Loans—The Company places loans on nonaccrual status when any portion of principal or interest is more than 90 days past due, or earlier when concern exists as to the ultimate collection of principal or interest. When a loan is placed on nonaccrual status, the Company reverses the accrual for unpaid interest and does not recognize interest income until the cash is received and the loan returns to accrual status. Generally, a loan may be returned to accrual status when all delinquent principal and interest are brought current in accordance with the terms of the loan agreement and the borrower has met certain performance criteria.

Impairment—The Company evaluates its loans for impairment on a quarterly basis. The Company regularly analyzes the extent and effect of any credit migration from underwriting and the initial investment review associated with a loan’s performance and/or value of underlying collateral as well as the financial and operating capability of the borrower/sponsor. Specifically, a property’s operating results and any cash reserves are analyzed and used to assess (i) whether cash from operations are sufficient to cover the debt service requirements currently and into the future, (ii) the ability of the borrower to refinance the loan, and/or (iii) the property’s liquidation value. Where applicable, the Company also evaluates the financial wherewithal of any loan guarantors as well as the borrower’s competency in managing and operating the properties. A loan is considered to be impaired when it is probable that the Company will not be able to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. A loan is also considered to be impaired if it has been restructured in a troubled debt restructuring (“TDR”) involving a modification of terms as a concession resulting from the debtor’s financial difficulties. The Company measures impairment based on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, the loan’s observable market price, or the fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent. If the loan valuation is less than the recorded investment in the loan, a valuation allowance is established with a corresponding charge to allowance for loan loss.

Acquired Credit-Distressed Loans—The Company and its unconsolidated joint ventures acquire credit-distressed loans for which the Company or the joint venture expects to collect less than the contractual amounts due under the terms of the loan based, at least in part, on the assessment of the credit quality of the borrower. Acquired credit-distressed loans are recorded at the initial investment in the loans and accreted to the estimated cash flows expected to be collected measured at acquisition date. The excess of cash flows expected to be collected measured at acquisition date over the initial investment (“accretable yield”) is recognized in interest income over the remaining life of the loan using the effective interest method. The excess of contractually required payments at the acquisition date over expected cash flows (“nonaccretable difference”) is not recognized as an adjustment of yield, loss accrual or valuation allowance. Subsequent increases in cash flows expected to be collected are recognized prospectively through an adjustment to the loan’s accretable yield over its remaining life, which may result in a reclassification from nonaccretable difference to accretable yield. Subsequent decreases in cash flows expected to be collected are evaluated to determine whether a provision for loan loss should be established. If decreases in expected cash flows result in a decrease in the estimated fair value of the loan below its amortized cost, the loan is deemed to be impaired and the Company will record a provision for loan losses calculated as the difference between the loan’s amortized cost and the revised cash flows, discounted at the loan’s effective yield.

Acquired credit-distressed loans may be aggregated into pools based upon common risk characteristics, such as loan performance, collateral type and/or geographic location of the collateral. Once a loan pool is identified, a composite yield and estimate of cash flows expected to be collected (including expected prepayments) are used to recognize interest income. A loan resolution within a loan pool, which may involve the sale of the loan or foreclosure on the underlying collateral, results in removal of the loan at an allocated carrying amount that preserves the yield of the pool. A loan modified within a loan pool remains in the loan pool, with the effect of the modification incorporated into the expected future cash flows.

Investments in Debt Securities

The Company designates debt securities as held-to-maturity, available-for-sale, or trading depending upon its intent at the time of acquisition. The Company’s beneficial interests in debt securities are designated as available-for-sale and are presented at fair

 

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value. Unrealized gains or losses are included as a component of other comprehensive income or loss. Premiums or discounts are amortized or accreted into income using the effective interest method over the expected lives of the individual securities. The Company performs a quarterly assessment of its debt securities to determine whether a decline in fair value below amortized cost is other than temporary. Other-than-temporary impairment exists when it is probable that the Company will be unable to recover the entire amortized cost basis of the security. If the decline in fair value is deemed to be other than temporary, the security is written down to fair value which becomes the new cost basis and an impairment loss is recognized.

Share-Based Payments

The Company recognizes the cost of share-based awards based upon their fair values on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting period of the awards. For awards to the Company’s employees, including its independent directors, the fair value is determined as the grant date stock price. For share-based awards to non-employees, the fair value is based upon the vesting date stock price, which requires the amount of related expense to be adjusted to the fair value of the award at the end of each reporting period until the award has vested.

For awards with periodic vesting, the Company recognizes the related expense on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for the entire award, subject to periodic adjustments to ensure that the cumulative amount of expense recognized through the end of any reporting period is at least equal to the fair value of the portion of the award that has vested through that date. Share-based payments are reflected in the same expense category as would be appropriate if the payments had been made in cash.

Income Taxes

The Company elected to be taxed as a REIT, commencing with the Company’s initial taxable year ended December 31, 2009. A REIT is generally not subject to corporate level federal and state income tax on net income it distributes to its stockholders. To qualify as a REIT, the Company must meet a number of organizational and operational requirements, including a requirement to distribute at least 90% of its REIT taxable income to its stockholders. If the Company fails to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year, it will be subject to federal and state income taxes at regular corporate rates (including any applicable alternative minimum tax) and may not be able to qualify as a REIT for four subsequent taxable years. Even if the Company qualifies for taxation as a REIT, it and its subsidiaries may be subject to certain federal, state, local and foreign taxes on its income and property and to federal income and excise taxes on its undistributed taxable income.

The Company has elected or may elect to treat certain of its existing or newly created corporate subsidiaries as taxable REIT subsidiaries (each a “TRS”). In general, a TRS of a REIT may perform non-customary services for tenants of the REIT, hold assets that the REIT cannot hold directly and, subject to certain exceptions related to hotels and healthcare properties, may engage in any real estate or non-real estate related business. A TRS is treated as a regular corporation and is subject to federal, state, local and foreign taxes on its income and property.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements or tax returns. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. The deferred tax assets and liabilities of the TRSs relate primarily to temporary differences in the book and tax income of TRSs and operating loss carryforwards for federal and state income tax purposes, as well as the tax effect of accumulated other comprehensive income of TRSs. A valuation allowance for deferred tax assets is provided if the Company believes it is more likely than not that all or some portion of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. Realization of deferred tax assets is dependent on the Company generating sufficient taxable income in future periods.

The Company periodically evaluates its tax positions to determine whether it is more likely than not that such positions would be sustained upon examination by a tax authority for all open tax years, as defined by the statute of limitations, based on their technical merits. As of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, the Company has not established a liability for uncertain tax positions.

Segment Reporting

The Company is a REIT primarily focused on acquiring and originating commercial mortgage loans and other commercial real estate-related debt investments. For the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, the Company’s only reportable segment is the debt investment segment.

The Company has committed to invest up to $150 million in a joint venture with an investment fund managed by an affiliate of the Manager created for the purpose of acquiring and renting single family homes. The Company’s interest in the joint venture is 50%. Through June 30, 2012, the Company has invested $75 million in the joint venture. Although management has determined home rentals to be a separate operating segment, it does not meet the quantitative thresholds established by GAAP to be considered a reportable segment.

 

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3. Investments in Unconsolidated Joint Ventures

Pursuant to an investment allocation agreement between the Company, the Manager and Colony Capital, LLC (“Colony Capital”), the sole member of the Manager, many of the Company’s investments have been structured as joint ventures with one or more private investment funds or other investment vehicles managed by Colony Capital or its affiliates. The joint ventures are generally capitalized through equity contributions from the members, although certain investments are leveraged through various financing arrangements. The Company’s exposure to the joint ventures is limited to amounts invested or committed to the joint ventures at inception, and neither the Company nor the other investors are required to provide financial or other support in excess of their capital commitments.

The Company’s investments in unconsolidated joint ventures are summarized below:

 

(Amounts in thousands)

             Carrying Value  

Joint Ventures

  

Investment Description

  Ownership
     Percentage    
    June 30,
2012
    December 31,
2011
 

ColFin American Investors, LLC

   Acquisition and rental of single family homes     50.0%      $ 74,876      $ —     

ColFin Bulls Funding A, LLC, ColFin Bulls Funding B, LLC and Colony AMC Bulls, LLC

   Acquisition of approximately 650 credit-distressed loans consisting of substantially all first mortgage recourse commercial real estate loans     32.5%        45,185        63,699   

ColFin WLH Funding, LLC

   Origination of senior secured term loan secured by first mortgages on residential land and security interests in cash and other assets     24.0%        44,690        52,416   

ColFin NW Funding, LLC

   Acquisition of 25 credit-distressed first mortgage loans secured by commercial real estate     37.9%        44,167        51,396   

ColFin DB Guarantor, LLC and Colony AMC DB, LLC

   Structured acquisition in a joint venture with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”) of approximately 1,200 credit-distressed loans secured mostly by commercial real estate     33.3%        38,209        37,710   

ColFin 2011 CRE Holdco, LLC and Colony AMC 2011 CRE, LLC

   Structured acquisition in a joint venture with the FDIC of approximately 760 credit-distressed loans secured mostly by commercial real estate     44.4%        36,155        34,728   

ColFin JIH Holdco, LLC and ColFin JIH Mezzco A, LLC

   Equity interests in and senior mezzanine loan receivable from entities owning a portfolio of 103 limited service hotels     33.3%        30,437        —     

ColFin Hunt Holdco A, LLC and ColFin Hunt Holdco B, LLC

   Acquisition of 5 non-performing first mortgage loans secured by commercial real estate located in Germany     37.9%        27,163        27,714   

ColFin Ash Funding, LLC

   Acquisition of the two most junior mortgage participation interests in a newly restructured first mortgage secured by five full-service hotels     50.0%        24,473        —     

ColFin MF5 Funding, LLC

   Acquisition of most senior bond and interest-only certificate in a CMBS trust that owns approximately 270 first mortgage loans     11.0%        22,584        —     

ColFin 666 Funding, LLC

   Acquisition of a first mortgage pari-passu participation interest secured by Class A midtown Manhattan office building     33.3%        16,926        16,578   

ColFin FRB Investor, LLC

   Equity ownership in financial institution with approximately $30 billion of assets     5.9%        16,008        21,848   

ColFin FCDC Funding, LLC

   Equity interests in two partially developed master planned communities located in California     50.0%        15,744        —     

ColFin Inland Funding, LLC and ColFin Inland Investor, LLC

   Origination of first mortgage loan secured by a Southern California master planned development and equity participation rights     50.0%        14,606        14,176   

ColFin Bow Funding A, LLC, ColFin Bow Funding B, LLC and Colony AMC Bow, LLC

   Acquisition of 63 credit-distressed loans consisting of substantially all first mortgage recourse commercial real estate loans     50.0%        14,447        14,469   

ColFin Axle Funding, LLC

   Structured acquisition in a joint venture with the FDIC of approximately 1,660 credit-distressed loans consisting of substantially all first mortgage recourse commercial real estate loans     4.5%        12,185        11,822   

 

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(Amounts in thousands)

             Carrying Value  

Joint Ventures

  

Investment Description

  Ownership
Percentage
    June 30,
2012
    December 31,
2011
 

ColFin ALS Funding, LLC

   Origination of recourse loan secured by first liens on two West Village Manhattan townhomes and a photography catalogue     33.3%        11,928        11,093   

Colony Funds Sants S.à r.l.

