XNAS:CAFI Quarterly Report 10-Q/A Filing - 6/30/2012

Effective Date 6/30/2012

Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D. C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q/A

 

 

(Mark One)

 

x QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2012

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission File Number 0-25196

 

 

CAMCO FINANCIAL CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   51-0110823

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification Number)

814 Wheeling Avenue, Cambridge, Ohio 43725-9757

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (740) 435-2020

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer ¨   Accelerated filer ¨   Non-accelerated filer ¨   Smaller reporting company x

Indicate by checkmark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

As of August 13, 2012, the latest practicable date, 7,468,087 shares of the registrant’s common stock, $1.00 par value, were outstanding.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

Camco Financial Corporation

INDEX

 

     Page  

Explanatory Note

     3   

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

  

Item 1. Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition

     4   

Consolidated Statements of Operations

     5   

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income

     6   

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

     8   

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     10   

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     27   

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

     41   

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

     42   

PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

     42   

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

     42   

Item 1A. Risk Factors

     42   

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

     42   

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities

     42   

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

     42   

Item 5. Other Information

     42   

Item 6. Exhibits

     43   

SIGNATURES

     44   

 

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Camco Financial Corporation

Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q/A for the period ended June 30, 2012

EXPLANATORY NOTE

Camco Financial Corporation (the Camco”) is filing this Amendment No. 1 (“Amended Report”) to its Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended June 30, 2012, which was originally filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on August 14, 2012 (the “Original Report”), to amend related disclosures in the Management’s Discussion and Analysis.

As a result, Camco is filing this Amended Report to amend Item 2. “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” to correct minor errors and complete the capital table, which was inadvertently left blank. Accordingly, this Amended Report does not reflect other events occurring after the Original Report, nor does it modify or update those disclosures affected by other subsequent events. Changes to Item 2 are noted in bold italics below:

 

   

Other income (6 months ended June 30, 2012)

 

   

Other income totaled $3.7 million for the six months ended June 30, 2012, a decrease of $399,000, or 9.8%, from the comparable 2011 period. The decrease in other income was primarily attributable to a $1.3 million decrease in gain on sale of investments, offset partially by the increase of $1.1 million in gain on sale of loans.

 

   

The decrease in gain on sale of investments can be attributed to the fact that there were few sales in 2012. Gain on sale of loans increased in 2012 primarily due to 2011 including the sale of three portfolio loans at a loss of $433,000, which was offset by the 2011 year to date gain on the sale of mortgage loans of $433,000. When comparing the six months ended June 30, 2012 versus 2011, the gain on sale of mortgage loans increased $648,000.

 

   

General Administrative and Other Expense (3 months ended June 30, 2012)

 

   

The decrease in real estate owned and other expense of $419,000 is primarily due to the prepayment of FHLB borrowings in the first quarter of 2011. Additionally, 2011 included losses on sale of real estate owned of $590,000 versus current year gain on sale of $91,000. The decrease of $420,000 in other loan expense was due to lower classified asset expenses in the second quarter of 2012.

 

   

Camco and Advantage’s table presenting capital requirements as June 30, 2012

 

     Actual     For capital
Adequacy purposes
    To be “well-
capitalized” under
prompt corrective
action provisions
 
     Amount      Ratio     Amount      Ratio     Amount      Ratio  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Total capital to risk-weighted assets:

               

Camco Financial Corporation

   $ 58,843         10.00   ³ $47,068       ³ 8.0   ³ $58,835         10.0

Advantage Bank

   $ 56,591         9.62   ³ $47,039       ³ 8.0   ³ $58,799         10.0

Tier I capital to risk-weighted assets:

               

Camco Financial Corporation

   $ 51,409         8.74   ³ $23,534       ³ 4.0   ³ $35,301         6.0

Advantage Bank

   $ 49,157         8.36   ³ $23,520       ³ 4.0   ³ $35,279         6.0

Tier I leverage to average assets:

               

Camco Financial Corporation

   $ 51,409         6.62   ³ $31,057       ³ 4.0   ³ $38,821         5.0

Advantage Bank

   $ 49,157         6.35   ³ $30,986       ³ 4.0   ³ $38,732         5.0

This Amended Report also includes currently-dated certifications from the Camco’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as required by Sections 302 and 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

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While we are making only the changes noted above in Item 2 and to the Exhibits, for convenience and ease of future reference, we are filing the entire Quarterly Report for the quarter ended June  30, 2012, in this Amended Report.

Item 1. Financial Statements

Camco Financial Corporation

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION

(In thousands, except share data)

 

    

June 30,

2012

   

December 31,

2011

 
     (unaudited)        

ASSETS

    

Cash and due from banks

   $ 15,460      $ 16,420   

Interest-bearing deposits in other financial institutions

     12,700        21,954   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

     28,160        38,374   

Securities available for sale, at market

     72,430        17,845   

Securities held to maturity, at cost

     2,917        3,083   

Loans held for sale—at lower of cost or fair value

     2,532        8,090   

Loans receivable—net

     599,605        639,177   

Office premises and equipment—net

     8,365        8,645   

Real estate acquired through foreclosure

     11,966        10,888   

Federal Home Loan Bank stock—at cost

     9,888        9,888   

Accrued interest receivable

     2,717        2,945   

Mortgage servicing rights—at lower of cost or market

     3,302        3,263   

Prepaid expenses and other assets

     4,806        4,927   

Cash surrender value of life insurance

     20,228        19,893   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 766,916      $ 767,018   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

    

Deposits

   $ 638,516      $ 629,259   

Other Borrowings

     10,755        16,681   

Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank

     58,445        63,604   

Advances by borrowers for taxes and insurance

     869        2,100   

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

     11,555        9,769   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     720,140        721,413   

Commitments

     —          —     

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock—$1 par value; authorized 100,000 shares; no shares outstanding

     —          —     

Common stock—$1 par value; authorized 29,900,000 shares; 9,147,000 and 8,884,508 shares issued at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011 respectively

     9,147        8,885   

Unearned compensation

     (492     (31

Additional paid-in capital

     60,954        60,528   

Retained earnings

     1,245        350   

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) net of related tax effects

     36        (13

Treasury stock 1,678,913 shares at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, at cost

     (24,114     (24,114
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

     46,776        45,605   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 766,916      $ 767,018   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Camco Financial Corporation

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(In thousands, except per share data)

 

(unaudited)    Six months ended
June 30,
    Three months
ended June 30,
 
     2012     2011     2012     2011  

Interest and dividend income

        

Loans

   $ 15,912      $ 17,740      $ 7,699      $ 8,839   

Investment securities

     219        439        132        84   

Other interest-earning accounts

     218        503        105        157   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total interest and dividend income

     16,349        18,682        7,936        9,080   

Interest Expense

        

Deposits

     2,956        4,107        1,405        1,918   

Borrowings

     1,291        1,529        618        726   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total interest expense

     4,247        5,636        2,023        2,644   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net interest income

     12,102        13,046        5,913        6,436   

Provision for losses on loans

     1,142        2,810        137        1,797   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net interest income after provision for losses on loans

     10,960        10,236        5,776        4,639   

Other income

        

Late charges, rent and other

     551        565        223        203   

Loan servicing fees

     566        605        285        298   

Service charges and other fees on deposits

     998        1,032        508        529   

Gain (loss) on sale of loans

     1,081        —          517        (92

Mortgage servicing rights – net

     39        139        (63     (132

Gain (loss) on sale of investments & fixed assets

     (2     1,280        1        2   

Income on cash surrender value of life insurance

     426        437        208        220   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other income

     3,659        4,058        1,679        1,028   

General, administrative and other expenses

        

Employee compensation and benefits

     6,396        6,531        3,249        3,153   

Occupancy and equipment

     1,467        1,452        756        691   

Federal deposit insurance premiums and other insurance

     923        1,097        469        494   

Data processing

     571        561        285        277   

Advertising

     195        182        108        96   

Franchise taxes

     384        348        201        178   

Postage, supplies and office expenses

     507        471        251        253   

Travel, training and insurance

     121        121        71        56   

Professional services

     889        702        351        320   

Transaction processing

     399        367        207        200   

Real estate owned and other expenses

     1,236        1,655        589        825   

Loan expenses

     661        1,081        498        598   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total general, administrative and other expense

     13,749        14,568        7,035        7,141   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings (loss) before federal income taxes

     870        (274     420        (1,474

Federal income taxes (benefit)

     (25     537        (62     (11
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

NET EARNINGS (LOSS)

   $ 895      $ (811   $ 482      $ (1,463
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

EARNINGS (LOSS) PER SHARE

        

Basic

   $ 0.12      $ (0.11   $ 0.06      $ (0.20
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Diluted

   $ 0.12      $ (0.11   $ 0.06      $ (0.20
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Camco Financial Corporation

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

(In thousands)

 

(unaudited)   

Six months ended

June 30,

   

Three months ended

June 30,

 
     2012     2011     2012     2011  

Net earnings (loss)

   $ 895        (811   $ 482      $ (1,463

Other comprehensive income, net of tax:

        

Unrealized holding gains (losses) on securities during the period, net of tax effects of $25 and $(103), $63 and $10 for the respective periods

     50        (201     123        20   

Reclassification adjustment for realized gains included in net earnings, net of taxes of $0 and $(434), and $0 and $0 for the respective periods

     (1     (842     (1     —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive income (loss)

   $ 944      $ (1,854   $ 604      $ (1,443
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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CAMCO FINANCIAL CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(In thousands, except per share data)

 

    

Shares

outstanding

    

Common

stock

    

Additional

paid-in

capital

     Retained
earnings
   

Accumulated
other

comprehensive

income (loss)

    Unearned
compensation
    Treasury
stock
    Total
stockholders’
equity
 

Balance at December 31, 2010

     7,205,595       $ 8,885       $ 60,260       $ 136      $ 1,030      $ (94   $ (24,114   $ 46,103   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Stock Option Expense

     —           —           199         —          —          —          —          199   

Net earnings for the year ended December 31, 2011

     —           —           —           (811     —          —          —          (811

Restricted shares expense

     —           —           —           —          —          47        —          47   

