XLON:0M8V Philip Morris International Inc Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 3/31/2012

Effective Date 3/31/2012

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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
 
(X)
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2012
OR
 
( )
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                      to                     
Commission File Number 001-33708
Philip Morris International Inc.
 
 
 
 
 
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Virginia
13-3435103
(State or other jurisdiction of
    incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer
    Identification No.)
 
120 Park Avenue
New York, New York
10017
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code
(917) 663-2000
 
 
 
 
 
 
Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  þ        No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  þ        No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer  þ    Accelerated filer  ¨    Non-accelerated filer  ¨     Smaller reporting company  ¨
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  þ
At April 30, 2012, there were 1,705,563,303 shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock, no par value per share.



PHILIP MORRIS INTERNATIONAL INC.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
Page No.
 
 
 
PART I -
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
 
 
 
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets at
 
 
3 –  4
 
 
 
 
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings for the
 
 
 
 
 
 
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Earnings for the
 
 
 
 
 
 
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the
 
 
 
 
 
 
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the
 
 
8 –  9
 
 
 
 
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
10 – 30
 
 
 
Item 2.
31 – 55
 
 
 
Item 4.
 
 
 
PART II -
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
 
Item 1A.
 
 
 
Item 2.
 
 
 
Item 6.
 
 
 
 
In this report, “PMI,” “we,” “us” and “our” refers to Philip Morris International Inc. and subsidiaries.

- 2 -


PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1. Financial Statements.
Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(in millions of dollars)
(Unaudited)
 
 
March 31,
2012
 
December 31,
2011
ASSETS
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
3,576

 
$
2,550

Receivables (less allowances of
$49 in 2012 and $45 in 2011)
3,472

 
3,201

Inventories:
 
 
 
Leaf tobacco
3,467

 
3,463

Other raw materials
1,102

 
1,185

Finished product
2,742

 
3,472

 
7,311

 
8,120

Deferred income taxes
365

 
397

Other current assets
614

 
591

Total current assets
15,338

 
14,859

Property, plant and equipment, at cost
13,467

 
12,913

Less: accumulated depreciation
7,022

 
6,663

 
6,445

 
6,250

Goodwill
10,087

 
9,928

Other intangible assets, net
3,753

 
3,697

Other assets
776

 
754

TOTAL ASSETS
$
36,399

 
$
35,488










See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.
Continued

- 3 -


Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets (Continued)
(in millions of dollars, except share data)
(Unaudited)
 
 
March 31,
2012
 
December 31,
2011
LIABILITIES
 
 
 
Short-term borrowings
$
4,085

 
$
1,511

Current portion of long-term debt
1,410

 
2,206

Accounts payable
1,044

 
1,031

Accrued liabilities:
 
 
 
Marketing and selling
428

 
519

Taxes, except income taxes
4,339

 
5,346

Employment costs
776

 
894

Dividends payable
1,329

 
1,341

Other
816

 
873

Income taxes
915

 
897

Deferred income taxes
141

 
176

Total current liabilities
15,283

 
14,794

Long-term debt
15,346

 
14,828

Deferred income taxes
2,007

 
1,976

Employment costs
1,678

 
1,665

Other liabilities
470

 
462

Total liabilities
34,784

 
33,725

Contingencies (Note 10)

 

Redeemable noncontrolling interest (Note 7)
1,237

 
1,212

STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
 
 
 
Common stock, no par value
(2,109,316,331 shares issued in 2012 and 2011)

 

Additional paid-in capital
1,175

 
1,235

Earnings reinvested in the business
22,592

 
21,757

Accumulated other comprehensive losses
(2,367
)
 
(2,863
)
 
21,400

 
20,129

Less: cost of repurchased stock
(398,995,968 and 383,407,665 shares in 2012 and 2011, respectively)
21,288

 
19,900

Total PMI stockholders’ equity
112

 
229

Noncontrolling interests
266

 
322

Total stockholders’ equity
378

 
551

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
$
36,399

 
$
35,488



See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

- 4 -


Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings
(in millions of dollars, except per share data)
(Unaudited)
 
 
For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
2012
 
2011
Net revenues
$
18,022

 
$
16,530

Cost of sales
2,442

 
2,295

Excise taxes on products
10,574

 
9,739

Gross profit
5,006

 
4,496

Marketing, administration and research costs
1,571

 
1,449

Asset impairment and exit costs
8

 
16

Amortization of intangibles
24

 
24

Operating income
3,403

 
3,007

Interest expense, net
213

 
213

Earnings before income taxes
3,190

 
2,794

Provision for income taxes
958

 
807

Net earnings
2,232

 
1,987

Net earnings attributable to noncontrolling interests
71

 
68

Net earnings attributable to PMI
$
2,161

 
$
1,919

Per share data (Note 8):
 
 
 
Basic earnings per share
$
1.25

 
$
1.06

Diluted earnings per share
$
1.25

 
$
1.06

Dividends declared
$
0.77

 
$
0.64









See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.


- 5 -


Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Earnings
(in millions of dollars)
(Unaudited)

 
 
For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
Net earnings
 
$
2,232

 
$
1,987

Other comprehensive earnings (losses), net of income taxes:
 
 
 
 
Currency translation adjustments, net of income taxes of $22 in 2012 and $113 in 2011
 
461

 
963

Change in net loss and prior service cost:
 
 
 
 
Net losses and prior service costs, net of income taxes in 2012 and 2011
 

 

Less amortization of net losses, prior service costs and net transition costs, net of income taxes of ($12) in 2012 and ($7) in 2011
 
38

 
22

Change in fair value of derivatives accounted for as hedges:
 
 
 
 
(Gains)/losses transferred to earnings, net of income taxes of $1 in 2012 and ($1) in 2011
 
(10
)
 
7

Gains recognized, net of income taxes of ($5) in 2012 and ($2) in 2011
 
46

 
22

Total other comprehensive earnings
 
535

 
1,014

Total comprehensive earnings
 
2,767

 
3,001

Less comprehensive earnings attributable to:
 
 
 
 
Noncontrolling interests
 
61

 
61

Redeemable noncontrolling interest
 
49

 
27

Comprehensive earnings attributable to PMI
 
$
2,657

 
$
2,913



















See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

- 6 -


Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity
for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2012 and 2011
(in millions of dollars, except per share amounts)
(Unaudited)
 
PMI Stockholders’ Equity
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common
Stock
 
Additional
Paid-in
Capital
 
Earnings
Reinvested in
the
Business
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive Losses
 
Cost of
Repurchased
Stock
 
Noncontrolling
Interests
 
Total
Balances, January 1, 2011
$

 
$
1,225

 
$
18,133

 
$
(1,140
)
 
$
(14,712
)
 
$
427

 
 
$
3,933

 
Net earnings
 
 
 
 
1,919

 
 
 
 
 
44

(a) 
 
1,963

(a) 
Other comprehensive earnings,
net of income taxes
 
 
 
 
 
 
994

 
 
 
17

(a) 
 
1,011

(a) 
Exercise of stock options and issuance of other stock awards
 
 
(90
)
 
 
 
 
 
169

 
 
 
 
79

 
Dividends declared ($0.64 per share)
 
 
 
 
(1,149
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1,149
)
 
Payments to noncontrolling interests
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(169
)
 
 
(169
)
 
Purchase of subsidiary shares from noncontrolling interests
 
 
(1
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1
)
 
 
(2
)
 
Common stock repurchased
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1,356
)
 
 
 
 
(1,356
)
 
Balances, March 31, 2011
$

 
$
1,134

 
$
18,903

 
$
(146
)
 
$
(15,899
)
 
$
318

 
 
$
4,310

 
Balances, January 1, 2012
$

 
$
1,235

 
$
21,757

 
$
(2,863
)
 
$
(19,900
)
 
$
322

 
 
$
551

 
Net earnings
 
 
 
 
2,161

 
 
 
 
 
29

(a) 
 
2,190

(a) 
Other comprehensive earnings, net of income taxes
 
 
 
 
 
 
496

 
 
 
32

(a) 
 
528

(a) 
Exercise of stock options and issuance of other stock awards
 
 
(60
)
 
 
 
 
 
112

 
 
 
 
52

 
Dividends declared ($0.77 per share)
 
 
 
 
(1,326
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1,326
)
 
Payments to noncontrolling interests
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(117
)
 
 
(117
)
 
Common stock repurchased
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
(1,500
)
 
 
 
 
(1,500
)
 
Balances, March 31, 2012
$

 
$
1,175

 
$
22,592

 
$
(2,367
)
 
$
(21,288
)
 
$
266

 
 
$
378

 
(a) For the three months ended March 31, 2011, net earnings attributable to noncontrolling interests exclude $24 million of earnings related to the redeemable noncontrolling interest, which is reported outside of the equity section in the condensed consolidated balance sheet. Other comprehensive earnings, net of income taxes, also exclude $3 million of net currency translation adjustment gains related to the redeemable noncontrolling interest at March 31, 2011. For the three months ended March 31, 2012, net earnings attributable to noncontrolling interests exclude $42 million of earnings related to the redeemable noncontrolling interest, which is reported outside of the equity section in the condensed consolidated balance sheet. Other comprehensive earnings, net of income taxes, also exclude $7 million of net currency translation adjustment gains related to the redeemable noncontrolling interest at March 31, 2012.

