XNAS:BBBY Bed Bath & Beyond Inc Annual Report 10-K Filing - 2/25/2012

Effective Date 2/25/2012

XNAS:BBBY Fair Value Estimate
Premium
XNAS:BBBY Consider Buying
Premium
XNAS:BBBY Consider Selling
Premium
XNAS:BBBY Fair Value Uncertainty
Premium
XNAS:BBBY Economic Moat
Premium
XNAS:BBBY Stewardship
Premium
 

Table of Contents

 

 

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C.  20549

 


 

FORM 10-K

 

Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)
of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended February 25, 2012

 

Commission File Number 0-20214

 

BED BATH & BEYOND INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

New York

 

11-2250488

(State of incorporation)

 

(IRS Employer Identification No.)

 

650 Liberty Avenue, Union, New Jersey 07083

(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: 908/688-0888

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common stock, $.01 par value

 

The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC

 

 

(NASDAQ Global Select Market)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:  None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes x  No o

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o  No x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x  No o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x  No o

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer x

 

 

Accelerated filer o

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer o

 

 

Smaller reporting company o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o  Nox

 

As of August 27, 2011, the aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates (which was computed by reference to the closing price on such date of such stock on the NASDAQ National Market) was $12,750,872,956.*

 

The number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock (par value $0.01 per share) at March 24, 2012: 233,773,500.

 

Documents Incorporated by Reference

 

Portions of the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement for the 2012 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed pursuant to Regulation 14A are incorporated by reference in Part III hereof.

 


*                           For purposes of this calculation, all outstanding shares of common stock have been considered held by non-affiliates other than the 12,388,011 shares beneficially owned by directors and executive officers, including in the case of the Co-Chairmen trusts and foundations affiliated with them. In making such calculation, the Registrant does not determine the affiliate or non-affiliate status of any shares for any other purpose.

 

 

 



Table of Contents

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Form 10-K

 

 

Item No.

 

Name of Item

 

 

 

 

 

PART I

Item 1.

 

Business

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

Item 2.

 

Properties

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

 

 

 

 

PART II

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Item 6.

 

Selected Financial Data

Item 7.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

 

 

 

 

 

PART III

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Shareholder Matters

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

Item 14.

 

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

 

 

 

 

 

PART IV

Item 15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

2



Table of Contents

 

PART I

 

Unless otherwise indicated, the term “Company” refers collectively to Bed Bath & Beyond Inc. and subsidiaries as of February 25, 2012. The Company’s fiscal year is comprised of the 52 or 53 week period ending on the Saturday nearest February 28. Accordingly, fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009 represented 52 weeks and ended on February 25, 2012, February 26, 2011 and February 27, 2010, respectively. Unless otherwise indicated, all references herein to periods of time (e.g., quarters and years) are to fiscal periods.

 

ITEM 1 - BUSINESS

 

Introduction

 

Bed Bath & Beyond Inc. and subsidiaries (the “Company”) is a chain of retail stores, operating under the names Bed Bath & Beyond (“BBB”), Christmas Tree Shops (“CTS”), Harmon and Harmon Face Values (“Harmon”) and buybuy BABY. In addition, the Company is a partner in a joint venture which operates two stores in the Mexico City market under the name “Home & More.” The Company sells a wide assortment of domestics merchandise and home furnishings. Domestics merchandise includes categories such as bed linens and related items, bath items and kitchen textiles. Home furnishings include categories such as kitchen and tabletop items, fine tabletop, basic housewares, general home furnishings, consumables and certain juvenile products. The Company offers a breadth and depth of selection in most of its product categories that exceeds what is generally available in department stores or other specialty retail stores.

 

History

 

The Company was founded in 1971 by Leonard Feinstein and Warren Eisenberg, the Co-Chairmen of the Company. Each has more than 50 years of experience in the retail industry.

 

The Company commenced operations in 1971 with the opening of two stores, which primarily sold bed linens and bath accessories. In 1985, the Company introduced its first store carrying a full line of domestics merchandise and home furnishings. The Company began using the name “Bed Bath & Beyond” in 1987 in order to reflect the expanded product line offered by its stores and to distinguish its stores from conventional specialty retail stores offering only domestics merchandise or home furnishings. In March 2002, the Company acquired Harmon, a health and beauty care retailer, which operated 27 stores at the time located in Connecticut, New Jersey and New York. In June 2003, the Company acquired CTS, a retailer of giftware and household items, which operated 23 stores at the time located in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York and Rhode Island. In March 2007, the Company acquired buybuy BABY, a retailer of infant and toddler merchandise, which operated 8 stores at the time located in Maryland, New Jersey, New York and Virginia. In December 2007, the Company opened its first international BBB store in Ontario, Canada. In May 2008, the Company became a partner in a joint venture which operates two stores in the Mexico City market under the name “Home & More.”