   Syndicated senior secured loan to a Spanish commercial real estate company     5.1%        11,258        11,611   

ColFin 2011 ADC Funding, LLC and Colony AMC 2011 ADC, LLC

   Structured acquisition in a joint venture with the FDIC of approximately 1,500 credit-distressed loans secured mostly by commercial real estate     15.2%        10,673        10,159   

ColFin BAMO II Funding A, LLC, ColFin BAMO II Funding B, LLC and Colony AMC BMO II, LLC

   Acquisition of 26 credit-distressed loans consisting of substantially all first mortgage recourse commercial real estate loans     50.0%        9,227        —     

ColFin SXC Funding, LLC

   Origination of mezzanine loan cross-collateralized by a portfolio of limited-service hotels     50.0%        8,842        —     

ColFin Palm Funding, LLC

   Acquisition of a performing senior mortgage secured by a multifamily complex in Florida     50.0%        8,363        —     

ColFin 2011-2 CRE Holdco, LLC and Colony AMC 2011-2 CRE, LLC

   Structured acquisition in a joint venture with the FDIC of approximately 310 credit-distressed loans consisting of substantially all first mortgage recourse commercial real estate loans     24.7%        8,212        7,753   

ColFin Mira Mezz Funding, LLC

   Origination of senior first mortgage and mezzanine loans secured by all assets of a destination spa resort located in Arizona     50.0%        7,537        17,484   

C-VIII CDCF CFI MBS Investor, LLC

   Senior bond secured by seasoned CMBS bonds, U.S. Treasuries and a B-note     33.3%        5,819        5,036   

Other unconsolidated joint ventures (investments less than $5 million carrying value at June 30, 2012)

       10.6% to 50.0%        23,007        33,808   
      

 

 

   

 

 

 
       $ 582,721      $ 443,500   
      

 

 

   

 

 

 

Activity in the Company’s investments in unconsolidated joint ventures is summarized below:

 

(In thousands)

      

Balance at December 31, 2011

   $ 443,500   

Contributions

     172,250   

Assignment of loans receivable and related liabilities

     29,427   

Distributions

     (93,322

Equity in net income

     31,435   

Equity in other comprehensive income

     254   

Foreign currency translation loss

     (823
  

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2012

   $ 582,721   
  

 

 

 

 

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Combined condensed balance sheets and statements of operations for all unconsolidated joint ventures are presented below:

Combined Condensed Balance Sheets of Unconsolidated Joint Ventures

 

(In thousands)

   June 30,
2012
     December 31,
2011
 

Assets:

     

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 114,222       $ 97,157   

Loans receivable, net

     2,575,920         2,713,380   

Available-for-sale investment securities

     17,160         14,820   

Investments in unconsolidated joint ventures

     515,287         589,246   

Investments in real estate

     523,491         143,267   

Other assets

     764,892         555,415   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 4,510,972       $ 4,113,285   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Liabilities:

     

Debt

   $ 1,189,069       $ 1,151,237   

Other liabilities

     36,327         28,031   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     1,225,396         1,179,268   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Owners’ equity

     2,426,083         2,096,352   

Noncontrolling interest

     859,493         837,665   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total liabilities and equity

   $ 4,510,972       $ 4,113,285   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Company’s share of equity

   $ 582,721       $ 443,500   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Combined Condensed Statements of Operations of Unconsolidated Joint Ventures

 

     Three Months Ended
June 30,
     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 

(In thousands)

   2012      2011      2012      2011  

Income:

           

Interest income

   $ 92,920       $ 75,819       $ 184,383       $ 143,640   

Equity in income of unconsolidated joint ventures

     10,661         23,048         26,003         42,704   

Property operating

     23,075         1,201         43,825         1,815   

Other

     5,170         4,874         10,237         7,854   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total income

     131,826         104,942         264,448         196,013   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Expenses:

           

Interest expense

     9,606         6,118         20,760         12,191   

Property operating

     14,347         2,791         29,679         4,799   

Other (including $2,346, $1,529, $4,806 and $3,539 reimbursable to affiliates, respectively)

     23,182         14,343         45,292         23,270   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total expenses

     47,135         23,252         95,731         40,260   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Other income:

           

Realized and unrealized gain on investments, net

     193         3,120         55,953         3,867   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income

     84,884         84,810         224,670         159,620   

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest

     14,323         22,479         35,934         43,816   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income attributable to members

   $ 70,561       $ 62,331       $ 188,736       $ 115,804   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Company’s equity in net income

   $ 15,994       $ 9,416       $ 31,435       $ 17,900   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

No single investment represented greater than 10% of total assets at June 30, 2012 or December 31, 2011.

For the three and six months ended June 30, 2011, ColFin WLH Funding, LLC and ColFin NW Funding, LLC individually generated greater than 10% of total income. On a combined basis, these investments generated 27% and 29% of total income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2011, respectively. No single investment generated greater than 10% of total income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012.

Related Party Transactions of Unconsolidated Joint Ventures—The Company has equity ownership interests in certain unconsolidated asset management companies (each an “AMC”) that provide management services to certain of its unconsolidated joint ventures. The AMCs earn annual management fees equal to 50 to 75 basis points times the UPB of each loan portfolio and are responsible for the payment of allocations of compensation, overhead and direct costs incurred by an affiliate of the Manager pursuant to a cost allocation arrangement (Note 12).

 

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Certain unconsolidated joint ventures reimburse Colony Capital and its affiliates for expenses incurred on their behalf. The joint ventures, including AMCs, were allocated approximately $2.3 million and $1.5 million in expenses from such affiliates of the Manager for the three months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively, and $4.8 million and $3.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively. The Company’s proportionate share, based upon its percentage interests in the joint ventures, was $0.6 million and $0.3 million for the three months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively, and $1.2 million and $0.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

4. Loans Receivable

The following table summarizes the Company’s loans held for investment:

 

 

     June 30, 2012      December 31, 2011  

(In thousands)

   Principal      Carrying
Amount
     Weighted
Average
Coupon
    Weighted
Average
Maturity in
Years
     Principal      Carrying
Amount
     Weighted
Average
Coupon
    Weighted
Average
Maturity in
Years
 

Performing loans

                     

Mortgage loans

   $ 240,350       $ 207,869         8.9     2.5       $ 106,728       $ 105,580         10.3     4.4   

B-note

     14,122         14,008         20.9     3.8         —           —           —          —     

Mezzanine loans

     97,500         97,435         10.6     3.7         97,500         97,427         10.6     4.3   
  

 

 

    

 

 

         

 

 

    

 

 

      
     351,972         319,312              204,228         203,007        

Nonperforming loans

                     

Mezzanine loans

     —           —                25,989         29,612        
  

 

 

    

 

 

         

 

 

    

 

 

      
   $ 351,972       $ 319,312            $ 230,217       $ 232,619        
  

 

 

    

 

 

         

 

 

    

 

 

      

As of June 30, 2012, all loans were paying in accordance with their terms. There were no TDRs during the six months ended June 30, 2012.

At December 31, 2011, the Company owned one-third interests in nonperforming, delinquent mezzanine loans with an aggregate principal amount of $78 million, of which the Company’s share was $26 million. The remaining two-thirds interests in the mezzanine loans were owned by an investment fund managed by an affiliate of the Manager. On January 9, 2012, the Company and the co-investment fund (collectively, the “JIH Lenders”) completed the foreclosure on the collateral and assigned their rights as winning bidder to ColFin JIH Propco, LLC (“JIH Propco”), an unconsolidated joint venture in which the Company owns a one-third interest. As a result, JIH Propco now owns 100% of the indirect equity interests in the entities that own a portfolio of limited service hotels.

In April 2012, the Company amended and restated two notes receivable, each with an original principal amount of $19.55 million, into a $26 million A-note and a $14 million B-note. The A-note was sold to an unrelated third party for $25.7 million, or 99% of par. No gain or loss was recognized as a result of the sale. The remaining B-note bears interest at approximately 20.9%, of which approximately 6% may be paid in-kind.

In May 2012, the Company, in a joint venture with two unaffiliated investors owning an aggregate 40% noncontrolling interest, acquired a $181 million participation interest in an approximate $250 million recourse first mortgage loan. The loan shares the same corporate guarantor as a first mortgage loan that the Company originated in September 2011 (UPB of $45.2 million as of March 31, 2012). At acquisition, the newly acquired loan was collateralized by 269 residential properties located at 26 resorts in the US and various international destinations. The properties comprise the majority of the assets belonging to and operated by a leading destination club operator. This senior mortgage bears interest at the 1-month London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), with a 4.57% floor, plus 4% (8.57% at June 30, 2012) plus a 0.5% collateral management fee. The $181 million participation interest was acquired for approximately $159 million, or 88% of par. At acquisition, the borrower contributed $11.5 million, of which $10.0 million was funded into an interest reserve account to service the concurrent seller financing (Note 7). The borrower will receive credit in the amount of the cash contribution upon full payoff of the loan. The loan has an initial maturity of July 2014 and can be extended to January 2017, subject to an extension fee and an additional cash deposit from the borrower and requires minimum quarterly payments.

Concurrently with the acquisition, in order to achieve consistent economic interests across both loans, the Company sold a 10% participation interest in the existing $45.2 million loan to one of the unaffiliated investors and assigned the remaining 90% interest in the loan to a joint venture with the other unaffiliated investor who contributed approximately $13.6 million for a one-third noncontrolling interest in the joint venture. No gain or loss resulted from the partial sale or assignment of the loan.

 

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Activity in loans held for investment is summarized below:

 

(In thousands)

      

Balance at December 31, 2011

   $ 232,619   

Loan acquisitions

     148,298   

Paid-in-kind interest added to loan principal

     414   

Discount and net loan fee amortization

     989   

Basis of loans sold

     (30,159

Assignment of loans receivable to investment in unconsolidated joint ventures

     (29,612

Principal repayments

     (3,237
  

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2012

   $ 319,312   
  

 

 

 

Minimum scheduled principal payments required under the loan agreements for performing loans as of June 30, 2012, excluding credits available to borrowers upon full payoff, are as follows:

 

Year Ending December 31,

   (In thousands)  

Remaining 2012

   $ 7,381   

2013

     15,160   

2014

     146,749   

2015

     38,343   

2016

     132,839   
  

 

 

 

Total

   $ 340,472   
  

 

 

 

5. Beneficial Interests in Debt Securities

On June 30, 2011, the Company, through a 99%-owned joint venture with a strategic partner, acquired $28 million in beneficial interests in a series of tax-exempt bonds with an aggregate principal amount of $40.4 million. The bonds are secured by a multifamily property located in Georgia. At closing, the bonds financed the acquisition of the property by an institutional real estate firm. The $28 million in beneficial interests, in the form of senior certificates, were acquired at par but had an estimated fair value of $32.1 million at acquisition. The bonds have a six-year term, bear interest at a fixed rate of 7.125%, require semi-annual interest payments each December and June, and may be prepaid, subject to the payment of certain fees. The beneficial interests in debt securities are classified as available-for-sale and stated at estimated fair value, with changes in fair value reflected in other comprehensive income or loss.

The Company’s beneficial interests in debt securities are summarized below:

 

(In thousands)

   June 30,
2012
     December 31,
2011
 

Principal

   $ 28,000       $ 28,000   

Unamortized premium

     3,497         3,813   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Amortized cost

     31,497         31,813   

Unrealized gain included in accumulated other comprehensive income

     842         614   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Fair value

   $ 32,339       $ 32,427   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Concurrently with the acquisition of beneficial interests in debt securities, the Company’s strategic partner entered into a separate interest rate swap agreement with the borrower which, in conjunction with a special contribution/distribution arrangement with the joint venture, will result in a net current yield to the joint venture of the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (“SIFMA”) Municipal Swap Index plus 3.25% per annum (3.43% at June 30, 2012). The Company determined that the special contribution/distribution arrangement is an embedded derivative that meets the criteria for bifurcation and recorded a derivative liability. The bifurcated derivative does not qualify as a hedging instrument, so changes in the estimated fair value of the derivative are recognized in income. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, the change in the estimated fair value of the derivative of $160,000 and $340,000, respectively, is included in net unrealized loss on derivatives in the accompanying statements of operations.

6. Credit Agreement

On September 1, 2011, the Company amended its existing credit agreement with Bank of America, N.A., as administrative agent, and certain lenders. The amended and restated credit agreement (the “Credit Agreement”) provides a credit facility in the initial maximum principal amount of $175 million, which may be increased to $250 million, under certain conditions set forth in the Credit Agreement, including each lender or substitute lenders agreeing to provide commitments for such increased amount. Borrowings under the Credit Agreement will be used to finance investments in the Company’s target assets, as well as for general corporate purposes.