Unrealized (losses) of securities designated as available for sale, net of related tax benefits

     —           —           —           —          (1,043     —          —          (1,043
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2011

     7,205,595       $ 8,885       $ 60,459       $ (675   $ (13   $ (47   $ (24,114   $ 44,495   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2011

     7,205,595       $ 8,885       $ 60,528       $ 350      $ (13   $ (31   $ (24,114   $ 45,605   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Stock Option Expense

     —           —           64         —          —          —          —          64   

Net earnings for the six months ended June 30, 2012

     —           —           —           895        —          —          —          895   

Restricted shares granted

     262,492         262         362         —            (461     —          163   

Unrealized gains on securities designated as available for sale, net of related tax benefits

     —           —           —           —          49        —          —          49   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2012

     7,468,087       $ 9,147       $ 60,955       $ 1,245      $ 36      $ (492   $ (24,114   $ 46,776   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Camco Financial Corporation

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

For the six months ended June 30,

(In thousands)

 

     2012     2011  
     (unaudited)  

Cash flows from operating activities:

    

Net earnings (loss) for the period

   $ 895      $ (811

Adjustments to reconcile net earnings to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:

    

Amortization of deferred loan origination fees

     (71     (159

Amortization of premiums and discounts on investment and mortgage-backed securities – net

     16        30   

Amortization of mortgage servicing rights – net

     453        72   

Depreciation and amortization

     690        668   

Provision for losses on loans

     1,142        2,810   

Stock based compensation expense

     227        484   

Provisions for losses on REO

     335        47   

Gain on sale of real estate acquired through foreclosure

     (91     259   

Gain on sale of investments

     (1     (1,276

(Gain) on sale of loans

     (1,081     0   

(Gain)/loss on sale of assets

     3        (4

Loans originated for sale in the secondary market

     (48,100     (34,614

Proceeds from sale of loans in the secondary market

     54,739        33,123   

Net increase in cash surrender value of life insurance

     (335     (351

Increase (decrease) in cash due to changes in:

    

Accrued interest receivable

     228        357   

Prepaid expenses and other assets

     97        (777

Accrued interest and other liabilities

     1,786        (818
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash (used in) operating activities

     10,932        (960
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows provided by (used in) investing activities:

    

Principal repayments, maturities on securities held to maturity

     165        282   

Principal repayments, maturities on securities available for sale

     9,423        4,971   

Purchases of investment securities designated as available for sale

     (63,955     (12,615

Proceeds from sale of investments

     8        27,161   

Redemption of FHLB Stock

     —          20,000   

Loan principal repayments

     134,787        108,208   

Loan disbursements and purchased loans

     (100,046     (90,452

Proceeds from sale of office premises and equipment

     19        4   

Additions to office premises and equipment

     (433     (129

Proceeds from sale of real estate acquired through foreclosure

     1,945        2,876   

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

     (18,087     60,306   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by (used in) operating and investing activities balance carried forward

     (7,155     59,346   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Camco Financial Corporation

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (CONTINUED)

For the six months ended June 30,

(In thousands)

 

     2012     2011  

Net cash provided by (used in) operating and investing activities (balance brought forward)

   $ (7,155   $ 59,346   

Cash flows used in financing activities:

    

Net increase (decrease) in deposits

     9,257        (20,169

Proceeds from Federal Home Loan Bank advances and other borrowings

     79,691        42,317   

Repayment of Federal Home Loan Bank advances and other borrowings

     (90,776     (66,301

Decrease in advances by borrowers for taxes and insurance

     (1,231     (1,925
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

     (3,059     (46,078
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

     (10,214     13,268   

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

     38,374        29,114   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

   $ 28,160      $ 42,382   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:

    

Cash paid during the period for:

    

Interest on deposits and borrowings

   $ 4,246      $ 5,699   

Income taxes paid

     25        580   

Transfers from loans to real estate acquired through foreclosure

     3,268        7,540   

 

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1. Basis of Presentation

The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements were prepared in accordance with instructions for Form 10-Q and, therefore, do not include information or footnotes necessary for a complete presentation of financial position, results of operations and cash flows in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“US GAAP”). Accordingly, these financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto of Camco Financial Corporation (“Camco” or the “Corporation”) included in Camco’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011. However, all adjustments (consisting only of normal recurring accruals) which, in the opinion of management, are necessary for a fair presentation of the consolidated financial statements have been included. The results of operations for the six-month period ended June 2012, are not necessarily indicative of the results which may be expected for the entire year.

 

2. Principles of Consolidation

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Camco and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Advantage Bank (“Advantage” or the “Bank”). All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated.

On March 31, 2011, Camco Financial Corporation dissolved Camco Title Agency, Inc. and sold certain of its assets to a third party. The balance sheet and results of operations of Camco Title were not material to the Corporation’s consolidated financial statements. For the three months ended March 31, 2011, Camco Title’s operations resulted in net income of $15,000.

 

3. Critical Accounting Policies

“Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” as well as disclosures found elsewhere in this report, are based upon Camco’s consolidated financial statements, which are prepared in accordance with US GAAP. The preparation of these financial statements requires Camco to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses. Several factors are considered in determining whether or not a policy is critical in the preparation of financial statements. These factors include, among other things, whether the estimates are significant to the financial statements, the nature of the estimates, the ability to readily validate the estimates with other information including third parties or available prices, and sensitivity of the estimates to changes in economic conditions and whether alternative accounting methods may be utilized under US GAAP.

Material estimates that are particularly susceptible to significant change in the near term relate to the determination of the allowance for loan losses, the valuation of mortgage servicing rights, the valuation of deferred tax assets and other real estate owned. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Summary

We believe the accounting estimates related to the allowance for loan losses, the capitalization, amortization, and valuation of mortgage servicing rights, deferred income taxes and other real estate owned are “critical accounting estimates” because: (1) the estimates are highly susceptible to change from period to period because they require us to make assumptions concerning the changes in the types and volumes of the portfolios, rates of future prepayments, and anticipated economic conditions, and (2) the impact of recognizing an impairment or loan loss could have a material effect on Camco’s assets reported on the balance sheet as well as its net earnings.

Allowance for Loan Losses

The procedures for assessing the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses reflect management’s evaluation of credit risk after careful consideration of all information available to management. In developing this assessment, management must rely on estimates and exercise judgment regarding matters where the ultimate outcome is unknown such as economic factors, developments affecting companies in specific industries and issues with respect to single borrowers. Depending on changes in circumstances, future assessments of credit risk may yield materially different results, which may require an increase or a decrease in the allowance for loan losses.

 

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Each quarter, management analyzes the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses based on review of the loans in the portfolio along with an analysis of external factors (including current housing price depreciation, homeowners’ loss of equity, etc.) and historical delinquency and loss trends. The allowance is developed through specific components: 1) the specific allowance for loans subject to individual analysis, 2) the allowance for classified loans not otherwise subject to individual analysis and 3) the allowance for non-classified loans (primarily homogeneous).

Classified loans with indication or acknowledgment of deterioration are subject to individual analysis. Loan classifications are those used by regulators consisting of Special Mention, Substandard, Doubtful and Loss. In evaluating these loans for impairment, the measure of expected loss is based on the present value of the expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, a loan’s observable market price or the fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent. All other classified assets and non-classified assets are combined with the homogeneous loan pools and segregated into loan segments. The segmentation is based on grouping loans with similar risk characteristics (one-to-four family, home equity, etc.). Loss rate factors are developed for each loan segment which is used to estimate losses and determine an allowance. The loss factors for each segment are derived from historical delinquency, classification, and charge-off rates and adjusted for economic factors and an estimated loss scenario.

The allowance is reviewed by management to determine whether the amount is considered adequate to absorb probable, incurred losses inherent in the loan portfolio. Management’s evaluation of the adequacy of the allowance is an estimate based on management’s current judgment about the credit quality of the loan portfolio. This evaluation includes specific loss estimates on certain individually reviewed loans, statistical loss estimates for loan pools that are based on historical loss experience, and general loss estimates that are based upon the size, quality, and concentration characteristics of the various loan portfolios, adverse situations that may affect a borrower’s ability to repay, and current economic and industry conditions. Also considered as part of that judgment is a review of the Bank’s trends in delinquencies and loan losses, as well as trends in delinquencies and losses for the region and nationally, and economic factors. While the Corporation strives to reflect all known risk factors in its evaluations, judgment errors may occur.

Mortgage Servicing Rights

To determine the fair value of its mortgage servicing rights (“MSRs”) each reporting quarter, the Corporation provides information to a third party valuation firm, representing loan information in each pooling period accompanied by escrow amounts. The third party then evaluates the possible impairment of MSRs as described below.

MSRs are recognized as separate assets or liabilities when loans are sold with servicing retained. A pooling methodology, in which loans with similar characteristics are “pooled” together, is applied for valuation purposes. Once pooled, each grouping of loans is evaluated on a discounted earnings basis to determine the present value of future earnings that the Bank could expect to realize from the portfolio. Earnings are projected from a variety of sources including loan service fees, net interest earned on escrow balances, miscellaneous income and costs to service the loans. The present value of future earnings is the estimated fair value for the pool, calculated using consensus assumptions that a third party purchaser would utilize in evaluating a potential acquisition of the MSRs.

Events that may significantly affect the estimates used are changes in interest rates and the related impact on mortgage loan prepayment speeds and the payment performance of the underlying loans. The interest rate for net interest earned on escrow balances, which is supplied by management, takes into consideration the investment portfolio average yield as well as current short duration investment yields. Management believes this methodology provides a reasonable estimate. Mortgage loan prepayment speeds are calculated by the third party provider utilizing the Economic Outlook as published by the Office of Chief Economist of Freddie Mac in estimating prepayment speeds and provides a specific scenario with each evaluation. Based on the assumptions discussed, pre-tax projections are prepared for each pool of loans serviced. These earnings are used to calculate the approximate cash flow that could be received from the servicing portfolio. Valuation results are presented quarterly to management. At that time, management reviews the information and MSRs are marked to lower of amortized cost or fair value for the current quarter.

