XNYS:HOT Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide Inc Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 6/30/2012

Effective Date 6/30/2012

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Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C.20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

 

x Quarterly Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the Quarterly Period Ended June 30, 2012

OR

 

¨ Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the Transition Period from              to             

Commission File Number: 1-7959

 

 

STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS WORLDWIDE, INC.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Maryland

(State or other jurisdiction

of incorporation or organization)

52-1193298

(I.R.S. employer identification no.)

One StarPoint

Stamford, CT 06902

(Address of principal executive

offices, including zip code)

(203) 964-6000

(Registrant’s telephone number,

including area code)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer   x    Accelerated filer   ¨
Non-accelerated filer   ¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date:

196,469,854 shares of common stock, par value $0.01 per share, outstanding as of July 20, 2012.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

          Page  
PART I. Financial Information   

Item 1.

   Financial Statements      2   
  

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011

     3   
  

Consolidated Statements of Income for the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2012 and 2011

     4   
  

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2012 and 2011

     5   
  

Consolidated Condensed Statements of Cash Flows for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2012 and 2011

     6   
  

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     7   

Item 2.

   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      20   

Item 3.

   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk      37   

Item 4.

   Controls and Procedures      37   
PART II. Other Information   

Item 1.

   Legal Proceedings      37   

Item 1A.

   Risk Factors      37   

Item 6.

   Exhibits      38   


Table of Contents

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

The following unaudited consolidated financial statements of Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. (the “Company”) are provided pursuant to the requirements of this Item. In the opinion of management, all adjustments necessary for fair presentation, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, have been included. The consolidated financial statements presented herein have been prepared in accordance with the accounting policies described in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011 filed on February 21, 2012. See the notes to consolidated financial statements for the basis of presentation. Certain reclassifications have been made to the prior years’ financial statements to conform to the current year presentation. The consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included in this filing. Results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected for the full fiscal year ending December 31, 2012.

 

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STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS WORLDWIDE, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In millions, except share data)

 

     June 30,
2012
    December 31,
2011
 
     (Unaudited)        
ASSETS     

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 270      $ 454   

Restricted cash

     155        232   

Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $48 and $46

     597        569   

Inventories

     461        812   

Securitized vacation ownership notes receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $9 and $10

     60        64   

Prepaid expenses and other

     158        125   

Deferred income taxes

     279        278   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     1,980        2,534   

Investments

     267        259   

Plant, property and equipment, net

     3,187        3,175   

Assets held for sale, net

     117        127   

Goodwill and intangible assets, net

     2,027        2,025   

Deferred tax assets

     613        639   

Other assets

     417        355   

Securitized vacation ownership notes receivable, net

     381        446   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 8,989      $ 9,560   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY     

Current liabilities:

    

Short-term borrowings and current maturities of long-term debt

   $ —        $ 3   

Accounts payable

     104        144   

Current maturities of long-term securitized vacation ownership debt

     117        130   

Accrued expenses

     1,117        1,177   

Accrued salaries, wages and benefits

     336        375   

Accrued taxes and other

     149        163   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     1,823        1,992   

Long-term debt

     1,652        2,194   

Long-term securitized vacation ownership debt

     332        402   

Deferred income taxes

     45        46   

Other liabilities

     1,902        1,971   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
     5,754        6,605   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies

    

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Common stock; $0.01 par value; authorized 1,000,000,000 shares; outstanding 197,267,943 and 195,913,400 shares at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively

     2        2   

Additional paid-in capital

     999        963   

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     (358     (348

Retained earnings

     2,587        2,337   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Starwood stockholders’ equity

     3,230        2,954   

Noncontrolling interest

     5        1   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

     3,235        2,955   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 8,989      $ 9,560   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes to financial statements are an integral part of the above statements.

 

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STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS WORLDWIDE, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME

(In millions, except per share data)

(Unaudited)

 

     Three Months
Ended
June 30,
    Six Months
Ended
June 30,
 
     2012     2011     2012     2011  

Revenues

        

Owned, leased and consolidated joint venture hotels

   $ 453      $ 478      $ 855      $ 888   

Vacation ownership and residential sales and services

     316        146        830        299   

Management fees, franchise fees and other income

     222        201        423        378   

Other revenues from managed and franchised properties

     627        601        1,225        1,156   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
     1,618        1,426        3,333        2,721   

Costs and Expenses

        

Owned, leased and consolidated joint venture hotels

     360        381        709        742   

Vacation ownership and residential

     241        112        634        223   

Selling, general, administrative and other

     86        88        182        168   

Restructuring, goodwill impairment and other special charges (credits), net

     —          —          (11     —     

Depreciation

     56        60        113        120   

Amortization

     6        7        12        15   

Other expenses from managed and franchised properties

     627        601        1,225        1,156   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
     1,376        1,249        2,864        2,424   

Operating income

     242        177        469        297   

Equity (losses) earnings and gains and losses from unconsolidated ventures, net

     5        7        15        11   

Interest expense, net of interest income of $1, $0, $1, and $1

     (61     (52     (110     (106

Gain (loss) on asset dispositions and impairments, net

     (1     2        (8     (31
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations before taxes and noncontrolling interests

     185        134        366        171   

Income tax benefit (expense)

     (56     16        (108     6   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) from continuing operations

     129        150        258        177   

Discontinued operations:

        

Gain (loss) on dispositions, net of tax (benefit) expense of $(2), $1, $(1) and $2

     (7     (19     (8     (20
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

     122        131        250        157   

Net loss (income) attributable to noncontrolling interests

     —          —          —          2   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to Starwood

   $ 122      $ 131      $ 250      $ 159   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings (Losses) Per Share – Basic

        

Continuing operations

   $ 0.67      $ 0.79      $ 1.34      $ 0.95   

Discontinued operations

     (0.04     (0.10     (0.04     (0.11
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 0.63      $ 0.69      $ 1.30      $ 0.84   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings (Losses) Per Share – Diluted

        

Continuing operations

   $ 0.66      $ 0.77      $ 1.31      $ 0.92   

Discontinued operations

     (0.04     (0.09     (0.04     (0.10
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 0.62      $ 0.68      $ 1.27      $ 0.82   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Amounts attributable to Starwood’s Common Shareholders

        

Income (loss) from continuing operations

   $ 129      $ 150      $ 258      $ 179   

Discontinued operations

     (7     (19     (8     (20
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 122      $ 131      $ 250      $ 159   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted average number of shares

     195        189        193        188   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted average number of shares assuming dilution

     198        195        197        195   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes to financial statements are an integral part of the above statements.

 

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STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS WORLDWIDE, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

(In millions)

(Unaudited)

 

     Three Months Ended
June 30,
    Six Months Ended
June  30,
 
     2012     2011     2012     2011  

Net income

   $ 122      $ 131      $ 250      $ 157   

Other comprehensive income (loss), net of taxes:

        

Foreign currency translation adjustments

     (49     24        (10     79   

Amortization of actuarial gains and losses in net period pension cost

     —          1        1        1   

Change in fair value of derivatives

     1        (1     —          (3

Reclassification adjustments for losses (gains) included in net income

     (1     1        (1     1   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other comprehensive income (loss), net of taxes

     (49     25        (10     78   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income

     73        156        240        235   

Comprehensive loss attributable to noncontrolling interests

     —          —          —          2   

Foreign currency translation adjustments attributable to noncontrolling interests

     —          —          —          (2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive income attributable to Starwood

   $ 73      $ 156      $ 240      $ 235   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes to financial statements are an integral part of the above statements.

 

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STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS WORLDWIDE, INC.

CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(In millions)

(Unaudited)

 

     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
     2012     2011  

Operating Activities

    

Net income

   $ 250      $ 157   

Adjustments to net income:

    

Discontinued operations:

    

(Gain) loss on dispositions, net

     8        20   

Depreciation and amortization

     125        135   

Amortization of deferred gains

     (43     (42

(Gain) loss on asset dispositions and impairments, net

     8        31   

Stock-based compensation expense

     34        37   

Excess stock-based compensation tax benefit

     (68     (18

Distributions in excess (deficit) of equity earnings

     (8     (3

Non-cash portion of income tax (benefit) expense

     32        4   

Other non-cash adjustments to net income

     22        19   

Decrease (increase) in restricted cash

     7        (16

Other changes in working capital

     165        (109

Securitized VOI notes receivable activity, net

     69        57   

Unsecuritized VOI notes receivable activity, net

     (67     (66

Accrued and deferred income taxes and other

     12        (84
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash (used for) from operating activities

     546        122   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Investing Activities

    

Purchases of plant, property and equipment

     (150     (141

Proceeds from asset sales, net of transaction costs

     31        291   

(Issuance) collection of notes receivable, net

     2        —     

Acquisitions, net of acquired cash

     (1     —     

Distributions (contributions) from (to) investments, net

     1        2   

Other, net

     (11     (13
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash (used for) from investing activities

     (128     139   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Financing Activities

    

(Increase) decrease in restricted cash

     49        —     

Long-term debt repaid

     (565     (4

Long-term securitized debt repaid

     (83     (72

Long-term debt issued

     9        —     

Dividends paid

     (4     (3

Proceeds from employee stock option exercises

     39        55   

Excess stock-based compensation tax benefit

     68        18   

Share repurchases

     (61     —     

Other, net

     (56     (29
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash (used for) from financing activities

     (604     (35
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Exchange rate effect on cash and cash equivalents

     2        20   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

(Decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

     (184     246   

Cash and cash equivalents — beginning of period

     454        753   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents — end of period

   $ 270      $ 999   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Supplemental Disclosures of Cash Flow Information

    

Cash paid (received) during the period for:

    

Interest

   $ 89      $ 103   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income taxes, net of refunds

   $ 52      $ 67   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The accompanying notes to financial statements are an integral part of the above statements.

 

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 1. Basis of Presentation

The accompanying consolidated financial statements represent the consolidated financial position and consolidated results of operations of Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. and its subsidiaries (the “Company” or “Starwood”). The Company is one of the world’s largest hotel and leisure companies. The Company’s principal business is hotels and leisure, which is comprised of a worldwide hospitality network of over 1,100 full-service hotels, vacation ownership resorts and residential developments primarily serving two markets: luxury and upscale. The principal operations of Starwood Vacation Ownership, Inc. (“SVO”) include the acquisition, development and operation of vacation ownership resorts; marketing and selling of vacation ownership interests (“VOIs”) in the resorts; and providing financing to customers who purchase such interests.

The consolidated financial statements include assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses of the Company and all of its controlled subsidiaries and partnerships. In consolidating, all material intercompany transactions are eliminated. We have evaluated all subsequent events through the date the consolidated financial statements were filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

In accordance with the guidance for noncontrolling interests in Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 810, Consolidation, references in this report to our earnings per share, net income, and shareholders’ equity attributable to Starwood’s common stockholders do not include amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests.

Note 2. Recently Issued Accounting Standards

Adopted Accounting Standards

In September 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2011-08, “Intangibles-Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Testing Goodwill for Impairment”. This topic permits an entity to assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of the reporting unit is less than its carrying amount as a basis to determine whether an additional impairment test is necessary. This topic is for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011 with early adoption allowed. The Company early adopted this topic during the fourth quarter of 2011 in conjunction with its annual impairment testing.

In May 2011, the FASB issued ASU No. 2011-04, “Fair Value Measurements (Topic 820): Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRSs.” This topic clarifies the application of existing fair value measurements and disclosure requirements and certain changes to principles and requirements for measuring fair value. This update is to be applied prospectively and is effective during interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011. The Company adopted this ASU on January 1, 2012 and it did not have an effect on its consolidated financial statements.

Note 3. Earnings per Share

Basic and diluted earnings per share are calculated using income from continuing operations attributable to Starwood’s common stockholders (i.e. excluding amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests).