 

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The amount available for draw is limited to 3.5 times the annualized cash income (as defined in the Credit Agreement) from eligible assets. To be included in the borrowing capacity, an asset must meet certain criteria, including being free of all liens and pledges and, when taken with all other borrowing base assets, the average time to maturity must be at least 3.5 years. At June 30, 2012, the maximum amount available for draw was $126.5 million, of which $33 million was drawn.

Advances under the Credit Agreement accrue interest at a per annum rate equal to the sum of, at the Company’s election, the one, two, three, or six month LIBOR plus 3.50% or 3.75%, depending upon the leverage ratio as defined in the Credit Agreement. At June 30, 2012, the applicable spread was 3.50% and the Company had outstanding borrowings bearing weighted average interest at 4.23%. The Company also pays a commitment fee of 0.5% or 0.4% of the unused amount (0.5% at June 30, 2012), depending upon usage.

The initial maturity date of the Credit Agreement is August 30, 2013. Any amounts outstanding under the Credit Agreement upon maturity will convert automatically to a fully amortizing one-year term loan payable in quarterly installments. In the event of such conversions, the term loan will continue to bear interest at the same rate as the revolving loans from which they were converted.

Some of the Company’s subsidiaries provided a continuing guaranty (the “Guaranty”) under which such subsidiaries guaranty the obligations of the Company under the Credit Agreement. As security for the advances under the Credit Agreement, the Company and some of its affiliates pledged their equity interests in certain subsidiaries through which the Company directly or indirectly owns substantially all of its assets.

The Credit Agreement and the Guaranty contain various affirmative and negative covenants, including financial covenants that require the Company to maintain minimum tangible net worth and liquidity levels and financial ratios, as defined in the Credit Agreement. At June 30, 2012, the Company was in compliance with all of these financial covenants.

The Credit Agreement also includes customary events of default, in certain cases subject to reasonable and customary periods to cure, including but not limited to: failure to make payments when due; breach of covenants; breach of representations and warranties; insolvency proceedings; certain judgments and attachments; change of control; and failure to maintain status as a REIT. The occurrence of an event of default may result in the termination of the credit facility, accelerate the Company’s repayment obligations, in certain cases limit the Company’s ability to make distributions, and allow the lenders to exercise all rights and remedies available to them with respect to the collateral. There have been no events of default since the inception of the credit facility.

7. Secured Financing

In connection with the acquisition of a $181 million participation interest in a first mortgage loan (Note 4), the seller provided concurrent financing for $103.5 million, or 65%, of the purchase price. The non-recourse, co-terminus financing bears interest at a fixed rate of 5.0%. Concurrently with the loan acquisition, the borrower funded, on behalf of the Company, an interest reserve account in an amount sufficient to service the interest for the term of the secured financing. The interest reserve account is controlled by the secured financing lender and is included in other assets in the accompanying balance sheet. The financing has an initial maturity of July 2014 and can be extended to January 2017, subject to an extension fee. Upon exercise of the extension option, the borrower of the first mortgage loan will again be required to fund the interest reserve account on behalf of the Company to service the interest for the extended term of the secured financing. At June 30, 2012, the outstanding balance on the secured financing was $103.5 million.

On December 23, 2010, the Company assigned a $20.75 million first mortgage it originated to a third party in exchange for $14 million in proceeds, and retained a $6.75 million subordinated B-note participation. The Company accounted for the assignment as a financing transaction, as the Company retained effective control over the original first mortgage loan and, accordingly, it did not meet the criteria of a loan sale. The A-note holder receives interest at 4.85% per annum, which is recognized as interest expense in the Company’s consolidated statements of operations. Principal payments due under the original mortgage loan are allocated to the A-note holder and B-note holder in proportion to their participation interests.

Minimum scheduled principal payments due under the secured financing arrangements as of June 30, 2012 are as follows:

 

Year Ending December 31,

   (In thousands)  

Remaining 2012

   $ 4,090   

2013

     8,195   

2014

     91,737   

2015

     229   

2016

     13,032   
  

 

 

 

Total

   $ 117,283   
  

 

 

 

 

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8. Derivative Instruments

The Company has investments in five unconsolidated joint ventures denominated in Euro that expose the Company to foreign currency risk. At June 30, 2012, the Company’s net investments in such joint ventures totaled approximately €33.8 million, or $42.8 million. The Company generally uses collars (consisting of caps and floors) without upfront premium costs to hedge the foreign currency exposure of its net investments and does not anticipate entering into derivative transactions for speculative or trading purposes. At June 30, 2012, the total notional amount of the collars was approximately €27.3 million with termination dates ranging from December 2012 to July 2015.

The fair values of derivative instruments included in the Company’s consolidated balance sheets are as follows:

 

(In thousands)

   June 30,
2012
     December 31,
2011
 

Assets

     

Foreign exchange contracts designated as hedging instruments included in other assets

   $ 2,419       $ 2,887   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Liabilities

     

Foreign exchange contracts designated as hedging instruments included in accrued and other liabilities

   $ 400       $ 1,116   

Embedded derivative liability (Note 5) included in accrued and other liabilities

     4,023         4,204   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 4,423       $ 5,320   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

A net settlement loss on foreign currency collars of $182,000 for the three months ended June 30, 2011 and $29,000 and $173,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively, was reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) and is offset against net foreign exchange loss in the consolidated statements of operations.

Certain counterparties to the derivative instruments require the Company to deposit cash or other eligible collateral for derivative financial liabilities exceeding $100,000. As of June 30, 2012, the Company had no amounts on deposit related to these agreements.

9. Fair Value Measurements

Financial Instruments Reported at Fair Value

The Company has certain assets and liabilities that are required to be recorded at fair value on a recurring basis. The following table summarizes the fair values of those assets and liabilities, aggregated by the level in the fair value hierarchy:

 

     June 30, 2012      December 31, 2011  
     Fair Value Measurements Using             Fair Value Measurements Using         

(In thousands)

   Quoted Prices
in Active
Markets
for Identical
Instruments
(Level 1)
     Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)
     Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)
     Total      Quoted Prices
in Active
Markets
for Identical
Instruments
(Level 1)
     Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)
     Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)
     Total  

Assets

                       

Beneficial interests in debt securities

   $ —         $ 32,339       $ —         $ 32,339       $ —         $ 32,427       $ —         $ 32,427   

Foreign exchange contracts

     —           2,419         —           2,419         —           2,887         —           2,887   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ —         $ 34,758       $ —         $ 34,758       $ —         $ 35,314       $ —         $ 35,314   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Liabilities

                       

Foreign exchange contracts

   $ —         $ 400       $ —         $ 400       $ —         $ 1,116       $ —         $ 1,116   

Embedded derivative liability associated with beneficial interests in debt securities

     —           4,023         —           4,023         —           4,204         —           4,204   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ —         $ 4,423       $ —         $ 4,423       $ —         $ 5,320       $ —         $ 5,320   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The fair value of the beneficial interests in debt securities and the associated embedded derivative liability were determined by discounting the expected cash flows using observable current and forward rates of a widely used index that closely follows the SIFMA Municipal Swap Index. The fair values of foreign exchange contracts are determined by discounting the expected cash flow of each derivative instrument based on forecast foreign exchange rates. This analysis reflects the contractual terms of the derivatives, observable market-based inputs, and credit valuation adjustments to appropriately reflect the non-performance risk for both the Company and the respective counterparty. The Company has determined that the majority of inputs used to value its derivative

 

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financial instruments fall within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy. Although credit valuation adjustments, such as the risk of default, rely on Level 3 inputs, the Company has determined that these inputs are not significant to the overall valuation of its derivatives. As a result, derivative valuations in their entirety are classified in Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy.

Fair Value Disclosure of Financial Instruments Reported at Cost

The Company and its unconsolidated joint ventures estimate the fair value of financial instruments carried at historical cost on a quarterly basis. These instruments are recorded at fair value only if they are impaired. No impairment charges were recognized by the Company during the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011. In cases where quoted market prices are not available, fair values are estimated using inputs such as discounted cash flow projections, market comparables, dealer quotes and other quantitative and qualitative factors. Fair values of investments in unconsolidated joint ventures are primarily derived by applying the Company’s ownership interest to the fair value of the underlying assets and liabilities of each joint venture. The Company’s proportionate share of each joint venture’s fair value approximates the Company’s fair value of the investment as the timing of cash flows of the joint venture does not deviate materially from the timing of cash flows the Company receives from the joint venture. Considerable judgment is necessary to interpret market data and develop estimated fair value. The use of different assumptions or methodologies could have a material effect on the estimated fair value amounts.

The carrying values of interest receivable and accrued and other liabilities approximate their fair values due to their short term nature. At June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, the carrying value of the line of credit approximates its fair value as its contractual rate approximates the market rate of interest for similar instruments that would be available to the Company. The fair value of secured debt at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011 was estimated by discounting expected future cash outlays at current interest rates available for similar instruments.

The following tables present the estimated fair values and carrying values of the Company’s financial instruments carried at cost, aggregated by the level in the fair value hierarchy:

 

     June 30, 2012  
     Fair Value Measurements Using                

(In thousands)

   Quoted Prices in
Active Markets
for Identical
Instruments
(Level 1)
     Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)
     Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)
     Total Fair
Value
     Carrying
Value
 

Assets

              

Investments in unconsolidated joint ventures

   $ —         $ 26,217       $ 600,799       $ 627,016       $ 582,721   

Loans held for investment

     —           —           321,181         321,181         319,312   

Liabilities

              

Line of credit

   $ —         $ 33,000       $ —         $ 33,000       $ 33,000   

Secured financing

     —           —           117,294         117,294         117,283   
     December 31, 2011  
     Fair Value Measurements Using                

(In thousands)

   Quoted Prices in
Active Markets
for Identical
Instruments
(Level 1)
     Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)
     Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)
     Total Fair
Value
     Carrying
Value
 

Assets

              

Investments in unconsolidated joint ventures

   $ —         $ 34,017       $ 448,822       $ 482,839       $ 443,500   

Loans held for investment

     —           —           235,050         235,050         232,619   

Liabilities

              

Line of credit

   $ —         $ 69,000       $ —         $ 69,000       $ 69,000   

Secured financing

     —           —           13,900         13,900         13,845   

10. Stockholders’ Equity

The Company’s authorized capital stock consists of 50,000,000 shares of preferred stock, $0.01 par value per share, and 450,000,000 shares of common stock, $0.01 par value per share.

March 2012 Preferred Stock Offering

On March 20, 2012, the Company completed an underwritten public offering (the “March 2012 Preferred Stock Offering”) of 5,800,000 shares of the Company’s 8.5% Series A Cumulative Redeemable Perpetual Preferred Stock, par value $0.01 per share

 

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Table of Contents

(“Series A Preferred Stock”). The net offering proceeds, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering costs payable by the Company, were approximately $140.1 million. The Company used substantially all of the net proceeds to repay amounts outstanding under the Credit Agreement.

The Series A Preferred Stock must be paid a dividend at a rate of 8.5% per year on the $25.00 liquidation preference before the common stock is entitled to receive any dividends. The first dividend payment was made on July 16, 2012 in the amount of $0.6847 per share. The Series A Preferred Stock is redeemable at $25.00 per share plus accrued and unpaid dividends (whether or not declared) exclusively at the Company’s option commencing on March 20, 2017 (subject to the Company’s right under limited circumstances to redeem the Series A Preferred Stock earlier in order to preserve its qualification as a REIT or upon the occurrence of a change of control (as defined in the articles supplementary relating to the Series A Preferred Stock)). The Series A Preferred Stock is senior to the Company’s common stock with respect to dividends and distributions, including distributions upon liquidation, dissolution or winding up. The Series A Preferred Stock generally does not have any voting rights, except if the Company fails to pay dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock for six or more quarterly periods (whether or not consecutive). Under such circumstances, the Series A Preferred Stock will be entitled to vote to elect two additional directors to the Company’s board of directors, until all unpaid dividends have been paid or declared and set aside for payment. In addition, certain changes to the terms of the Series A Preferred Stock cannot be made without the affirmative vote of holders of at least two-thirds of the outstanding shares of Series A Preferred Stock voting separately as a class.