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

- 7 -


Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(in millions of dollars)
(Unaudited)
 
 
For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
2012
 
2011
CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) OPERATING ACTIVITIES
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net earnings
$
2,232

 
$
1,987

 
 
 
 
Adjustments to reconcile net earnings to operating cash flows:
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
227

 
239

Deferred income tax provision
51

 
19

Asset impairment and exit costs, net of cash paid
(5
)
 
11

Cash effects of changes, net of the effects from acquired and divested companies:
 
 
 
Receivables, net
(151
)
 
138

Inventories
1,036

 
478

Accounts payable
23

 
116

Income taxes
(53
)
 
(137
)
Accrued liabilities and other current assets
(1,543
)
 
(491
)
Pension plan contributions
(32
)
 
(26
)
Other
113

 
61

Net cash provided by operating activities
1,898

 
2,395

 
 
 
 
CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) INVESTING ACTIVITIES
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capital expenditures
(227
)
 
(159
)
Purchases of businesses, net of acquired cash

 
(20
)
Other
3

 
4

Net cash used in investing activities
(224
)
 
(175
)
 

















See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

Continued

- 8 -


Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (Continued)
(in millions of dollars)
(Unaudited)
 
 
For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
2012
 
2011
CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) FINANCING ACTIVITIES
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Short-term borrowing activity by original maturity:
 
 
 
    Net issuances (repayments) - maturities of 90 days or less
$
2,833

 
$
(32
)
    Issuances - maturities longer than 90 days
473

 

    Repayments - maturities longer than 90 days
(742
)
 

Long-term debt proceeds
1,220

 

Long-term debt repaid
(1,667
)
 
(23
)
Repurchases of common stock
(1,427
)
 
(1,308
)
Issuance of common stock

 
55

Dividends paid
(1,338
)
 
(1,159
)
Other
(135
)
 
(192
)
Net cash used in financing activities
(783
)
 
(2,659
)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
135

 
58

 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents:
 
 
 
Increase (decrease)
1,026

 
(381
)
Balance at beginning of period
2,550

 
1,703

Balance at end of period
$
3,576

 
$
1,322








See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

- 9 -


Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
Note 1. Background and Basis of Presentation:
Background
Philip Morris International Inc. is a holding company incorporated in Virginia, U.S.A., whose subsidiaries and affiliates and their licensees are engaged in the manufacture and sale of cigarettes and other tobacco products in markets outside of the United States of America. Throughout these financial statements, the term “PMI” refers to Philip Morris International Inc. and its subsidiaries.
Basis of Presentation
The interim condensed consolidated financial statements of PMI are unaudited. These interim condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles and such principles are applied on a consistent basis. It is the opinion of PMI’s management that all adjustments necessary for a fair statement of the interim results presented have been reflected therein. All such adjustments were of a normal recurring nature. Net revenues and net earnings attributable to PMI for any interim period are not necessarily indicative of results that may be expected for the entire year.
In June 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued Accounting Standards Update 2011-05, Presentation of Comprehensive Income, which became effective for PMI in the first quarter of 2012. Under the new guidance, PMI evaluated the presentation options and elected to present comprehensive earnings in a separate statement. As a result of this new standard, certain amounts reported in the prior year statements have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.
These statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and related notes, which appear in PMI’s Annual Report to Shareholders and which are incorporated by reference into PMI’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011.

Note 2. Asset Impairment and Exit Costs:
Pre-tax asset impairment and exit costs consisted of the following:
 
(in millions)
 
For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
Separation programs:
 
 
 
 
European Union
 
$

 
$
11

Eastern Europe, Middle East & Africa
 

 
2

Asia
 

 
2

Latin America & Canada
 
8

 
1

Total separation programs
 
8

 
16

Asset impairment and exit costs
 
$
8

 
$
16


Exit Costs
Separation Programs
PMI recorded pre-tax separation program charges of $8 million and $16 million for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively. The 2012 pre-tax separation program charges related to severance costs for a factory restructuring. The 2011 pre-tax separation program charges primarily related to severance costs for factory and R&D restructurings in the European Union.





- 10 -

Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


Movement in Exit Cost Liabilities
The movement in the exit cost liabilities for the three months ended March 31, 2012 was as follows:
 
(in millions)
 
Liability balance, January 1, 2012
$
28

Charges
8

Cash spent
(13
)
Currency/other
(1
)
Liability balance, March 31, 2012
$
22

Cash payments related to exit costs at PMI were $13 million and $5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively. Future cash payments for exit costs incurred to date are expected to be approximately $22 million, and will be substantially paid by the end of 2012.

Note 3. Stock Plans:
Under the Philip Morris International Inc. 2008 Performance Incentive Plan (the “Plan”), PMI may grant to certain eligible employees stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock, restricted stock units, deferred stock and deferred stock units and other stock-based awards based on PMI’s common stock, as well as performance-based incentive awards. Up to 70 million shares of PMI’s common stock may be issued under the Plan. At March 31, 2012, shares available for grant under the Plan were 26,074,253.
PMI also adopted the Philip Morris International Inc. 2008 Stock Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors (the “Non-Employee Directors Plan”). A non-employee director is defined as each member of the PMI Board of Directors who is not a full-time employee of PMI or of any corporation in which PMI owns, directly or indirectly, stock possessing at least 50% of the total combined voting power of all classes of stock entitled to vote in the election of directors in such corporation. Up to 1 million shares of PMI common stock may be awarded under the Non-Employee Directors Plan. As of March 31, 2012, shares available for grant under the plan were 819,195.
During the three months ended March 31, 2012, PMI granted 3.2 million shares of restricted and deferred stock awards to eligible employees at a weighted-average grant date fair value of $79.42 per share. During the three months ended March 31, 2011, PMI granted 3.8 million shares of restricted and deferred stock awards to eligible employees at a weighted average grant date fair value of $59.39 per share. PMI recorded compensation expense for restricted stock and deferred stock awards of $77 million and $38 million during the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively. Compensation expense for the three months ended March 31, 2012, includes approximately $27 million of accelerated expense primarily associated with employees approaching or reaching certain age milestones that accelerate the vesting. As of March 31, 2012, PMI had $392 million of total unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested restricted and deferred stock awards. The cost is recognized over the original restriction period of the awards, which is typically three or more years after the date of the award, subject to earlier vesting on death or disability or normal retirement, or separation from employment by mutual agreement after reaching age 58.
 
During the three months ended March 31, 2012, 3.6 million shares of PMI restricted stock and deferred stock awards vested. The grant date fair value of all the vested shares was approximately $141 million. The total fair value of restricted stock and deferred stock awards that vested during the three months ended March 31, 2012 was approximately $287 million.

Note 4. Benefit Plans:
Pension coverage for employees of PMI’s subsidiaries is provided, to the extent deemed appropriate, through separate plans, many of which are governed by local statutory requirements. In addition, PMI provides health care and other benefits to substantially all U.S. retired employees and certain non-U.S. retired employees. In general, health care benefits for non-U.S. retired employees are covered through local government plans.



- 11 -

Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)



Pension Plans
Components of Net Periodic Benefit Cost
Net periodic pension cost consisted of the following:
 
 
 
U.S. Plans
 
Non-U.S. Plans
 
 
For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)
 
2012
 
2011
 
2012
 
2011
Service cost
 
$
2

 
$
2

 
$
49

 
$
41

Interest cost
 
4

 
4

 
49

 
49

Expected return on plan assets
 
(4
)
 
(4
)
 
(84
)
 
(76
)
Amortization:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net loss
 
3

 
2

 
31

 
14

Prior service cost
 

 

 
3

 
2

Other
 

 
1

 

 

Net periodic pension cost
 
$
5

 
$
5

 
$
48

 
$
30


Employer Contributions
PMI makes, and plans to make, contributions, to the extent that they are tax deductible and to meet specific funding requirements of its funded U.S. and non-U.S. plans. Employer contributions of $32 million were made to the pension plans during the three months ended March 31, 2012. Currently, PMI anticipates making additional contributions during the remainder of 2012 of approximately $131 million to its pension plans, based on current tax and benefit laws. However, this estimate is subject to change as a result of changes in tax and other benefit laws, as well as asset performance significantly above or below the assumed long-term rate of return on pension assets, or changes in interest rates.

Note 5. Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets, net:
Goodwill and other intangible assets, net, by segment were as follows:
 
 
 
Goodwill
 
Other Intangible Assets, net
(in millions)
 
March 31,
2012
 
December 31,
2011
 
March 31,
2012
 
December 31,
2011
European Union
 
$
1,457

 
$
1,392

 
$
667

 
$
663

Eastern Europe, Middle East & Africa
 
665

 
666

 
252

 
250

Asia
 
4,937

 
4,966

 
1,616

 
1,633

Latin America & Canada
 
3,028

 
2,904

 
1,218

 
1,151

Total
 
$
10,087

 
$
9,928

 
$
3,753

 
$
3,697








- 12 -

Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


Goodwill is due primarily to PMI’s acquisitions in Canada, Indonesia, Mexico, Greece, Serbia, Colombia and Pakistan, as well as the business combination in the Philippines in February 2010. The movements in goodwill from December 31, 2011, are as follows:
 
(in millions)
 
European
Union
 
Eastern
Europe,
Middle East
&
Africa
 
Asia
 
Latin
America &
Canada
 
Total
Balance at December 31, 2011
 
$
1,392

 
$
666

 
$
4,966

 
$
2,904

 
$
9,928

Changes due to:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Acquisitions
 

 

 

 

 

Currency
 
65

 
(1
)
 
(29
)
 
124

 
159

Balance at March 31, 2012
 
$
1,457

 
$
665

 
$
4,937

 
$
3,028

 
$
10,087

Additional details of other intangible assets were as follows:
 
 
 
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
(in millions)
 
Gross
Carrying
Amount
 
Accumulated
Amortization
 
Gross
Carrying
Amount
 
Accumulated
Amortization
Non-amortizable intangible assets
 
$
2,115

 
 
 
$
2,067

 
 
Amortizable intangible assets
 
2,041

 
$
403

 
2,001

 
$
371

Total other intangible assets
 
$
4,156

 
$
403

 
$
4,068

 
$
371


 
Non-amortizable intangible assets substantially consist of trademarks from PMI’s acquisitions in Indonesia in 2005 and Mexico in 2007. Amortizable intangible assets primarily consist of certain trademarks, distribution networks and non-compete agreements associated with business combinations. The range of useful lives as well as the weighted-average remaining useful life of amortizable intangible assets at March 31, 2012 is as follows:
 
Description
Initial
Estimated
Useful Lives
    
Weighted-Average
Remaining Useful Life
Trademarks
2 - 40 years
    
26
 years
Distribution networks
20 - 30 years
    
16
 years
Non-compete agreements
3 - 10 years
    
3
 years
Other (including farmer
  contracts)
12.5 - 17 years
    
13
 years

Pre-tax amortization expense for intangible assets during the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, was $24 million. Amortization expense for each of the next five years is estimated to be $98 million or less, assuming no additional transactions occur that require the amortization of intangible assets.
The increase in other intangible assets from December 31, 2011, was due to currency movements.
During the first quarter of 2012, PMI completed its annual review of goodwill and non-amortizable intangible assets for potential impairment, and no impairment charges were required as a result of this review.