The following is a reconciliation of basic earnings per share to diluted earnings per share for income from continuing operations (in millions, except per share data):

 

     Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
     2012      2011  

Income from continuing operations

   $ 129       $ 150   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Weighted average common shares for basic earnings per share

     195         189   

Effect of dilutive stock options and restricted stock awards

     3         6   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Weighted average common shares for diluted earnings per share

     198         195   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Basic earnings per share

   $ 0.67       $ 0.79   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Diluted earnings per share

   $ 0.66       $ 0.77   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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     Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
     2012      2011  

Income from continuing operations

   $ 258       $ 179   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Weighted average common shares for basic earnings per share

     193         188   

Effect of dilutive stock options and restricted stock awards

     4         7   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Weighted average common shares for diluted earnings per share

     197         195   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Basic earnings per share

   $ 1.34       $ 0.95   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Diluted earnings per share

   $ 1.31       $ 0.92   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Approximately 1,493,356 shares and 1,103,000 shares for the three months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively, and 1,305,513 and 875,000 shares for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively, were excluded from the computation of diluted shares, as their impact would have been anti-dilutive.

Note 4. Asset Dispositions and Impairments

During the three months ended March 31, 2012, the Company sold one wholly-owned hotel for cash proceeds of approximately $11 million, net, and recognized a pre-tax loss of $7 million related to the sale. The hotel was sold subject to a long-term franchise agreement.

During the three months ended June 30, 2011, the Company sold two wholly-owned hotels, subject to long-term management agreements, for cash proceeds of approximately $237 million. The Company also sold its interest in a consolidated joint venture for cash proceeds of approximately $44 million, with the buyer assuming $57 million of the Company’s debt. The Company recognized an after-tax loss in discontinued operations of approximately $18 million as a result of the sale. Additionally, the Company sold non-core assets for approximately $2 million and recorded a gain of approximately $2 million.

During the three months ended March 31, 2011, the Company recorded an impairment charge of $32 million to write-off its noncontrolling interest in a joint venture that owns a hotel in Tokyo, Japan.

Note 5. Assets Held for Sale

During the three months ended June 30, 2012, the Company entered into purchase and sale agreements for the sales of certain wholly-owned hotels. The Company received a non-refundable deposit during the second quarter, and the hotels and estimated goodwill to be allocated to these assets have been reclassified as assets held for sale as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011. These hotels are expected to be sold unencumbered by management or franchise agreements. In connection with the anticipated sales, the Company recognized an impairment charge of $5 million (net of tax) recorded in discontinued operations (see Note 14), primarily related to the write-down to fair market value of the properties based on the current market prices. The sales are expected to be completed in the second half of 2012.

Note 6. Transfers of Financial Assets

The Company has variable interests in the entities associated with its five outstanding securitization transactions. As these securitizations consist of similar, homogenous loans, they have been aggregated for disclosure purposes. The Company applied the variable interest model and determined it is the primary beneficiary of these Variable Interest Entities (“VIEs”). In making this determination, the Company evaluated the activities that significantly impact the economics of the VIEs, including the management of the securitized notes receivable and any related non-performing loans. The Company also evaluated its retention of the residual economic interests in the related VIEs. The Company is the servicer of the securitized mortgage receivables. The Company also has the option, subject to certain limitations, to repurchase or replace VOI notes receivable that are in default, at their outstanding principal amounts. Such activity totaled $8 million and $15 million during the three months and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively, compared to $9 million and $17 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2011. The Company has been able to resell the VOIs underlying the VOI notes repurchased or replaced under these provisions without incurring significant losses. The Company holds the risk of potential loss (or gain) as the last to be paid out by proceeds of the VIEs under the terms of the agreements. As such, the Company holds both the power to direct the activities of the VIEs and obligation to absorb the losses (or benefits) from the VIEs.

The securitization agreements are without recourse to the Company, except for breaches of representations and warranties. Based on the right of the Company to fund defaults at its option, subject to certain limitations, it intends to do so until the debt is extinguished, to maintain the credit rating of the underlying notes.

Upon transfer of VOI notes receivable to the VIEs, the receivables and certain cash flows derived from them become restricted for use in meeting obligations to the VIE creditors. The VIEs utilize trusts which have ownership of cash balances that also have restrictions, the amounts of which are reported in restricted cash. The Company’s interests in trust assets are subordinate to the interests of third-party investors and, as such, may not be realized by the Company if needed to absorb deficiencies in cash flows that are allocated to the investors in

 

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the trusts’ debt (see Note 11). The Company is contractually obligated to receive the excess cash flows (spread between the collections on the notes and third party obligations defined in the securitization agreements) from the VIEs. Such activity totaled $12 million and $25 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively, compared to $10 million and $21 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2011, respectively, and is classified in cash and cash equivalents.

Note 7. Vacation Ownership Notes Receivable

Notes receivable (net of reserves) related to the Company’s vacation ownership loans consist of the following (in millions):

 

     June 30,
2012
    December 31,
2011
 

Vacation ownership loans – securitized

   $ 441      $ 510   

Vacation ownership loans – unsecuritized

     168        113   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
     609        623   

Less: current portion

    

Vacation ownership loans – securitized

     (60     (64

Vacation ownership loans – unsecuritized

     (23     (20
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 526      $ 539   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The current and long-term maturities of unsecuritized VOI notes receivable are included in accounts receivable and other assets, respectively, in the Company’s consolidated balance sheets.

The Company records interest income associated with VOI notes in its vacation ownership and residential sales and services line item in its consolidated statements of income. Interest income related to the Company’s VOI notes receivable was as follows (in millions):

 

     Three Months Ended
June  30,
 
     2012      2011  

Vacation ownership loans – securitized

   $ 16       $ 15   

Vacation ownership loans – unsecuritized

     4         6   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 20       $ 21   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     Six Months Ended
June  30,
 
     2012      2011  

Vacation ownership loans – securitized

   $ 34       $ 32   

Vacation ownership loans – unsecuritized

     8         11   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 42       $ 43   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table presents future maturities of gross VOI notes receivable and interest rates (in millions):

 

     Securitized     Unsecuritized     Total  

2012

   $ 34      $ 20      $ 54   

2013

     71        19        90   

2014

     72        17        89   

2015

     71        20        91   

Thereafter

     259        155        414   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2012

   $ 507      $ 231      $ 738   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted Average Interest Rates

     12.84     12.49     12.72
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Range of interest rates

     5 to 17     6 to 17     5 to 17
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

For the vacation ownership and residential segment, the Company records an estimate of expected uncollectibility on its VOI notes receivable as a reduction of revenue at the time it recognizes profit on a timeshare sale. The Company holds large amounts of homogeneous VOI notes receivable and therefore assesses uncollectibility based on pools of receivables. In estimating loss reserves, the Company uses a technique referred to as static pool analysis, which tracks uncollectible notes for each year’s sales over the life of the respective notes and projects an estimated default rate that is used in the determination of its loan loss reserve requirements. As of June 30, 2012, the average estimated default rate for the Company’s pools of receivables was approximately 9.8%.

 

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Table of Contents

The activity and balances for the Company’s loan loss reserve are as follows (in millions):

 

     Securitized     Unsecuritized     Total  

Balance at March 31, 2012

   $ 73      $ 59      $ 132   

Provisions for loan losses

     —          5        5   

Write-offs

     —          (8     (8

Other

     (7     7        —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2012

   $ 66      $ 63      $ 129   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2011

   $ 80      $ 56      $ 136   

Provisions for loan losses

     —          12        12   

Write-offs

     —          (19     (19

Other

     (14     14        —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2012

   $ 66      $ 63      $ 129   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at March 31, 2011

   $ 72      $ 78      $ 150   

Provisions for loan losses

     4        6        10   

Write-offs

     —          (12     (12

Other

     (8     8        —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2011

   $ 68      $ 80      $ 148   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2010

   $ 82      $ 79      $ 161   

Provisions for loan losses

     2        13        15   

Write-offs

     —          (28     (28

Other

     (16     16        —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2011

   $ 68      $ 80      $ 148   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The primary credit quality indicator used by the Company to calculate the loan loss reserve for the VOI notes is the origination of the notes by brand (Sheraton, Westin, and Other) as the Company believes there is a relationship between the default behavior of borrowers and the brand associated with the vacation ownership property they have acquired. In addition to quantitatively calculating the loan loss reserve based on its static pool analysis, the Company supplements the process by evaluating certain qualitative data, including the aging of the respective receivables, current default trends by brand and origination year, and the Fair Isaac Corporation (“FICO”) scores of the buyers.

Given the significance of the Company’s respective pools of VOI notes receivable, a change in the projected default rate can have a significant impact to its loan loss reserve requirements, with a 0.1% change estimated to have an impact of approximately $4 million.

The Company considers a VOI note receivable delinquent when it is more than 30 days outstanding. Delinquent notes receivable amounted to $59 million and $62 million as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively. All delinquent loans are placed on nonaccrual status and the Company does not resume interest accrual until payment is made. Upon reaching 120 days outstanding, the loan is considered to be in default and the Company commences the repossession process. Uncollectible VOI notes receivable are charged off when title to the unit is returned to the Company. The Company generally does not modify VOI notes that become delinquent or upon default.

Note 8. Fair Value

The following table represents the Company’s fair value hierarchy for its financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of June 30, 2012 (in millions):

 

     Level 1      Level 2      Level 3      Total  

Assets:

           

Forward contracts

   $ —         $ 2       $ —         $ 2   

Interest rate swaps

     —           6         —           6   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ —         $ 8       $ —         $ 8   

Liabilities:

           

Forward contracts

   $ —         $ 2       $ —         $ 2   

The forward contracts are over-the-counter contracts that do not trade on a public exchange. The fair values of the contracts are based on inputs such as foreign currency spot rates and forward points that are readily available on public markets, and as such, are classified as Level 2. The Company considered both its credit risk, as well as its counterparties’ credit risk, in determining fair value and no adjustment was made as the risk of default was deemed insignificant based on the short duration of the contracts and the Company’s rate of short-term debt.

The interest rate swaps are valued using an income approach. Expected future cash flows are converted to a present value amount based on market expectations of the yield curve on floating interest rates, which is readily available on public markets.

 

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Table of Contents

Note 9. Debt

Long-term debt and short-term borrowings consisted of the following, excluding securitized vacation ownership debt (in millions):

 

     June 30,
2012
     December 31,
2011
 

Senior Credit Facility:

     

Revolving Credit Facility, maturing 2013

   $ —         $ —     

Senior Notes, interest at 6.25%, maturing 2013

     —           500   

Senior Notes, interest at 7.875%, maturing 2014

     499         497   

Senior Notes, interest at 7.375%, maturing 2015

     450         450   

Senior Notes, interest at 6.75%, maturing 2018

     400         400   

Senior Notes, interest at 7.15%, maturing 2019

     245         245   

Mortgages and other, interest rates ranging from 1.00% to 9.00%, various maturities

     58         105   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     1,652         2,197   

Less current maturities

     —           (3
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Long-term debt

   $ 1,652       $ 2,194   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

During the three months ended June 30, 2012, the Company redeemed all of its outstanding 6.25% Senior Notes due 2013, which had a principal amount of approximately $495 million. In connection with this transaction, the Company terminated three interest rate swaps, which had notional amounts totaling $250 million (see Note 13). As a result of the early redemption of the 6.25% Senior Notes, the Company recorded a net charge of approximately $15 million in interest expense, representing the tender premiums, swap settlements and other related redemption costs. Also during the three months ended June 30, 2012, the Company prepaid $52 million of third party debt previously secured by one owned hotel.

Note 10. Restructuring, Goodwill Impairment and Other Special Charges (Credits), Net

As a result of a court ruling during the three months ended March 31, 2012, the Company recorded a favorable adjustment of $11 million to reverse a portion of its litigation reserve attributable to its hotel segment.

The Company had remaining accruals of $78 million and $89 million as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively, which are primarily recorded in accrued expenses.