Dividend Reinvestment and Direct Stock Purchase Plan

The Company’s Dividend Reinvestment and Direct Stock Purchase Plan (the “DRIP Plan”) provides existing common stockholders and other investors the opportunity to purchase shares (or additional shares, as applicable) of the Company’s common stock by reinvesting some or all of the cash dividends received on their shares of the Company’s common stock or making optional cash purchases within specified parameters. The DRIP Plan acquires shares either in the open market, directly from the Company as newly issued common stock, or in privately negotiated transactions with third parties. As of June 30, 2012, no shares had been acquired under the DRIP Plan from the Company in the form of new issuances.

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income

The components of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) attributable to the stockholders are as follows:

 

(In thousands)

   June 30, 2012     December 31, 2011  

Equity in accumulated other comprehensive loss of unconsolidated joint ventures

   $ (159   $ (406

Unrealized gain on beneficial interests in debt securities

     838        611   

Unrealized gain on fair value of derivative instruments designated as hedges, net of tax effect

     2,016        1,793   

Unrealized loss on foreign currency translation, net of tax effect

     (5,073     (4,328
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ (2,378   $ (2,330
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

11. Earnings per Share

The Company calculates basic earnings per share using the two-class method, which allocates earnings per share for each share of common stock and nonvested shares containing nonforfeitable rights to dividends and dividend equivalents treated as participating securities. Diluted earnings per share is calculated using the more dilutive of the two-class method or the treasury stock method, which assumes that the proceeds from the exercise of participating securities are used to purchase common shares at the average market price for the period. The following table reconciles the numerator and denominator of the basic and diluted per-share computations for net income available to common stockholders:

 

     Three Months Ended June 30,     Six Months Ended June 30,  

(In thousands, except share and per share data)

   2012     2011     2012     2011  

Numerator:

        

Net income

   $ 16,555      $ 8,338      $ 29,332      $ 15,714   

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest

     (1,454     (301     (1,763     (314
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to Colony Financial, Inc.

     15,101        8,037        27,569        15,400   

Preferred dividends

     (3,082     —          (3,458     —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to common stockholders

     12,019        8,037        24,111        15,400   

Net income allocated to participating securities (nonvested shares)

     (132     (2     (268     (4
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Numerator for basic and diluted net income allocated to common stockholders

   $ 11,887      $ 8,035      $ 23,843      $ 15,396   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Denominator:

           

Basic weighted average number of common shares outstanding

     32,745,500         31,911,500         32,696,100         24,684,900   

Weighted average effect of dilutive shares (1)

     61,400         287,500         35,300         287,500   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Diluted weighted average number of common shares outstanding

     32,806,900         32,199,000         32,731,400         24,972,400   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Earnings per share:

           

Net income attributable to common stockholders per share–basic

   $ 0.36       $ 0.25       $ 0.73       $ 0.62   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income attributable to common stockholders per share–diluted

   $ 0.36       $ 0.25       $ 0.73       $ 0.62   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1)

For the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, weighted average dilutive shares include the effect of shares of common stock issuable to the Manager for incentive fees incurred for the period (Note 12). For the three and six months ended June 30, 2011, weighted average dilutive shares include the effect of shares of common stock issuable for reimbursement of the Manager’s partial payment of underwriting discounts and commissions incurred in connection with the Company’s initial public offering (“IPO”).

12. Related Party Transactions

Management Agreement

The Manager provides the day-to-day management of the Company’s operations pursuant to a management agreement. The Manager is responsible for (1) selecting, purchasing and selling the Company’s portfolio investments, (2) the Company’s financing activities and (3) providing investment advisory services. The management agreement requires the Manager to manage the Company’s business affairs in conformity with the Company’s investment guidelines and other policies that are approved and monitored by the Company’s board of directors. The Manager’s role is under the supervision and direction of the Company’s board of directors. The initial term of the management agreement expires on September 29, 2012 (the third anniversary of the completion of the IPO) and will be automatically renewed for a one-year term each anniversary date thereafter unless previously terminated upon at least 180 days’ prior written notice to the Manager.

Base Management Fee—The Manager earns a base management fee of 1.5% of stockholders’ equity, per annum. For purposes of calculating the base management fee, stockholders’ equity means: (a) the sum of (1) the net proceeds from all issuances of equity securities since inception (allocated on a pro rata basis for such issuances during the fiscal quarter of any such issuance), plus (2) retained earnings at the end of the most recently completed calendar quarter (as determined in accordance with GAAP, adjusted to exclude any non-cash equity compensation expense incurred in current or prior periods), less (b) any amount paid to repurchase the Company’s common stock since inception. The definition of stockholders’ equity also excludes (1) any unrealized gains or losses from mark-to-market valuation changes (other than permanent impairment) that have impacted stockholders’ equity as reported in the financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP, (2) the effect of any gains or losses from one-time events pursuant to changes in GAAP, (3) non-cash items which in the judgment of management should not be included in Core Earnings (as defined below) and (4) the portion of the net proceeds of the IPO and the concurrent private placement that have not yet been initially invested in the Company’s target assets. For items (2) and (3), such exclusions shall only be applied after discussions between the Manager and the independent directors and after approval by a majority of the independent directors. As a result, stockholders’ equity, for purposes of calculating the management fee, could be greater or less than the amount of stockholders’ equity shown in the Company’s financial statements.

Incentive Fees—The Manager is entitled to an incentive fee with respect to each calendar quarter that the management agreement is in effect, in an amount not less than zero, equal to the difference between (1) the product of (x) 20% and (y) the difference between (i) Core Earnings (as defined below), on a rolling four-quarter basis and before the incentive fee for the current quarter, and (ii) the product of (A) the weighted average of the issue price per share of common stock in all of the Company’s offerings multiplied by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding (including any restricted shares of common stock and any other shares of common stock underlying awards granted under our equity incentive plans, if any) in such four-quarter period and (B) 8%, and (2) the sum of any incentive fee paid to the Manager with respect to the first three calendar quarters of such previous four quarters; provided, however, that no incentive fee is payable with respect to any calendar quarter unless Core Earnings is greater than zero for the most recently completed 12 calendar quarters, or the number of completed calendar quarters since the IPO, whichever is less.

Core Earnings is a non-GAAP measure and is defined as GAAP net income (loss) excluding non-cash equity compensation expense, the incentive fee, real estate depreciation and amortization and any unrealized gains, losses or other non-cash items recorded in the period, regardless of whether such items are included in other comprehensive income or loss, or in net income. The amount is adjusted to exclude one-time events pursuant to changes in GAAP and certain other non-cash charges after discussions between the Manager and the Company’s independent directors and after approval by a majority of the Company’s independent directors.

 

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The incentive fee is payable to the Manager quarterly in arrears in shares of the Company’s common stock, subject to certain ownership and New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) limitations. The number of shares to be issued to the Manager is equal to the dollar amount of the portion of the quarterly installment of the incentive fee payable in shares divided by the average of the closing prices of the Company’s common stock on the NYSE for the five trading days prior to the date on which such quarterly installment is settled. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, the Company incurred $523,000 and $936,000, respectively, in incentive fees. The Company settled $150,000 of incentive fees in May 2012 in shares of the Company’s common stock and expects to settle the remaining accrued incentive fees during the third quarter of 2012. No incentive fees were incurred for the six months ended June 30, 2011.

Reimbursement of Expenditures—Pursuant to the management agreement, the Company is required to reimburse the Manager for expenditures incurred by the Manager on behalf of the Company, including legal, accounting, financial, due diligence and other services, in amounts which are no greater than those which would be payable to third parties negotiated on an arm’s length basis. In addition, pursuant to a secondment agreement between the Company and Colony Capital, the Company is responsible for Colony Capital’s expenses incurred in employing the Company’s chief financial officer. The Company also reimburses Colony Capital for its pro rata portion of overhead expenses incurred by Colony Capital and its affiliates, including the Manager, based upon the ratio of the Company’s assets to all Colony Capital-managed assets.

Cost Reimbursement for Asset Management Services

Colony AMC Milestone West, LLC (“AMC Milestone West”) and Colony AMC Milestone North, LLC (“AMC Milestone North”), each a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, provide asset management services to two joint ventures with the FDIC (“FDIC Ventures”) for which certain of our unconsolidated joint ventures are managing members. The FDIC Ventures pay an annual 50-basis point asset management fee calculated on the aggregate UPB of each respective loan portfolio. In addition, one of the unconsolidated joint ventures reimburses AMC Milestone North for any expenses not covered by the 50-basis point fee. Asset management fees and expense reimbursements were $569,000 and $346,000 for the three months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively, and $1,119,000 and $907,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively. Effective January 1, 2011, through AMC Milestone West and AMC Milestone North, the Company began reimbursing an affiliate of the Manager for compensation, overhead and direct costs incurred by the affiliate pursuant to a cost allocation arrangement. The Company was allocated costs under this arrangement of $353,000 and $211,000 for the three months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively, and $567,000 and $529,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

The following table summarizes the amounts incurred by the Company and payable to the Manager or its affiliates for the periods presented:

 

     Three Months Ended June 30,      Six Months Ended June 30,  

(In thousands)

   2012      2011      2012      2011  

Base management fees

   $ 2,813       $ 2,228       $ 5,164       $ 3,524   

Incentive fees

     523         —           936         —     

Compensation pursuant to secondment agreement

     301         350         598         704   

Allocated and direct investment-related expenses

     470         303         914         650   

Allocated and direct administrative expenses

     282         134         576         170   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 4,389       $ 3,015       $ 8,188       $ 5,048   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table summarizes the amounts due to the Manager or its affiliates as of each balance sheet date:

 

(In thousands)

   June 30, 2012      December 31, 2011  

Base management fees

   $ 2,813       $ 2,288   

Incentive fee

     1,047         261   

Secondment reimbursement

     433         880   

Reimbursement of direct and allocated administrative and investment costs

     271         359   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 4,564       $ 3,788   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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13. Share-Based Payments

Director Stock Plan

The Company’s 2009 Non-Executive Director Stock Plan (the “Director Stock Plan”) provides for the grant of restricted stock, restricted stock units and other stock-based awards to its non-executive directors. The maximum number of shares of stock reserved under the Director Stock Plan is 100,000. The individual share awards generally vest one year from the date of grant.

Equity Incentive Plan

The Colony Financial, Inc. 2011 Equity Incentive Plan (the “Equity Incentive Plan”) provides for the grant of options to purchase shares of common stock, share awards (including restricted stock and stock units), stock appreciation rights, performance awards and annual incentive awards, dividend equivalent rights, long-term incentive units, cash and other equity-based awards. Certain named executive officers of the Company, along with other eligible employees, directors and service providers, including the Manager and employees of the Manager, are eligible to receive awards under the Equity Incentive Plan. The Company has reserved a total of 1,600,000 shares of common stock for issuance pursuant to the Equity Incentive Plan, subject to certain adjustments set forth in the plan.

In January 2012, the Company awarded an aggregate 475,000 restricted shares of its common stock to the Company’s executive officers (including its chief financial officer) and certain employees of the Manager and its affiliates under the Equity Incentive Plan. The awards vest over a three-year period as follows: 25% in March 2012 and 25% on each of the first three anniversaries of the grant date.

A summary of the Company’s nonvested shares under the Director Stock Plan and Equity Incentive Plan for the six months ended June 30, 2012 is presented below:

 

     Restricted Stock
Grants to
Non-Executive
Directors
     Restricted
Stock Grants
to Employee
    Restricted
Stock Grants
to Employees of
Manager
    Total  

Nonvested shares at December 31, 2011

     3,000         —          —          3,000   

Granted

     8,274         34,344        440,656        483,274   

Vested

     —           (8,586     (110,164     (118,750

Forfeited

     —           —          (1,275     (1,275
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Nonvested shares at June 30, 2012

     11,274         25,758        329,217        366,249   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted average grant date fair value per share

   $ 16.32       $ 16.16      $ 16.16      $ 16.16   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The following table summarizes the components of share-based compensation included in the consolidated statements of operations:

 

     Three Months Ended June 30,      Six Months Ended June 30,  

(In thousands)

   2012      2011      2012      2011  

Share-based compensation included in management fees

   $ 608       $ —         $ 2,364       $ —     

Share-based compensation included in administrative expenses

     85         29         245         59   

For the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, the total fair value of shares vested, based on the quoted closing share price of the Company’s common stock on the NYSE on the day of vesting, was $1.9 million. There was no vesting or shares granted during the six months ended June 30, 2011. As of June 30, 2012, aggregate unrecognized compensation cost related to restricted stock granted under the Director Stock Plan and Equity Incentive Plan was approximately $5.6 million. That cost is expected to be fully recognized over a weighted-average period of 30 months.