- 13 -

Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


Note 6. Financial Instruments:
Overview
PMI operates in markets outside of the United States, with manufacturing and sales facilities in various locations around the world. PMI utilizes certain financial instruments to manage foreign currency exposure. Derivative financial instruments are used by PMI principally to reduce exposures to market risks resulting from fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates by creating offsetting exposures. PMI is not a party to leveraged derivatives and, by policy, does not use derivative financial instruments for speculative purposes. Financial instruments qualifying for hedge accounting must maintain a specified level of effectiveness between the hedging instrument and the item being hedged, both at inception and throughout the hedged period. PMI formally documents the nature and relationships between the hedging instruments and hedged items, as well as its risk-management objectives, strategies for undertaking the various hedge transactions and method of assessing hedge effectiveness. Additionally, for hedges of forecasted transactions, the significant characteristics and expected terms of the forecasted transaction must be specifically identified, and it must be probable that each forecasted transaction will occur. If it were deemed probable that the forecasted transaction would not occur, the gain or loss would be recognized in earnings. PMI reports its net transaction gains or losses in marketing, administration and research costs on the condensed consolidated statements of earnings.
PMI uses deliverable and non-deliverable forward foreign exchange contracts, foreign currency swaps and foreign currency options, collectively referred to as foreign exchange contracts, to mitigate its exposure to changes in exchange rates from third-party and intercompany actual and forecasted transactions. The primary currencies to which PMI is exposed include the Euro, Indonesian rupiah, Japanese yen, Mexican peso, Russian ruble, Swiss franc and Turkish lira. At March 31, 2012, PMI had contracts with aggregate notional amounts of $12.0 billion. Of the $12.0 billion aggregate notional amount at March 31, 2012, $2.5 billion related to cash flow hedges and $9.5 billion related to other derivatives that primarily offset currency exposures on intercompany financing.
The fair value of PMI’s foreign exchange contracts included in the condensed consolidated balance sheet as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, were as follows:
 
 
 
Asset Derivatives
 
Liability Derivatives
 
 

 
Fair Value
 

 
Fair Value
(in millions)
 
Balance Sheet Classification
 
At
March 31,
2012
 
At
December 31,
2011
 
Balance Sheet Classification
 
At
March 31,
2012
 
At
December 31,
2011
Foreign exchange contracts designated as hedging instruments
 
Other current assets
 
$
91

 
$
57

 
Other accrued liabilities
 
$

 
$
4

Foreign exchange contracts not designated as hedging instruments 
 
Other current assets 
 
25

 
88

 
Other accrued liabilities
 
36

 
62

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-current liabilities
 
2

 

Total derivatives
 
 
 
$
116

 
$
145

 
 
 
$
38

 
$
66








- 14 -

Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


Hedging activities, which represent movement in derivatives as well as the respective underlying transactions, had the following effect on PMI’s condensed consolidated statements of earnings and other comprehensive earnings for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011:
 
(in millions)
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2012
Gain (Loss)
 
Cash Flow
Hedges
 
Net
Investment
Hedges
 
Other
Derivatives
 
Income
Taxes
 
Total
Statement of Earnings:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net revenues
 
$
11

 
 
 
$

 
 
 
$
11

Cost of sales
 
15

 
 
 

 
 
 
15

Marketing, administration and research costs
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

Operating income
 
26

 
 
 

 
 
 
26

Interest expense, net
 
(15
)
 
 
 
1

 
 
 
(14
)
Earnings before income taxes
 
11

 
 
 
1

 
 
 
12

Provision for income taxes
 
(1
)
 
 
 

 
 
 
(1
)
Net earnings attributable to PMI
 
$
10

 
 
 
$
1

 
 
 
$
11

Other Comprehensive Earnings:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gains transferred to earnings
 
$
(11
)
 
 
 
 
 
$
1

 
$
(10
)
Recognized gains
 
51

 
 
 
 
 
(5
)
 
46

Net impact on equity
 
$
40

 
 
 
 
 
$
(4
)
 
$
36

Cumulative translation adjustment
 
 
 
$

 
 
 
 
 
$

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(in millions)
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2011
Gain (Loss)
 
Cash Flow
Hedges    
 
Net
Investment
Hedges    
 
Other
Derivatives    
 
Income
Taxes    
 
Total    
Statement of Earnings:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net revenues
 
$

 
 
 
$

 
 
 
$

Cost of sales
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

Marketing, administration and research costs
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

Operating income
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

Interest expense, net
 
(8
)
 
 
 
3

 
 
 
(5
)
Earnings before income taxes
 
(8
)
 
 
 
3

 
 
 
(5
)
Provision for income taxes
 
1

 
 
 
(1
)
 
 
 

Net earnings attributable to PMI
 
$
(7
)
 
 
 
$
2

 
 
 
$
(5
)
Other Comprehensive Earnings:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Losses transferred to earnings
 
$
8

 
 
 
 
 
$
(1
)
 
$
7

Recognized gains
 
24

 
 
 
 
 
(2
)
 
22

Net impact on equity
 
$
32

 
 
 
 
 
$
(3
)
 
$
29

Cumulative translation adjustment
 


 
$
2

 
 
 


 
$
2

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



 

- 15 -

Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


Each type of hedging activity is described in greater detail below.
Cash Flow Hedges
PMI has entered into foreign exchange contracts to hedge foreign currency exchange risk related to certain forecasted transactions. The effective portion of gains and losses associated with qualifying cash flow hedge contracts is deferred as a component of accumulated other comprehensive losses until the underlying hedged transactions are reported in PMI’s condensed consolidated statements of earnings. During the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, ineffectiveness related to cash flow hedges was not material. As of March 31, 2012, PMI has hedged forecasted transactions for periods not exceeding the next nine months. The impact of these hedges is included in operating cash flows on PMI’s condensed consolidated statements of cash flows.
 
For the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, foreign exchange contracts that were designated as cash flow hedging instruments impacted the condensed consolidated statements of earnings and other comprehensive earnings as follows:
 
(pre-tax, in millions)
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
Derivatives in
Cash Flow
Hedging
Relationship  
 
Statement of Earnings
Classification of Gain/(Loss)
Reclassified from Other
Comprehensive Earnings into
Earnings
 
Amount of Gain/(Loss)
Reclassified  from Other
Comprehensive  Earnings
into
Earnings
 
Amount of Gain/(Loss)
Recognized in Other
Comprehensive Earnings
on
Derivatives
 
 
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
2012
 
2011
Foreign exchange contracts
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
51

 
$
24

 
 
Net revenues
 
$
11

 
$

 
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of sales
 
15

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Marketing, administration
and research costs
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest expense, net
 
(15
)
 
(8
)
 
 
 
 
Total
 
 
 
$
11

 
$
(8
)
 
$
51

 
$
24

 
Hedges of Net Investments in Foreign Operations
PMI designates certain foreign currency denominated debt and forward exchange contracts as net investment hedges of its foreign operations. For the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, these hedges of net investments resulted in gains (losses), net of income taxes, of $(42) million and $(207) million, respectively. These gains (losses) were reported as a component of accumulated other comprehensive losses within currency translation adjustments. For the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, ineffectiveness related to net investment hedges was not material. Settlement of net investment hedges is included in other investing cash flows on PMI’s condensed consolidated statements of cash flows.
 
For the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, foreign exchange contracts that were designated as net investment hedging instruments impacted the condensed consolidated statements of earnings and other comprehensive earnings as follows:
 
(pre-tax, in millions)
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
Derivatives in Net
Investment
Hedging
Relationship
 
Statement of Earnings
Classification of
Gain/(Loss) Reclassified
from Other Comprehensive
Earnings into
Earnings
 
Amount of Gain/(Loss)
Reclassified from Other
Comprehensive Earnings
into
Earnings
 
Amount of Gain/(Loss)
Recognized in Other
Comprehensive Earnings
on
Derivatives
 
 
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
2012
 
2011
Foreign exchange contracts
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$

 
$
2

 
 
Interest expense, net
 
$

 
$

 
 
 
 



- 16 -

Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


Other Derivatives
PMI has entered into foreign exchange contracts to hedge the foreign currency exchange risks related to intercompany loans between certain subsidiaries, and third-party loans. While effective as economic hedges, no hedge accounting is applied for these contracts; therefore, the unrealized gains (losses) relating to these contracts are reported in PMI’s condensed consolidated statements of earnings. For the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, the gains from contracts for which PMI did not apply hedge accounting were $62 million and $295 million, respectively. The gains (losses) from these contracts substantially offset the losses and gains generated by the underlying intercompany and third-party loans being hedged.
  
As a result, for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, these items affected the condensed consolidated statements of earnings as follows:
 
(pre-tax, in millions)
 
  
 
  
Derivatives not Designated
   as Hedging Instruments
 
Statement of Earnings
Classification of
Gain/(Loss)
 
Amount of Gain/(Loss)
Recognized in Earnings
 
 
 
 
2012
 
2011
Foreign exchange contracts
 

 

 


 
 
Interest expense, net
 
$
1

 
$
3

Qualifying Hedging Activities Reported in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Losses
Derivative gains or losses reported in accumulated other comprehensive losses are a result of qualifying hedging activity. Transfers of these gains or losses to earnings are offset by the corresponding gains or losses on the underlying hedged item. Hedging activity affected accumulated other comprehensive losses, net of income taxes, as follows:
 
(in millions)
 
For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
Gain as of January 1
 
$
15

 
$
2

Derivative (gains) losses transferred to earnings
 
(10
)
 
7

Change in fair value
 
46

 
22

Gain as of March 31
 
$
51

 
$
31

At March 31, 2012, PMI expects $47 million of derivative gains that are included in accumulated other comprehensive losses to be reclassified to the condensed consolidated statement of earnings within the next twelve months. These gains are expected to be substantially offset by the statement of earnings impact of the respective hedged transactions.
Credit Exposure and Credit Risk
PMI is exposed to credit loss in the event of non-performance by counterparties. While PMI does not anticipate non-performance, its risk is limited to the fair value of the financial instruments. PMI actively monitors its exposure to credit risk through the use of credit approvals and credit limits, and by selecting and continuously monitoring a diverse group of major international banks and financial institutions as counterparties.
Contingent Features
PMI’s derivative instruments do not contain contingent features.
Fair Value
See Note 13. Fair Value Measurements for disclosures related to the fair value of PMI’s derivative financial instruments.