 

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Deferred Income Taxes

Camco recognizes expense for federal income taxes currently payable as well as for deferred federal taxes for estimated future tax effects of temporary differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities and amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets. Realization of a deferred tax asset is dependent upon generating sufficient taxable income in either the carry forward or carry back periods to cover net operating losses generated by the reversal of temporary differences. A valuation allowance is provided for deferred tax assets if it is determined that it is more likely than not that some or all of the deferred tax asset will not be realized. If different assumptions and conditions were to prevail, the valuation allowance may not be adequate to absorb unrealized deferred taxes and the amount of income taxes payable may need to be adjusted by way of a charge to expense. Furthermore, income tax returns are subject to audit by the IRS. Income tax expense for current and prior periods is subject to adjustment based upon the outcome of such audits. During 2011, the IRS began an examination of the Corporation’s tax returns for the year ended December 31, 2009. Accrual of income taxes payable and valuation allowances against deferred tax assets are estimates subject to change based upon the outcome of future events.

Other Real Estate

Assets acquired through or instead of foreclosure, primarily other real estate owned, are initially recorded at fair value less costs to sell when acquired, establishing a new cost basis. New real estate appraisals are generally obtained at the time of foreclosure and are used to establish fair value. If fair value declines, a valuation allowance is recorded through expense. Estimating the initial and ongoing fair value of these properties involves a number of factors and judgments including holding time, costs to complete, holding costs, discount rate, absorption and other factors.

 

4. Earnings Per Share

Basic earnings per common share is computed based upon the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per common share is computed including the dilutive effect of additional potential common shares issuable under outstanding stock options. Diluted earnings per share is not computed for periods in which an operating loss is sustained. The computations were as follows for the periods ended June 30, 2012 and 2011:

 

    

For the six months

ended June 30,

    For the three months
ended June 30,
 
     2012      2011     2012      2011  
     (In thousands, except per share information)  

BASIC:

          

Net Earnings

   $ 895       $ (811   $ 482       $ (1,463

Weighted average common shares outstanding

     7,344         7,206        7,468         7,206   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Basic earnings (loss) per share

   $ 0.12       $ (0.11   $ 0.06       $ (0.20
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

DILUTED:

          

Net Earnings

   $ 895       $ (811   $ 482       $ (1,463

Weighted average common shares outstanding

     7,344         7,206        7,468         7,206   

Dilutive effect of stock options

     —           —          14         —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total common shares and dilutive potential common shares

     7,344         7,206        7,482         7,206   

Diluted earnings (loss) per share

   $ 0.12       $ (0.11   $ 0.06       $ (0.20
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Anti-dilutive options to purchase 580,900 and 604,583 shares of common stock with respective weighted-average exercise prices of $4.70 and $4.97 were outstanding at June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively, but were excluded from the computation of common share equivalents for each of the six month periods, because the exercise prices were greater than the average market price of the common shares.

Anti-dilutive options to purchase 428,286 and 609,583 shares of common stock with respective weighted-average exercise prices of $6.05 and $4.93 were outstanding at June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively, but were excluded from the computation of common share equivalents for each of the three month periods, because the exercise prices were greater than the average market price of the common shares.

 

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Table of Contents
5. Stock Based Compensation

The Corporation follows a fair-value based method for valuing stock-based compensation that measures compensation cost at the grant date based on the fair value of the award.

The fair value of each option grant is estimated on the date of grant using the modified Black-Scholes options-pricing model. The following table details the fair value and assumptions used to value stock options as of the grant date that were granted during the six months ended June 30, 2011:

 

     2011  

Fair value, calculated

   $ 1.49   

Exercise Price

   $ 2.14   

Risk-free interest rate

     3.58

Expected stock price volatility

     57.30

Expected dividend yield

     —     

Expected Life

     10 years   

In 2012 no options were granted as the Corporation awarded restricted shares in lieu of options related to goals achieved within the 2011 officer incentive plan.

A summary of the status of the Corporation’s stock option plans as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, and changes during the periods ending on those dates is presented below:

 

    

Six Months ended

June 30, 2012

    

Year ended

December 31, 2011

 
     Shares     Weighted-
average
exercise
price
     Shares     Weighted-
average
exercise
price
 

Outstanding at beginning of period

     587,342      $ 4.68         463,642      $ 5.84   

Granted

     —          —           161,538        2.14   

Exercised

     —          —           —          —     

Forfeited

     (1,442     8.67         (29,338     7.03   

Expired

     —          —           (8,500     11.93   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Outstanding at end of period

     585,900      $ 4.65         587,342      $ 4.68   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Options exercisable at period end

     399,033      $ 5.76         317,467      $ 6.58   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted-average fair value of options granted during the period

     $ —           $ 1.49   
    

 

 

      

 

 

 

The following information applies to options outstanding at June 30, 2012:

 

     Options Outstanding      Options Exercisable  

Range of Exercise Prices

   Number
Outstanding
     Weighted-Average
Remaining
Contractual
Life (Years)
     Weighted-
Average
Exercise
Price
     Number
Exercisable
     Weighted-
Average
Exercise
Price
 

$1.90 - $2.51

     471,652         8.0       $ 2.39         284,785       $ 2.42   

$8.92

     19,260         5.6         8.92         19,260         8.92   

$11.36 - $14.16

     45,137         3.8         13.70         45,137         13.70   

$16.13 - $17.17

     49,851         1.8         16.44         49,851         16.44   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     585,900         7.0       $ 4.67         399,033       $ 5.78   

In 2009, Camco granted 50,000 restricted shares of stock out of the current authorized common stock related to an employment agreement. The issuance of restricted stock vests in four equal increments beginning in 2010.

 

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In March 2012, Camco granted 262,500 shares of restricted stock awards with an impact to unearned/deferred compensation of $625,000, $262,500 of common stock and additional paid in capital of $362,500. The stock was granted under the Camco Financial Corporation 2010 Equity Plan to officers based on 2011 performance. The restrictions on the shares that were granted and have vested generally lapse after one year. The grant date fair value per share of restricted stock is the stock price at close on grant date, which is expensed on a straight-line basis during the vesting period. The shares represented by restricted stock awards are considered outstanding at the grant date, as the recipients are entitled to voting rights and dividends if declared. A summary of restricted stock award activity for the period is presented below:

 

    Non-vested Number of
Shares
    Weighted Average Grant
Date Fair Value
 

Non-vested balance at January 1, 2011

    37,500      $ 2.50   

Vested

    (12,500     2.50   
 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-vested balance at December 31, 2011

    25,000      $ 2.50   

Granted

    262,492        2.38   

Vested

    (64,979     2.40   
 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-vested balance at June 30, 2012

    222,513      $ 2.39   
 

 

 

   

 

 

 

At June 30, 2012, there was approximately $458,000 of compensation cost that has not yet been recognized related to restricted stock awards. That cost is expected to be recognized over a remaining period of two years.

 

6. Fair Value

The fair value framework as disclosed in the Fair Value Measurements and Disclosure Topic of FASB ASC Topic 825, Financial Instruments (Fair Value Topic) includes a hierarchy which focuses on prioritizing the inputs used in valuation techniques. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1), a lower priority to observable inputs other than quoted prices in active markets for identical assets and liabilities (Level 2), and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3). When determining the fair value measurements for assets and liabilities, the Corporation looks to active markets to price identical assets or liabilities whenever possible and classifies such items in Level 1. When identical assets and liabilities are not traded in active markets, the Corporation looks to observable market data for similar assets and liabilities and classifies such items as Level 2. Certain assets and liabilities are not actively traded in observable markets and the Corporation must use alternative techniques, based on unobservable inputs, to determine the fair value and classifies such items as Level 3. The level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest level of input that is significant in the fair value measurement.

As a financial services corporation, the carrying value of certain financial assets and liabilities is impacted by the application of fair value measurements, either directly or indirectly. In certain cases, an asset or liability is measured and reported at fair value on a recurring basis, such as available-for-sale investment securities. In other cases, management must rely on estimates or judgments to determine if an asset or liability not measured at fair value warrants an impairment write-down or whether a valuation reserve should be established. Given the inherent volatility, the use of fair value measurements may have a significant impact on the carrying value of assets or liabilities, or result in material changes to the financial statements, from period to period.

The following methods, assumptions, and valuation techniques were used by the Corporation to measure different financial assets and liabilities at fair value and in estimating its fair value disclosures for financial instruments.

Cash and Cash Equivalents: The carrying amounts reported in the consolidated statements of financial condition for cash and cash equivalents is deemed to approximate fair value and are classified as Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy.

Investment Securities: Fair values for investment securities are determined by quoted market prices if available (Level 1). For securities where quoted prices are not available, fair values are calculated based on market prices of similar securities. For securities where quoted prices or market prices of similar securities are not available, fair values are calculated using matrix pricing, which is a mathematical technique widely used in the industry to value investment securities without relying exclusively on quoted prices for the specific investment securities but rather relying on the investment securities’ relationship to other benchmark quoted investment securities (Level 2). Any investment securities not valued based upon the methods above is considered Level 3.

 

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Table of Contents

The Corporation utilizes information provided by a third-party investment securities portfolio manager in analyzing the investment securities portfolio in accordance with the fair value hierarchy of the Fair Value Topic. The portfolio manager’s evaluation of investment security portfolio pricing is performed using a combination of prices and data from other sources, along with internally developed matrix pricing models. The third-party’s month-end pricing process includes a series of quality assurance activities where prices are compared to recent market conditions, previous evaluation prices, and between the various pricing services. These processes produce a series of quality assurance reports on which price exceptions are identified, reviewed and where appropriate, securities are repriced. In the event of a materially different price, the third party will report the variance and review the pricing methodology in detail. The results of the quality assurance process are incorporated into the selection of pricing providers by the third party.

Loans Held for Sale: Mortgage loans held for sale are classified as Level 2 and are estimated using fair value which is determined using quoted prices and if available the contracted sales price of loans committed for delivery, which is determined on the date of sale commitment. Gains and losses on the sale of loans are recorded as net gains from sales of loans within noninterest income in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Loans Receivable: The loan portfolio has been segregated into categories with similar characteristics, such as one- to four-family residential real estate, multi-family residential real estate, installment and other. These loan categories were further delineated into fixed-rate and adjustable-rate loans. The fair values for the resultant loan categories were computed via discounted cash flow analysis, using current interest rates offered for loans with similar terms to borrowers of similar credit quality. The methods utilized to estimate the fair value of loans do not necessarily represent an exit price and due to the significant judgment involved in evaluating credit quality, loans are classified within Level 3 classification.