 

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14. Income Taxes

The Company’s TRSs are subject to corporate level federal, state, foreign and local income taxes. The Company’s income tax provision (benefit) is as follows:

 

     Three Months Ended
June  30,
    Six Months Ended
June  30,
 

(In thousands)

   2012     2011     2012     2011  

Current

        

Federal

   $ 1,025      $ 335      $ 1,129      $ 498   

State

     295        22        425        40   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current tax provision

     1,320        357        1,554        538   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Deferred

        

Federal

     (759     (131     (663     (540

State

     (120     —          (86     —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total deferred tax provision (benefit)

     (879     (131     (749     (540
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total income tax provision (benefit)

   $ 441      $ 226      $ 805      $ (2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Deferred tax assets of $1.5 million and $0.6 million are included in other assets as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively, and deferred tax liabilities of $170,000 and $69,000 are included in accrued and other liabilities as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively. Deferred tax assets and liabilities arise from temporary differences in income recognition for GAAP and tax purposes and the tax effect of net foreign currency translation gains and losses on certain investments in unconsolidated joint ventures held in TRSs.

15. Commitments and Contingencies

Pursuant to the operating agreements of certain unconsolidated joint ventures, the joint venture partners may be required to fund additional amounts for ordinary operating costs, guaranties or commitments of the joint ventures. At June 30, 2012, the Company’s share of those commitments was $7.4 million.

On May 7, 2012, two of the Company’s unconsolidated joint ventures, ColFin Bulls Funding A, LLC and ColFin Bulls Funding B, LLC, entered into loan agreements with a financial institution to finance certain commercial real estate loans for an aggregate amount of $35.0 million. The Company provided non-recourse carve-outs guaranties of the loans, which mature in May 2015 or earlier, upon full resolution of the underlying collateral loans. The aggregate balance of the loans at June 30, 2012 was $33.4 million, or approximately 23% of the carrying amount of the loans in the portfolio. The Company believes that the likelihood of making any payments under the guarantee is remote, and has not accrued for a guarantee liability as of June 30, 2012.

In the ordinary course of business, the Company may be involved in litigation which may result in legal costs and liability that could have a material effect on the Company’s financial position and results of operations.

16. Subsequent Events

In July 2012, the Company completed an underwritten public offering (the “July 2012 Preferred Stock Offering”) of 4,280,000 shares of the Company’s Series A Preferred Stock, including a partial exercise of the overallotment option by the underwriters. The net offering proceeds, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering costs payable by the Company, were approximately $106 million. The Company used a portion of the net proceeds to repay amounts outstanding under the Credit Agreement and the remaining proceeds to fund acquisitions of target assets.

On July 31, 2012, the Company committed to invest $150 million in a newly formed investment vehicle, CSFR Operating Partnership, L.P. (“CSFR”), managed by an affiliate of the Manager. Such investment will be made in the form of a transfer of the Company’s interest in the single-family home rental platform ($150 million through August 3, 2012 in ColFin American Investors, LLC).

 

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ITEM 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

In this quarterly report on Form 10-Q (this “Report”) we refer to Colony Financial, Inc. as “we,” “us,” “Company,” or “our,” unless we specifically state otherwise or the context indicates otherwise. We refer to our manager, Colony Financial Manager, LLC, as our “Manager,” and the parent company of our Manager, Colony Capital, LLC, together with its consolidated subsidiaries (other than us), as “Colony Capital.”

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our unaudited consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes thereto, which are included in Item 1 of this Report, as well as the information contained in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011, which is accessible on the Securities and Exchange Commission’s (the “SEC”) website at www.sec.gov.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION RELATED TO FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Some of the statements contained in this Report constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and we intend such statements to be covered by the safe harbor provisions contained in Section 21E of the Exchange Act. Forward-looking statements relate to expectations, beliefs, projections, future plans and strategies, anticipated events or trends and similar expressions concerning matters that are not historical facts. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” or “potential” or the negative of these words and phrases or similar words or phrases which are predictions of or indicate future events or trends and which do not relate solely to historical matters. You can also identify forward-looking statements by discussions of our strategy, plans or intentions.

While forward-looking statements reflect our good faith beliefs, assumptions and expectations, they are not guarantees of future performance. Furthermore, we disclaim any obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement to reflect changes in underlying assumptions or factors, of new information, data or methods, future events or other changes. We caution investors not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements and urge you to carefully review the disclosures we make concerning risks in sections entitled “Risk Factors,” “Forward-Looking Statements,” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K and any subsequent Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q.

Overview

We are an externally managed real estate investment and finance company that was organized in June 2009 primarily to acquire, originate and manage a diversified portfolio of real estate-related debt and equity investments at attractive risk-adjusted returns. Our investment portfolio and target assets are primarily composed of interests in: (i) secondary loans acquired at a discount to par; (ii) new loan originations; and (iii) equity in single family homes to be held for investment and rented to tenants. Secondary debt purchases may include performing, sub-performing or non-performing loans (including loan-to-own strategies). See “BusinessOur Target Assets” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011 for additional information about our target assets.

We elected to be taxed as a real estate investment trust (“REIT”) for U.S. federal income tax purposes, commencing with our initial taxable year ended December 31, 2009. We also intend to continue to operate our business in a manner that will permit us to maintain our exemption from registration under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the “1940 Act”).

Business Objective and Outlook

Our objective is to provide attractive risk-adjusted returns to our investors through a diversified portfolio of real estate-related debt and equity investments, including single family homes to be rented to tenants. The total return profile of our investments is composed of both current yield, which is distributed through regular-way dividends, and capital appreciation potential, which is distributed through regular-way and/or special dividends. Our investments typically fall within three general categories: 1) Loan Acquisitions – the purchase of performing, sub-performing and/or non-performing commercial real estate debt, often at significant discounts to par; 2) Loan Originations – the origination of structured senior and subordinate debt secured by mortgages and/or equity interests in commercial real estate with a bias towards current yield; and 3) Single Family Homes – the acquisition of single family homes to be rented to tenants. We also may pursue other real estate-related special situation investments including CMBS, sale/leasebacks, triple net lease investments and minority equity interests in banks. Our investments are diversified across a wide spectrum of commercial real estate property types – office, industrial, retail, multifamily, hospitality and single-family residential – and geographically, with investments across the United States and Europe.

Significant dislocation has occurred in global real estate credit markets since the financial downturn, and while the market has begun the process of recovery, we continue to find opportunities to acquire financial and real estate assets that we believe are mispriced relative to intrinsic value of the underlying collateral. We believe the recovery will occur in two general phases: phase one

 

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will involve many loan acquisition opportunities as financial institutions around the globe deleverage and divest of troubled assets, and phase two will involve an increasing number of loan originations and property acquisitions as commercial real estate fundamentals continue to stabilize and commercial real estate assets are refinanced or acquired with new capital based on revised underwriting, valuation and operating metrics. We believe phases one and two are actively underway in the United States, whereas Europe is lagging and is currently producing mostly loan acquisition opportunities. We believe that we are well positioned to capitalize on such opportunities sourcing transactions through the numerous relationships enjoyed by our Manager through its two decade history in the real estate investment business. We also believe that our Manager’s in-depth understanding of commercial real estate and real estate-related investments (including our target assets), and in-house underwriting and asset management capabilities, enable us to acquire assets with attractive risk-adjusted return profiles and the potential for meaningful capital appreciation.

Recent Developments

Investment Activities

During the quarter ended June 30, 2012, we invested approximately $82 million in six new assets and invested another $70 million in a joint venture created in March 2012 to invest in single-family homes for rental. See “—Our Investments” for our recent investment activities and updates relating to our existing investments. Many of our investments have been structured as joint ventures with one or more of the private investment funds managed by Colony Capital or its affiliates (collectively, “Co-Investment Funds”). For more information about our investment allocation agreement and conflicts of interest that may arise in connection with these co-investments, see “Business—Co-Investment Funds” and “Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Management and Our Relationship with Our Manager” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011.

Preferred Stock Offering

On March 20, 2012, we completed an underwritten public offering (the “March 2012 Preferred Stock Offering”) of 5,800,000 shares of our 8.50% Series A Cumulative Redeemable Perpetual Preferred Stock, par value $0.01 per share (“Series A Preferred Stock”), including a partial exercise of the overallotment option by the underwriters. The net offering proceeds, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering costs payable by us, were approximately $140.1 million. We used $105 million of the net proceeds to repay amounts outstanding under our line of credit and the remainder for operations and to fund acquisitions of our target assets.

In July 2012, we completed an underwritten public offering (the “July 2012 Preferred Stock Offering”) of 4,280,000 shares of our Series A Preferred Stock, including a partial exercise of the overallotment option by the underwriters at a premium to par that translated to a strip yield of 8.3%. The net offering proceeds, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering costs payable by us, were approximately $106 million. We used $40.5 million of the net proceeds to repay amounts outstanding under our line of credit and will use the remainder primarily for operations and to fund acquisitions of our target assets.

The Series A Preferred Stock must be paid a dividend at a rate of 8.5% per year on the $25.00 liquidation preference before the common stock is entitled to receive any dividends. The first dividend payment for the Series A Preferred Stock issued in the March 2012 Preferred Stock Offering was paid July 16, 2012 in the amount of $0.6847 per share. The Series A Preferred Stock is redeemable at $25.00 per share plus accrued and unpaid dividends (whether or not declared) exclusively at our option commencing on March 20, 2017 (subject to our right under limited circumstances to redeem the Series A Preferred Stock earlier in order to preserve our qualification as a REIT or upon the occurrence of a change of control (as defined in the articles supplementary relating to the Series A Preferred Stock)). The Series A Preferred Stock is senior to our common stock with respect to dividends and distributions, including distributions upon liquidation, dissolution or winding up. The Series A Preferred Stock generally does not have any voting rights, except if we fail to pay dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock for six or more quarterly periods (whether or not consecutive). Under such circumstances, the Series A Preferred Stock will be entitled to vote to elect two additional directors to our board or directors, until all unpaid dividends have been paid or declared and set aside for payment. In addition, certain changes to the terms of the Series A Preferred Stock cannot be made without the affirmative vote of holders of at least two-thirds of the outstanding shares of Series A Preferred Stock voting separately as a class.

 

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Table of Contents

Our Investments

The following table is a summary of investments we owned as of June 30, 2012:

 

($ in millions)

Our Investments

   Date of
Initial
Investment
     Original
Invested
and
Committed
Equity(1)
     Current
Equity
Investment(2)
     Company’s
Proportionate
Share of
Current
UPB(3)
     Company’s
Proportionate
Share of

Real
Estate(3)
    

Description

Colony American Homes

     Mar-12       $ 150.0       $ 74.9         NA       $ 65.1       Investment entity created for the purpose of acquiring and renting single family homes; acquired 1,156 homes in AZ, CA, NV and TX.

Centro Mezzanine Loans

     Jun-11         60.0         60.0         60.0         —         Participation in mezzanine loans secured by equity interests in 107 retail centers located in 27 states.