Note 11. Securitized Vacation Ownership Debt

As discussed in Note 6, the Company’s VIEs associated with the securitization of its VOI notes receivable are consolidated in the Company’s financial statements. Long-term and short-term securitized vacation ownership debt consisted of the following (in millions):

 

     June 30,
2012
    December 31,
2011
 

2005 securitization, interest rates ranging from 5.25% to 6.29%, maturing 2018

   $ 29      $ 37   

2006 securitization, interest rates ranging from 5.28% to 5.85%, maturing 2018

     22        27   

2009 securitization, interest rate at 5.81%, maturing 2016

     77        92   

2010 securitization, interest rates ranging from 3.65% to 4.75%, maturing 2021

     163        190   

2011 securitization, interest rates ranging from 3.67% to 4.82%, maturing 2026

     158        186   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
     449        532   

Less current maturities

     (117     (130
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Long-term securitized debt

   $ 332      $ 402   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

Note 12. Other Liabilities

Other liabilities consisted of the following (in millions):

 

     June 30,
2012
     December 31,
2011
 

Deferred gains on asset sales

   $ 886       $ 933   

SPG point liability

     696         724   

Deferred revenue including VOIs and residential sales

     42         36   

Benefit plan liabilities

     69         74   

Insurance reserves

     48         47   

Other

     161         157   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 1,902       $ 1,971   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The Company defers gains realized in connection with the sale of a property that the Company continues to manage through a long-term management agreement and recognizes the gains over the initial term of the related agreement. As of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, the Company had total deferred gains of approximately $1.0 billion included in accrued expenses and other liabilities in the Company’s consolidated balance sheets. Amortization of deferred gains is included in management fees, franchise fees and other income in the Company’s consolidated statements of income and totaled approximately $22 million and $43 million in the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively, and $22 million and $42 million in the three and six months ended June 30, 2011, respectively.

Note 13. Derivative Financial Instruments

The Company enters into forward currency contracts to manage its exposure to fluctuations in certain foreign currency exchange rates. The Company enters into forward contracts to hedge forecasted transactions based in certain foreign currencies. These forward contracts have been designated and qualify as cash flow hedges, and their change in fair value is recorded as a component of other comprehensive income and reclassified into earnings in the same period or periods in which the forecasted transaction occurs. To qualify as a hedge, the Company needs to formally document, designate and assess the effectiveness of the transactions that receive hedge accounting. The notional dollar amounts of the outstanding Euro forward contracts at June 30, 2012 are $15 million, with average exchange rates of 1.4, with terms of less than one year. The Company reviews the effectiveness of its hedging instruments on a quarterly basis and records any ineffectiveness into earnings. The Company discontinues hedge accounting for any hedge that is no longer evaluated to be highly effective. From time to time, the Company may choose to de-designate portions of hedges when changes in estimates of forecasted transactions occur.

The Company also enters into forward currency contracts to manage foreign currency exchange risk on intercompany loans that are not deemed permanently invested. These forward contracts are not designated as hedges, and their change in fair value is recorded in the Company’s consolidated statements of income in the interest expense line item during each reporting period. These forward contracts provide an economic hedge, as they largely offset foreign currency exposure on intercompany loans.

The Company enters into interest rate swap agreements to manage interest expense. The Company’s objective is to manage the impact of interest rates on the results of operations, cash flows and the market value of the Company’s debt. At June 30, 2012, the Company had three interest rate swap agreements with an aggregate notional amount of $150 million under which the Company pays floating rates and receives fixed rates of interest (“Fair Value Swaps”). The Fair Value Swaps hedge the change in fair value of certain fixed rate debt related to fluctuations in interest rates and mature in 2014. The Fair Value Swaps modify the Company’s interest rate exposure by effectively converting debt with a fixed rate to a floating rate. These interest rate swaps have been designated and qualify as fair value hedges and have met the requirements to assume zero ineffectiveness. During the second quarter of 2012, the Company terminated its three 2013 interest rate swap agreements with a total notional amount of $250 million, resulting in a gain of approximately $3 million recorded to interest expense.

The counterparties to the Company’s derivative financial instruments are major financial institutions. The Company evaluates the bond ratings of the financial institutions and believes that credit risk is at an acceptable level.

 

12


Table of Contents

The following tables summarize the fair value of the Company’s derivative instruments, the effect of derivative instruments on its Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income, the amounts reclassified from “Other Comprehensive Income” and the effect on the Consolidated Statements of Income during the quarter.

Fair Value of Derivative Instruments

(in millions)

 

      June 30,
2012
     December 31,
2011
 
      Balance Sheet
Location
   Fair
Value
     Balance Sheet
Location
     Fair
Value
 

Derivatives designated as hedging instruments

           

Asset Derivatives

           

Forward contracts

   Prepaid and other
current assets
   $ 2        
 
Prepaid and other
current assets
  
  
   $ 3   

Interest rate swaps

   Other assets      6         Other assets         12   
     

 

 

       

 

 

 

Total assets

      $ 8          $ 15   
     

 

 

       

 

 

 
     June 30,
2012
     December 31,
2011
 
     Balance Sheet
Location
   Fair
Value
     Balance Sheet
Location
     Fair
Value
 

Derivatives not designated as hedging instruments

           

Asset Derivatives

           

Forward contracts

   Prepaid and other
current assets
   $ —          
 
Prepaid and other
current assets
  
  
   $ —     
     

 

 

       

 

 

 

Total assets

      $ —            $ —     
     

 

 

       

 

 

 

Liability Derivatives

           

Forward contracts

   Accrued expenses    $ 2         Accrued expenses       $ —     
     

 

 

       

 

 

 

Total liabilities

      $ 2          $ —     
     

 

 

       

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income

for the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2012 and 2011

(in millions)

 

Balance at March 31, 2012

   $ (2

Mark-to-market loss (gain) on forward exchange contracts

     (1

Reclassification of gain (loss) from OCI to management fees, franchise fees, and other income

                 1   
  

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2012

   $ (2
  

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2011

   $ (3

Mark-to-market (gain) loss on forward exchange contracts

     —     

Reclassification of gain (loss) from OCI to management fees, franchise fees, and other income

     1   
  

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2012

   $ (2
  

 

 

 

Balance at March 31, 2011

   $ 2   

Mark-to-market (gain) loss on forward exchange contracts

     1   

Reclassification of gain (loss) from OCI to management fees, franchise fees, and other income

     (1
  

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2011

   $ 2   
  

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2010

   $   

Mark-to-market (gain) loss on forward exchange contracts

     3   

Reclassification of gain (loss) from OCI to management fees, franchise fees, and other income

     (1
  

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2011

   $ 2   
  

 

 

 

 

      Derivatives Not

Designated as Hedging

        Instruments

   Location of Gain
or  (Loss) Recognized
in Income on Derivative
     Amount of Gain
or  (Loss) Recognized
in Income on Derivative
 
            Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
            2012      2011  

Foreign forward exchange contracts

     Interest expense, net       $ 2       $ (5
     

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total loss included in income

      $ 2       $ (5
     

 

 

    

 

 

 
            Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
            2012      2011  

Foreign forward exchange contracts

     Interest expense, net       $ 1       $ (5
     

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total loss included in income

      $ 1       $ (5
     

 

 

    

 

 

 

Note 14. Discontinued Operations

During the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, the loss of $7 million and $8 million, respectively, primarily relates to the Company’s $5 million (net of tax) write-down to fair market value, based on current market prices, of certain wholly-owned hotels classified as held for sale (see Note 5). Additionally, the Company recorded a loss of $1 million and $2 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively, for accrued interest related to an uncertain tax position associated with a previous disposition.

During the three and six months ended June 30, 2011, the loss of $19 million and $20 million, respectively, primarily relates to the Company’s $18 million (net of tax) loss from the sale of its interest in a consolidated joint venture. Additionally, the Company recorded a loss of $1 million and $2 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2011, respectively, for accrued interest related to an uncertain tax position associated with a previous disposition.

 

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Table of Contents

Note 15. Pension and Postretirement Benefit Plans

The following table presents the components of net periodic benefit cost for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011 (in millions):

 

     Three Months Ended June 30,  
     2012      2011  
     Pension
Benefits
     Foreign
Pension
Benefits
    Postretirement
Benefits
     Pension
Benefits
     Foreign
Pension
Benefits
    Postretirement
Benefits
 

Service cost

   $ —         $ —        $ —         $ —         $ —        $ —     

Interest cost

     0.2         2.4        0.2         0.3         2.5        0.3   

Expected return on plan assets

     —           (3.0     —           —           (3.0     —     

Amortization of actuarial loss

     0.1         0.5        —           —           0.4        —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net period benefit cost (income)

   $ 0.3       $ (0.1   $ 0.2       $ 0.3       $ (0.1   $ 0.3   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

     Six Months Ended June 30,  
     2012      2011  
     Pension
Benefits
     Foreign
Pension
Benefits
    Postretirement
Benefits
     Pension
Benefits
     Foreign
Pension
Benefits
    Postretirement
Benefits
 

Service cost

   $ —         $ —        $ —         $ —         $ —        $ —     

Interest cost

     0.4         4.8        0.4         0.5         4.9        0.5   

Expected return on plan assets

     —           (6.0     —           —           (5.9     —     

Amortization of actuarial loss

     0.1         1.0        —           —           0.7        —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net period benefit cost (income)

   $ 0.5       $ (0.2   $ 0.4       $ 0.5       $ (0.3   $ 0.5   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

During the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, the Company contributed approximately $3 million and $5 million, respectively, to its pension and postretirement benefit plans. For the remainder of 2012, the Company expects to contribute approximately $6 million to its pension and postretirement benefit plans. A portion of this funding will be reimbursed for costs related to employees of managed hotels.

Note 16. Income Taxes

The total amount of unrecognized tax benefits as of June 30, 2012, was $158 million, of which $45 million would affect the Company’s effective tax rate if recognized. It is reasonably possible that approximately $60 million of the Company’s unrecognized tax benefits as of June 30, 2012 will reverse within the next twelve months.

The Company recognizes interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits through income tax expense. As of June 30, 2012, the Company had $79 million accrued for the payment of interest and $1 million accrued for the payment of penalties.

The Company is subject to taxation in the U.S. federal jurisdiction, as well as various state and foreign jurisdictions. As of June 30, 2012, the Company is no longer subject to examination by U.S. federal taxing authorities for years prior to 2007 and to examination by any U.S. state taxing authority prior to 1998. All subsequent periods remain eligible for examination. In the significant foreign jurisdictions in which the Company operates, the Company is no longer subject to examination by the relevant taxing authorities for any years prior to 2001.

 

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Table of Contents

Note 17. Stockholders’ Equity

The following tables represent changes in stockholders’ equity that are attributable to Starwood’s stockholders and non-controlling interests for the three and six month periods ending June 30, 2012 (in millions):

 

           Equity Attributable to Starwood Stockholders         
     Total     Common
Shares
     Additional
Paid-in
Capital
    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Loss
    Retained
Earnings
     Equity
Attributable to
Noncontrolling
Interests
 

Balance at March 31, 2012

   $ 3,168      $ 2       $ 1,005      $ (309   $ 2,465       $ 5   

Net income (loss)

     122        —           —          —          122         —     

Equity compensation activity and other

     55        —           55        —          —           —     

Share repurchases

     (61     —           (61     —          —           —     

Other comprehensive income (loss)

     (49     —           —          (49     —           —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2012

   $ 3,235      $ 2       $ 999      $ (358   $ 2,587       $ 5   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

           Equity Attributable to Starwood Stockholders         
     Total     Common
Shares
     Additional
Paid-in
Capital
    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Loss
    Retained
Earnings
     Equity
Attributable to
Noncontrolling
Interests
 

Balance at December 31, 2011

   $ 2,955      $ 2       $ 963      $ (348   $ 2,337       $ 1   

Net income (loss)

     250        —           —          —          250         —     

Equity compensation activity and other

     101        —           97        —          —           4   

Share repurchases

     (61     —           (61     —          —           —     

Other comprehensive income (loss)

     (10     —           —          (10     —           —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2012

   $ 3,235      $ 2       $ 999      $ (358   $ 2,587       $ 5   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Share Issuances and Repurchases. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, the Company issued approximately 1,210,000 and 1,954,000 Company common shares, respectively, as a result of stock option exercises. During the three months ended June 30, 2012, the Company repurchased 1,248,278 common shares at an average price of $49.07 for a total cost of approximately $61 million. Through July 20, 2012, the Company repurchased an additional 797,538 common shares at an average price of $49.39. These shares are included in the number of shares outstanding as of June 30, 2012. As of June 30, 2012, $189 million remained available under the share repurchase authorization previously approved by the Company’s Board of Directors.