- 17 -

Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


Note 7. Redeemable Noncontrolling Interest:
Philippines Business Combination:
On February 25, 2010, PMI's affiliate, Philip Morris Philippines Manufacturing Inc. (“PMPMI”), and Fortune Tobacco Corporation (“FTC”) combined their respective business activities by transferring selected assets and liabilities of PMPMI and FTC to a new company called PMFTC Inc. (“PMFTC”). PMPMI and FTC hold equal economic interests in PMFTC, while PMI manages the day-to-day operations of PMFTC and has a majority of its Board of Directors. Consequently, PMI accounts for the contributed assets and liabilities of FTC as a business combination.
The fair value of the assets and liabilities contributed by FTC in this non-cash transaction has been determined to be $1.17 billion. FTC holds the right to sell its interest in PMFTC to PMI, except in certain circumstances, during the period from February 25, 2015 through February 24, 2018, at an agreed-upon value of $1.17 billion, which was recorded on PMI’s condensed consolidated balance sheet as a redeemable noncontrolling interest at the date of the business combination.
 
With the consolidation of PMFTC, FTC’s share of PMFTC’s comprehensive income or loss is attributable to the redeemable noncontrolling interest, impacting the carrying value. To the extent that the attribution of these amounts would cause the carrying value to fall below the redemption amount of $1.17 billion, the carrying amount would be adjusted back up to the redemption value through stockholders’ equity. The movement in redeemable noncontrolling interest for the three months ended March 31, 2012 was as follows:
 
(in millions)
  
Redeemable noncontrolling interest at December 31, 2011
$
1,212

Share of net earnings
42

Dividend payments
(24
)
Currency translation
7

Redeemable noncontrolling interest at March 31, 2012
$
1,237

The redeemable noncontrolling interest balance at March 31, 2011 was $1,202 million. The increase in redeemable noncontrolling interest from December 31, 2010 through March 31, 2011 of $14 million was due to $24 million of net earnings and currency translation gains of $3 million, partially offset by dividend payments of $13 million.
In future periods, if the fair value of 50% of PMFTC were to drop below the redemption value of $1.17 billion, the difference would be treated as a special dividend to FTC and would reduce PMI’s earnings per share. Reductions in earnings per share may be partially or fully reversed in subsequent periods if the fair value of the redeemable noncontrolling interest increases relative to the redemption value. Such increases in earnings per share would be limited to cumulative prior reductions. At March 31, 2012, PMI determined that 50% of the fair value of PMFTC exceeded the redemption value of $1.17 billion.


Note 8. Earnings Per Share:
Basic and diluted earnings per share (“EPS”) were calculated using the following:
 
(in millions)
 
For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
Net earnings attributable to PMI
 
$
2,161

 
$
1,919

Less distributed and undistributed earnings attributable to share-based payment awards
 
12

 
10

Net earnings for basic and diluted EPS
 
$
2,149

 
$
1,909

Weighted-average shares for basic EPS
 
1,719

 
1,793

Plus incremental shares from assumed conversions:
 
 
 
 
Stock options
 

 
1

Weighted-average shares for diluted EPS
 
1,719

 
1,794


- 18 -

Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


Unvested share-based payment awards that contain non-forfeitable rights to dividends or dividend equivalents are participating securities and therefore are included in PMI’s earnings per share calculation pursuant to the two-class method.
For the 2012 and 2011 computations, there were no antidilutive stock options.

Note 9. Segment Reporting:
PMI’s subsidiaries and affiliates are engaged in the manufacture and sale of cigarettes and other tobacco products in markets outside of the United States of America. Reportable segments for PMI are organized and managed by geographic region. PMI’s reportable segments are European Union; Eastern Europe, Middle East & Africa; Asia; and Latin America & Canada.
PMI’s management evaluates segment performance and allocates resources based on operating companies income, which PMI defines as operating income before general corporate expenses and amortization of intangibles. Interest expense, net, and provision for income taxes are centrally managed and, accordingly, such items are not presented by segment since they are excluded from the measure of segment profitability reviewed by management.
 
Segment data were as follows:
 
(in millions)
 
For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
Net revenues:
 
 
 
 
European Union
 
$
6,470

 
$
6,415

Eastern Europe, Middle East & Africa
 
4,069

 
3,671

Asia
 
5,177

 
4,288

Latin America & Canada
 
2,306

 
2,156

Net revenues
 
$
18,022

 
$
16,530

Earnings before income taxes:
 
 
 
 
Operating companies income:
 
 
 
 
European Union
 
$
1,030

 
$
1,006

Eastern Europe, Middle East & Africa
 
810

 
722

Asia
 
1,407

 
1,093

Latin America & Canada
 
237

 
251

Amortization of intangibles
 
(24
)
 
(24
)
General corporate expenses
 
(57
)
 
(41
)
Operating income
 
3,403

 
3,007

Interest expense, net
 
(213
)
 
(213
)
Earnings before income taxes
 
$
3,190

 
$
2,794

Items affecting the comparability of results from operations are asset impairment and exit costs. See Note 2. Asset Impairment and Exit Costs for a breakdown of these costs by segment.

Note 10. Contingencies:            
Litigation - General
Legal proceedings covering a wide range of matters are pending or threatened against us, and/or our subsidiaries, and/or our indemnitees in various jurisdictions. Our indemnitees include distributors, licensees, and others that have been named as parties in certain cases and that we have agreed to defend, as well as pay costs and some or all of judgments, if any, that may be entered against them. Pursuant to the terms of the Distribution Agreement between Altria Group, Inc. ("Altria") and PMI, PMI will indemnify Altria and PM USA for tobacco product claims based in substantial part on products manufactured by PMI or contract

- 19 -

Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


manufactured for PMI by PM USA, and PM USA will indemnify PMI for tobacco product claims based in substantial part on products manufactured by PM USA, excluding tobacco products contract manufactured for PMI. Various types of claims are raised in these proceedings, including, among others, product liability, consumer protection, antitrust, employment and tax.
It is possible that there could be adverse developments in pending cases against us and our subsidiaries. An unfavorable outcome or settlement of pending tobacco-related litigation could encourage the commencement of additional litigation.
Damages claimed in some of the tobacco-related litigation are significant and, in certain cases in Brazil, Canada, Israel and Nigeria, range into the billions of dollars. The variability in pleadings in multiple jurisdictions, together with the actual experience of management in litigating claims, demonstrate that the monetary relief that may be specified in a lawsuit bears little relevance to the ultimate outcome. Much of the tobacco-related litigation is in its early stages and litigation is subject to uncertainty. However, as discussed below, we have to date been largely successful in defending tobacco-related litigation.
We and our subsidiaries record provisions in the consolidated financial statements for pending litigation when we determine that an unfavorable outcome is probable and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. At the present time, while it is reasonably possible that an unfavorable outcome in a case may occur, after assessing the information available to it (i) management has not concluded that it is probable that a loss has been incurred in any of the pending tobacco-related cases; (ii) management is unable to estimate the possible loss or range of loss for any of the pending tobacco-related cases; and (iii) accordingly, no estimated loss has been accrued in the consolidated financial statements for unfavorable outcomes in these cases, if any. Legal defense costs are expensed as incurred.
It is possible that our consolidated results of operations, cash flows or financial position could be materially affected in a particular fiscal quarter or fiscal year by an unfavorable outcome or settlement of certain pending litigation. Nevertheless, although litigation is subject to uncertainty, we and each of our subsidiaries named as a defendant believe, and each has been so advised by counsel handling the respective cases, that we have valid defenses to the litigation pending against us, as well as valid bases for appeal of adverse verdicts, if any. All such cases are, and will continue to be, vigorously defended. However, we and our subsidiaries may enter into settlement discussions in particular cases if we believe it is in our best interests to do so.
Tobacco-Related Litigation
To date, we have paid total judgments, including costs, of approximately six thousand Euros in tobacco-related cases. These payments were made in order to appeal three Italian small claims cases, two of which were subsequently reversed on appeal and one of which remains on appeal. To date, no tobacco-related case has been finally resolved in favor of a plaintiff against us, our subsidiaries or indemnitees.
The table below lists the number of tobacco-related cases pending against us and/or our subsidiaries or indemnitees as of May 1, 2012, 2011 and 2010:
 
Type of Case
 
Number of
Cases Pending as of May 1, 2012
 
Number of
Cases Pending  as of
May 1, 2011
 
Number of
Cases Pending  as of
May 1, 2010
Individual Smoking and Health Cases
 
76

 
93

 
119

Smoking and Health Class Actions
 
10

 
11

 
9

Health Care Cost Recovery Actions
 
10

 
11

 
10

Lights Class Actions
 
2

 
2

 
3

Individual Lights Cases (small claims court)
 
9

 
10

 
12

Public Civil Actions
 
3

 
5

 
10

Since 1995, when the first tobacco-related litigation was filed against a PMI entity, 380 Smoking and Health, Lights, Health Care Cost Recovery, and Public Civil Actions in which we and/or one of our subsidiaries and/or indemnitees were a defendant have been terminated in our favor. Ten cases have had decisions in favor of plaintiffs. Six of these cases have subsequently reached final resolution in our favor and four remain on appeal.


 

- 20 -

Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


The table below lists the verdicts and post-trial developments in the three pending cases (excluding an individual case on appeal from an Italian small claims court) in which verdicts were returned in favor of plaintiffs:
 
Date
  
Location of
Court/Name of Plaintiff
  
Type of
Case
  
Verdict
  
Post-Trial
Developments
May 2011
  
Brazil/Laszlo
  
Individual Smoking and Health
  
The Civil Court of São Vicente found for plaintiff and ordered Philip Morris Brasil to pay damages of R$31,333 (approximately $17,800), plus future costs for cessation and medical treatment of smoking related diseases.
  
In June 2011, Philip Morris Brasil filed an appeal. In December 2011, the Appellate Court reversed the trial court decision. In February 2012, plaintiff appealed the decision.