Bulls Loan Portfolio

     Jun-11         65.1         45.2         93.8         0.8       512 performing and non-performing loans consisting of substantially all first mortgage recourse commercial real estate loans and 4 REO properties

WLH Secured Loan

     Oct-09         48.0         44.7         50.5         —         Senior secured term loan secured by first mortgages on residential land and security interests in cash and other assets

U.S. Life Insurance Loan Portfolio

     Dec-09         49.7         44.2         48.5         —         19 fixed-rate first mortgages secured by commercial real estate

DB FDIC Portfolio

     Jan-10         34.7         38.2         76.7         10.1       755 performing and non-performing loans secured mostly by commercial real estate and 118 REO properties

Extended Stay Loan

     Oct-10         37.4         37.4         37.5         —         Performing mezzanine loan to Extended Stay Hotels, which includes a 664 hotel portfolio

CRE FDIC Portfolio

     Aug-11         33.4         36.2         85.6         2.4       623 performing and non-performing loans secured mostly by commercial real estate and 14 REO properties

Luxury Destination Club Recourse Loan II

     May-12         34.3         35.1         107.8         —         First mortgage loan collateralized by 267 high-end units at 26 resorts in the US and various international destinations

Hotel Portfolio (4)

     Apr-10         23.9         30.4         NA         77.4       Equity interests in and senior mezzanine loan receivable from entities owning a portfolio of 103 limited service hotels

Multifamily Tax-Exempt Bonds

     Jun-11         27.9         28.3         27.9         —         Senior interest in tax-exempt bonds secured by a multifamily residential property located in Atlanta, GA

German Loan Portfolio IV

     Jul-11         30.0         27.2         132.5         —         5 non-performing commercial real estate loans

Luxury Destination Club Recourse Loan I

     Sep-11         45.8         26.9         40.8         —         Performing first mortgage secured by 41 properties located primarily in Manhattan and Maui

Ashford

     Feb-12         24.5         24.5         25.6         —         Two most junior mortgage participation interests in a newly restructured first mortgage secured by five full-service hotels

MF5 CMBS

     Feb-12         25.0         22.6         30.3         0.4       Most senior bond and interest-only certificate in a CMBS trust that owns 245 performing and non-performing first mortgage loans and 4 REO properties

Class A Manhattan Office Loan Participation

     Mar-10         15.0         16.9         22.0         —         First mortgage pari-passu participation interest secured by Class A midtown Manhattan office building

First Republic Bank

     Jun-10         24.0         16.0         NA         —         Equity ownership in financial institution with approximately $30 billion of assets

California Master Planned Communities

     May-12         15.9         15.8         NA         —         Equity interests acquired through deed-in-lieu in two partially developed master planned communities located in California

 

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Table of Contents

($ in millions)

Our Investments

   Date of
Initial
Investment
     Original
Invested
and
Committed
Equity(1)
     Current
Equity
Investment(2)
     Company’s
Proportionate
Share of
Current
UPB(3)
     Company’s
Proportionate
Share of

Real
Estate(3)
    

Description

Southern California Land

Loan

     May-11         13.4         14.6         14.4         —         First mortgage loan secured by a Southern California master planned development and equity participation rights

BOW Loan Portfolio

     Dec-11         14.5         14.4         29.5         —         55 performing and non-performing loans secured mostly by commercial real estate

Barclays FDIC Portfolio

     Jul-10         10.3         12.2         23.3         1.0       1,203 performing and non-performing loans consisting of substantially all first mortgage recourse commercial real estate loans and 39 REO properties

West Village Loan

     Mar-10         9.9         11.9         11.6         —         Recourse loan secured by first liens on two West Village Manhattan townhomes and a photography catalogue

Spanish REOC/Colonial

Loan

     Nov-09         12.5         11.3         11.3         —         Syndicated senior secured loan to a Spanish commercial real estate company

Cushman ADC FDIC

Portfolio

     Jan-11         9.1         10.7         44.4         0.1       1,111 performing and non-performing loans secured mostly by commercial real estate and 2 REO properties

Manhattan Landmark

Buildings

Loan

     Mar-11         29.1         10.4         10.5         —         Performing first mortgage B-note secured by two landmark properties in Manhattan

BAMO Loan Portfolio

     Jun-12         9.3         9.2         18.5         —         26 credit-distressed loans consisting of substantially all first mortgage recourse commercial real estate loans

New England Hotel Portfolio

Mezzanine Loan

     May-12         13.7         8.8         8.8         —         Origination of mezzanine loan cross- collateralized by a portfolio of limited- service hotels

Florida Multifamily Complex

Loan

     May-12         8.4         8.4         9.7         —         Acquisition of a performing senior mortgage secured by a multifamily complex in Florida

CRE FDIC Portfolio II

     Dec-11         7.8         8.2         31.0         0.5       271 performing and non-performing loans secured mostly by commercial real estate and 4 REO properties

Luxury Destination Resort

Loan

     Nov-11         17.3         7.5         7.5         —         Mezzanine loan secured by pledge on the equity borrower

2100 Grand B-Note

     Dec-10         6.6         6.7         6.6         —         First mortgage B-note participation interest secured by an office building in El Segundo, CA

CMBS-Related Bond

     May-10         4.3         5.5         10.2         —         Senior bond secured by seasoned CMBS bonds, U.S. Treasuries and a B-note.

Other Investments

     various         46.4         23.0         53.0         0.2       10 investments, each with less than $5 million of current investment balance
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total

      $ 957.2       $ 787.3       $ 1,129.8       $ 158.0      
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

(1) Amounts include our share of transaction costs and working capital and are net of loan origination fees.
(2) Amounts reflect our share of income less amounts distributed and realized since the inception of the investment and represent the carrying value of our investment at June 30, 2012, net of investment-specific financing and amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests.
(3) Amounts reflect our share of the unpaid principal balance (“UPB”) of each loan or loan portfolio or our share of real estate assets based upon our economic interest in each investment, unadjusted for any investment-specific financing, net of amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests as of June 30, 2012.
(4) In January 2012, we foreclosed on the collateral securing the delinquent mezzanine loans and now own indirect equity interests in the entities that own a portfolio of limited service hotels. See the description of the Hotel Portfolio Loans below.

The following table summarizes the carrying and fair values of our investment portfolio by our target asset type as of June 30, 2012. Many of these investments are held through consolidated or unconsolidated joint ventures, and are shown net of investment-specific financing and amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests.

 

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Table of Contents
(Amounts in thousands )    Carrying Value     Fair Value  

Target Asset Type

   Amount      Percentage
of Portfolio
    Amount      Percentage
of Portfolio
 

Acquired whole mortgage loans

   $ 344,842         44   $ 372,431         45

Originated whole mortgage loans

     97,092         12     102,650         12

Mezzanine loans

     113,814         14     115,100         14

Single-family homes

     74,876         10     74,876         9

Commercial mortgage-backed securities

     22,584         3     23,100         3

B-notes

     22,091         3     22,139         2

Equity ownership in bank

     16,008         2     25,500         3

Real estate owned

     30,437         4     30,900         4

Other investments (1)

     65,508         8     66,415         8
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 787,252         100   $ 833,111         100
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) Includes our investment in Multifamily Tax-Exempt Bonds, net of associated derivative liability.

For descriptions of our investments originated or acquired prior to December 31, 2011, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Our Investments” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011. The following summaries provide certain information on investments we acquired or originated during the six months ended June 30, 2012 (as of each of their respective acquisition or origination dates) and certain developments during the period on our existing investments.

 

   

Colony American Homes. Through the quarter ended June 30, 2012, we had invested $75 million in a joint venture with an investment fund managed by an affiliate of our Manager created for the purpose of acquiring and renting single-family homes for investment purposes. In July, our Board of Directors approved a commitment to invest up to $150 million in the aggregate into single-family residential (“SFR”) investments (inclusive of the $75 million invested through the quarter ended June 30, 2012). On July 31, 2012, we committed to invest $150 million in a newly formed investment vehicle, CSFR Operating Partnership, L.P. (“CSFR”), managed by an affiliate of our Manager. Such investment will be made in the form of a transfer of our SFR investments ($150 million through August 3, 2012). On July 31, 2012, CSFR had its initial capital raise in the amount of approximately $500 million (inclusive of our commitment of $150 million). We believe there will be many benefits to our investing in single-family homes through CSFR, including the following: our investment will enjoy much greater diversity in terms of the markets we have exposure to and the number of homes owned than if we continued with our current investment program; as part of a larger pool of homes, we should benefit from economies of scale both in terms of acquisition opportunities (participation in acquisitions of larger pools of homes where competition if often scarcer) as well as property management costs (either through obtaining better terms from vendors or from having the scale to self-manage); potentially better access to the private and public capital markets which will provide more options to grow the business as well as more options for potential exit strategies.

 

   

WLH Secured Loan. In October 2009, we participated in the origination of a $206 million senior secured term loan to William Lyon Homes, Inc. (“WLH”) through a joint venture (“WLH Investor”) with certain Co-Investment Funds. We have a 24% ownership interest in WLH Investor.

In connection with a comprehensive recapitalization plan, in December 2011, WLH announced that it filed a voluntary Chapter 11 case to seek confirmation of a pre-packaged plan of reorganization. WLH emerged from bankruptcy on February 25, 2012 with the key restructured terms including: (i) the WLH Loan amendment to increase the principal balance while reducing the interest rate; (ii) WLH’s existing senior noteholders converting their existing notes into new second lien notes of WLH and common equity in William Lyon Homes (the sole shareholder of WLH); and (iii) WLH receiving new cash proceeds of $85 million.

In order to support the borrower’s operations and ensure adequate liquidity during the pendency of the Chapter 11 case, WLH Investor provided a new $30 million non-revolving, senior secured, super priority debtor-in-possession credit facility (“DIP Loan”). WLH had borrowed $5 million on the DIP loan, and fully repaid the principal, accrued interest and associated fees upon emergence from bankruptcy in February 2012.

Pursuant to the terms of the recapitalization plan, WLH Secured Loan has been amended (the “Amended WLH Loan”) into a new $235 million senior secured term loan facility (upsized from $206 million without requiring additional funding by the lenders) with a 10.25% interest rate (reduced from the previous 14.0% interest rate), and a term expiring on January 31, 2015. The Amended WLH Loan is prepayable by WLH at any time without penalty, yield maintenance or a “make-whole” payment, however, any early repayment of the upsized $235.0 million outstanding loan amount would be

 

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accretive to the original yield-to-maturity on this investment. WLH Investor received a restructuring fee of 1% on the principal amount of the Amended WLH Loan. In April 2012, WLH Investor sold a $25 million participation in the Amended WLH Loan to an unrelated third party at par (10.25% yield).

 

   

U.S. Life Insurance Loan Portfolio. During the quarter ended June 30, 2012, four loans in the U.S. Life Insurance Portfolio totaling approximately $35 million of UPB were prepaid at par. Our interest in this portfolio is 37.9%. These four loans were originally acquired in December 2009 at an average allocated purchase price of 80% of the UPB.

 

   

Luxury Destination Club Recourse Loan I and Luxury Destination Club Recourse Loan II. In May 2012, we, in a joint venture with two unaffiliated investors, acquired, at a discount, a $181 million participation interest in an approximate $250 million recourse first mortgage loan, which shares the same corporate guarantor as a $46 million loan we originated in September 2011. At acquisition, the newly acquired loan was collateralized by 269 luxury residential properties located at 26 resorts in the United States and various international destinations. The properties comprise the majority of the assets belonging to and operated by a leading luxury destination club operator. This senior mortgage bears interest at 8.57% plus a 50 basis points collateral management fee. The $181 million participation interest was acquired for approximately $159 million, or 88% of par, and financed with an approximately $103 million nonrecourse, co-terminus loan at a fixed rate of 5.0%. Our share of the net equity investment of $56 million is $34 million, or 60%, with the remaining 40% owned by the two unaffiliated investors. As part of the transaction, we also assigned $18 million, or 40%, of the existing $46 million loan originated in September 2011 to the same unaffiliated investors in the transaction to maintain consistent ownership across both interests. The estimated loan-to-value of the combined loan interests is approximately 56% and the Company’s combined investment of $62 million, which is an incremental $16 million to its pre-existing investment, is expected to generate a blended current cash yield of approximately 20% following the transaction.