Note 18. Stock-Based Compensation

In accordance with the Company’s 2004 Long-Term Incentive Compensation Plan, during the six month period ended June 30, 2012, the Company granted stock options, restricted stock and restricted stock units to executive officers, members of the Board of Directors and certain employees. The Company granted approximately 371,000 stock options that had a weighted average grant date fair value of $18.62 per option. The weighted average exercise price of these options was $55.06. In addition, the Company granted approximately 1,423,000 shares of restricted stock and restricted stock units that had a weighted average grant date fair value of $55.04 per share or unit.

The Company recorded stock-based employee compensation expense, including the impact of reimbursements from third parties, of $16 million and $34 million, in the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively, and $18 million and $37 million in the three and six months ended June 30, 2011, respectively.

As of June 30, 2012, there was approximately $99 million of unrecognized compensation cost, net of estimated forfeitures, including the impact of reimbursements from third parties, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 1.74 years on a straight-line basis.

 

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Table of Contents

Note 19. Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The following table presents the carrying amounts and estimated fair values of the Company’s financial instruments (in millions):

 

          June 30, 2012      December 31, 2011  
     Hierarchy
Level
   Carrying
Amount
     Fair
Value
     Carrying
Amount
     Fair
Value
 

Assets:

              

Restricted cash

   1    $ 3       $ 3       $ 2       $ 2   

VOI notes receivable

   3      145         175         93         109   

Securitized vacation ownership notes receivable

   3      381         470         446         551   

Other notes receivable

   3      22         22         26         26   
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total financial assets

      $ 551       $ 670       $ 567       $ 688   
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Liabilities:

              

Long-term debt

   1    $ 1,652       $ 1,919       $ 2,194       $ 2,442   

Long-term securitized debt

   3      332         350         402         412   
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total financial liabilities

      $ 1,984       $ 2,269       $ 2,596       $ 2,854   
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Off-Balance sheet:

              

Letters of credit

   2    $ —         $ 109       $ —         $ 171   

Surety bonds

   2      —           78         —           21   
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total Off-Balance sheet

      $ —         $ 187       $ —         $ 192   
     

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

As previously discussed, on January 1, 2012, the Company adopted ASU No. 2011-04. As a result, the Company has disclosed on a prospective basis the financial hierarchy that prioritizes inputs to valuation techniques as described in ASC No. 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures.

The Company believes the carrying values of its financial instruments related to current assets and liabilities approximate fair value. The Company records its derivative assets and liabilities at fair value. See Note 8 for recorded amounts and the method and assumption used to estimate fair value.

The carrying value of the Company’s restricted cash approximates its fair value. The Company estimates the fair value of its VOI notes receivable and securitized VOI notes receivable using assumptions related to current securitization market transactions. To gain additional comfort on the value, the amount is then compared to a discounted expected future cash flow model using a discount rate commensurate with the risk of the underlying notes, primarily determined by the credit worthiness of the borrowers based on their FICO scores. The results of these two methods are then evaluated to conclude on the estimated fair value. The fair value of other notes receivable is estimated based on terms of the instrument and current market conditions. These financial instrument assets are recorded in the other assets line item in the Company’s consolidated balance sheet.

The Company estimates the fair value of its publicly traded debt based on the bid prices in the public debt markets. The carrying amount of its floating rate debt is a reasonable basis of fair value due to the variable nature of the interest rates. The Company’s non-public, securitized debt, and fixed rate debt fair value is determined based upon discounted cash flows for the debt rates deemed reasonable for the type of debt, prevailing market conditions and the length to maturity for the debt.

The fair values of the Company’s letters of credit and surety bonds are estimated to be the same as the contract values based on the nature of the fee arrangements with the issuing financial institutions.

Note 20. Business Segment Information

The Company has two operating segments: hotels and vacation ownership and residential sales. The hotel segment generally represents a worldwide network of owned, leased and consolidated joint venture hotels and resorts operated primarily under the Company’s proprietary brand names including St. Regis®, The Luxury Collection®, Sheraton®, Westin®, W®, Le Méridien®, Aloft®, Element®, and Four Points® by Sheraton as well as hotels and resorts which are managed or franchised under these brand names in exchange for fees. The vacation ownership and residential sales segment includes the acquisition, development and operation of vacation ownership resorts, marketing and selling of VOIs, and providing financing to customers who purchase such interests.

The performance of the hotels and vacation ownership and residential segments is evaluated primarily on operating profit before corporate selling, general and administrative expense, interest, gains and losses on the sale of real estate, restructuring and other special (charges) credits, and income taxes. The Company does not allocate these items to its segments.

 

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The following table presents revenues, operating income, capital expenditures and assets for the Company’s reportable segments (in millions):

 

     Three Months Ended
June 30,
    Six Months Ended
June  30,
 
     2012     2011     2012     2011  

Revenues:

        

Hotel

   $ 1,261      $ 1,238      $ 2,421      $ 2,341   

Vacation ownership and residential

     357        188        912        380   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

   $ 1,618      $ 1,426      $ 3,333      $ 2,721   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income:

        

Hotel

   $ 212      $ 186      $ 353      $ 308   

Vacation ownership and residential

     71        29        187        64   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total segment operating income

     283        215        540        372   

Selling, general, administrative and other

     (41     (38     (82     (75

Restructuring, goodwill impairment and other special charges (credits), net

     —          —          11        —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income

     242        177        469        297   

Equity earnings (losses) and gains and (losses) from unconsolidated ventures, net:

        

Hotel

     5        5        14        9   

Vacation ownership and residential

     —          2        1        2   

Interest expense, net

     (61     (52     (110     (106

Gain (loss) on asset dispositions and impairments, net

     (1     2        (8     (31
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations before taxes and noncontrolling interests

   $ 185      $ 134      $ 366      $ 171   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Capital expenditures:

        

Hotel

   $ 71      $ 41      $ 124      $ 83   

Vacation ownership and residential(a)

     (1     47        8        76   

Corporate

     18        26        36        44   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total(b)

   $ 88      $ 114      $ 168      $ 203   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
     June 30,
2012
    December
31, 2011
       

Assets:

      

Hotel(c)

   $ 6,129      $ 6,162     

Vacation ownership and residential(d)

     1,684        2,207     

Corporate

     1,176        1,191     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total

   $ 8,989      $ 9,560     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

(a) Represents gross inventory and other capital expenditures of $17 million and $47 million less VOI costs of sales of $18 million and $39 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2011, respectively, gross inventory and other capital expenditures were $63 million and $113 million less VOI costs of sales of $16 million and $37 million.
(b) Includes $78 million and $150 million of property, plant, and equipment expenditures for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively, and $79 million and $141 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2011, respectively. Additional expenditures included in the amounts above consist of vacation ownership inventory and investments in management contracts and hotel joint ventures.
(c) Includes $236 million and $229 million of investments in unconsolidated joint ventures at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively.
(d) Includes $31 million and $30 million of investments in unconsolidated joint ventures at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively.

Note 21. Commitments and Contingencies

Variable Interest Entities. The Company has evaluated 18 hotels in which it has a variable interest, generally in the form of investments, loans, guarantees, or equity. The Company determines if it is the primary beneficiary of the hotel by considering the qualitative factors. Qualitative factors include evaluating if the Company has the power to control the VIE and has the obligation to absorb the losses and rights to receive the benefits of the VIE, that could potentially be significant to the VIE. The Company has determined it is not the primary beneficiary of the 18 VIEs, and therefore these entities are not consolidated in the Company’s financial statements. See Note 6 for the VIEs in which the Company is deemed the primary beneficiary and has consolidated the entities.

The 18 VIEs associated with the Company’s variable interests represent entities that own hotels for which the Company has entered into management or franchise agreements. The Company is paid a fee primarily based on financial metrics of the hotel. The hotels are financed by the owners, generally in the form of working capital, equity and debt.

At June 30, 2012, the Company had approximately $80 million of investments and loan balances of $10 million associated with 16 of our 18 VIEs. As the Company is not obligated to fund future cash contributions under these agreements, the maximum loss equals the carrying value. In addition, the Company has not contributed amounts to the VIEs in excess of their contractual obligations.

 

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Additionally, the Company has approximately $5 million of investments and certain performance guarantees associated with the remaining two VIEs. The performance guarantees have possible cash outlays of up to $63 million, $62 million of which, if required, would be funded over several years and would be largely offset by management fees received under these contracts.

At December 31, 2011, the Company had approximately $83 million of investments and a loan balance of $9 million associated with the 16 VIEs. Additionally, the Company had approximately $5 million of investments and certain performance guarantees associated with the remaining two VIEs.

Guaranteed Loans and Commitments. In limited cases, the Company has made loans to owners of, or partners in, hotel or resort ventures for which the Company has a management or franchise agreement. Loans outstanding under this program totaled $12 million at June 30, 2012. The Company evaluates these loans for impairment, and at June 30, 2012, believes the net carrying value of these loans is collectible. Unfunded loan commitments aggregating $19 million were outstanding at June 30, 2012, none of which is expected to be funded in the next twelve months or in total. These loans typically are secured by pledges of project ownership interests and/or mortgages on the projects. The Company also has $94 million of equity and other potential contributions associated with managed or joint venture properties, $54 million of which is expected to be funded in the next twelve months.

Surety bonds issued on behalf of the Company as of June 30, 2012 totaled $78 million, primarily related to an appeal of certain litigation, requirements by state or local governments relating to our vacation ownership operations and by our insurers to secure large deductible insurance programs.

To secure management contracts, the Company may provide performance guarantees to third-party owners. Most of these performance guarantees allow the Company to terminate the contract rather than fund shortfalls if certain performance levels are not met. In limited cases, the Company is obligated to fund shortfalls in performance levels through the issuance of loans. Many of the performance tests are multi-year tests, tied to the results of a competitive set of hotels, and have exclusions for force majeure and acts of war and terrorism. The Company does not anticipate any significant funding under its performance guarantees in 2012.

In connection with the purchase of the Le Méridien brand in November 2005, the Company was indemnified for certain of Le Méridien’s historical liabilities by the entity that bought Le Méridien’s owned and leased hotel portfolio. The indemnity is limited to the financial resources of that entity. However, at this time, the Company believes that it is unlikely that it will have to fund any of these liabilities.

In connection with the sale of 33 hotels to a third party in 2006, the Company agreed to indemnify the third party for certain pre-disposition liabilities, including operations and tax liabilities. At this time, the Company believes that it will not have to make any significant payments under such indemnities.

Litigation. The Company is involved in various legal matters that have arisen in the normal course of business, some of which include claims for substantial sums. Accruals have been recorded when the outcome is probable and can be reasonably estimated. While the ultimate results of claims and litigation cannot be determined, the Company does not believe that the resolution of these legal matters will have a material adverse effect on its consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flow. However, depending on the amount and the timing, an unfavorable resolution of some or all of these matters could materially affect the Company’s future results of operations or cash flows in a particular period.