Federal Home Loan Bank Stock: The carrying amount presented in the consolidated statements of financial condition is deemed to approximate fair value.

Accrued Interest Receivable and Payable: The carrying value for accrued interest approximates fair value.

Deposits: The fair values of deposits with no stated maturity, such as money market demand deposits, savings and NOW accounts have been analyzed by management and assigned estimated maturities and cash flows which are then discounted to derive a value. The fair value of fixed-rate certificates of deposit is based on the discounted value of contractual cash flows. The discount rate is estimated using the rates currently offered for deposits of similar remaining maturities. The Corporation classifies the estimated fair value of deposit liabilities as Level 2 in the fair value hierarchy.

Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank: The fair value of these advances is estimated using the rates currently offered for similar advances of similar remaining maturities or, when available, quoted market prices.

Repurchase Agreements: The fair value of repurchase agreements is based on the discounted value of contractual cash flows using rates currently offered for similar maturities. The Corporation classifies the estimated fair value of short-term borrowings as Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy.

Subordinated Debentures: The fair value of subordinated debentures is based on the discounted value of contractual cash flows using rates currently offered for smaller maturities.

Advances by Borrowers for Taxes and Insurance: The carrying amount of advances by borrowers for taxes and insurance is deemed to approximate fair value.

Commitments to Extend Credit: For fixed-rate and adjustable-rate loan commitments, the fair value estimate considers the difference between current levels of interest rates and committed rates. At June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, the fair value of loan commitments was not material.

 

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Table of Contents

Listed below are three levels of inputs that Camco uses to measure fair value:

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets that the entity has the ability to access as of the measurement date.

Level 2: Quoted prices on identical assets or liabilities that are not actively traded. Also consists of an observable market price for a similar asset or liability. This includes the use of “matrix pricing” used to value debt securities absent the exclusive use of quoted prices.

Level 3: Consists of unobservable inputs that are used to measure fair value when observable market inputs are not available. This could include the use of internally developed models, financial forecasting, etc.

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or transfer a liability between market participants at the balance sheet date. When possible, the Corporation looks to active and observable markets to price identical assets or liabilities. When identical assets and liabilities are not traded in active markets, the Corporation looks to observable market data for similar assets and liabilities. However, certain assets and liabilities are not traded in observable markets and Camco must use other valuation methods to develop a fair value. The fair value of impaired loans is based on the fair value of the underlying collateral, which is estimated through third party appraisals or internal estimates of collateral values.

Based on the foregoing methods and assumptions, the carrying value and fair value of the Corporation’s financial instruments are as follows:

 

(in thousands as of June 30, 2012)   

Carrying

value

    

Fair

value

     Level 1      Level 2      Level 3  

Financial assets

        

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 28,160       $ 28,160       $ 28,160       $ 0       $ 0   

Investment securities available for sale

     72,430         72,430         0         72,386         44   

Investment securities held to maturity

     2,917         2,972         0         2,972         0   

Loans held for sale

     2,532         2,627         0         2,627         0   

Loans receivable

     599,605         607,189         0         0         607,189   

Federal Home Loan Bank stock

     9,888         9,888         0         0         9,888   

Accrued interest receivable

     2,717         2,717         2,717         0         0   

Financial liabilities

              

Deposits

   $ 638,516       $ 632,635       $ 65,996       $ 566,639       $ 0   

Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank

     58,445         61,856         0         61,856         0   

Repurchase agreements

     5,755         5,755         0         0         5,755   

Subordinated debentures

     5,000         4,928         0         0         4,928   

Advances by borrowers for taxes and insurance

     869         869         869         0         0   

Accrued interest payable

     1,694         1,694         1,694         0         0   

 

(in thousands as of December 31, 2011)    Carrying
value
    

Fair

value

 

Financial assets

     

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 38,374       $ 38,374   

Investment securities available for sale

     17,845         17,845   

Investment securities held to maturity

     3,083         3,135   

Loans held for sale

     8,090         8,250   

Loans receivable

     639,177         639,477   

Federal Home Loan Bank stock

     9,888         9,888   

Accrued interest receivable

     2,945         2,945   

Financial liabilities

     

Deposits

   $ 629,259       $ 623,145   

Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank

     63,604         67,951   

Repurchase agreements

     11,681         11,681   

Subordinated debentures

     5,000         4,928   

Advances by borrowers for taxes and insurance

     2,100         2,100   

Accrued interest payable

     1,693         1,693   

 

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The following table presents financial assets and liabilities measured on a recurring basis:

 

            Fair Value Measurements at Reporting Date Using  
(in thousands)    Balance      Level 1      Level 2      Level 3  

June 30, 2012

           

Securities available for sale:

           

U.S. government sponsored enterprises

   $ 71,028       $ 0       $ 71,028       $ 0   

Corporate equity securities

     44         0         0         44   

Mortgage-backed securities

     1,358         0         1,358         0   

December 31, 2011

           

Securities available for sale:

           

U.S. government sponsored enterprises

   $ 16,292       $ 0       $ 16,292       $ 0   

Corporate equity securities

     52         0         —           52   

Mortgage-backed securities

     1,501         0         1,501         0   
The following table presents financial assets and liabilities measured on a non-recurring basis:   
            Fair Value Measurements at Reporting Date Using  
(in thousands)    Balance      Level 1      Level 2      Level 3  

June 30, 2012

           

Impaired loans

   $ 25,587       $ 0       $ 0       $ 25,587   

Real estate acquired through foreclosure

     11,966         0         0         11,966   

December 31, 2011

           

Impaired loans

   $ 22,956         0         0       $ 22,956   

Real estate acquired through foreclosure

     10,888         0         0         10,888   

Impaired loans are measured and reported at fair value when management believes collection of contractual interest and principal payments is doubtful. Management’s determination of the fair value for these loans represents the estimated net proceeds to be received from the sale of the collateral based on observable market prices and market value provided by independent, licensed or certified appraisers.

Fair value for real estate acquired through foreclosure is generally determined by obtaining recent appraisals on the properties. Other types of valuing include broker price opinions and valuations pertaining to the current and anticipated deterioration in the regional economy and real estate market, as evidenced by, among other things, changes in the local population, unemployment rates, increasing vacancy rates, borrower delinquencies, declining property values and rental prices, differences between foreclosure appraisals and real estate owned sales prices, and an increase in concessions and other forms of discounting or other items approved by our asset classification committee. The fair value under such appraisals is determined by using one of the following valuation techniques: income, cost or comparable sales. The fair value is then reduced by management’s estimate for the direct costs expected to be incurred in order to sell the property. Holding costs or maintenance expenses are recorded as period costs when occurred and are not included in the fair value estimate.

 

7. Allowance for Loan Losses

The allowance for loan losses is a reserve established through a provision which is charged to expense and represents management’s best estimate of probable losses that could be incurred within the existing portfolio of loans. The allowance is necessary to reserve for estimated loan losses and risks inherent in the loan portfolio. The Corporation’s allowance for possible loan loss methodology is based on historical loss experience by type of credit and internal risk grade, specific homogeneous risk pools and specific loss allocations, with adjustments for current events and conditions. The provision for possible loan losses reflects loan quality trends, including the levels of and trends related to non-accrual loans, past due loans, potential problem loans, criticized loans and net charge-offs or recoveries, among other factors. The amount of the provision reflects not only the necessary allowance for possible loan losses related to newly identified criticized loans, but it also reflects actions taken related to other loans including, among other things, any necessary increases or decreases in required allowances for specific loans or loan pools. While management utilizes its best judgment and information available, the ultimate adequacy of the allowance is dependent upon a variety of factors beyond the Corporation’s control, including, among other things, changes in market interest rates and other factors in the local economies that we serve, such as unemployment rates and real estate market values.

 

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Table of Contents

The Corporation’s allowance for possible loan losses consists of three elements: (i) specific valuation allowances on probable losses on specific loans; (ii) historical valuation allowances based on historical loan loss experience for similar loans with similar characteristics and trends, adjusted, as necessary, to reflect the impact of current conditions; and (iii) general valuation allowances based on general economic conditions and other qualitative risk factors both internal and external to the Corporation.

Loans identified as losses by management are charged-off. Furthermore, consumer loan accounts are charged-off automatically based on regulatory requirements.

Allowance for loan losses for the three and six months period ending June 30, 2012 and 2011 are summarized as follows:

 

(in thousands)    Construction     Consumer     Multi-
Family
    Land, Farm
& Ag
Loans
    Residential     Commercial &
Non-
Residential
    Commercial
and
Industrial
    Total  

Allowance for credit losses:

                

Beginning balance December 31, 2011

   $ 35      $ 80      $ 2,484      $ 554      $ 8,277      $ 2,565      $ 537      $ 14,532   

Charge-offs

     0        (2     (11     (356     (1,227     (65     (51     (1,712

Recoveries

     0        1        9        3        110        36        64        223   

Provision

     519        (30     (794     567        (764     1,582        62        1,142   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance June 30, 2012

   $ 554      $ 49      $ 1,688      $ 768      $ 6,396      $ 4,118      $ 612      $ 14,185   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Beginning balance March 31, 2012

   $ 428      $ 48      $ 1,548      $ 1,043      $ 6,966      $ 4,356      $ 565      $ 14,954   

Charge-offs

     0        (2     0        (356     (593     (65     (5     (1,021

Recoveries

     0        1        1        2        60        26        25        115   

Provision

     126        2        139        79        (37     (199     27        137   

Ending balance June 30, 2012

   $ 554      $ 49      $ 1,688      $ 768      $ 6,396      $ 4,118      $ 612      $ 14,185   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Beginning balance December 31, 2010

   $ 166      $ 246      $ 2,860      $ 849      $ 8,050      $ 3,638      $ 1,061      $ 16,870   