 

   

Hotel Portfolio Loans. As of December 31, 2011, we owned one-third interests in two nonperforming mezzanine loans with an aggregate principal amount of $78 million, of which our share was $26 million. The remaining two-thirds interests in the mezzanine loans were owned by a Co-Investment Fund. On January 9, 2012, we and the Co-Investment Fund (collectively, the “JIH Lenders”) completed the foreclosure on the collateral from the most junior mezzanine loan and assigned our rights as winning bidder to ColFin JIH Propco, LLC (“JIH Propco”), an unconsolidated joint venture in which we own a one-third interest. As a result, JIH Pr opco now owns 100% of the indirect equity interests in the entities that own a portfolio of 103 limited service hotels, and we and the Co-Investment Fund continue to own the $39 million first mezzanine loan to the entities.

 

   

Ashford Notes. In February and March 2012, we invested a combined $24.5 million in a joint venture with a Co-Investment Fund that acquired, at a slight discount to the aggregate UPB of $51.8 million, the two most junior mortgage participation interests in a newly restructured first mortgage secured by five full-service hotels. The junior mortgage participation interests bear interest at a blended rate of 1-month LIBOR plus 9.15% with a yield-to-maturity of 13% with a flat LIBOR curve, and may be prepaid in full at any time without penalty.

 

   

MF5 CMBS. On February 16, 2012, we invested $25 million in a joint venture with certain Co-Investment Funds that acquired the most senior bond and the interest-only certificate in a CMBS trust. The senior bond has a coupon of 5.1% and is secured by approximately 270 first mortgage loans (of which 89% were performing) collateralized primarily by multifamily properties. The aggregate purchase price for the senior bond and interest-only certificate was approximately $226.1 million, representing a discount of 27.4% to par value of the senior bond.

 

   

First Republic Bank. In connection with First Republic Bank’s secondary public offering on March 5, 2012, ColFin FRB Investor, LLC, a joint venture with certain Co-Investment Funds in which we own a 5.9% interest, sold 6,198,500 shares of common stock in First Republic Bank. Our share of net cash proceeds (after our pro rata share of underwriting discounts and expenses) and gain on sale was approximately $10.5 million and $3.5 million, respectively. ColFin FRB Investor, LLC sold an additional 3,000,000 shares of common stock of First Republic Bank on July 26, 2012. This most recent secondary sale represented a cumulative sale of approximately 62% of our original share holdings and a return of approximately 118% of our original cost basis. After giving effect to the dispositions of shares to-date, we own an approximate 0.5% indirect interest in First Republic Bank through our interest in ColFin FRB Investor, LLC.

 

   

California Master Planned Communities. In May 2012, we invested in a joint venture with a Co-Investment Fund and an unaffiliated investor that acquired two non-performing loans secured by two master planned communities in California for approximately $57 million, or 16% of the UPB. Immediately subsequent to acquisition, the joint venture entered into a deed-in-lieu with the borrower and now owns the properties. Our share of this investment is 24%.

 

   

Manhattan Landmark Buildings Loan. In April 2012, we amended and restated two notes receivable, each with an original principal amount of $19.55 million, into a $26 million A-note and a $14 million B-note. The A-note was sold to an unrelated third party for $25.7 million, or 99% of par. The remaining B-note bears interest at approximately 20.9%, of which approximately 6% will be paid-in-kind.

 

   

Midwest Multifamily/Retail Loan. In May 2012, the Midwest Multifamily Retail Loan fully repaid approximately $13 million at maturity including an exit fee. The loan was originated in May 2010 by us and an investment fund managed by an affiliate of our Manager as a $9.8 million loan. Our share of the loan was 33.3%.

 

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BAMO Loan Portfolio. In June 2012, we invested in a joint venture with a Co-Investment Fund that acquired a portfolio of loans from a U.S. commercial bank. The portfolio included 26 performing and non-performing loans with an aggregate UPB of approximately $38.7 million, consisting of substantially all first mortgage loans geographically concentrated in the Midwest. The purchase price for the portfolio was approximately $18 million, or 47% of the portfolio’s UPB. Our share of this investment is 50%.

 

   

New England Hotel Portfolio Mezzanine Loan. In May 2012, we invested in a joint venture with a Co-Investment Fund that originated a $17.5 million loan on a portfolio of five select-service hotels in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. We and the investment fund managed by an affiliate of our Manager will fund an additional $10 million in the form of a mezzanine loan if the borrower adds certain hotels to the collateral package over the next 18 months. The loan bears an interest rate of 13.5% with a 1.0% origination fee, and matures in July 2017. Our share of this investment is 50%.

 

   

Florida Multifamily Complex Loan. In May 2012, we invested in a joint venture with a Co-Investment Fund that acquired a performing $20 million senior mortgage loan secured by a multifamily asset in Florida. The loan was acquired for $17 million, or 85% of the UPB. The loan bears a 5.5% fixed interest rate and matures in March 2016. Our share of this investment is 49%.

 

   

Luxury Destination Resort Loan. In May 2012, we sold our 50% share of a $20 million senior first mortgage loan secured by all assets of a destination spa resort located in Arizona to an unrelated third party at par. We retained our 50% share of a $15 million mezzanine loan, which bears interest at approximately 15%.

 

   

WLH Land Acquisition and Sale. In June 2012, we, along with an investment fund managed by an affiliate of our Manager, sold residential development projects to WLH for an aggregate purchase price of $21.5 million. WLH paid $11 million in cash and issued 10,000,000 shares of Class A common stock of WLH to us and an investment fund managed by an affiliate of our Manager. These development projects were originally purchased from WLH for $13.6 million in December 2009. Our share of this investment is 24%.

 

   

Assisted Living Properties B-Note. In May 2012, we invested in a joint venture with a Co-Investment Fund that invested, at par, in a $10 million B-note cut from a $56 million term loan recently originated in October 2011. The loan is secured by nine assisted living properties and features full recourse to the sponsor, one of the largest operators of assisted living and memory care facilities in the United States. The B-note bears interest at LIBOR plus 12% with final maturity in October 2014. Our share of this investment is 50%.

Some of the loans in our investment portfolio are in the process of being restructured or may otherwise be under credit watch or at risk. We make various assumptions and judgments about the collectability of our loan portfolio, including the creditworthiness of our borrowers and the value of the real estate and other assets serving as collateral for the repayment of many of our loans. If we determine that it is probable that we will not be able to collect all amounts according to the terms of a particular loan agreement, we could be required to recognize an impairment charge or a loss on the loan. If our assumptions regarding, among other things, the present value of expected future cash flows or the value of the collateral securing our loans are incorrect or general economic and financial conditions cause a significant number of borrowers to become unable to make payments under their loans, we could be required to recognize significant impairment charges, which could result in a material reduction in earnings and distributions in the period in which the loans are determined to be impaired.

Critical Accounting Policies

Our financial statements are prepared in accordance with GAAP, which requires the use of estimates and assumptions that involve the exercise of judgment and use of assumptions as to future uncertainties. There have been no material changes to our critical accounting policies or those of our unconsolidated joint ventures since the filing of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011. As a result of restricted stock grants to our executive officers (including our chief executive officer) and certain employees of our Manager and its affiliates in January 2012, we have adopted accounting policies on share-based payments as described in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements in “Item 1. Financial Statements” of this Report.

 

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Results of Operations—Comparison of Three Months Ended June 30, 2012 and 2011

Income from Our Investments

Our primary source of income is our investments in loans, which we hold either directly or through our investments in unconsolidated joint ventures. We have been continually investing in our target assets throughout 2011 and the first half of 2012, and therefore, income from some investments may reflect less than a full quarter’s results of operations. Income (loss) from our investments by type of investment is summarized below, shown net of investment-related expenses and amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests:

 

     Three Months Ended
June  30,
 

(In thousands)

   2012      2011  

Acquired whole mortgage loans:

     

Single loans

   $ 3,034       $ 1,648   

FDIC loan portfolios

     1,792         1,848   

German non-performing loan portfolios

     823         296   

Other loan portfolios

     3,577         1,825   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     9,226         5,617   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Originated mortgage loans

     4,301         2,835   

Mezzanine loans

     3,072         1,767   

Commercial mortgage-backed securities

     798         107   

B-notes

     678         219   

Equity ownership in bank

     509         1,169   

Real estate owned

     949         —     

Other investments

     2,280         479   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 21,813       $ 12,193   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Income from acquired whole mortgage loans for the three months ended June 30, 2012 increased $3.6 million, or 64%, compared to the three months ended June 30, 2011. The increase primarily reflects income from the Luxury Destination Club Recourse Loan II acquired in May 2012, Bulls Loan Portfolio acquired at the end June 2011 and Ashford Notes acquired in first quarter of 2012.

Income from originated loans for the three months ended June 30, 2012 increased $1.5 million, or 52%, compared to the three months ended June 30, 2011. The increase primarily reflects income from the Luxury Destination Club Recourse Loan which was originated in September 2011, and a full quarter’s effect of the Southern California Land Loan, originated in May 2011.

Income from mezzanine loans for the three months ended June 30, 2012 increased $1.3 million, or 74%, compared to the three months ended June 30, 2011, primarily reflecting interest income from the Centro Mezzanine Loans which we originated in late June 2011.

Income from CMBS for the three months ended June 30, 2012 is related to our investment in MF5 CMBS, which we acquired in February 2012. Income from CMBS for the corresponding period in 2011 was related to our investment in a $40 million AAA-rated TALF-financed CMBS, which was sold in September 2011.

Income from equity ownership in bank for the three months ended June 30, 2012 decreased $0.7 million, or 56%, compared to the three months ended June 30, 2011. The decrease reflects our reduced ownership interest in First Republic Bank following our periodic sales of shares of common stock in First Republic Bank. Through June 2012, we have sold approximately 50% of First Republic Bank stock originally acquired in June 2010 and recovered approximately 96% of our original cost basis.

Income from real estate owned for the three months ended June 30, 2012 reflects income from the Hotel Portfolio which was classified under mezzanine loans in 2011 prior to the foreclosure in January 2012 as discussed in “—Our Investments.”

Income from other investments for the three months ended June 30, 2012 increased $1.9 million, or 402%, compared to the three months ended June 30, 2011. This increase primarily reflects a gain of $1.8 million recognized in June 2012 from the sale of all assets of WLH Land Acquisition.

Certain investments individually generated greater than 10% of our total income for the periods presented. For the three months ended June 30, 2011, U.S. Life Insurance Loan Portfolio and WLH Secured Loan collectively generated 27% of our total income. No individual investment generated greater than 10% of our total income during the three months ended June 30, 2012.

 

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Other Income from Affiliates

Two 100%-owned asset management companies provide asset management services to two of our FDIC portfolios and earn asset management fees of 50 basis points of each portfolio’s UPB per annum, payable monthly. For the three months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, the asset management companies earned asset management fees and received cost reimbursements of $569,000 and $346,000, respectively, from these portfolios, and incurred $566,000 and $271,000 of expenses, respectively, as described below.

Expenses

 

 

Management Fees—Management fees include the following:

 

     Three Months Ended June 30,  

(In thousands)

   2012      2011  

Base management fees

   $ 2,813       $ 2,228   

Share-based compensation

     608         —     

Incentive fees

     523         —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 3,944       $ 2,228   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Base management fees have increased by approximately $585,000 due to an increase in our stockholders’ equity fee base, as defined in the management agreement, primarily from the March 2012 Preferred Stock Offering. Share-based compensation of $608,000 represents the current quarter amortization of the fair value of restricted shares awarded to certain of our executive officers and certain employees of our Manager and its affiliates in January 2012. Incentive fees are based upon our Core Earnings, further described at “—Non-GAAP Supplemental Financial Measure: Core Earnings,” and are payable to our Manager in shares of our common stock. We did not meet the Core Earnings threshold for the quarter ended June 30, 2011 and, accordingly, no incentive fee was earned by the Manager for such period. For a complete description of base management fees and incentive fees, see “Business—Our Manager and the Management Agreement—Base Management Fee and Incentive Fee” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011.