 

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Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

Forward-Looking Statements

This report includes “forward-looking” statements, as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 or by the Securities and Exchange Commission in its rules, regulations and releases. Forward-looking statements are any statements other than statements of historical fact, including statements regarding our expectations, beliefs, hopes, intentions or strategies regarding the future. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of words such as “may,” “will,” “expects,” “should,” “believes,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential,” “continue,” or other words of similar meaning. Forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those discussed in, or implied by, the forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause such a difference include, but are not limited to, general economic conditions, our financial and business prospects, our capital requirements, our financing prospects, our relationships with associates and labor unions, and those disclosed as risks in other reports filed by us with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including those described in Part I of our most recently filed Annual Report on Form 10-K. We caution readers that any such statements are based on currently available operational, financial and competitive information, and they should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which reflect management’s opinion only as of the date on which they were made. Except as required by law, we disclaim any obligation to review or update these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances as they occur.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”) discusses our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and costs and expenses during the reporting periods. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates and judgments, including those relating to revenue recognition, bad debts, inventories, investments, plant, property and equipment, goodwill and intangible assets, income taxes, financing operations, frequent guest program liability, self-insurance claims payable, restructuring costs, retirement benefits and contingencies and litigation.

We base our estimates and judgments on historical experience and on various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily available from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions and conditions.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

We believe the following to be our critical accounting policies:

Revenue Recognition. Our revenues are primarily derived from the following sources: (1) hotel and resort revenues at our owned, leased and consolidated joint venture properties; (2) management and franchise revenues; (3) vacation ownership and residential sales and (4) other revenues from managed and franchised properties. Generally, revenues are recognized when the services have been rendered. The following is a description of the composition of our revenues:

 

   

Owned, Leased and Consolidated Joint Ventures — Represents revenue primarily derived from hotel operations, including the rental of rooms and food and beverage sales from owned, leased or consolidated joint venture hotels and resorts. Revenue is recognized when rooms are occupied and services have been rendered. These revenues are impacted by global economic conditions affecting the travel and hospitality industry as well as relative market share of the local competitive set of hotels. Revenue per available room (“REVPAR”) is a leading indicator of revenue trends at owned, leased and consolidated joint venture hotels as it measures the period-over-period growth in rooms’ revenue for comparable properties.

 

   

Management and Franchise Fees — Represents fees earned on hotels managed worldwide, usually under long-term contracts, franchise fees received in connection with the franchise of our Sheraton®, Westin®, Four Points® by Sheraton, Le Méridien®, St. Regis®, W®, Luxury Collection®, Aloft® and Element® brand names, termination fees and the amortization of deferred gains related to sold properties for which we have significant continuing involvement. Management fees are comprised of a base fee, which is generally based on a percentage of gross revenues, and an incentive fee, which is generally based on the property’s profitability. For any time during the year, when the provisions of our management contracts allow receipt of incentive fees upon termination, incentive fees are recognized for the fees due and earned as if the contract was terminated at that date, exclusive of any termination fees due or payable. Therefore, during periods prior to year-end, the incentive fees recorded may not be indicative of the eventual incentive fees that will be recognized at year-end as conditions and incentive hurdle calculations may not be final. Franchise fees are generally based on a percentage of hotel room revenues. As with hotel revenues discussed above, these revenue sources are affected by conditions impacting the travel and hospitality industry as well as competition from other hotel management and franchise companies.

 

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Vacation Ownership Interests and Residential Sales — We recognize revenue from the sale and financing of VOIs and the sale of residential units which are typically a component of mixed use projects that include a hotel. Such revenues are impacted by the state of the global economies and, in particular, the U.S. economy, as well as interest rate and other economic conditions affecting the lending market. Revenue is generally recognized upon the buyer’s demonstration of a sufficient level of initial and continuing involvement. We determine the portion of revenues to recognize for sales accounted for under the percentage of completion method based on judgments and estimates including total project costs to complete. Additionally, we record reserves against these revenues based on expected default levels. Changes in costs could lead to adjustments to the percentage of completion status of a project, which may result in differences in the timing and amount of revenues recognized from the projects. We have also entered into licensing agreements with third-party developers to offer consumers branded condominiums or residences. Our fees from these agreements are generally based on the gross sales revenue of units sold. Residential fee revenue is recorded in the period that a purchase and sale agreement exists, delivery of services and obligations has occurred, the fee to the owner is deemed fixed and determinable and collectability of the fees is reasonably assured. Residential sales revenue on whole ownership units is generally recorded using the completed contract method, whereby revenue is recognized only when a sales contract is completed or substantially completed. During the performance period, costs and deposits are recorded on the balance sheet.

 

   

Other Revenues From Managed and Franchised Properties — These revenues represent reimbursements of costs incurred on behalf of managed hotel properties and franchisees. These costs relate primarily to payroll costs at managed properties where we are the employer. Since the reimbursements are made based upon the costs incurred with no added margin, these revenues and corresponding expenses have no effect on our operating income or our net income.

Frequent Guest Program. Starwood Preferred Guest (“SPG”) is our frequent guest incentive marketing program. SPG members earn points based on spending at our owned, managed and franchised hotels, as incentives to first-time buyers of VOIs and residences, and through participation in affiliated partners’ programs such as co-branded credit cards. Points can be redeemed at substantially all of our owned, managed and franchised hotels as well as through other redemption opportunities with third parties, such as conversion to airline miles.

We charge our owned, managed and franchised hotels the cost of operating the SPG program, including the estimated cost of our future redemption obligation, based on a percentage of our SPG members’ qualified expenditures. The Company’s management and franchise agreements require that we be reimbursed for the costs of operating the SPG program, including marketing, promotions and communications and performing member services for the SPG members. As points are earned, the Company increases the SPG point liability for the amount of cash it receives from its managed and franchised hotels related to the future redemption obligation. For our owned hotels, we record an expense for the amount of our future redemption obligation with the offset to the SPG point liability. When points are redeemed by the SPG members, the hotels recognize revenue and the SPG point liability is reduced.

We, through the services of third-party actuarial analysts, determine the value of the future redemption obligation based on statistical formulas which project the timing of future point redemptions based on historical experience, including an estimate of the “breakage” for points that will never be redeemed, and an estimate of the points that will eventually be redeemed as well as the cost of reimbursing hotels and other third parties in respect of other redemption opportunities for point redemptions.

We consolidate the assets and liabilities of the SPG program including the liability associated with the future redemption obligation which is included in other long-term liabilities and accrued expenses in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. The total actuarially determined liability as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011 is $839 million and $844 million, respectively, of which $250 million and $251 million, respectively, is included in accrued expenses.

Long-Lived Assets. We evaluate the carrying value of our long-lived assets for impairment by comparing the expected undiscounted future cash flows of the assets to the net book value of the assets if certain trigger events occur. If the expected undiscounted future cash flows are less than the net book value of the assets, the excess of the net book value over the estimated fair value is charged to current earnings. Fair value is based upon discounted cash flows of the assets at a rate deemed reasonable for the type of asset and prevailing market conditions, appraisals and, if appropriate, current estimated net sales proceeds from pending offers. We evaluate the carrying value of our long-lived assets based on our plans, at the time, for such assets and such qualitative factors as future development in the surrounding area, status of expected local competition and projected incremental income from renovations. Changes to our plans, including a decision to dispose of or change the intended use of an asset, can have a material impact on the carrying value of the asset.

Assets Held for Sale. We consider properties to be assets held for sale when management approves and commits to a formal plan to actively market a property or group of properties for sale and a signed sales contract and significant non-refundable deposit or contract break-up fee exist. Upon designation as an asset held for sale, we record the carrying value of each property or group of properties at the lower of its carrying value which includes allocable segment goodwill or its estimated fair value, less estimated costs to sell, and we stop recording depreciation expense. Any gain realized in connection with the sale of properties for which we have significant continuing involvement (such as through a long-term management agreement) is deferred and recognized over the initial term of the related agreement. The operations of the properties held for sale prior to the sale date are recorded in discontinued operations unless we will have continuing involvement (such as through a management or franchise agreement) after the sale.

Loan Loss Reserves. For the vacation ownership and residential segment, we record an estimate of expected uncollectibility on our VOI notes receivable as a reduction of revenue at the time we recognize a timeshare sale. We hold large amounts of homogeneous VOI notes

 

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receivable and therefore assess uncollectibility based on pools of receivables. In estimating loan loss reserves, we use a technique referred to as static pool analysis, which tracks defaults for each year’s mortgage originations over the life of the respective notes and projects an estimated default rate. As of June 30, 2012, the average estimated default rate for our pools of receivables was approximately 9.8%.

The primary credit quality indicator used by us to calculate the loan loss reserve for the vacation ownership notes is the origination of the notes by brand (Sheraton, Westin, and Other) as we believe there is a relationship between the default behavior of borrowers and the brand associated with the vacation ownership property they have acquired. In addition to quantitatively calculating the loan loss reserve based on its static pool analysis, we supplement the process by evaluating certain qualitative data, including the aging of the respective receivables, current default trends by brand and origination year, and the FICO scores of the buyers.

Given the significance of our respective pools of VOI notes receivable, a change in the projected default rate can have a significant impact to its loan loss reserve requirements, with a 0.1% change estimated to have an impact of approximately $4 million.

We consider a VOI note receivable delinquent when it is more than 30 days outstanding. All delinquent loans are placed on nonaccrual status and we do not resume interest accrual until payment is made. Upon reaching 120 days outstanding, the loan is considered to be in default and we commence the repossession process. Uncollectible VOI notes receivable are charged off when title to the unit is returned to us. We generally do not modify vacation ownership notes that become delinquent or upon default.

For the hotel segment, we measure the impairment of a loan based on the present value of expected future cash flows, discounted at the loan’s original effective interest rate, or the estimated fair value of the collateral. For impaired loans, we establish a specific impairment reserve for the difference between the recorded investment in the loan and the present value of the expected future cash flows or the estimated fair value of the collateral. We apply the loan impairment policy individually to all loans in the portfolio and do not aggregate loans for the purpose of applying such policy. For loans that we have determined to be impaired, we recognize interest income on a cash basis.

Legal Contingencies. We are subject to various legal proceedings and claims, the outcomes of which are subject to significant uncertainty. An estimated loss from a loss contingency should be accrued by a charge to income if it is probable that an asset has been impaired or a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. We evaluate, among other factors, the degree of probability of an unfavorable outcome and the ability to make a reasonable estimate of the amount of loss. Changes in these factors could materially impact our financial position or our results of operations.

Income Taxes. We provide for income taxes in accordance with principles contained in FASB ASC 740, Income Taxes. Under these principles, we recognize the amount of income tax payable or refundable for the current year and deferred tax assets and liabilities for the future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in our financial statements or tax returns.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in earnings in the period when the new rate is enacted. Deferred tax assets are evaluated for future realization and reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent we believe a portion will not be realized. We consider many factors when assessing the likelihood of future realization of our deferred tax assets, including our recent cumulative earnings experience and expectations of future taxable income by taxing jurisdiction, the carry-forward periods available to us for tax reporting purposes and tax attributes.

We also measure and recognize the amount of tax benefit that should be recorded for financial statement purposes for uncertain tax positions taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. With respect to uncertain tax positions, we evaluate the recognized tax benefits for derecognition, classification, interest and penalties, interim period accounting and disclosure requirements. Judgment is required in assessing the future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in our financial statements or tax returns.

 

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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion presents an analysis of results of our operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011.

The difficult business conditions that plagued the global lodging industry in 2008 and 2009 began to stabilize in 2010. The lodging recovery continued through 2011 and the first half of 2012, as occupancies approached prior peak levels, average daily rates increased, and growth in new hotel supply in the Western economies fell well below historic rates of growth. Although known and unknown challenges, such as uncertainty in Europe and the Middle East, could slow or derail the lodging recovery, we remain optimistic that the recovery will continue.

As we move forward, we believe we are uniquely positioned due to the strength of our brands, our high-end focus, and our geographic diversification. We remain committed to investing in our core operations while also expanding our presence in emerging markets, such as Asia and Latin America. Starwood is particularly well positioned to take advantage of global growth through our operating teams that have worked in the emerging markets for decades. We also expect to grow in the developed world as we build out our underpenetrated brands in these markets. We believe that we have the highest quality pipeline in the industry, as measured by percentage growth potential as well as our focus on valuable management contracts in the upper upscale and luxury segments.