Date
  
Location of
Court/Name of
Plaintiff
  
Type of
Case
  
Verdict
  
Post-Trial
Developments
September 2009
  
Brazil/Bernhardt
  
Individual Smoking and Health
  
The Civil Court of Rio de Janeiro found for plaintiff and ordered Philip Morris Brasil to pay R$13,000 (approximately $7,400) in “moral damages.”
  
Philip Morris Brasil filed its appeal against the decision on the merits with the Court of Appeals in November 2009. In February 2010, without addressing the merits, the Court of Appeals annulled the trial court’s decision and remanded the case to the trial court to issue a new ruling, which was required to address certain compensatory damage claims made by the plaintiff that the trial court did not address in its original ruling. In July 2010, the trial court reinstated its original decision, while specifically rejecting the compensatory damages claim. Philip Morris Brasil appealed this decision.
In March 2011, the Court of Appeals affirmed the trial court’s decision and denied Philip Morris Brasil’s appeal. The Court of Appeals increased the amount of damages awarded to the plaintiff to R$100,000 (approximately $56,700). Philip Morris Brasil filed an appeal in June 2011.


- 21 -

Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


Date
  
Location of
Court/Name of
Plaintiff
  
Type of
Case
  
Verdict
  
Post-Trial
Developments
February 2004
  
Brazil/The Smoker Health Defense Association (“ADESF”)
  
Class Action
  
The Civil Court of São Paulo found defendants liable without hearing evidence. The court did not assess moral or actual damages, which were to be assessed in a second phase of the case. The size of the class was not defined in the ruling.
  
In April 2004, the court clarified its ruling, awarding “moral damages” of R$1,000 (approximately $570) per smoker per full year of smoking plus interest at the rate of 1% per month, as of the date of the ruling. The court did not award actual damages, which were to be assessed in the second phase of the case. The size of the class was not estimated. Defendants appealed to the São Paulo Court of Appeals, which annulled the ruling in November 2008, finding that the trial court had inappropriately ruled without hearing evidence and returned the case to the trial court for further proceedings. In May 2011, the trial court dismissed the claim. Plaintiff has appealed.
In addition, the defendants filed a constitutional appeal to the Federal Supreme Tribunal on the basis that the plaintiff did not have standing to bring the lawsuit. This appeal is still pending.
 
Pending claims related to tobacco products generally fall within the following categories:
Smoking and Health Litigation: These cases primarily allege personal injury and are brought by individual plaintiffs or on behalf of a class of individual plaintiffs. Plaintiffs’ allegations of liability in these cases are based on various theories of recovery, including negligence, gross negligence, strict liability, fraud, misrepresentation, design defect, failure to warn, breach of express and implied warranties, violations of deceptive trade practice laws and consumer protection statutes. Plaintiffs in these cases seek various forms of relief, including compensatory and other damages, and injunctive and equitable relief. Defenses raised in these cases include licit activity, failure to state a claim, lack of defect, lack of proximate cause, assumption of the risk, contributory negligence, and statute of limitations.
As of May 1, 2012, there were a number of smoking and health cases pending against us, our subsidiaries or indemnitees, as follows:
 
76 cases brought by individual plaintiffs in Argentina (31), Brazil (31), Canada (2), Chile (2), Greece (1), Italy (5), the Philippines (1), Scotland (1), Thailand (1) and Turkey (1), compared with 93 such cases on May 1, 2011, and 119 cases on May 1, 2010; and
10 cases brought on behalf of classes of individual plaintiffs in Brazil (2) and Canada (8), compared with 11 such cases on May 1, 2011, and 9 such cases on May 1, 2010.
In the first class action pending in Brazil, The Smoker Health Defense Association (ADESF) v. Souza Cruz, S.A. and Philip Morris Marketing, S.A., Nineteenth Lower Civil Court of the Central Courts of the Judiciary District of São Paulo, Brazil, filed July 25, 1995, our subsidiary and another member of the industry are defendants. The plaintiff, a consumer organization, is seeking damages for smokers and former smokers and injunctive relief. The verdict and post-trial developments in this case are described in the above table.


- 22 -

Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


In the second class action pending in Brazil, Public Prosecutor of São Paulo v. Philip Morris Brasil Industria e Comercio Ltda., Civil Court of the City of São Paulo, Brazil, filed August 6, 2007, our subsidiary is a defendant. The plaintiff, the Public Prosecutor of the State of São Paulo, is seeking (i) unspecified damages on behalf of all smokers nationwide, former smokers, and their relatives; (ii) unspecified damages on behalf of people exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (“ETS”) nationwide, and their relatives; and (iii) reimbursement of the health care costs allegedly incurred for the treatment of tobacco-related diseases by all Brazilian States and Municipalities, and the Federal District. In an interim ruling issued in December 2007, the trial court limited the scope of this claim to the State of São Paulo only. In December 2008, the Seventh Civil Court of São Paulo issued a decision declaring that it lacked jurisdiction because the case involved issues similar to the ADESF case discussed above and should be transferred to the Nineteenth Lower Civil Court in São Paulo where the ADESF case is pending. The court further stated that these cases should be consolidated for the purposes of judgment. Our subsidiary appealed this decision to the State of São Paulo Court of Appeals, which subsequently declared the case stayed pending the outcome of the appeal. In April 2010, the São Paulo Court of Appeals reversed the Seventh Civil Court’s decision that consolidated the cases, finding that they are based on different legal claims and are progressing at different stages of proceedings. This case was returned to the Seventh Civil Court of São Paulo, and our subsidiary filed its closing arguments in December 2010. In March 2012, the trial court dismissed the case on the merits. Plaintiff may appeal this decision.
In the first class action pending in Canada, Cecilia Letourneau v. Imperial Tobacco Ltd., Rothmans, Benson & Hedges Inc. and JTI Macdonald Corp., Quebec Superior Court, Canada, filed in September 1998, our subsidiary and other Canadian manufacturers are defendants. The plaintiff, an individual smoker, is seeking compensatory and unspecified punitive damages for each member of the class who is deemed addicted to smoking. The class was certified in 2005. On February 14, 2012, the court ruled that the federal government will remain as a third-party in the case. Trial began on March 12, 2012 and is expected to continue for a year or more.
In the second class action pending in Canada, Conseil Québécois Sur Le Tabac Et La Santé and Jean-Yves Blais v. Imperial Tobacco Ltd., Rothmans, Benson & Hedges Inc. and JTI Macdonald Corp., Quebec Superior Court, Canada, filed in November 1998, our subsidiary and other Canadian manufacturers are defendants. The plaintiffs, an anti-smoking organization and an individual smoker, are seeking compensatory and unspecified punitive damages for each member of the class who allegedly suffers from certain smoking-related diseases. The class was certified in 2005. On February 14, 2012, the court ruled that the federal government will remain as a third-party in the case. Trial began on March 12, 2012 and is expected to continue for a year or more.
In the third class action pending in Canada, Kunta v. Canadian Tobacco Manufacturers’ Council, et al., The Queen’s Bench, Winnipeg, Canada, filed June 12, 2009, we, our subsidiaries, and our indemnitees (PM USA and Altria Group, Inc.), and other members of the industry are defendants. The plaintiff, an individual smoker, alleges her own addiction to tobacco products and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (“COPD”), severe asthma, and mild reversible lung disease resulting from the use of tobacco products. She is seeking compensatory and unspecified punitive damages on behalf of a proposed class comprised of all smokers, their estates, dependents and family members, as well as restitution of profits, and reimbursement of government health care costs allegedly caused by tobacco products. In September 2009, plaintiff’s counsel informed defendants that he did not anticipate taking any action in this case while he pursues the class action filed in Saskatchewan (see description of Adams, below).
In the fourth class action pending in Canada, Adams v. Canadian Tobacco Manufacturers’ Council, et al., The Queen’s Bench, Saskatchewan, Canada, filed July 10, 2009, we, our subsidiaries, and our indemnitees (PM USA and Altria Group, Inc.), and other members of the industry are defendants. The plaintiff, an individual smoker, alleges her own addiction to tobacco products and COPD resulting from the use of tobacco products. She is seeking compensatory and unspecified punitive damages on behalf of a proposed class comprised of all smokers who have smoked a minimum of 25,000 cigarettes and have allegedly suffered, or suffer, from COPD, emphysema, heart disease, or cancer, as well as restitution of profits. Preliminary motions are pending.
In the fifth class action pending in Canada, Semple v. Canadian Tobacco Manufacturers’ Council, et al., The Supreme Court (trial court), Nova Scotia, Canada, filed June 18, 2009, we, our subsidiaries, and our indemnitees (PM USA and Altria Group, Inc.), and other members of the industry are defendants. The plaintiff, an individual smoker, alleges his own addiction to tobacco products and COPD resulting from the use of tobacco products. He is seeking compensatory and unspecified punitive damages on behalf of a proposed class comprised of all smokers, their estates, dependents and family members, as well as restitution of profits, and reimbursement of government health care costs allegedly caused by tobacco products. No activity in this case is anticipated while plaintiff’s counsel pursues the class action filed in Saskatchewan (see description of Adams, above).
In the sixth class action pending in Canada, Dorion v. Canadian Tobacco Manufacturers’ Council, et al., The Queen’s Bench, Alberta, Canada, filed June 15, 2009, we, our subsidiaries, and our indemnitees (PM USA and Altria Group, Inc.), and other members of the industry are defendants. The plaintiff, an individual smoker, alleges her own addiction to tobacco products and chronic bronchitis and severe sinus infections resulting from the use of tobacco products. She is seeking compensatory and

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Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


unspecified punitive damages on behalf of a proposed class comprised of all smokers, their estates, dependents and family members, restitution of profits, and reimbursement of government health care costs allegedly caused by tobacco products. To date, we, our subsidiaries, and our indemnitees have not been properly served with the complaint. No activity in this case is anticipated while plaintiff’s counsel pursues the class action filed in Saskatchewan (see description of Adams, above).
In the seventh class action pending in Canada, McDermid v. Imperial Tobacco Canada Limited, et al., Supreme Court, British Columbia, Canada, filed June 25, 2010, we, our subsidiaries, and our indemnitees (PM USA and Altria Group, Inc.), and other members of the industry are defendants. The plaintiff, an individual smoker, alleges his own addiction to tobacco products and heart disease resulting from the use of tobacco products. He is seeking compensatory and unspecified punitive damages on behalf of a proposed class comprised of all smokers who were alive on June 12, 2007, and who suffered from heart disease allegedly caused by smoking, their estates, dependents and family members, plus disgorgement of revenues earned by the defendants from January 1, 1954 to the date the claim was filed. Defendants have filed jurisdictional challenges on the grounds that this action should not proceed during the pendency of the Saskatchewan class action (see description of Adams, above).
 