Charge-offs

     0        (57     (33     (107     (1,447     (579     (9     (2,232

Recoveries

     0        2        116        204        383        109        89        903   

Provision

     (141     (77     (10     (318     1,988        1,934        (566     2,810   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance June 30, 2011

   $ 25      $ 114      $ 2,933      $ 628      $ 8,974        5,102      $ 575      $ 18,351   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Beginning balance March 31, 2011

   $ 164      $ 278      $ 2,355      $ 782      $ 7,962      $ 5,428      $ 441      $ 17,410   

Charge-offs

     0        (55     (33     (107     (737     (313     0        (1,245

Recoveries

     0        1        110        9        248        21        0        389   

Provision

     (139     (110     501        (56     1,501        (34     134        1,797   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance June 30, 2011

   $ 25      $ 114      $ 2,933      $ 628      $ 8,974      $ 5,102      $ 575      $ 18,351   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Allocation of the allowance for loan loss by segment to loans individually and collectively evaluated for impairment as follows:

 

At June 30, 2012 (in thousands)    Construction      Consumer      Multi-
Family
     Land, Farm
& Ag
Loans
     Residential      Commercial &
Non-
Residential
     Commercial
and
Industrial
     Total  

Individually evaluated for impairment

   $ 4       $ 18       $ 406       $ 25       $ 481       $ 540       $ 59       $ 1,533   

Collectively evaluated for impairment

   $ 550       $ 31       $ 1,282       $ 743       $ 5,915       $ 3,578       $ 553       $ 12,652   

            Portfolio balances:

                       

Collectively evaluated for impairment

   $ 24,589       $ 3,663       $ 71,963       $ 15,579       $ 285,028       $ 150,145       $ 35,703       $ 586,670   

Individually evaluated for impairment

                       

With no related allowance

     0         0         0         666         507         504         100         1,777   

With related allowance

     17         259         4,588         238         11,651         8,232         358         25,343   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 24,606       $ 3,922       $ 76,551       $ 16,483       $ 297,186       $ 158,88       $ 36,161       $ 613,790   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents
At December 31, 2011 (in thousands)    Construction      Consumer      Multi-
Family
     Land, Farm
& Ag
Loans
     Residential      Commercial  &
Non-

Residential
     Commercial
and
Industrial
     Total  

Individually evaluated for impairment

   $ 3       $ 41       $ 426       $ 208       $ 720       $ 335       $ 27       $ 1,760   

Collectively evaluated for impairment

   $ 32       $ 39       $ 2,058       $ 346       $ 7,557       $ 2,230       $ 510       $ 12,772   

        Portfolio balances:

                       

Collectively evaluated for impairment

   $ 23,857       $ 3,402       $ 83,246       $ 16,619       $ 307,057       $ 156,457       $ 38,355       $ 628,993   

Individually evaluated for impairment

                       

With no related allowance

     0         0         51         0         1,945         695         112         2,803   

With related allowance

     19         128         4,633         1,203         8,922         6,612         396         21,913   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Ending balance

   $ 23,876       $ 3,530       $ 87,930       $ 17,822       $ 317,924       $ 163,764       $ 38,863       $ 653,709   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Non-accrual and Past Due Loans. Loans are considered past due if the required principal and interest payments have not been received as of the date such payments were due. Loans are placed on non-accrual status when the loan is more than three payments past due, as well as when required by regulatory provisions. Loans may be placed on non-accrual status regardless of whether or not such loans are considered past due. When interest accrual is discontinued, all unpaid accrued interest is reversed. Interest income is recognized when the loan is returned to accrual status and all the principal and interest amounts contractually due are brought current (minimum of six months), or future payments are reasonably assured. Future payments interest income will be recognized while the previous payments of interest (during non-accrual status) will not be recognized until payoff or refinance.

The following table details non-accrual loans at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011:

 

     Non-Accrual      Non-Accrual  
(in thousands)    June 30, 2012      December 31, 2011  

Construction

   $ 17       $ 19   

Land, Farmland, Ag Loans

     1,005         367   

Residential

     20,482         22,277   

Commercial

     1,648         1,879   

Consumer

     357         113   

Commercial and industrial

     144         212   

Multi Family

     0         51   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 23,653       $ 24,918   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

An age analysis of past due loans, segregated by class of loans were as follows:

 

June 30, 2012

(in thousands)

   Loans
30-59
Days
Past Due
     Loans 60 -
89 Past
Due
     Loans 90+
Days Past
Due
     Total
Past
Due
     Current      Total
Loans
     Accruing
Loans 90
Days Past
Due
 

Construction

   $ 0       $ 0       $ 0       $ 0       $ 24,606       $ 24,606       $ 0   

Land, Farmland, Ag Loans

     13         279         136         428         16,055         16,483         0   

Residential / prime

     1,862         1,101         6,119         9,082         227,630         236,712         0   

Residential / subprime

     1,951         827         5,428         8,206         52,268         60,474         0   

Commercial

     0         0         714         714         158,167         158,881         0   

Consumer

     78         0         150         228         3,694         3,922         0   

Commercial and industrial

     0         0         100         100         36,061         36,161         0   

Multi Family

     0         0         0         0         76,551         76,551         0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 3,904       $ 2,207       $ 12,647       $ 18,758       $ 595,032       $ 613,790       $ 0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents
December 31, 2011    Loans 30-
59 Days
Past Due
     Loans 60 -
89 Past
Due
     Loans 90+
Days Past
Due
     Total
Past
Due
     Current      Total
Loans
     Accruing
Loans 90
Days Past
Due
 
(in thousands)                                                 

Construction

   $ 0       $ 0       $ 0       $ 0       $ 23,876       $ 23,876       $ 0   

Land, Farmland, Ag Loans

     103         0         136         239         17,583         17,822         0   

Residential / prime

     638         269         4,139         5,046         235,502         240,548         0   

Residential / subprime

     5,380         1,818         9,499         16,697         60,679         77,376         0   

Commercial

     462         527         638         1,627         162,137         163,764         0   

Consumer

     54         76         18         148         3,382         3,530         0   

Commercial and industrial

     45         0         114         159         38,704         38,863         0   

Multi Family

     0         0         51         51         87,879         87,930         0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 6,682       $ 2,690       $ 14,595       $ 23,967       $ 629,742       $ 653,709       $ 0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Although we believe that the allowance for loan losses at June 30, 2012 is adequate to cover losses inherent in the loan portfolio at that date based upon the available facts and circumstances, there can be no assurance that additions to the allowance for loan losses will not be necessary in future periods, which could adversely affect our results of operations. Unemployment rates in our markets and Ohio in general, are close to the national average, but we are still experiencing some decline in values of residential real estate. Ohio in general has experienced some decreases in home values over the past five years like many regions in the U.S., which should comparatively mitigate losses on loans. Nonetheless, these factors, compounded by a very uncertain national economic outlook, may continue to increase the level of future losses beyond our current expectations.

Impaired loans. Loans are considered impaired when, based on current information and events, it is probable Advantage will be unable to collect all amounts due in accordance with the original contractual terms of the loan agreement, including scheduled principal and interest payments. Impairment is evaluated in total for smaller-balance loans of a similar nature and on an individual loan basis for other larger commercial credits. If a loan is collateral dependent and payment is expected solely from the collateral, or is less than the present value of estimated future cash flows using the loan’s existing rate and the calculated value is not sufficient it is considered impaired. If it is impaired a specific valuation allowance is allocated, so that the loan is reported net, or at the loan’s fair sale value. All payments on impaired loans are typically applied to principal unless collectability of the principal amount is reasonably assured in which case interest is recognized on an accrual basis. Impaired loans or portions of loans are charged off when deemed uncollectible.

We have included the following information with respect to impairment measurements relating to collateral-dependent loans for better understanding of our process and procedures relating to fair value of loans:

Ÿ Based on policy, a loan is typically deemed impaired (non-performing) once it has gone over three payments or 90 days delinquent or is considered a modification. See the Modifications section below. Our management of the troubled credit will vary as will the timing of valuations, loan loss provision and charge offs based on a multitude of factors such as; cash flow of the business/borrower, responsiveness of the borrower, communication with the commercial banker, property inspections, property deterioration, and delinquency. Typically, a nonperforming, non-homogeneous collateral dependent loan will be valued and adjusted (if needed) within a time frame as short as 30 days or as many as 180 days after determination of impairment. If impaired, the collateral is then evaluated and an updated appraisal is most typically ordered. Upon receipt of an appraisal or other valuation, we complete an analysis to determine if the impaired loan requires a specific reserve or to be charged down to estimated net realizable value. The time frame may be as short as 30 days or as much as 180 days, when an appraisal is ordered.

Ÿ Camco’s credit risk management process consistently monitors key performance metrics across both the performing and non-performing assets to identify any further degradation of credit quality. Additionally, impaired credits are monitored in weekly loan committee asset quality discussions, monthly Asset Classification Committee meetings and quarterly loan loss reserve reviews. Strategy documents and exposure projections are completed on a monthly basis to ensure that the current status of the troubled asset is clearly understood and reported.

Ÿ The Asset Classification Committee oversees the management of all impaired loans and any subsequent loss provision or charge off that is considered. When a loan is deemed impaired, the valuation is obtained to determine any existing loss that may be present as of the valuation date. Policy dictates that any differences from fair market value, less costs to sell, are to be recognized as loss during the current period (loan loss provision or charge off). Any deviations from this policy will be identified by amount and contributing reasons for the policy departure during our quarterly reporting process.

 

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Table of Contents

Ÿ Camco’s policies dictate that an impaired loan subject to partial charge off will remain in a nonperforming status until it is brought current. Typically, this occurs when a loan is paid current and completes a period of on-time payments that demonstrate that the loan can perform and/or there is some certainty payments will continue. Camco monitors through various system reports any loan whose terms have been modified. These reports identify troubled debt restructures, modifications, and renewals.

Ÿ When circumstances do not allow for an updated appraisal or Camco determines that an appraisal is not needed, the underlying collateral’s fair market value is estimated in the following ways:

 

   

Camco’s personnel property inspections combined with original appraisal review

 

   

County Auditor values

 

   

Broker price opinions

 

   

Various on-line fair market value estimation programs (i.e. Freddie Mac, Fannie Mae, etc.).