At June 30, 2012, we had approximately 365 hotels in the active pipeline representing approximately 95,000 rooms, driven by strong interest in all Starwood brands. Of these rooms, 71% are in the upper upscale and luxury segments and 87% are outside of North America. During the second quarter of 2012, we signed 34 hotel management and franchise contracts representing approximately 8,300 rooms of which 30 are new builds and four are conversions from another brand. We also opened 14 new hotels and resorts representing approximately 2,700 rooms. During the second quarter of 2012, five hotels left the system, representing approximately 1,000 rooms.

An indicator of the performance of our owned, leased and consolidated joint venture hotels is REVPAR, as it measures the period-over-period change in rooms’ revenue for comparable properties. This is particularly the case in the United States, where there is no impact on this measure from foreign currency exchange rates.

We continually update and renovate our owned, leased and consolidated joint venture hotels and include these hotels in our Same-Store Owned Hotel results. We also undertake major repositionings of hotels. While undergoing major repositionings, hotels are generally not operating at full capacity and, as such, these repositionings can negatively impact our hotel revenues and are not included in Same-Store Owned Hotel results. We may continue to reposition our owned, leased and consolidated joint venture hotels as we pursue our brand and quality strategies. In addition, several owned hotels are located in regions which are seasonal and, therefore, these hotels do not operate at full capacity throughout the year.

 

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The following represents our top five markets in the United States by metropolitan area as a percentage of our total owned, leased and consolidated joint venture revenues for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 (with comparable data for 2011):

 

Top Five Metropolitan Areas in the United States as a % of Total Owned

Revenues for the Three Months Ended June 30, 2012

with Comparable Data for the Same Period in 2011 (1)

 

Metropolitan Area

   2012
Revenues
    2011
Revenues
 

New York, NY

     12.8     11.9

Hawaii

     6.1     5.3

Phoenix, AZ

     5.7     5.2

San Francisco, CA

     4.1     4.0

Chicago, IL

     3.1     3.6

 

Top Five Metropolitan Areas in the United States as a % of Total Owned

Revenues for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2012

with Comparable Data for the Same Period in 2011 (1)

 

Metropolitan Area

   2012
Revenues
    2011
Revenues
 

New York, NY

     11.5     11.1

Phoenix, AZ

     7.1     6.3

Hawaii

     6.7     5.8

San Francisco, CA

     4.4     4.1

Atlanta, GA

     3.2     4.0

 

(1) Includes the revenues of hotels sold for the period prior to their sale.

 

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The following represents our top five international markets as a percentage of our total owned, leased and consolidated joint venture revenues for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 (with comparable data for 2011):

 

Top Five International Markets as a % of Total Owned Revenues for

the Three Months Ended June 30, 2012

with Comparable Data for the Same Period in 2011 (1)

 

International Market

   2012
Revenues
    2011
Revenues
 

Canada

     10.9     11.2

Italy

     8.1     9.1

Spain

     6.8     7.1

Mexico

     4.4     3.9

Australia

     4.3     4.2

 

Top Five International Markets as a % of Total Owned Revenues for

the Six Months Ended June 30, 2012

with Comparable Data for the Same Period in 2011(1)

 

International Market

   2012
Revenues
    2011
Revenues
 

Canada

     10.9     10.9

Italy

     6.6     7.2

Spain

     5.2     6.0

Australia

     4.8     4.6

Mexico

     4.8     4.3

 

(1) Includes the revenues of hotels sold for the period prior to their sale.

 

25


Table of Contents

The following table summarizes REVPAR, Average Daily Rate (“ADR”) and occupancy for our Same-Store Owned Hotels for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011. The results for the three months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011 represent results for 48 owned, leased and consolidated joint venture hotels (excluding five hotels sold and 11 hotels undergoing significant repositionings or without comparable results in 2012 and 2011). The results for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, represent results for 47 owned, leased and consolidated joint venture hotels (excluding five hotels sold and 12 hotels undergoing significant repositionings or without comparable results in 2012 and 2011.)

 

     Three Months Ended
June 30,
    Variance  
     2012     2011    

Worldwide (48 hotels with approximately 19,000 rooms)

      

REVPAR(1)

   $ 172.34      $ 171.91        0.3

ADR

   $ 230.75      $ 231.02        (0.1 )% 

Occupancy

     74.7     74.4     0.3   

North America (23 hotels with approximately 11,000 rooms)

      

REVPAR(1)

   $ 176.01      $ 174.06        1.1

ADR

   $ 224.71      $ 222.05        1.2

Occupancy

     78.3     78.4     (0.1

International (25 hotels with approximately 8,000 rooms)

      

REVPAR(1)

   $ 167.94      $ 169.33        (0.8 )% 

ADR

   $ 238.82      $ 243.12        (1.8 )% 

Occupancy

     70.3     69.6     0.7   

 

     Six Months Ended
June 30,
    Variance  
     2012     2011    

Worldwide (47 hotels with approximately 19,000 rooms)

      

REVPAR(1)

   $ 159.67      $ 156.06        2.3

ADR

   $ 222.01      $ 218.97        1.4

Occupancy

     71.9     71.3     0.6   

North America (23 hotels with approximately 11,000 rooms)

      

REVPAR(1)

   $ 167.58      $ 163.45        2.5

ADR

   $ 223.37      $ 218.26        2.3

Occupancy

     75.0     74.9     0.1   

International (24 hotels with approximately 8,000 rooms)

      

REVPAR(1)

   $ 149.83      $ 146.89        2.0

ADR

   $ 220.15      $ 219.97        0.1

Occupancy

     68.1     66.8     1.3   

 

(1) REVPAR is calculated by dividing room revenue, which is derived from rooms and suites rented or leased, by total room nights available for a given period. REVPAR may not be comparable to similarly titled measures such as revenues.

 

26


Table of Contents

The following table summarizes REVPAR, ADR and occupancy for our Same-Store Systemwide Hotels for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011. Same-Store Systemwide Hotels represent results for same-store owned, leased, managed and franchised hotels.

 

     Three Months Ended
June 30,
    Variance  
     2012     2011    

Worldwide

      

REVPAR(1)

   $ 121.82      $ 116.86        4.2

ADR

   $ 170.41      $ 169.47        0.6

Occupancy

     71.5     69.0     2.5   

North America

      

REVPAR(1)

   $ 123.66      $ 115.80        6.8

ADR

   $ 163.32      $ 157.28        3.8

Occupancy

     75.7     73.6     2.1   

International

      

REVPAR(1)

   $ 119.37      $ 118.28        0.9

ADR

   $ 181.27      $ 188.52        (3.8 )% 

Occupancy

     65.8     62.7     3.1   

 

     Six Months Ended
June 30,
    Variance  
     2012     2011    

Worldwide

      

REVPAR(1)

   $ 116.25      $ 110.79        4.9

ADR

   $ 169.77      $ 167.80        1.2

Occupancy

     68.5     66.0     2.5   

North America

      

REVPAR(1)

   $ 116.58      $ 108.94        7.0

ADR

   $ 162.36      $ 157.06        3.4

Occupancy

     71.8     69.4     2.4   

International

      

REVPAR(1)

   $ 115.81      $ 113.30        2.2

ADR

   $ 180.99      $ 184.17        (1.7 )% 

Occupancy

     64.0     61.5     2.5   

 

(1) REVPAR is calculated by dividing room revenue, which is derived from rooms and suites rented or leased, by total room nights available for a given period. REVPAR may not be comparable to similarly titled measures such as revenues.

 

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Table of Contents

Three Months Ended June 30, 2012 Compared with Three Months Ended June 30, 2011

Continuing Operations

 

     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
     Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
    Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Owned, Leased and Consolidated Joint Venture Hotels

   $ 453       $ 478       $ (25     (5.2 )% 

Management Fees, Franchise Fees and Other Income

     222         201         21        10.4

Vacation Ownership and Residential

     316         146         170        n/m   

Other Revenues from Managed and Franchised Properties

     627         601         26        4.3
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Revenues

   $ 1,618       $ 1,426       $ 192        13.5
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

The decrease in revenues from owned, leased and consolidated joint venture hotels was primarily due to lost revenues from five owned hotels that were sold or closed in 2011 and 2012. These sold or closed hotels had no revenues in the three months ended June 30, 2012 compared to $26 million for the corresponding period in 2011. Revenues at our Same-Store Owned Hotels (48 hotels for the three months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, excluding the five hotels sold and 11 additional hotels undergoing significant repositionings or without comparable results in 2012 and 2011) decreased 0.9%, or $3 million, to $399 million for the three months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to $402 million in the corresponding period of 2011, as REVPAR and ADR remained relatively consistent between periods.

REVPAR at our worldwide Same-Store Owned Hotels increased 0.3% to $172.34 for the three months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the corresponding period in 2011. The increase in REVPAR at these worldwide Same-Store Owned Hotels resulted from an increase in occupancy rates to 74.7% in the three months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to 74.4% in the corresponding period in 2011, partially offset by a decrease in ADR of 0.1% to $230.75 for the three months ended June 30, 2012 compared to $231.02 for the corresponding period in 2011. REVPAR at Same-Store Owned Hotels in North America increased 1.1% for the three months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the corresponding period of 2011. REVPAR growth was particularly strong at our owned hotels in Phoenix, Arizona, San Francisco, California and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. North America results were negatively impacted by results at our owned hotels in Canada. REVPAR at the owned hotels in Canada declined 6.5% in constant dollars as group business at these hotels was negatively impacted by the strengthening of the Canadian Dollar. REVPAR at our international Same-Store Owned Hotels decreased by 0.8% for the three months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the corresponding period of 2011. REVPAR for Same-Store Owned Hotels internationally increased 5.3% excluding the unfavorable effects of foreign currency translation.

The increase in management fees, franchise fees and other income was primarily a result of a $24 million increase in management and franchise revenues to $215 million for the three months ended June 30, 2012 compared to $191 million for the corresponding period in 2011. Management fees increased 13.5% to $126 million and franchise fees increased 6.1% to $52 million. These increases were primarily due to growth in REVPAR at existing hotels under management as well as the net addition of 54 managed and franchised hotels to our system since the three months ended June 30, 2011. Year-over-year base management fee and franchise fee comparisons were impacted by the conversion of some franchise agreements to management contracts in Germany in the second quarter of 2011.

Total vacation ownership and residential services revenue increased $170 million to $316 million for the three months ended June 30, 2012, when compared to the corresponding period in 2011, primarily due to the recognition of residential sales at Bal Harbour. In late 2011, we started contract closings for the St. Regis Bal Harbour and, during the three months ended June 30, 2012, realized revenues of $167 million. During the three months ended June 30, 2012, we closed sales of 45 units and realized incremental cash proceeds of $148 million associated with these units. For the units that closed in the three months ended June 30, 2012, approximately half were from sales in 2012, with the remainder sold during the construction of the project. From project inception through June 30, 2012, we have closed contracts and recognized revenue on approximately 60% of the total residential units.

Vacation ownership revenues for the three months ended June 30, 2012 increased 2.8% to $148 million compared to the corresponding period in 2011 primarily due to the timing and recognition of deferred revenues and favorable trends with respect to default rates on notes receivable. Originated contract sales of VOI inventory decreased 5.0% in the three months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the corresponding period in 2011, primarily due to lower closing efficiency partially offset by increased tour flow. The number of contracts signed decreased 1.8% when compared to 2011 and the average contract amount per vacation ownership unit sold decreased 2.6% to approximately $14,400 driven by inventory mix.

Other revenues from managed and franchised properties increased primarily due to an increase in payroll costs commensurate with increased occupancy at our existing managed hotels and payroll costs for the new hotels entering the system. These revenues represent reimbursements of costs incurred on behalf of managed hotel and vacation ownership properties and franchisees and relate primarily to payroll costs at managed properties where we are the employer. Since the reimbursements are made based upon the costs incurred with no added margin, these revenues and corresponding expenses have no effect on our operating income or our net income.

 

28


Table of Contents
     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
     Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
    Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Selling, General, Administrative and Other

   $ 86       $ 88       $ (2     (2.3 )% 

Selling, general, administrative and other expenses decreased to $86 million compared to $88 million in 2011 primarily due to changes in foreign exchange rates.