In the eighth class action pending in Canada, Bourassa v. Imperial Tobacco Canada Limited, et al., Supreme Court, British Columbia, Canada, filed June 25, 2010, we, our subsidiaries, and our indemnitees (PM USA and Altria Group, Inc.), and other members of the industry are defendants. The plaintiff, the heir to a deceased smoker, alleges that the decedent was addicted to tobacco products and suffered from emphysema resulting from the use of tobacco products. She is seeking compensatory and unspecified punitive damages on behalf of a proposed class comprised of all smokers who were alive on June 12, 2007, and who suffered from chronic respiratory diseases allegedly caused by smoking, their estates, dependents and family members, plus disgorgement of revenues earned by the defendants from January 1, 1954 to the date the claim was filed. Defendants have filed jurisdictional challenges on the grounds that this action should not proceed during the pendency of the Saskatchewan class action (see description of Adams, above).
Health Care Cost Recovery Litigation: These cases, brought by governmental and non-governmental plaintiffs, seek reimbursement of health care cost expenditures allegedly caused by tobacco products. Plaintiffs’ allegations of liability in these cases are based on various theories of recovery including unjust enrichment, negligence, negligent design, strict liability, breach of express and implied warranties, violation of a voluntary undertaking or special duty, fraud, negligent misrepresentation, conspiracy, public nuisance, defective product, failure to warn, sale of cigarettes to minors, and claims under statutes governing competition and deceptive trade practices. Plaintiffs in these cases seek various forms of relief including compensatory and other damages, and injunctive and equitable relief. Defenses raised in these cases include lack of proximate cause, remoteness of injury, failure to state a claim, adequate remedy at law, “unclean hands” (namely, that plaintiffs cannot obtain equitable relief because they participated in, and benefited from, the sale of cigarettes), and statute of limitations.
As of May 1, 2012, there were 10 health care cost recovery cases pending against us, our subsidiaries or indemnitees in Canada (4), Nigeria (5) and Spain (1), compared with 11 such cases on May 1, 2011 and 10 such cases on May 1, 2010.
In the first health care cost recovery case pending in Canada, Her Majesty the Queen in Right of British Columbia v. Imperial Tobacco Limited, et al., Supreme Court, British Columbia, Vancouver Registry, Canada, filed January 24, 2001, we, our subsidiaries, our indemnitee (PM USA), and other members of the industry are defendants. The plaintiff, the government of the province of British Columbia, brought a claim based upon legislation enacted by the province authorizing the government to file a direct action against cigarette manufacturers to recover the health care costs it has incurred, and will incur, resulting from a “tobacco related wrong.” The Supreme Court of Canada has held that the statute is constitutional. We and certain other non-Canadian defendants challenged the jurisdiction of the court. The court rejected the jurisdictional challenge, and pre-trial discovery is ongoing. The trial court also has granted plaintiff’s request that the target trial date of September 2011 be postponed indefinitely. Meanwhile, in December 2009, the British Columbia Court of Appeal ruled that the defendants could pursue a third-party claim against the government of Canada for negligently misrepresenting to defendants the efficacy of the low tar tobacco strain that the federal government developed and licensed to some of the defendants. In May 2010, the Supreme Court of Canada agreed to hear both the appeal of the Attorney General of Canada and the defendants’ cross-appeal from the British Columbia Court of Appeal decision. In July 2011, the Supreme Court of Canada dismissed the third-party claims against the federal government.
In the second health care cost recovery case filed in Canada, Her Majesty the Queen in Right of New Brunswick v. Rothmans Inc., et al., Court of Queen’s Bench of New Brunswick, Trial Court, New Brunswick, Fredericton, Canada, filed March 13, 2008, we, our subsidiaries, our indemnitees (PM USA and Altria Group, Inc.), and other members of the industry are defendants. The claim was filed by the government of the province of New Brunswick based on legislation enacted in the province. This legislation is similar to the law introduced in British Columbia that authorizes the government to file a direct action against cigarette manufacturers to recover the health care costs it has incurred, and will incur, as a result of a “tobacco related wrong.” Pre-trial discovery is ongoing.

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Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


In the third health care cost recovery case filed in Canada, Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Ontario v. Rothmans Inc., et al., Ontario Superior Court of Justice, Toronto, Canada, filed September 29, 2009, we, our subsidiaries, our indemnitees (PM USA and Altria Group, Inc.), and other members of the industry are defendants. The claim was filed by the government of the province of Ontario based on legislation enacted in the province. This legislation is similar to the laws introduced in British Columbia and New Brunswick that authorize the government to file a direct action against cigarette manufacturers to recover the health care costs it has incurred, and will incur, as a result of a “tobacco related wrong.” Preliminary motions are pending.
In the fourth health care cost recovery case filed in Canada, Attorney General of Newfoundland and Labrador v. Rothmans Inc., et al., Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador, St. Johns, Canada, filed February 8, 2011, we, our subsidiaries, our indemnitees (PM USA and Altria Group, Inc.), and other members of the industry are defendants. The claim was filed by the government of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador based on legislation enacted in the province that is similar to the laws introduced in British Columbia, New Brunswick and Ontario. The legislation authorizes the government to file a direct action against cigarette manufacturers to recover the health care costs it has incurred, and will incur, as a result of a “tobacco related wrong.” Preliminary motions are pending.
In the first case in Nigeria, The Attorney General of Lagos State v. British American Tobacco (Nigeria) Limited, et al., High Court of Lagos State, Lagos, Nigeria, filed April 30, 2007, our subsidiary and other members of the industry are defendants. Plaintiff seeks reimbursement for the cost of treating alleged smoking-related diseases for the past 20 years, payment of anticipated costs of treating alleged smoking-related diseases for the next 20 years, various forms of injunctive relief, plus punitive damages. In February 2008, our subsidiary was served with a Notice of Discontinuance. The claim was formally dismissed in March 2008. However, the plaintiff has since refiled its claim. Our subsidiary is in the process of making challenges to service and the court’s jurisdiction. Currently, the case is stayed in the trial court pending the appeals of certain co-defendants relating to service objections. We currently have no employees, operations or assets in Nigeria.
In the second case in Nigeria, The Attorney General of Kano State v. British American Tobacco (Nigeria) Limited, et al., High Court of Kano State, Kano, Nigeria, filed May 9, 2007, our subsidiary and other members of the industry are defendants. Plaintiff seeks reimbursement for the cost of treating alleged smoking-related diseases for the past 20 years, payment of anticipated costs of treating alleged smoking-related diseases for the next 20 years, various forms of injunctive relief, plus punitive damages. Our subsidiary is in the process of making challenges to service and the court’s jurisdiction.
In the third case in Nigeria, The Attorney General of Gombe State v. British American Tobacco (Nigeria) Limited, et al., High Court of Gombe State, Gombe, Nigeria, filed May 18, 2007, our subsidiary and other members of the industry are defendants. Plaintiff seeks reimbursement for the cost of treating alleged smoking-related diseases for the past 20 years, payment of anticipated costs of treating alleged smoking-related diseases for the next 20 years, various forms of injunctive relief, plus punitive damages. In July 2008, the court dismissed the case against all defendants based on the plaintiff’s failure to comply with various procedural requirements when filing and serving the complaint. The plaintiff did not appeal the dismissal. However, in October 2008, the plaintiff refiled its claim. In June 2010, the court ordered the plaintiff to amend the claim to properly name Philip Morris International Inc. as a defendant. Philip Morris International Inc. objected to plaintiff’s attempted service of amended process. In February 2011, the court granted, in part, our service objections, ruling that the plaintiff had not complied with the procedural steps necessary to serve us. As a result of this ruling, Philip Morris International Inc. is not currently a defendant in the case. Plaintiff may appeal the ruling or follow the procedural steps required to serve Philip Morris International Inc.
In the fourth case in Nigeria, The Attorney General of Oyo State, et al., v. British American Tobacco (Nigeria) Limited, et al., High Court of Oyo State, Ibadan, Nigeria, filed May 25, 2007, our subsidiary and other members of the industry are defendants. Plaintiffs seek reimbursement for the cost of treating alleged smoking-related diseases for the past 20 years, payment of anticipated costs of treating alleged smoking-related diseases for the next 20 years, various forms of injunctive relief, plus punitive damages. Our subsidiary challenged service as improper. In June 2010, the court ruled that plaintiffs did not have leave to serve the writ of summons on the defendants and that they must re-serve the writ. Our subsidiary has not yet been re-served.
In the fifth case in Nigeria, The Attorney General of Ogun State v. British American Tobacco (Nigeria) Limited, et al., High Court of Ogun State, Abeokuta, Nigeria, filed February 26, 2008, our subsidiary and other members of the industry are defendants. Plaintiff seeks reimbursement for the cost of treating alleged smoking-related diseases for the past 20 years, payment of anticipated costs of treating alleged smoking-related diseases for the next 20 years, various forms of injunctive relief, plus punitive damages. In May 2010, the trial court rejected our subsidiary’s service objections. Our subsidiary has appealed.
In a series of proceedings in Spain, Junta de Andalucia, et al. v. Philip Morris Spain, et al., Court of First Instance, Madrid, Spain, the first of which was filed February 21, 2002, our subsidiary and other members of the industry were defendants. The plaintiffs sought reimbursement for the cost of treating certain of their citizens for various alleged smoking-related illnesses. In May 2004,