 

 

Investment Expenses—For the three months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, we incurred investment expenses of $1.1 million and $323,000, respectively. Two of our FDIC portfolios are managed by asset management companies that are wholly-owned by us. These asset management companies receive allocations of compensation, overhead and direct costs from an affiliate of our Manager pursuant to a cost allocation arrangement. For the three months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, the asset management companies incurred $566,000 and $271,000 of expenses, respectively, of which $353,000 and $211,000, respectively, were allocated by the affiliate of our Manager. The current period increase reflects transaction costs incurred pursuant to the sale of the Manhattan Landmark Buildings Loan A-note and the acquisition and restructuring of the Luxury Destination Club Recourse Loans I and II as discussed in “—Our Investments.” The remaining investment expenses include the cost of managing and servicing our investments and investment transaction costs expensed in connection with the initial acquisition of our investments, as well as costs associated with unsuccessful transactions.

 

 

Interest Expense—Interest expense includes the following:

 

     Three Months Ended June 30,  

(In thousands)

   2012      2011  

Credit facility

   $ 636       $ 310   

2100 Grand secured financing

     173         176   

Luxury Destination Club Recourse Loan II secured financing

     952         —     

Other

     68         —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 1,829       $ 486   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Interest expense for the current quarter related to our credit facility was higher due to (1) outstanding borrowings to finance our investment activities, and (2) higher unused commitment fees and amortization of deferred financing costs due to a $100 million increase in total availability following the restructuring of our credit facility in September 2011. For the three months ended June 30, 2011, all of the interest expense was from unused commitment fees and amortization of deferred financing costs, as we had no outstanding amounts under the credit facility.

Interest expense on Luxury Destination Club Recourse Loan II represents contractual interest and amortization of deferred financing costs on the seller-provided financing of the May 2012 loan acquisition.

 

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Administrative Expenses—Administrative expenses are summarized below:

 

     Three Months Ended
June  30,
 

(In thousands)

   2012      2011  

Reimbursements to Colony Capital:

     

Compensation pursuant to secondment agreement

   $ 301       $ 350   

Allocated overhead and direct administrative expenses

     282         134   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total reimbursements to Colony Capital

     583         484   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Professional fees

     453         659   

Insurance

     163         182   

Share-based compensation (excluding board compensation)

     38         —     

Board-related costs

     92         69   

Other

     149         139   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 1,478       $ 1,533   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total administrative expenses decreased $55,000, or 4%, for the three months ended June 30, 2012 compared to the three months ended June 30, 2011. The primary reason for the overall decrease is lower tax planning and compliance services.

Income Tax Provision

Our taxable REIT subsidiaries (each a “TRS”), which directly or indirectly hold certain of our investments, are subject to corporate level federal, state, foreign and local income taxes. For the three months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, we recorded an income tax provision of $441,000 and $226,000, respectively. The 2012 expense primarily reflects current income taxes payable on loan resolutions in the Cushman ADC FDIC Portfolio and from the operations of our TRSs. The current taxes payable are partially offset by a net deferred tax benefit resulting from temporary differences related to income recognition for our BOW Loan Portfolio, Bulls Loan Portfolio, Cushman ADC FDIC Portfolio and investments in certain of our foreign joint ventures. The 2011 expense reflects current federal and state income taxes which were offset by an incremental increase in deferred tax assets associated with the temporary differences related to income recognition from our investments in foreign joint ventures.

Comparison of Six Months Ended June 30, 2012 and 2011

Income from Our Investments

Income from our investments by type of investment is summarized below, shown net of investment-related expenses and amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests:

 

     Six Months Ended
June  30,
 

(In thousands)

   2012      2011  

Acquired whole mortgage loans:

     

Single loans

   $ 4,685       $ 2,442   

FDIC loan portfolios

     4,633         3,533   

German non-performing loan portfolios

     1,531         668   

Other loan portfolios

     7,740         3,624   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     18,589         10,267   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Originated mortgage loans

     7,589         5,074   

Mezzanine loans

     5,943         3,454   

Commercial mortgage-backed securities

     1,190         216   

B-notes

     903         442   

Equity ownership in bank

     4,702         2,161   

Real estate owned

     438         —     

Other investments

     3,024         977   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 42,378       $ 22,591   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Income from our investments in the six months ended June 30, 2012 increased approximately $19.8 million, or 88%, compared to the corresponding period in 2011. The substantial increase reflects our continuing investment activity throughout 2011 and the first six months of 2012. Many of our investments owned as of June 30, 2012 were not owned for all or part of the six months ended June 30, 2011, and we added new investments in every category except in equity ownership in bank, as summarized in our investments table in “—Our Investments.”

For the six months ended June 30, 2011, U.S. Life Insurance Loan Portfolio and WLH Secured Loan collectively generated 29% of our total income. No individual investment generated greater than 10% of our total income during the six months ended June 30, 2012.

Other Income from Affiliates

Two 100%-owned asset management companies provide asset management services to two of our FDIC portfolios and earn asset management fees of 50 basis points of each portfolio’s UPB per annum, payable monthly. For the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, the asset management companies earned asset management fees and received cost reimbursements of $1.1 million and $907,000, respectively, from these portfolios, and incurred $1.0 million and $922,000 of expenses, respectively, as described below.

Expenses

 

 

Management Fees—Management fees include the following:

 

     Six Months Ended June 30,  

(In thousands)

   2012      2011  

Base management fees

   $ 5,164       $ 3,524   

Share-based compensation

     2,364         —     

Incentive fees

     936         —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 8,464       $ 3,524   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Base management fees have increased by approximately $1.6 million, or 47%, due to an increase in our stockholders’ equity fee base, as defined in the management agreement, primarily from the March 2012 Preferred Stock Offering. Share-based compensation of $2.4 million represents the current year amortization of the fair value of restricted shares awarded to certain of our executive officers and certain employees of our Manager and its affiliates in January 2012. Incentive fees are based upon our Core Earnings, further described at “—Non-GAAP Supplemental Financial Measure: Core Earnings,” and are payable to our Manager in shares of our common stock. We did not meet the Core Earnings threshold for the six months ended June 30, 2011 and, accordingly, no incentive fee was earned by the Manager for such period. For a complete description of base management fees and incentive fees, see “Business—Our Manager and the Management Agreement—Base Management Fee and Incentive Fee” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011.

 

 

Investment Expenses—For the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, we incurred investment expenses of $1.8 million and $1 million, respectively. Two of our FDIC portfolios are managed by asset management companies that are wholly-owned by us. These asset management companies receive allocations of compensation, overhead and direct costs from an affiliate of our Manager pursuant to a cost allocation arrangement. For the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, the asset management companies incurred $1.0 million and $922,000 of expenses, respectively, of which $567,000 and $529,000, respectively, were allocated by the affiliate of our Manager. The current period increase reflects transaction costs incurred pursuant to the sale of the Manhattan Landmark Buildings Loan A-note and the acquisition and restructuring of the Luxury Destination Club Recourse Loans I and II as discussed in “—Our Investments,” as well as an increase in the cost of managing and servicing our investments due to a larger investment portfolio and increased transaction volume.

 

 

Interest Expense—Interest expense includes the following:

 

     Six Months Ended June 30,  

(In thousands)

   2012      2011  

Credit facility

   $ 1,882       $ 646   

2100 Grand secured financing

     347         350   

Luxury Destination Club Recourse Loan II secured financing

     952         —     

Other

     142         —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 3,323       $ 996   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Interest expense for the current period related to our credit facility was significantly higher due to (1) substantial outstanding borrowings to finance our investment activities, until we repaid all outstanding amounts using a portion of the net proceeds from the March 2012 Preferred Stock Offering in late March, and (2) higher unused commitment fees and amortization of deferred financing costs due to a $100 million increase in total availability following the restructuring of our credit facility in September 2011. For the six months ended June 30, 2011, substantially all of the interest expense was from unused commitment fees and amortization of deferred financing costs, as we had minimal outstanding amounts under the credit facility. Interest expense on Luxury Destination Club Recourse Loan II represents contractual interest and amortization of deferred financing costs on the seller-provided financing of the May 2012 loan acquisition.

 

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Administrative Expenses—Administrative expenses are summarized below:

 

     Six Months Ended June 30,  

(In thousands)

   2012      2011  

Reimbursements to Colony Capital:

     

Compensation pursuant to secondment agreement

   $ 598       $ 704   

Allocated overhead and direct administrative expenses

     576         170   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total reimbursements to Colony Capital

     1,174         874   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Professional fees

     1,111         1,442   

Insurance

     327         363   

Share-based compensation (excluding board compensation)

     176         —     

Board-related costs

     164         137   

Other

     280         232   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 3,232       $ 3,048   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total administrative expenses increased $184,000, or 6%, for the six months ended June 30, 2012 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2011. The increase is primarily due to the reimbursement of compensation costs of certain employees of Colony Capital and an increase in the ratio of our total assets relative to total Colony Capital-managed assets. This is partially offset by a decrease in professional fees, primarily legal and tax consulting services.

Income Tax Provision

Our TRSs, which directly or indirectly hold certain of our investments in unconsolidated joint ventures, are subject to corporate level federal, state, foreign and local income taxes. For the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, we recorded an income tax provision of $805,000 and an income tax benefit of $2,000, respectively. The 2012 expense primarily reflects current income taxes payable on loan resolutions in the Cushman ADC FDIC Portfolio and from the operations of our TRSs. The current taxes payable are partially offset by a net deferred tax benefit resulting from temporary differences related to income recognition for our BOW Loan Portfolio, Bulls Loan Portfolio, Cushman ADC FDIC Portfolio and investments in certain of our foreign joint ventures. The 2011 benefit reflects $538,000 of current federal and state income tax expense on our TRSs, entirely offset by the release of the valuation allowance on the deferred tax assets based on management’s expectation that the deferred tax assets associated with the cumulative temporary differences related to our investments in foreign joint ventures and the tax bases of certain of our other joint ventures would be realized.

 

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Information About Our Loan Portfolio

The following tables summarize certain characteristics of the loans and beneficial interests in securities held by the Company and the joint ventures and our proportionate share as of June 30, 2012:

 

    Jun e 30, 2012  

($ in thousands )

  Total Portfolio     Company's Proportionate Share  

Collateral Type

  Unpaid
Principal
Balance
    Amortized
Cost
    Unpaid
Principal
Balance
    Amortized
Cost
    % of
Amortized
Cost
    Weighted
Average
Coupon
    Current
Interest
Yield
on Cost
    Weighted
Average
Maturity
 

Originated performing loans

               

Retail

  $ 60,000      $ 60,000      $ 60,000      $ 60,000        8.6     9.8     9.8     4.3   

Office

    20,392        20,351        20,188        20,148        2.9     8.0     8.0     3.7   

Hospitality

    95,784        94,977        73,439        72,908        10.5     11.7     11.8     4.1   

Other commercial

    9,866        9,865        4,933        4,933        0.7     12.2     12.2     2.5   

Residential

    238,764        210,850        64,845        57,601        8.3     10.6     12.2     3.1   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

Total originated performing loans

    424,806        396,043        223,405        215,590        31.0     10.6     11.0     3.8   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

Acquired loans and beneficial interests in debt securities

               

Performing:

               

Retail

    339,037        231,748        50,228        34,786        5.0     6.0     8.8     4.7   

Office

    281,426        198,684        50,394        35,168        5.1     4.9     7.3     6.8   

Industrial

    209,840        156,993        29,658        22,239        3.2     6.1     8.4     3.5   

Hospitality

    290,819        240,594        144,618        122,706        17.7     9.1     10.7     2.5   

Multifamily

    508,023        391,274        93,488        78,057        11.2     5.0     6.0     10.3   

Other commercial

    380,260        260,021        43,337        29,769        4.3     9.7     13.6     2.9   

Residential

    60,369        27,687        10,094        5,360        0.8     5.5     10.4     7.2   

Land

    158,491        63,585        11,835        4,193        0.6     5.9     16.4     2.5   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

Total performing

    2,228,265        1,570,586        433,652        332,278        47.9     7.1     9.3     5.2   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

Non-performing:

               

Retail

    356,620        160,072