Impaired loans are set forth in the following table:

 

     Recorded
Investment
     Unpaid
Principal
Balance
     Related
Allowance
 
(in thousands)    June 30, 2012  

With no related allowance recorded:

        

Construction

   $ 0       $ 0       $ 0   

Land, Farmland, Ag Loans

     666         1,022         0   

Residential

     507         641         0   

Commercial

     504         1,507         0   

Consumer

     0         0         0   

Commercial and industrial

     100         101         0   

Multi Family

     0         661         0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 1,777       $ 3,932       $ 0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

With a related specific allowance recorded:

        

Construction

   $ 17       $ 17       $ 4   

Land, Farmland, Ag Loans

     238         238         25   

Residential

     11,651         12,013         481   

Commercial

     8,232         8,232         540   

Consumer

     259         301         18   

Commercial and industrial

     358         358         59   

Multi Family

     4,588         4,588         406   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 25,343       $ 25,747       $ 1,533   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

    Average
Recorded
Investment
    Interest
Income
Recognized
    Average
Recorded
Investment
    Interest
Income
Recognized
    Average
Recorded
Investment
    Interest
Income
Recognized
    Average
Recorded
Investment
    Investment
Income
Recognized
 
(in thousands)   3 Months Ended June 30, 2012     3 Months Ended June 30, 2011     6 Months Ended June 30, 2012     6 Months Ended June 30, 2011  

With no related allowance recorded:

               

Construction

  $ 0      $ 0      $ 0      $ 0      $ 0      $ 0      $ 0      $ 0   

Land, Farmland, Ag Loans

    1,024        1        1,207        12        667        16        1,095        23   

Residential

    567        0        401        0        551        0        398        0   

Commercial

    504        0        902        0        504        0        901        0   

Consumer

    0        0        0        0        0        0        0        0   

Commercial and industrial

    103        0        0        0        102        0        0        0   

Multi Family

    0        0        66        0        0        0        66        0   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

  $ 2,198      $ 1      $ 2,576      $ 12      $ 1,824      $ 16      $ 2,460      $ 23   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

With a related specific allowance recorded:

                       

Construction

   $ 19       $ 0       $ 0       $ 0       $ 18       $ 0       $ 0       $ 0   

Land, Farmland, Ag Loans

     246         2         200         18         243         9         165         22   

Residential

     11,856         94         5,984         40         11,756         194         5,624         63   

Commercial

     8,104         127         8,172         51         8,361         253         8,149         106   

Consumer

     298         2         0         0         280         8         0         0   

Commercial and industrial

     389         5         415         4         377         12         406         10   

Multi Family

     4,622         54         4,061         48         4,611         107         4,046         95   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 25,534       $ 284       $ 18,832       $ 161       $ 25,646       $ 583       $ 18,390       $ 296   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

December 31, 2011

(in thousands)

   Recorded
Investment
     Unpaid
Principal
Balance
     Related
Allowance
 

With no related allowance recorded:

        

Construction

   $ 0       $ 0       $ 0   

Land, Farmland, Ag Loans

     0         0         0   

Residential

     1,945         3,579         0   

Commercial

     695         2,015         0   

Consumer

     0         0         0   

Commercial and industrial

     112         151         0   

Multi Family

     51         971         0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 2,803       $ 6,716       $ 0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

With a related specific allowance recorded:

        

Construction

   $ 19       $ 0       $ 3   

Land, Farmland, Ag Loans

     1,203         1,216         208   

Residential

     8,922         9,033         720   

Commercial

     6,612         6,612         335   

Consumer

     128         100         41   

Commercial and industrial

     396         396         27   

Multi Family

     4,633         4,633         426   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 21,913       $ 21,990       $ 1,760   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The Corporation categorizes loans and leases into risk categories based on relevant information about the ability of borrowers to service their debt such as: current financial information, historical payment experience, credit documentation, public information, and current economic trends, among other factors. The Corporation analyzes loans and leases individually by classifying the loans and leases as to credit risk. The loans monitored utilizing the risk categories listed below refer to commercial, commercial and industrial, construction, land, farmland and agriculture loans. All non-homogeneous loans are monitored through delinquency reporting. This analysis is performed on a quarterly basis. The Corporation uses the following definitions for risk ratings:

 

   

Un-criticized Assets (Grade 1-3)

Un-criticized assets exhibit no material problems, credit deficiencies or payment problems. These assets generally are well protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or by the value of the asset or underlying collateral. Such credits are graded as follows: Excellent (1), Good (2) or Satisfactory (3).

 

   

Watch (Grade 4)

Watch rated credits are of acceptable credit quality, but exhibit one or more characteristics which merit closer monitoring or enhanced structure. Such characteristics include higher leverage, lower debt service coverage, industry issues or a construction loan without preleasing commitments (generally multifamily projects).

 

   

Special Mention Assets (Grade 5)

Special Mention Assets have potential weaknesses or pose financial risk that deserves management’s close attention. If left uncorrected, these weaknesses may result in deterioration of the repayment prospects for the asset or in the Bank’s credit position at some future date. Special Mention Assets are not adversely classified and do not expose the Bank to sufficient risk to warrant adverse classification.

 

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Table of Contents
   

Substandard Assets (Grade 6)

An asset classified Substandard is protected inadequately by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor, or by the collateral pledged, if any. Assets so classified have a well-defined weakness or weaknesses that jeopardize the liquidation of the debt. They are characterized by the distinct possibility that the Bank will sustain some loss if the deficiencies are not corrected. The possibility that liquidation would not be timely requires a substandard classification even if there is little likelihood of total loss.

Assets classified as Substandard may exhibit one or more of the following weaknesses:

• The primary source of repayment is gone or severely impaired and the Bank may have to rely upon a secondary source.

• Loss does not seem likely but sufficient problems have arisen to cause the Bank to go to abnormal lengths to protect its position in order to maintain a high probability of repayment.

• Obligors are unable to generate enough cash flow for debt reduction.

• Collateral has deteriorated.

• The collateral is not subject to adequate inspection and verification of value (if the collateral is expected to be the source of repayment).

• Flaws in documentation leave the Bank in a subordinated or unsecured position if the collateral is needed for the repayment of the loan.

• For assets secured by real estate, the appraisal does not conform to FDIC appraisal standards or the assumptions underlying the appraisal are demonstrably incorrect.

 

   

Doubtful Assets (Grade 7)

An asset classified Doubtful has all the weaknesses inherent in one classified as Substandard with the added characteristic that the weaknesses make collection or liquidation in full, on the basis of currently existing facts, conditions, and values, highly questionable and improbable.

 

   

Loss Assets (Grade 8)

An asset, or portion thereof, classified loss is considered uncollectible and of such little value that its continuance on the books is not warranted. This classification does not mean that the asset has absolutely no recovery or salvage value; rather, it is not practical or desirable to defer writing off an essentially worthless asset (or portion thereof), even though partial recovery may occur in the future.

Loans and leases not meeting the criteria above that are analyzed individually as part of the above described process are considered to be pass rated loans and leases.

Based on the most recent analysis performed, the risk category of non-homogeneous loans and leases is as follows:

 

     (Dollars in Thousands)  
June 30, 2012    Pass      Watch      Special
Mention
     Substandard      Total(1)  

Construction

   $ 11,750       $ 12,839       $ 0       $ 17       $ 24,606   

Land, Farmland, Ag Loans

     15,131         0         280         1,072         16,483   

Commercial

     120,391         21,500         7,064         9,926         158,881   

Commercial and industrial

     30,666         5,182         90         223         36,161   

Multi Family

     49,424         19,203         4,421         3,503         76,551   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 227,362       $ 58,724       $ 11,855       $ 14,741       $ 312,682   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

December 31, 2011    Pass      Watch      Special
Mention
     Substandard      Total(1)  

Construction

   $ 16,263       $ 7,594       $ —         $ 19       $ 23,876   

Land, Farmland, Ag Loans

     15,894         173         292         1,463         17,822   

Commercial

     129,446         17,112         4,959         12,247         163,764   

Commercial and industrial

     33,064         5,154         336         309         38,863   

Multi Family

     57,353         24,470         4,138         1,969         87,930   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 252,020       $ 54,503       $ 9,725       $ 16,007       $ 332,255   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

Homogeneous loans are monitored at 60+ days delinquent. See the above schedule on page 16 related to change in allowance for loans which includes all class of loans including the loans related to residential and consumer.

(1) There were no doubtful loans as of June 30, 2012 or December 31, 2011.

Modifications.

A modification of a loan constitutes a troubled debt restructuring (“TDR”) when a borrower is experiencing financial difficulty and the modification constitutes a concession. The Corporation offers various types of concessions when modifying a loan, however, forgiveness of principal is rarely granted. Commercial and industrial loans modified in a TDR often involve temporary interest-only payments, term extensions, and converting revolving credit lines to term loans. Additional collateral and/or guarantors may be requested.

Commercial mortgage and construction loans modified in a TDR often involve a temporary or permanent interest rate reduction, extending the maturity date at an interest rate lower than the current market rate for new debt with similar risk, and/or substituting or adding a new borrower or guarantor. Construction loans modified in a TDR may also involve extending the interest-only payment period. Residential mortgage loans modified in a TDR are primarily comprised of loans where monthly payments are lowered to accommodate the borrowers’ financial needs. This is accomplished by temporary interest only payment periods, temporarily lowering the interest rate, extending the maturity date or a combination of these strategies. The accrual status of modified residential mortgages is dependent on the delinquency status before, during and after the modification process. Home equity modifications are uniquely designed to meet the specific needs of each borrower. Modified terms for home equity loans include renewal of an interest only payment stream, extending the maturity date, converting to a principal and interest payment, amortizing the balance due, or a combination of these strategies. Automobile loans are typically not modified.

Loans modified in a TDR may be in accrual status, non-accrual status, partial charge-offs, not delinquent, delinquent or any combination of these criteria. As a result, loans modified in a TDR for the Corporation may have the financial effect of increasing the specific allowance associated with individual loans. An allowance for impaired consumer and commercial loans that have been modified in a TDR is measured based either on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s original effective interest rate, or the estimated fair value of the collateral, less any selling costs, if the loan is collateral dependent. Management exercises significant judgment in developing these estimates.