 

     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
     Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
    Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Depreciation and Amortization

   $ 62       $ 67       $ (5     (7.4 )% 

The decrease in depreciation and amortization expense for the three months ended June 30, 2012, when compared to the same period of 2011, was primarily due to reduced depreciation expense from sold hotels and reduced amortization expense from certain intangible assets that are now fully amortized, partially offset by additional depreciation related to capital expenditures in the last twelve months.

 

     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
     Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
     Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Operating Income

   $ 242       $ 177       $ 65         36.7

The increase in operating income for the three months ended June 30, 2012, when compared to the corresponding period of 2011, was primarily due to the increase in vacation ownership and residential operating income of $42 million. Additionally, increased REVPAR at our managed and franchised hotels and new contract additions favorably impacted our operating income from management and franchise fees.

 

     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
     Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
    Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Equity Earnings (Losses) and Gains and (Losses) from Unconsolidated Ventures, Net

   $ 5       $ 7       $ (2     n/m   

The decrease in equity earnings (losses) and gains and (losses) from unconsolidated joint ventures for the three months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the same period of 2011 was primarily due to decreases in operating results and unfavorable mark-to-market adjustments on US dollar denominated debt at several properties in Latin America, partially offset by a $2 million gain realized on the disposal of a non-core asset at one of our joint venture properties.

 

     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
     Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
     Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Net Interest Expense

   $ 61       $ 52       $ 9         17.3

Net interest expense increased $9 million for the three months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the same period of 2011, primarily due to the redemption in June 2012 of the 6.25% Senior Notes due 2013 (see Note 9) and a reduction of capitalized interest related to completed construction projects, partially offset by lower interest expense due to a lower average debt balance. In connection with the redemption of our 6.25% Senior Notes, we recorded a net charge of approximately $15 million representing the tender premiums, swap settlements and other related redemption costs. For the three months ended June 30, 2012, we maintained a lower average debt balance, primarily due to the redemption of approximately $605 million of 7.875% Senior Notes in December 2011. Our weighted average interest rate was 7.05% at June 30, 2012 compared to 6.79% at June 30, 2011.

 

29


Table of Contents
     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
    Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
     Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Income Tax (Benefit) Expense

   $ 56       $ (16   $ 72         n/m   

The increase in income tax expense for the three months ended June 30, 2012, compared to the same period in 2011, was primarily related to a $50 million tax benefit, in 2011, from the sale of two wholly-owned hotels during that period. Additionally, the increase was attributable to higher pretax income and a higher effective tax rate. The higher effective tax rate primarily related to the change in the pretax income mix across jurisdictions with disparate tax rates.

 

     Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
    Three Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
    Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
     Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Discontinued Operations, Net

   $ (7   $ (19   $ 12         (63.2 )% 

During the three months ended June 30, 2012, we recorded a loss of $7 million in discontinued operations, net, primarily related to the write-down to fair market value of certain wholly-owned hotels classified as held for sale. We expect to close the sales for these hotels, unencumbered by management or franchise agreements, in the second half of 2012.

During the three months ended June 30, 2011, we recorded a loss of $19 million, primarily related the sale of our interest in a consolidated joint venture.

 

30


Table of Contents

Six Months Ended June 30, 2012 Compared with Six Months Ended June 30, 2011

Continuing Operations

 

     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
     Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
    Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Owned, Leased and Consolidated Joint Venture Hotels

   $ 855       $ 888       $ (33     (3.7 )% 

Management Fees, Franchise Fees and Other Income

     423         378         45        11.9

Vacation Ownership and Residential

     830         299         531        n/m   

Other Revenues from Managed and Franchised Properties

     1,225         1,156         69        6.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Revenues

   $ 3,333       $ 2,721       $ 612        22.5
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

The decrease in revenues from owned, leased and consolidated joint venture hotels was primarily due to lost revenues from five owned hotels that were sold or closed in 2011. These sold or closed hotels had revenues of $2 million in the six months ended June 30, 2012 compared to $57 million for the same period in 2011. Revenues at our Same-Store Owned Hotels (47 hotels for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, excluding the five hotels sold and 12 additional hotels undergoing significant repositionings or without comparable results in 2012 and 2011) increased 1.5%, or $11 million, to $739 million for the six months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to $728 million in the same period of 2011 due primarily to an increase in REVPAR.

REVPAR at our worldwide Same-Store Owned Hotels increased 2.3% to $159.67 for the six months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the same period in 2011. The increase in REVPAR at these worldwide Same-Store Owned Hotels resulted from an increase in occupancy rates to 71.9% in the six months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to 71.3% in the same period in 2011 as well as a 1.4% increase in ADR to $222.01 for the six months ended June 30, 2012 compared to $218.97 for the same period in 2011. REVPAR at Same-Store Owned Hotels in North America increased 2.5% for the six months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the same period of 2011. REVPAR growth was particularly strong at our owned hotels in San Francisco, California, Phoenix, Arizona and St. John, VI. North America results were negatively impacted by results at our owned hotels in Canada. REVPAR at the owned hotels in Canada declined 4.0% in constant dollars as group business at these hotels was negatively impacted by the strengthening of the Canadian Dollar. REVPAR at our international Same-Store Owned Hotels increased by 2.0% for the six months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the same period of 2011. REVPAR for Same-Store Owned Hotels internationally increased 5.7% excluding the unfavorable effects of foreign currency translation.

The increase in management fees, franchise fees and other income was primarily a result of a $48 million increase in management and franchise revenues to $411 million for the six months ended June 30, 2012 compared to $363 million for the same period in 2011. Management fees increased 15.9% to $241 million and franchise fees increased 5.4% to $97 million. These increases were primarily due to growth in REVPAR at existing hotels under management as well as the net addition of 54 managed and franchised hotels to our system since the second quarter of 2011.

Total vacation ownership and residential services revenue increased $531 million to $830 million for the six months ended June 30, 2012 compared to the same period in 2011 primarily due to the recognition of residential sales at Bal Harbour. For the six months ended June 30, 2012, we have realized revenues of $523 million for residential sales at Bal Harbour. Additionally, we have closed 147 units and generated incremental cash proceeds of $411 million associated with these units.

Vacation ownership revenues for the six months ended June 30, 2012 increased 3.1% to $300 million compared to the same period in 2011 primarily due to increases in resort income, timing and recognition of deferred revenues and favorable trends with respect to default rates on notes receivable. Originated contract sales of VOI inventory decreased 1.9% in the six months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the same period in 2011, primarily due to lower closing efficiency and a decrease in the average price per vacation ownership unit sold, partly offset by increased tour flow. The number of contracts signed increased 0.8% when compared to 2011, and the average price per vacation ownership unit sold decreased 2.3% to approximately $15,300 driven by inventory mix.

Other revenues from managed and franchised properties increased primarily due to an increase in payroll costs commensurate with increased occupancy at our existing managed hotels and payroll costs for the new hotels entering the system. These revenues represent reimbursements of costs incurred on behalf of managed hotel and vacation ownership properties and franchisees and relate primarily to payroll costs at managed properties where we are the employer. Since the reimbursements are made based upon the costs incurred with no added margin, these revenues and corresponding expenses have no effect on our operating income and our net income.

 

31


Table of Contents
     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
     Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
     Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Selling, General, Administrative and Other

   $ 182       $ 168       $ 14         8.3

Selling, general, administrative and other expenses increased $14 million to $182 million for the six months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the same period of 2011, primarily due to non-recurring professional expenses in 2012 and favorable reserve adjustments recorded in the prior year.

 

     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
    Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
     Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
    Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Restructuring, Goodwill Impairments and Other Special Charges (Credits), Net

   $ (11   $ —         $ (11     n/m   

As a result of a court ruling, during the six months ended June 30, 2012, we recorded a favorable adjustment of $11 million to reverse a portion of our litigation reserve.

 

     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
     Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
    Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Depreciation and Amortization

   $ 125       $ 135       $ (10     (7.4 )% 

The decrease in depreciation and amortization expense for the six months ended June 30, 2012, when compared to the same period of 2011, was primarily due to reduced depreciation expense from sold hotels and reduced amortization expense from certain intangible assets that are now fully amortized, partially offset by additional depreciation related to capital expenditures in the last twelve months.

 

     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
     Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
     Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Operating Income

   $ 469       $ 297       $ 172         57.9

The increase in operating income for the six months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the same period of 2011 was primarily due to the increase in vacation ownership and residential fee revenues as described earlier and the increase in management fees as a result of the increase in REVPAR. For the six months ended June 30, 2012, we also received an $11 million benefit from a favorable adjustment of a litigation reserve and a $10 million decrease in depreciation and amortization, partially offset by an increase in selling, general, administrative and other expense.

 

     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
     Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
     Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Equity Earnings (Losses) and Gains and (Losses) from Unconsolidated Ventures, Net

   $ 15       $ 11       $ 4         36.4

The increase in equity earnings and gains and losses from unconsolidated joint ventures for the six months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the same period of 2011 was primarily due to improved operating results at several properties in the three months ended March 31, 2012 and a $2 million gain realized on the disposal of a non-core asset at one of our joint venture properties.

 

32


Table of Contents
     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
     Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
     Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Net Interest Expense

   $ 110       $ 106       $ 4         3.8

The increase in net interest expense for the six months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the same period of 2011 was primarily due to the redemption in June 2012 of the 6.25% Senior Notes due 2013 and a reduction of capitalized interest related to completed construction projects, partially offset by lower interest expense due to a lower average debt balance. As a result of the early redemption of the 6.25% Senior Notes, the Company recorded a net charge of approximately $15 million in interest expense, representing the tender premiums, swap settlements and other related redemption costs. For the six months ended June 30, 2012, we maintained a lower average debt balance, primarily due to the redemption of approximately $605 million of 7.875% Senior Notes in December 2011. Our weighted average interest rate was 7.05% at June 30, 2012 as compared to 6.79% at June 30, 2011.

 

     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
    Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
    Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
     Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Gain (Loss) on Asset Dispositions and Impairments, Net

   $ (8   $ (31   $ 23         (74.2 )% 

During the six months ended June 30, 2012, we recorded an $8 million loss on dispositions and impairments, primarily related to a $7 million loss related to the sale of an owned hotel, which was sold subject to a long-term franchise agreement, and the disposal of various non-core assets.

During the six months ended June 30, 2011, we recorded an impairment charge of $32 million to fully impair our noncontrolling interest in a joint venture that owns a hotel in Tokyo, Japan. This charge was partially offset by the sale of non-core assets.

 

     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
    Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
     Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Income Tax (Benefit) Expense

   $ 108       $ (6   $ 114         n/m   

The increase in income tax expense for the six months ended June 30, 2012 when compared to the same period of 2011 was primarily due to a one-time tax benefit, in 2011, of approximately $50 million related to the sale of two wholly-owned hotels during that period. Additionally, the increase was attributable to higher pretax income and a higher effective tax rate. The increase in the effective rate is primarily due to increased earnings in jurisdictions with higher tax rates.

 

     Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2012
    Six Months
Ended

June  30,
2011
    Increase /
(decrease)
from
prior
year
     Percentage
change

from  prior
year
 
     (in millions)  

Discontinued Operations, Net

   $ (8   $ (20   $ 12         (60.0 )% 

During the six months ended June 30, 2012, we recorded a loss of $8 million in discontinued operations, net primarily related to the write-down to fair market value of certain wholly-owned hotels classified as held for sale. We expect to close the sales for these hotels, unencumbered by management or franchise agreements, in the second half of 2012.

During the six months ended June 30, 2011, we recorded a loss of $20 million, primarily related to the sale of our interest in a consolidated joint venture.

Additionally, for both the six months ended June 30, 2012 and June 30, 2011, we recorded a loss of $2 million for accrued interest related to an uncertain tax position, associated with a previous disposition.

Seasonality and Diversification

The hotel and leisure industry is seasonal in nature; however, the periods during which our properties experience higher hotel revenue vary from property to property and depend principally upon location. Our revenues historically have generally been lower in the first quarter than in the second, third or fourth quarters.