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Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


the first instance court dismissed the initial case, finding that the State was a necessary party to the claim, and thus, the claim must be filed in the Administrative Court. The plaintiffs appealed. In February 2006, the appellate court affirmed the lower court’s dismissal. The plaintiffs then filed notice that they intended to pursue their claim in the Administrative Court against the State. Because they were defendants in the original proceeding, our subsidiary and other members of the industry filed notices with the Administrative Court that they are interested parties in the case. In September 2007, the plaintiffs filed their complaint in the Administrative Court. In November 2007, the Administrative Court dismissed the claim based on a procedural issue. The plaintiffs asked the Administrative Court to reconsider its decision dismissing the case, and that request was rejected in a ruling rendered in February 2008. Plaintiffs appealed to the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court rejected plaintiffs’ appeal in November 2009, resulting in the final dismissal of the claim. However, plaintiffs have filed a second claim in the Administrative Court against the Ministry of Economy. This second claim seeks the same relief as the original claim, but relies on a different procedural posture. The Administrative Court has recognized our subsidiary as a party in this proceeding. Our subsidiary and other defendants filed preliminary objections that resulted in a stay of the term to file the answer. In May 2011, the court rejected the defendants’ preliminary objections, but it has not yet set a deadline for defendants to file their answers.
Lights Cases: These cases, brought by individual plaintiffs, or on behalf of a class of individual plaintiffs, allege that the use of the term “lights” constitutes fraudulent and misleading conduct. Plaintiffs’ allegations of liability in these cases are based on various theories of recovery including misrepresentation, deception, and breach of consumer protection laws. Plaintiffs seek various forms of relief including restitution, injunctive relief, and compensatory and other damages. Defenses raised include lack of causation, lack of reliance, assumption of the risk, and statute of limitations.
As of May 1, 2012, there were a number of lights cases pending against our subsidiaries or indemnitees, as follows:
 
2 cases brought on behalf of overlapping classes of individual plaintiffs in Israel, compared with 2 such cases on May 1, 2011 and 3 such cases on May 1, 2010; and
 
9 cases brought by individuals in the equivalent of small claims courts in Italy, where the maximum damages are approximately one thousand Euros per case, compared with 10 such cases on May 1, 2011, and 12 such cases on May 1, 2010.
In the first class action pending in Israel, El-Roy, et al. v. Philip Morris Incorporated, et al., District Court of Tel-Aviv/Jaffa, Israel, filed January 18, 2004, our subsidiary and our indemnitees (PM USA and our former importer) are defendants. The plaintiffs filed a purported class action claiming that the class members were misled by the descriptor “lights” into believing that lights cigarettes are safer than full flavor cigarettes. The claim seeks recovery of the purchase price of lights cigarettes and compensation for distress for each class member. Hearings took place in November and December 2008 regarding whether the case meets the legal requirements necessary to allow it to proceed as a class action. The parties’ briefing on class certification was completed in March 2011. A hearing for final oral argument on class certification took place in November 2011. We are awaiting the court's decision.
The claims in a second class action pending in Israel, Navon, et al. v. Philip Morris Products USA, et al., District Court of Tel-Aviv/Jaffa, Israel, filed December 5, 2004, against our indemnitee (our distributor) and other members of the industry are similar to those in El-Roy, and the case is currently stayed pending a ruling on class certification in El-Roy.
Public Civil Actions: Claims have been filed either by an individual, or a public or private entity, seeking to protect collective or individual rights, such as the right to health, the right to information or the right to safety. Plaintiffs’ allegations of liability in these cases are based on various theories of recovery including product defect, concealment, and misrepresentation. Plaintiffs in these cases seek various forms of relief including injunctive relief such as banning cigarettes, descriptors, smoking in certain places and advertising, as well as implementing communication campaigns and reimbursement of medical expenses incurred by public or private institutions.
As of May 1, 2012, there were 3 public civil actions pending against our subsidiaries in Argentina (1), Brazil (1), and Venezuela (1), compared with 5 such cases on May 1, 2011, and 10 such cases on May 1, 2010.
In the public civil action in Argentina, Asociación Argentina de Derecho de Danos v. Massalin Particulares S.A., et al., Civil Court of Buenos Aires, Argentina, filed February 26, 2007, our subsidiary and another member of the industry are defendants. The plaintiff, a consumer association, seeks the establishment of a relief fund for reimbursement of medical costs associated with diseases allegedly caused by smoking. Our subsidiary filed its answer in September 2007. In March 2010, the case file was transferred to the Federal Court on Administrative Matters after the Civil Court granted the plaintiff’s request to add the national government as a co-plaintiff in the case.


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Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


In the public civil action in Brazil, The Brazilian Association for the Defense of Consumer Health (“SAUDECON”) v. Philip Morris Brasil Industria e Comercio Ltda. and Souza Cruz S.A., Civil Court of City of Porto Alegre, Brazil, filed November 3, 2008, our subsidiary is a defendant. The plaintiff, a consumer organization, is asking the court to establish a fund that will be used to provide treatment to smokers who claim to be addicted and who do not otherwise have access to smoking cessation treatment. Plaintiff requests that each defendant’s liability be determined according to its market share. In May 2009, the trial court dismissed the case on the merits. Plaintiff has appealed.
In the public civil action in Venezuela, Federation of Consumers and Users Associations (“FEVACU”), et al. v. National Assembly of Venezuela and the Venezuelan Ministry of Health, Constitutional Chamber of the Venezuelan Supreme Court, filed April 29, 2008, we were not named as a defendant, but the plaintiffs published a notice pursuant to court order, notifying all interested parties to appear in the case. In January 2009, our subsidiary appeared in the case in response to this notice. The plaintiffs purport to represent the right to health of the citizens of Venezuela and claim that the government failed to protect adequately its citizens’ right to health. The claim asks the court to order the government to enact stricter regulations on the manufacture and sale of tobacco products. In addition, the plaintiffs ask the court to order companies involved in the tobacco industry to allocate a percentage of their “sales or benefits” to establish a fund to pay for the health care costs of treating smoking-related diseases. In October 2008, the court ruled that plaintiffs have standing to file the claim and that the claim meets the threshold admissibility requirements.
Other Litigation
Other litigation includes an antitrust suit, a breach of contract action, various tax and individual employment cases and tort claims.
Antitrust: In the antitrust class action in Kansas, Smith v. Philip Morris Companies Inc., et al., District Court of Seward County, Kansas, filed February 7, 2000, we and other members of the industry are defendants. The plaintiff asserts that the defendant cigarette companies engaged in an international conspiracy to fix wholesale prices of cigarettes and sought certification of a class comprised of all persons in Kansas who were indirect purchasers of cigarettes from the defendants. The plaintiff claims unspecified economic damages resulting from the alleged price-fixing, trebling of those damages under the Kansas price-fixing statute and counsel fees. The trial court granted plaintiff’s motion for class certification in 2001. On March 23, 2012, the trial court granted defendants' motions for summary judgment in their entirety and, accordingly, entered judgment for the defendants on all claims. On April 23, 2012, plaintiffs filed their objections to the trial court's finding of facts and conclusions of law. Plaintiffs' time to appeal is extended until after the trial court rules on these objections.
Breach of Contract: In the breach of contract action in Ontario, Canada, The Ontario Flue-Cured Tobacco Growers’ Marketing Board, et al. v. Rothmans, Benson & Hedges Inc., Superior Court of Justice, London, Ontario, Canada, filed November 5, 2009, our subsidiary is a defendant. Plaintiffs in this putative class action allege that our subsidiary breached contracts with the proposed class members (Ontario tobacco growers and their related associations) concerning the sale and purchase of flue-cured tobacco from January 1, 1986 to December 31, 1996. Plaintiffs allege that our subsidiary was required by the contracts to disclose to plaintiffs the quantity of tobacco included in cigarettes to be sold for duty free and export purposes (which it purchased at a lower price per pound than tobacco that was included in cigarettes to be sold in Canada), but failed to disclose that some of the cigarettes it designated as being for export and duty free purposes were ultimately sold in Canada. Our subsidiary has been served, but there is currently no deadline to respond to the statement of claim. In September 2011, plaintiffs served a notice of motion seeking class certification.
Tax: In Brazil, there are 113 tax cases involving Philip Morris Brasil S.A. and Philip Morris Brasil Ltda. relating to the payment of state tax on the sale and transfer of goods and services, federal social contributions, excise, social security and income tax, and other matters. Fifty-seven of these cases are under administrative review by the relevant fiscal authorities and 56 are under judicial review by the courts.
Employment: Our subsidiaries, Philip Morris Brasil S.A. and Philip Morris Brasil Ltda., are defendants in various individual employment cases resulting, among other things, from the termination of employment in connection with the shut-down of one of our factories in Brazil.
Tort: In the first action in Delaware, Antonio Emilio Hupan et al. v. Alliance One International, Inc. et al. Superior Court for the State of Delaware in and for New Castle County, filed February 14, 2012, we, our subsidiaries, other members of the industry, certain companies allegedly involved in the purchase of tobacco leaf in Argentina, and certain companies allegedly involved in the manufacture of herbicides are defendants. Plaintiffs in this action are eight children born between the years of 1996 and 2008 and their families, all residing in Argentina. Plaintiffs claim that the children developed birth defects as a result of the exposure of their parents to herbicides while working on farms in Argentina. Plaintiffs allege that we, our subsidiaries, other members of the industry, and certain companies allegedly involved in the purchase of tobacco leaf in Argentina required the use of certain

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Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


herbicides in tobacco growing while failing to warn tobacco growers of the risks. Plaintiffs claim unspecified compensatory and punitive damages. One of our subsidiaries was served with the complaint on March 21, 2012 and we were served on March 22, 2012.
In the second action in Delaware, Pabla Chalañuk et al. v. Alliance One International, Inc. et al. Superior Court for the State of Delaware in and for New Castle County, filed April 5, 2012, we, our subsidiaries, other members of the industry, certain companies allegedly involved in the purchase of tobacco leaf in Argentina, and certain companies allegedly involved in the manufacture of herbicides are defendants. Plaintiffs in this action are 41 children born between the years of 1986 and 2009 and their families, all residing in Argentina. Plaintiffs claim that the children developed birth defects as a result of the exposure of their parents to herbicides while working on farms in Argentina. Plaintiffs allege that we, our subsidiaries, other members of the industry, and certain companies allegedly involved in the purchase of tobacco leaf in Argentina required the use of certain herbicides in tobacco growing while failing to warn tobacco growers of the risks. Plaintiffs claim unspecified compensatory and punitive damages. One of our subsidiaries was served with the complaint on May 2, 2012.