The following presents by class, information related to loans modified in a TDR during the six months ended June 30, 2012.

 

    

Loans Modified as a TDR for the

Three Months Ended June 30, 2012

    

Loans Modified as a TDR for the

Six Months Ended June 30, 2012

 
Troubled Debt Restructurings1    Number of      Recorded
Investment
     Number of      Recorded
Investment
 

(dollars in thousands)

   Contracts      (as of period end)      Contracts      (as of period end)  

Land, Farmland, Ag Loans

     2       $ 733         2      $ 733  

Residential—prime

     20         2,572         24         2,818   

Residential—subprime

     7         781         8         802   

Commercial

     5         2,239         5         2,239   

Consumer Other

     2         111         3         120   

Multi Family

     1         160         1         160   

Total

     37       $ 6,596         43       $ 6,872   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

1 The period end balances are inclusive of all partial pay downs and charge-offs since the modification date. Loans modified in a TDR that were fully paid down, charged-off, or foreclosed upon by period end are not reported.

 

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The following presents by class, loans modified in a TDR from July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012 that subsequently defaulted (i.e., 60 days or more past due following a modification) during the three and six months ended June 30, 2012.

 

     Loans Modified as a TDR      Loans Modified as a TDR  
     Within the Previous Twelve Months      Within the Previous Twelve Months  
     That Subsequently Defaulted During the      That Subsequently Defaulted During the  
     Three Months Ended June 30, 2012      Twelve Months Ended June 30, 2012  
            Recorded             Recorded  
     Number  of
Contracts
     Investment      Number  of
Contracts
     Investment  

(dollars in thousands)

      (as of period end)  1         (as of period end)  1  

Residential - prime

     1       $ 68         1       $ 68   

Consumer

     1         20         1         20   

Total

     2       $ 88         2       $ 88   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

1 The period end balances are inclusive of all partial pay downs and charge-offs since the modification date. Loans modified in a TDR that were fully paid down, charged-off, or foreclosed upon by period end are not reported.

 

8. Investment Securities

The amortized cost, gross unrealized gains, gross unrealized losses and estimated fair values of investment securities at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011 are as follows:

 

     June 30, 2012  
     Amortized
cost
     Gross
unrealized
gains
     Gross
unrealized
losses
     Estimated
fair

value
 
    

(In thousands)

 

Available for sale:

           

U.S. Government sponsored enterprises

   $ 70,958       $ 82       $ 12       $ 71,028   

Corporate equity securities

     100         0         56         44   

Mortgage-backed securities

     1,317         41         0         1,358   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total investment securities available for sale

   $ 72,375       $ 123       $ 68       $ 72,430   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Held to maturity:

           

Municipal bonds

   $ 1,936       $ 0       $ 0       $ 1,936   

Mortgage-backed securities

     981         55         0         1,036   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total investment securities held to maturity

   $ 2,917       $ 55       $ 0       $ 2,972   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     December 31, 2011  
     Amortized
cost
     Gross
unrealized
gains
     Gross
unrealized
losses
     Estimated
fair

value
 
            (In thousands)         

Available for sale:

           

U.S. Government sponsored enterprises

   $ 16,289       $ 6       $ 3       $ 16,292   

Corporate equity securities

     106         0         54         52   

Mortgage-backed securities

     1,469         32         0         1,501   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total investment securities available for sale

   $ 17,864       $ 38       $ 57       $ 17,845   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Held to maturity:

           

Municipal bonds

   $ 2,008       $ 0       $ 0       $ 2,008   

Mortgage-backed securities

     1,075         52         0         21,127   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total investment securities held to maturity

   $ 3,083       $ 52       $ 0       $ 3,135   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

The amortized cost and estimated fair value of investment securities at June 30, 2012 by contractual term to maturity are shown below.

 

     Available for Sale      Held to Maturity  
     Amortized
cost
     Estimated
fair
value
     Amortized
cost
     Estimated
fair
value
 
     (In thousands)  

Due in one year or less

   $ 2,500       $ 2,499       $ 0       $ 0   

Due after one year through five years

     68,458         68,529         0         0   

Due after five years through ten years

     0         0         0         0   

Due after ten years

     0         0         1,936         1,936   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Subtotal

     70,958         71,028         1,936         1,936   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Mortgage-backed securities

     1,317         1,358         981         1,036   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Corporate equity securities

     100         44         0         0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 72,375       $ 72,430       $ 2,917       $ 2,972   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Proceeds from sales of investment securities during the six months ended June 30, 2012, totaled $8,000, resulting in gross realized gains of $1,000, and for the year ended December 31, 2011, proceeds from sales totaled $27.2 million, resulting in gross realized gains of $1.3 million.

At June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, there were $16.5 million and $7.0 million securities in an unrealized loss position less than twelve months and $0 and $0 of securities in an unrealized loss position more than twelve months, respectively. The table below indicates the length of time individual securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011.

 

     June 30, 2012  
     Less than 12 months             More than 12 months         
(In thousands)    Fair
value
     Unrealized
losses
     No. of
Securities
     Fair
value
     Unrealized
losses
     No. of
Securities
 

Available for sale:

                 

Corporate equity securities

   $ 0       $ 0         0         44       $ 56         1   

U.S. Government sponsored enterprises

     16,482         12         8         0         0         0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 16,482       $ 12         8       $ 44       $ 56         1   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

     December 31, 2011  
     Less than 12 months             More than 12 months         
(In thousands)    Fair
value
     Unrealized
losses
     No. of
Securities
     Fair
value
     Unrealized
losses
     No. of
Securities
 

Available for sale:

                 

Corporate equity securities

   $ 0       $ 0         0       $ 52       $ 54         2   

U.S. Government sponsored enterprises

     6,994         3         3         0         0         0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 6,994       $ 3         3       $ 52       $ 54         2   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Management has the intent and ability to hold these securities for the foreseeable future and the decline in the fair value is primarily due to an increase in market interest rates. The fair values are expected to recover as securities approach maturity dates.

At June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011approximately $10.0 and $13.7 million, respectively, of investment securities were pledged in accordance with federal and state requirements to secure deposits and repurchase agreements.

 

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Table of Contents

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation

Forward Looking Statements

This Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (MD&A) and this Form 10-Q include forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Exchange Act), as amended, which can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology, such as may, might, could, would, believe, expect, intend, plan, seek, anticipate, estimate, project or continue or the negative thereof or comparable terminology. All statements other than statements of historical fact included in this document regarding our outlook, financial position and results of operation, liquidity, capital resources and interest rate sensitivity are forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements also include, but are not limited to:

 

   

anticipated changes in industry conditions created by state and federal legislation and regulations;

 

   

anticipated changes in general interest rates and the impact of future interest rate changes on our profitability, capital adequacy and the fair value of our financial assets and liabilities;

 

   

retention of our existing customer base and our ability to attract new customers;

 

   

the development of new products and services and their success in the marketplace;

 

   

the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses; and

 

   

statements regarding our anticipated loan and deposit account growth, expense levels, liquidity and capital resources and projections of earnings.

These forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause our actual results to be materially different from any future results expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Although we believe the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, we can give no assurance such expectations will prove to have been correct. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements also include, but are not limited to:

 

   

competition in the industry and markets in which we operate;

 

   

changes in general interest rates;

 

   

rapid changes in technology affecting the financial services industry;

 

   

changes in government regulation; and

 

   

general economic and business conditions

This MD&A is intended to give stockholders a more comprehensive review of the issues facing management than could be obtained from an examination of the financial statements alone. This analysis should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related footnotes and the selected financial data elsewhere in this report. As used herein and except as the context may otherwise require, references to “Camco,” “the Corporation”, “we,” “us,” or “our” means, collectively, Camco Financial Corporation and its wholly owned subsidiary, Advantage Bank, and through March 31, 2011, its formerly wholly-owned subsidiary, Camco Title Agency.

Overview

Camco is a full-service provider of financial products through its subsidiary, Advantage Bank. Products and services include traditional banking products, such as deposit accounts and lending products within Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia. Services are provided through 22 financial offices, 20 ATMs and telephone and internet-based banking. Brokerage services are offered exclusively through an unaffiliated registered broker-dealer at certain locations.

Summary of Recent Transactions and Events

The following is a summary of recent transactions or events that have impacted or are expected to impact Camco’s results of operations or financial condition:

 

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Table of Contents

Since early 2009, Camco’s loan quality has been negatively impacted by adverse conditions within the commercial real estate market and economy as a whole. The deterioration in the economic conditions of the country has created challenges for the Corporation, including the following:

 

   

Volatile equity markets that declined significantly

 

   

Stress on the banking industry with significant financial assistance to many financial institutions, extensive regulatory and congressional scrutiny and regulatory requirements

 

   

Low interest rate environment particularly given the government involvement in the financial markets, and

 

   

Continued high levels of unemployment nationally and in our local markets

The above factors resulted in the continued movement of loans to nonperforming status during the past few years. In addition, many of these loans are collateral dependent real estate loans that the Bank is required to write down to fair value less estimated costs to sell, with the fair values determined primarily based on third party appraisals. Beginning in 2009 and continuing through 2012, appraised values have decreased significantly. As a result, in the past few years, the Bank’s evaluation of the loan portfolio and allowance for loan losses resulted in higher than normal net charge-offs and the need to record higher provision for loan losses over the past few years. The Corporation has made noted improvements over the past three years See Note 7. Allowance Loan Losses and related tables above and note C in the 10-K for the period ending December 31, 2011.

In 2011, the Corporation took steps to improve capital ratios through the reduction of assets and borrowings. Assets were reduced through the sale of $27.2 million in investments that created a gain of $1.2 million. The Bank used the proceeds of the sale to pay $21.0 million in FHLB borrowings, including a prepayment penalty of $216,000. Additionally, Camco filed a Form S-1 on July 17, 2012 for a potential rights offering of up to $10.0 million in Camco common stock.