 

33


Table of Contents

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

Cash From Operating Activities

Cash flow from operating activities is generated primarily from management and franchise revenues, operating income from our owned hotels and sales of VOIs and residential units. Other sources of cash are distributions from joint ventures, servicing financial assets and interest income. These are the principal sources of cash used to fund our operating expenses, principal and interest payments on debt, capital expenditures, dividend payments, property and income taxes and share repurchases.

The majority of our cash flow is derived from corporate and leisure travelers and is dependent on the supply and demand in the lodging industry. In a recessionary economy, we experience significant declines in business and leisure travel. The impact of declining demand in the industry and higher hotel supply in key markets could have a material impact on our cash flow from operating activities.

State and local regulations governing sales of VOIs and residential properties allow the purchaser of a VOI or property to rescind the sale subsequent to its completion for a pre-specified number of days. In addition, cash payments received from buyers of products under construction are held in escrow during the period prior to obtaining a certificate of occupancy.

Cash Used for Investing Activities

Gross capital spending during the six months ended June 30, 2012 was as follows (in millions):

 

Maintenance Capital Expenditures(1):

  

Owned, leased and consolidated joint venture hotels

   $ 16   

Corporate and information technology

     35   
  

 

 

 

Subtotal

     51   

VOI and Residential Capital Expenditures:

  

Net capital expenditures for inventory (excluding St. Regis Bal Harbour)(2)

   $ (20

Capital expenditures for inventory — St. Regis Bal Harbour

     17   
  

 

 

 

Subtotal

     (3

Development Capital

     120   
  

 

 

 

Total Capital Expenditures

   $ 168   
  

 

 

 

 

(1) Maintenance capital expenditures include renovations, asset replacements and improvements that extend the useful life of the asset.
(2) Represents gross inventory capital expenditures of $19 million less cost of sales of $39 million.

In late 2011, we received the certificate of occupancy for our residential project in Bal Harbour. During the six months ended June 30, 2012, we closed sales of 147 units and realized incremental cash proceeds of $411 million. From project inception through June 30, 2012, we have closed contracts and recognized revenue on approximately 60% of the total residential units.

Gross capital spending during the six months ended June 30, 2012 included approximately $51 million of maintenance capital and $120 million of development capital. Investment spending on gross VOI and residential inventory was $36 million, primarily in Bal Harbour and Orlando, Florida. Our capital expenditure program includes both offensive and defensive capital. Defensive spending is related to maintenance and renovations that we believe are necessary to remain competitive in the markets we are in. Other than capital to address fire and life safety issues, we consider defensive capital to be discretionary, although reductions to this capital program could result in decreases to our cash flow from operations, as hotels in certain markets could become less desirable. Offensive capital expenditures, which primarily relate to new projects that we expect will generate a return, are also considered discretionary. We currently anticipate that our defensive capital expenditures for the full year 2012 (excluding vacation ownership and residential inventory) will be approximately $200 million for maintenance, renovations, and technology capital. In addition, for the full year 2012, we currently expect to spend approximately $375 million for investment projects, various joint ventures and other investments.

In order to secure management or franchise agreements, we have made loans to third-party owners, made non-controlling investments in joint ventures and provided certain guarantees and indemnifications. See Note 21 of the consolidated financial statements for discussion regarding the amount of loans we have outstanding with owners, unfunded loan commitments, equity and other potential contributions, surety bonds outstanding, performance guarantees and indemnifications we are obligated under, and investments in hotels and joint ventures.

We intend to finance the acquisition of additional hotel properties (including equity investments), hotel renovations, VOI and residential construction, capital improvements, technology spend and other core and ancillary business acquisitions and investments and provide for general corporate purposes (including dividend payments and share repurchases) from cash on hand, net proceeds from asset dispositions, and cash generated from operations.

 

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We periodically review our business to identify properties or other assets that we believe either are non-core (including hotels where the return on invested capital is not adequate), no longer complement our business, are in markets which may not benefit us as much as other markets during an economic recovery or could be sold at significant premiums. We are focused on enhancing real estate returns and monetizing investments.

Since 2006 and through June 30, 2012, we have sold 66 hotels realizing proceeds of approximately $5.5 billion in numerous transactions. To date, where we have sold hotels, we have not provided seller financing or other financial assistance to buyers.

There can be no assurance, however, that we will be able to complete future dispositions on commercially reasonable terms or at all.

Cash Used for Financing Activities

The following is a summary of our debt portfolio excluding securitized vacation ownership debt (including capital leases) as of June 30, 2012:

 

     Amount
Outstanding at
June 30,

2012(a)
    Weighted
Average
Interest Rate at
June 30,

2012
    Weighted
Average
Remaining
Term
 
     (in millions)           (In years)  

Floating Rate Debt

      

Revolving Credit

   $ —          —          1.4   

Mortgages and Other

     46        5.15     4.5   

Interest Rate Swaps

     150        5.73  
  

 

 

     

Total/Average

   $ 196        5.60     4.5   
  

 

 

     

Fixed Rate Debt

      

Senior Notes

   $ 1,594        7.34     4.3   

Mortgages and Other

     12        2.75     15.5   

Interest Rate Swaps

     (150     7.88  
  

 

 

     

Total/Average

   $ 1,456        7.24     4.4   
  

 

 

     

Total Debt

      

Total Debt and Weighted Average Terms

   $ 1,652        7.05     4.4   
  

 

 

     

 

(a) Excludes approximately $418 million of our share of unconsolidated joint venture debt, all of which is non-recourse.

We have evaluated the commitments of each of the lenders in our Revolving Credit Facility (the “Facility”), and we have reviewed our debt covenants. We do not anticipate any issues regarding the availability of funds under the Facility. The cost of borrowing of the Facility is determined by a combination of our leverage ratios and credit ratings. Changes in our credit ratings may result in changes in our borrowing costs. Downgrades in our credit ratings would likely increase the relative costs of borrowing, whereas upgrades would likely reduce costs and increase our ability to issue-long-term debt. A credit rating is not a recommendation to buy, sell or hold securities, is subject to revision or withdrawal at any time by the assigning rating organization and should be evaluated independently of any other rating. During the three months ended March 31, 2012, we were upgraded to investment grade by all three rating agencies. During the three months ended June 30, 2012, we were upgraded again one additional ratings notch by two of the three rating agencies.

On June 29, 2012, we redeemed all $495 million of our 6.25% Senior Notes, which were scheduled to mature in February 2013. We paid $519 million in connection with the redemption and recorded in interest expense a net charge of approximately $15 million representing the tender premiums, swap settlements and other related redemption costs (see Note 9).

Also during the three months ended June 30, 2012, we prepaid $52 million of third party debt previously secured by one owned hotel.

 

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Table of Contents

Our debt and net debt for our portfolio and non-recourse securitized debt period-over-period is as follows:

 

     June 30,
2012
    December 31,
2011
 
     (in millions)  

Gross Unsecuritized Debt

   $ 1,652      $ 2,197   

less: cash (including restricted cash of $140 million in 2012 and $212 million in 2011)

     (410     (666
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Unsecuritized Debt

   $ 1,242      $ 1,531   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross Securitized Debt (non-recourse)

   $ 449      $ 532   

less: cash restricted for securitized debt repayments (not included above)

     (18     (22
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Securitized Debt

   $ 431      $ 510   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Net Debt

   $ 1,673      $ 2,041   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Our Facility is used to fund general corporate cash needs. As of June 30, 2012, we have availability of over $1.5 billion under the Facility. The Facility allows for multi-currency borrowing and, if drawn upon, would have an applicable margin, inclusive of the commitment fee, of 2.00% plus the applicable currency LIBOR rate. Our ability to borrow under the Facility is subject to compliance with the terms and conditions under the Facility, including certain leverage and coverage covenants.

Based upon the current level of operations, management believes that our cash flow from operations, together with our significant cash balances, available borrowings under the Facility, and our capacity for additional borrowings will be adequate to meet anticipated requirements for scheduled maturities (including $499 million of 7.875% Senior Notes due in October 2014), dividends, working capital, capital expenditures, marketing and advertising program expenditures, other discretionary investments, interest and scheduled principal payments and share repurchases for the foreseeable future. However, there can be no assurance that we will be able to refinance our indebtedness as it becomes due and, if refinanced, on favorable terms. Approximately $103 million, included in our cash balance above, is deemed to be permanently invested in foreign countries and we would be subject to U.S. income taxes if we repatriated these amounts. In addition, there can be no assurance that in our continuing business we will generate cash flow at or above historical levels, that currently anticipated results will be achieved or that we will be able to complete dispositions on commercially reasonable terms or at all.

If we are unable to generate sufficient cash flow from operations in the future to service our debt, we may be required to sell additional assets at lower than preferred amounts, reduce capital expenditures, refinance all or a portion of our existing debt or obtain additional financing at unfavorable rates. Our ability to make scheduled principal payments, to pay interest on or to refinance our indebtedness depends on our future performance and financial results, which, to a certain extent, are subject to general conditions in or affecting the hotel and vacation ownership industries and to general economic, political, financial, competitive, legislative and regulatory factors beyond our control.

We had the following commercial commitments outstanding as of June 30, 2012 (in millions):

 

            Amount of Commitment Expiration Per Period  
     Total      Less than
1 Year
     1-3 Years      3-5 Years      After
5 Years
 

Standby letters of credit

   $ 109       $ 106       $ —         $ —         $ 3   

For the six months ended June 30, 2012, we repurchased 1,248,278 common shares in the open market at an average price of $49.07 for a total cost of approximately $61 million. Through July 20, 2012, we repurchased an additional 797,538 common shares at an average price of $49.39 (see Note 17).

 

36


Table of Contents
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.

We enter into forward contracts to manage foreign exchange risk in forecasted transactions based in foreign currencies and to manage foreign currency exchange risk on intercompany loans that are not deemed permanently invested. We also enter into interest rate swap agreements to hedge interest rate risk (see Note 13).

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

As of the end of the period covered by this report, we carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive and principal financial officers, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as such term is defined in Rules 13(a)-15(e) and 15(d)-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”)). Based upon the foregoing evaluation, our principal executive and principal financial officers concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective and operating to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the rules and forms of the Securities and Exchange Commission, and to provide reasonable assurance that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive and principal financial officers, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

There has been no change in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13(a)-15(e) and 15(d)-15(e) under the Exchange Act) that occurred during the period covered by this report that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings.

We are involved in various claims and lawsuits arising in the ordinary course of business, none of which, in the opinion of management, is expected to have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flow.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

The discussion of our business and operations should be read together with the risk factors contained in Item 1A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which describe various risks and uncertainties to which we are or may become subject. These risks and uncertainties have the potential to affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, strategies or prospects in a material and adverse manner. At June 30, 2012, there have been no material changes to the risk factors set forth in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011.

 

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Table of Contents
Item 6. Exhibits.

 

31.1    Certification Pursuant to Rule 13a-14 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 – Chief Executive Officer (1)
31.2    Certification Pursuant to Rule 13a-14 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 – Chief Financial Officer (1)
32.1    Certification Pursuant to Section 1350 of Chapter 63 of Title 18 of the United States Code – Chief Executive Officer (1)
32.2    Certification Pursuant to Section 1350 of Chapter 63 of Title 18 of the United States Code – Chief Financial Officer (1)
101    The following materials from Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2012 formatted in XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language): (i) the Consolidated Balance Sheets, (ii) the Consolidated Statements of Income, (iii) the Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income, (iv) the Consolidated Condensed Statements of Cash Flows, and (v) notes to the consolidated financial statements

 

(1) Filed herewith.

 

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Table of Contents

SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

STARWOOD HOTELS & RESORTS

WORLDWIDE, INC.

By:   /s/ Frits van Paasschen
 

Frits van Paasschen

Chief Executive Officer and Director

By:   /s/ Alan M. Schnaid
 

Alan M. Schnaid

Senior Vice President, Corporate Controller and Principal Accounting Officer

Date: July 26, 2012

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