Note 11. Income Taxes:
Income tax provisions for jurisdictions outside the United States, as well as state and local income tax provisions, were determined on a separate company basis and the related assets and liabilities were recorded in PMI’s condensed consolidated balance sheets.
PMI’s effective tax rates for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 were 30.0% and 28.9%, respectively. The effective tax rate for the three months ended March 31, 2011 was favorably impacted by an enacted decrease in corporate income tax rates in Greece ($11 million). The effective tax rates are based on PMI’s full-year geographic earnings mix projections and cash repatriation plans. Changes in earnings mix or in cash repatriation plans could have an impact on the effective tax rates, which PMI monitors each quarter. Significant judgment is required in determining income tax provisions and in evaluating tax positions.
PMI is regularly examined by tax authorities around the world and is currently under examination in a number of jurisdictions. The U.S. federal statute of limitations remains open for the years 2004 onward, with years 2004 to 2006 currently under examination by the IRS. Foreign and U.S. state jurisdictions have statutes of limitations generally ranging from three to five years. Years still open to examination by foreign tax authorities in major jurisdictions include Germany (2007 onward), Indonesia (2007 onward), Russia (2010 onward) and Switzerland (2010 onward).
It is reasonably possible that within the next twelve months certain tax examinations will close, which could result in a change in unrecognized tax benefits along with related interest and penalties. An estimate of any possible change cannot be made at this time.

Note 12. Indebtedness:
Short-term Borrowings:
At March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, PMI’s short-term borrowings, consisting of commercial paper and bank loans to certain PMI subsidiaries, had a carrying value of $4,085 million and $1,511 million, respectively. The fair value of PMI’s short-term borrowings, based on current market interest rates, approximates carrying value.
















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Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


Long-term Debt:
At March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, PMI’s long-term debt consisted of the following:
 
(in millions)
 
March 31, 2012
 
December 31, 2011
U.S. dollar notes, 1.625% to 6.875% (average interest rate 4.810%), due through 2042
 
$
12,488

 
$
11,269

Foreign currency obligations:
 
 
 
 
Euro notes, 5.750% to 5.875% (average interest rate 5.813%), due through 2016
 
1,978

 
3,533

Swiss franc notes, 1.0% to 4.0% (average interest rate 2.799%), due through 2021
 
1,790

 
1,719

Other (average interest rate 2.930%), due through 2024
 
500

 
513

 
 
16,756

 
17,034

Less current portion of long-term debt
 
1,410

 
2,206

 
 
$
15,346

 
$
14,828

Other foreign currency debt above includes capital lease obligations primarily associated with PMI's vending machine distribution network in Japan. Other foreign currency debt also includes long-term debt from our business combination in the Philippines and mortgage debt in Switzerland.
In March 2012, PMI issued $700 million of 4.500% U.S. dollar notes due March 2042 and $550 million of 1.625% U.S. dollar notes due March 2017. Interest on these notes is payable semiannually beginning in September 2012. The net proceeds from the sale of these securities ($1,220 million) were used to meet PMI’s working capital requirements, to repurchase PMI’s common stock, to refinance debt and for general corporate purposes.
Credit Facilities:
At March 31, 2012, PMI’s total committed credit facilities were $6.0 billion, and there were no borrowings outstanding under these committed credit facilities.

 
Note 13. Fair Value Measurements:
The authoritative guidance defines fair value as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. The guidance also establishes a fair value hierarchy, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The guidance describes three levels of input that may be used to measure fair value, which are as follows:
Level 1 -
Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.
Level 2 -
Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities.
Level 3 -
Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities.
Derivative Financial Instruments – Foreign Exchange Contracts
PMI assesses the fair value of its derivative financial instruments, which consist of foreign exchange forward contracts, foreign currency swaps and foreign currency options, using internally developed models that use, as their basis, readily observable market inputs. The fair value of PMI’s foreign exchange forward contracts is determined by using the prevailing foreign exchange spot rates and interest rate differentials, and the respective maturity dates of the instruments. The fair value of PMI’s currency options is determined by using a Black-Scholes methodology based on foreign exchange spot rates and interest rate differentials, currency

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Philip Morris International Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


volatilities and maturity dates. PMI’s derivative financial instruments have been classified within Level 2 in the table shown below. See Note 6. Financial Instruments for an additional discussion of derivative financial instruments.
Debt
The fair value of PMI’s outstanding debt, which is utilized solely for disclosure purposes, is determined using quotes and market interest rates currently available to PMI for issuances of debt with similar terms and remaining maturities. The aggregate carrying value of PMI’s debt, excluding short-term borrowings and $72 million of capital lease obligations, was $16,684 million at March 31, 2012. The fair value of PMI’s outstanding debt, excluding the aforementioned short-term borrowings and capital lease obligations has been classified within Level 1 and Level 2 in the table shown below.
 
The aggregate fair value of PMI’s derivative financial instruments and debt as of March 31, 2012, was as follows:
 
(in millions)
 
Fair Value
at
March 31,
2012
 
Quoted Prices
in Active
Markets for
Identical
Assets/Liabilities
(Level 1)
 
Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)
 
Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)
Assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign exchange contracts
 
$
116

 
$

 
$
116

 
$

Total assets
 
$
116

 
$

 
$
116

 
$

Liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Debt
 
$
18,493

 
$
18,040

 
$
453

 
$

Foreign exchange contracts
 
38

 

 
38

 

Total liabilities
 
$
18,531

 
$
18,040

 
$
491

 
$



Note 14. Accumulated Other Comprehensive Losses:
PMI’s accumulated other comprehensive losses, net of taxes, consisted of the following:
 
(in millions)
 
At
March 31,
2012
 
At
December 31,
2011
 
At
March 31,
2011
Currency translation adjustments
 
$
129

 
$
(293
)
 
$
1,450

Pension and other benefits
 
(2,547
)
 
(2,585
)
 
(1,628
)
Derivatives accounted for as hedges
 
51

 
15

 
31

Equity securities
 

 

 
1

Total accumulated other comprehensive losses
 
$
(2,367
)
 
$
(2,863
)
 
$
(146
)

- 30 -


Item 2.
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF
FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Description of Our Company
We are a holding company whose subsidiaries and affiliates, and their licensees, are engaged in the manufacture and sale of cigarettes and other tobacco products in markets outside the United States of America. We manage our business in four segments:
 
European Union;
Eastern Europe, Middle East & Africa (“EEMA”);
Asia; and
Latin America & Canada.
Our products are sold in approximately 180 countries and, in many of these countries, they hold the number one or number two market share position. We have a wide range of premium, mid-price and low-price brands. Our portfolio comprises both international and local brands.
We use the term net revenues to refer to our operating revenues from the sale of our products, net of sales and promotion incentives. Our net revenues and operating income are affected by various factors, including the volume of products we sell, the price of our products, changes in currency exchange rates and the mix of products we sell. Mix is a term used to refer to the proportionate value of premium-price brands to mid-price or low-price brands in any given market (product mix). Mix can also refer to the proportion of shipment volume in more profitable markets versus shipment volume in less profitable markets (geographic mix). We often collect excise taxes from our customers and then remit them to local governments, and, in those circumstances, we include the excise taxes in our net revenues and in excise taxes on products. Our cost of sales consists principally of tobacco leaf, non-tobacco raw materials, labor and manufacturing costs.
Our marketing, administration and research costs include the costs of marketing our products, other costs generally not related to the manufacture of our products (including general corporate expenses), and costs incurred to develop new products. The most significant components of our marketing, administration and research costs are marketing expenses and general and administrative expenses.
We are a legal entity separate and distinct from our direct and indirect subsidiaries. Accordingly, our right, and thus the right of our creditors and stockholders, to participate in any distribution of the assets or earnings of any subsidiary is subject to the prior claims of creditors of such subsidiary, except to the extent that claims of our company itself as a creditor may be recognized. As a holding company, our principal sources of funds, including funds to make payment on our debt securities, are from the receipt of dividends and repayment of debt from our subsidiaries. Our principal wholly owned and majority-owned subsidiaries currently are not limited by long-term debt or other agreements in their ability to pay cash dividends or to make other distributions with respect to their common stock.

- 31 -



Executive Summary
The following executive summary provides significant highlights from the "Discussion and Analysis" that follows.

Consolidated Operating Results for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2012 – The changes in our reported diluted earnings per share (“diluted EPS”) for the three months ended March 31, 2012, from the comparable 2011 amounts, were as follows:

 
 
Diluted EPS
 
% Growth    
For the three months ended March 31, 2011
 
$
1.06

 
 
2011 Asset impairment and exit costs
 
0.01

 
 
2011 Tax items
 
(0.01
)
 
 
Currency
 
(0.02
)
 
 
Impact of lower shares outstanding and share-based payments
 
0.05

 
 
Operations
 
0.16

 
 
For the three months ended March 31, 2012
 
$
1.25

 
17.9
%
Asset Impairment and Exit Costs – During the three months ended March 31, 2011, we recorded pre-tax asset impairment and exit costs of $16 million ($0.01 per share) primarily related to severance costs for factory and R&D restructurings in the European Union. During the three months ended March 31, 2012, we recorded pre-tax asset impairment and exit costs of $8 million (insignificant impact on diluted EPS) related to severance costs for a factory restructuring in Latin America & Canada.
Income Taxes – Our effective income tax rate for the three months ended March 31, 2012 increased 1.1 percentage points to 30.0%. The effective tax rate for the three months ended March 31, 2011 was favorably impacted by an enacted decrease in corporate income tax rates in Greece ($11 million), which increased our diluted EPS by $0.01 per share in 2011.
Currency – The unfavorable currency impact during the reporting period was due primarily to the Argentine peso, Mexican peso, Polish zloty, Swiss franc and the Turkish lira, partially offset by the Japanese yen and the Euro.
Lower Shares Outstanding and Share-Based Payments – The favorable diluted EPS impact was due to the repurchase of our common stock pursuant to our share repurchase program.
Operations – The increase in our operations reflected in the table above was due primarily to the following segments:

Asia: Higher pricing and favorable volume/mix, partially offset by higher marketing, administration and research costs; and

Eastern Europe, Middle East & Africa: Higher pricing and favorable volume/mix, partially offset by higher marketing, administration and research costs.