The Corporation is addressing credit quality issues by directing the efforts of experienced workout specialists solely to manage the resolution of nonperforming assets. We continue to deal with the economic challenges in our markets, through our loan charge-offs and provision for loan losses as we continue to recognize the results of difficult economic conditions. The real estate market continues to create a very challenging environment as bankruptcies, foreclosures and unemployment continue to be higher than normal in Ohio.

It is the Corporation’s goal to remove the majority of the nonperforming assets from its balance sheet while still obtaining reasonable value for these assets. Given the current conditions in the real estate market, accomplishing this goal is a significant undertaking, requiring both time and considerable effort of staff. We believe that we are taking the appropriate steps forward in managing our classified assets. We have devoted and will continue to devote substantial management resources toward the resolution of all delinquent and non-performing assets, but no assurance can be made that management’s efforts will be successful.

Net interest income, the amount by which interest income exceeds interest expense, is affected by various factors, including changes in market interest rates due to the Federal Reserve Board’s monetary policy, the level and degree of pricing competition for both loans and deposits in our markets and the amount and composition of earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities. We have found that “core” deposit growth continues to be challenging in our markets but have continued to work with commercial borrowers to build banking relationships. The extended low rate environment and increased competition for deposits continue to put pressure on marginal funding costs, despite the continuing low market rates. Earnings related to net interest income continues to be challenged as net interest income and margin are impacted by changes in market interest rates based upon actions taken by the Federal Reserve either directly or through its Open Market Committee. Between 2007 and 2008, the Federal Reserve reduced the Federal Funds rate 500 basis points to a range of 0% to .25% and reduced the Discount Rate 575 basis points to .50%. These actions have caused a downward shift in short-term market interest rates and these rates have continued at historically low levels with expectations that the rates will not increase until 2014.

Discussion of Financial Condition Changes from December 31, 2011 to June 30, 2012

At June 30, 2012, Camco’s consolidated assets totaled $766.9 million, a decrease of $102,000, from December 31, 2011. The decrease in total assets resulted primarily from decreases in cash and cash equivalents and loans receivable and loans held for sale, offset partially by increases in securities available for sale. Loans receivable decreased in the second quarter of 2012, primarily due to the slowing of portfolio production and continued expected payoffs, which in turn has decreased our concentration limits.

 

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Table of Contents

Advantage continues to monitor certain types of commercial loan growth related to regulatory guidance that suggests financial institutions not exceed 3x risk based capital in a concentration of commercial real estate. At June 30, 2012, Advantage’s ratio for this concentration was 3.76x risk based capital, approximately $43.1 million over the guidance limitation. Advantage has a number of pay-downs approaching throughout 2012. Additionally, Advantage continues to monitor and control our concentration exposure through our concentration management plan that was implemented in 2011. Camco also plans to raise capital through a rights offering, as described in the Form S-1 that was filed with the SEC on July 17, 2012. Camco intends to contribute a significant portion of the additional capital raised to the Bank to help correct and/or eliminate the exposure and concentration limits.

Residential loan production increased slightly in the second quarter of 2012. High unemployment rates in Ohio have fallen from 10.0% in 2010 to 7.3% at June 30, 2012. This coupled with a slight decrease in loan rates in 2012 has resulted in some new residential home loan purchases and additional refinancing in the first six months of 2012.

Management’s continued focus at the Bank has been on managing credit, reducing risk and concentrations within the loan portfolio and maintaining sufficient liquidity and capital in a distressed economic environment. Continuous progress is being made on addressing these issues, but we expect the distressed economic environment to continue through 2012 and into 2013.

Cash and interest-bearing deposits in other financial institutions totaled $28.2 million at June 30, 2012, a decrease of $10.2 million, or 26.6%, from December 31, 2011. Cash was previously held at higher levels as we continued to restructure the balance sheet by decreasing assets and liabilities when possible to improve our capital position in conjunction with ensuring that liquidity continues to be adequate.

As of June 30, 2012, securities totaled $75.3 million, an increase of $54.4 million, or 260.0%, from December 31, 2011, due to the purchase of $64.0 million in securities at a weighted rate of .51%, offset partially by principal repayments and maturities of $9.6 million. Decreases of $39.6 million in the loan portfolio; and $5.6 million in loans held for sale and an increase of $9.3 million in deposits created additional liquidity that was utilized to purchase securities in the first six months of 2012.

Loans receivable, including loans held for sale, totaled $602.1 million at June 30, 2012, a decrease of $45.1 million, or 7.0%, from December 31, 2011. The decrease resulted primarily from principal repayments of $134.8 million, loan sales of $53.7 million, $3.3 million of loans transferred to real estate owned, and an addition of $1.1 million to losses on loans, all of which was offset partially by loan disbursements totaling $148.1 million. Principal repayments and payoffs on loans were higher than 2011, which have decreased the portfolio balances and improved our concentration levels related to commercial production. The reduction in residential real estate loan balances was intensified by the secondary market offering historically low long-term fixed rates during the current year. New purchase customers are currently more likely to choose fixed rate loans during this low rate environment. Due to the fact that Advantage normally sells fixed rate loans and does not hold them, the portfolio balance of residential loans continues to decrease. Management will consider holding some fixed rate loans in the second half of 2012 if the portfolio continues to decrease and liquidity is available.

Loan originations during the six-month period ended June 30, 2012 included $86.3 million of commercial loans, $53.9 million in loans secured by one- to four-family residential real estate and $7.9 million in consumer and other loans. Our intent is to continue to service our communities in one- to four-family residential, consumer and commercial real estate lending and continue with our strategic plan of generating additional lending opportunities and core relationships.

The Corporation continues to originate fixed-rate, single-family loans in its marketplace, with most originated for sale in the secondary market rather than for its portfolio. The origination and sale of fixed-rate loans has historically generated gains on sale and allowed the Corporation to manage its investment in loans serviced, without assuming the interest-rate risk associated with holding long-term fixed-rate assets, which facilitates the maintenance of liquidity levels. Mortgage application volume has remained elevated in the current quarter, due to a low interest rate environment, and consisted predominantly of loan refinancing highly correlated to interest rate movements and levels. New home sales continue to remain weak in the current economic environment, limiting new home financing opportunities.

During the first six months of 2012, the average yield on loans was 5.21% a decrease of 36 basis points as compared to 5.57% for the same period in 2011. The decrease in yield is due to lower average loan balances coupled with lower effective rates in the loan portfolio during 2012. As we continue to have payoffs and adjustable rate loans re-price and originate new loans at the current lower rate environment we expect the yield on loans to continue to decrease slightly throughout 2012.

 

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Table of Contents

The allowance for loan losses totaled $14.2 million and $14.5 million at June 30, 2012, and December 31, 2011, respectively, representing 60.0% and 58.3% of nonperforming loans, respectively, at those dates. Nonperforming loans (loans with three payments delinquent plus nonaccrual loans) totaled $23.7 million and $24.9 million at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively, constituting 3.8% of total net loans for June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, including loans held for sale. See the Allowance for loan losses footnote above for additional information related to change in allowance and delinquency. Net charge-offs totaled $1.5 million and $1.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and June 30, 2011 respectively.

The following table sets forth information with respect to Advantage’s nonperforming assets for the periods indicated.

 

Loans accounted for on nonaccrual basis:

(dollars in thousands)

   June 30,
2012
    December 31,
2011
    December 31,
2010
    December 31,
2009
    December 31,
2008
 

Total nonperforming loans

   $ 23,653      $ 24,918      $ 33,779      $ 36,449      $ 53,528   

Other real estate owned

     11,966        10,888        10,096        9,660        5,841   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total nonperforming assets

   $ 35,619      $ 35,806      $ 43,875      $ 46,109      $ 59,369   

Allowance for loan losses

   $ 14,185      $ 14,532      $ 16,870      $ 16,099      $ 15,747   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Nonperforming loans as a percent of total net loans

     3.85     3.85     4.92     5.40     6.91

Nonperforming assets to total assets

     4.64     4.67     5.38     5.47     5.93

Allowances for loan losses as a percent of nonperforming loans

     60.0     58.3     49.9     44.2     29.4

Memo section:

          

Troubled debt restructurings

          

Loans and leases restructured and in compliance with modified terms

   $ 17,527      $ 16,095      $ 7,122      $ 16,645      $ 11,440   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loans and leases restructured and not in compliance with modified terms

   $ 7,643      $ 7,161      $ 9,276      $ 4,783      $ 12,882   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Nonaccrual status denotes loans greater than three payments past due, loans for which, in the opinion of management, the collection of additional interest is unlikely, or loans that meet nonaccrual criteria as established by regulatory authorities. Payments received on a nonaccrual loan are either applied to the outstanding principal balance or recorded as an asset which holds the interest income, depending on management’s assessment of the collectability of the loan.

At June 30, 2012, the Corporation’s other real estate owned (REO) consisted of 169 repossessed properties with a net book value of $12.0 million, an increase of $1.1 million, compared to December 31, 2011, due primarily to one large relationship. Initial loss is recorded as a charge to the allowance for loan losses. Thereafter, if there is a further deterioration in value, a specific valuation allowance is established and charged to operations. The Corporation reflects costs to carry REO as period costs. When property is acquired through foreclosure or deed in lieu of foreclosure, it is initially recorded at the fair value of the related assets at the date of foreclosure, less estimated costs to sell the property.

The Corporation works with borrowers to avoid foreclosure if possible. Furthermore, if it becomes inevitable that a borrower will not be able to retain ownership of their property, the Corporation often seeks a deed in lieu of foreclosure in order to gain control of the property earlier in the recovery process. The strategy of pursuing deeds in lieu of foreclosure more aggressively should result in a reduction in the holding period for nonperforming assets and ultimately reduce economic losses.

Deposits totaled $638.5 million at June 30, 2012, an increase of $9.3 million, or 1.5%, from the total at December 31, 2011. The following table details our deposit portfolio balances and the average rate paid on our deposit portfolio at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011:

 

     June 30, 2012     December 31, 2011     Change  
(Dollars in thousands)    Balance      Rate     Balance      Rate     Balance     Rate  

Noninterest-bearing demand

   $ 67,460         0.00   $ 62,881         0.00     4,579        0.00 <