 

Total net sales of the Company were $9.500 billion, $8.759 billion and $7.829 billion for fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.  Net sales outside of the U.S. were not material for fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009.  Refer to Part II, Item 7 and Item 8 of this Form 10-K for additional financial information.

 

Operations

 

It is the Company’s goal to offer quality merchandise at everyday low prices; to maintain a wide assortment of merchandise; to present merchandise in a distinctive manner designed to maximize customer convenience and reinforce customer perception of wide selection; and to emphasize dedication to customer service and satisfaction.

 

Pricing. The Company believes in maintaining everyday low prices. The Company regularly monitors price levels at its competitors in order to ensure that its prices are in accordance with its pricing philosophy. The Company believes that the application of its everyday low price philosophy is an important factor in establishing its reputation among customers.

 

3



Table of Contents

 

Merchandise Assortment. The Company sells a wide assortment of domestics merchandise and home furnishings. Domestics merchandise includes categories such as bed linens and related items, bath items and kitchen textiles. Home furnishings include categories such as kitchen and tabletop items, fine tabletop, basic housewares, general home furnishings, consumables and certain juvenile products. The Company encourages local store personnel to tailor the merchandise mix as appropriate to respond to changing trends and conditions. The factors taken into account in selecting the merchandise mix for a particular store include store size, configuration and local market conditions, such as climate and demographics. The Company, on an ongoing basis, tests new merchandise categories and adjusts the categories of merchandise carried in its stores and may add new departments or adjust the size of existing departments as required. Additionally, the Company continues to integrate the merchandise assortments within its concepts. The Company believes that the process of adding new departments, integrating the Company’s merchandise within concepts, and expanding or reducing the size of various departments in response to changing conditions is an important part of its merchandising strategy.

 

Merchandise Presentation. The Company has developed a distinctive style of merchandise presentation. Primarily all of the Company’s stores have groups of related product lines presented together in separate areas of each store, creating the appearance that the store is comprised of several individual specialty stores for different product lines. The Company believes that this format of merchandise presentation makes it easy for customers to locate products, reinforces customer perception of wide selection and communicates to customers that its stores offer a level of customer service generally associated with smaller specialty stores.

 

The Company believes that its extensive merchandise selection, rather than fixturing, should be the focus of customer attention and, accordingly, primarily uses simple modular fixturing throughout its stores. This fixturing is primarily designed so that it can be easily reconfigured to adapt to changes in the store’s merchandise mix and presentation. The Company believes that its merchandise displays create an exciting and attractive shopping environment that encourages impulse purchases of additional items.

 

Advertising. In general, the Company relies on “word of mouth advertising,” its reputation for offering a wide assortment of quality merchandise at everyday low prices and the use of paid advertising. Primary vehicles of paid advertising used by the Company include full-color circulars and other advertising pieces distributed via direct mail or inserts, as well as digital media including email, mobile, social and search advertising. Also, to support the opening of new stores, the Company primarily uses “grand opening” newspaper advertising and email.

 

Customer Service. The Company places a strong focus on customer service and seeks to make shopping at its stores as pleasant and convenient as possible. Most stores are open seven days and six evenings a week in order to enable customers to shop at times that are convenient for them. In addition, the Company’s websites, www.bedbathandbeyond.com, www.christmastreeshops.com, www.harmondiscount.com, www.facevalues.com, www.buybuybaby.com and www.bedbathandbeyond.ca as well as the Company’s facebook pages are available for customers to access 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

 

Suppliers

 

In fiscal 2011, the Company purchased its merchandise from approximately 5,600 suppliers with the Company’s largest supplier accounting for approximately 8% of the Company’s merchandise purchases and the Company’s 10 largest suppliers accounting for approximately 22% of such purchases. The Company purchases substantially all of its merchandise in the United States, the majority from domestic sources and the balance from importers. The Company purchases a small amount of its merchandise directly from overseas sources. The Company has no long term contracts for the purchase of merchandise. The Company believes that most merchandise, other than brand name goods, is available from a variety of sources and that most brand name goods can be replaced with comparable merchandise.

 

4



Table of Contents

 

Warehousing

 

The Company’s merchandise displays allow a substantial amount of merchandise to be displayed on the sales floor at all times. Merchandise not displayed on the sales floor is typically stored in warehouse space within the store. In addition, the Company maintains 12 supplemental storage locations as well as three central distribution centers. The majority of the Company’s merchandise is directly shipped to stores from vendors through third party carriers and service providers; the remainder of the Company’s merchandise is shipped to stores through its distribution centers.

 

In addition, the Company maintains two E-Service fulfillment centers.

 

Employees

 

As of February 25, 2012, the Company employed approximately 48,000 persons in full-time and part-time positions. The Company believes that its relations with its employees are very good and that the labor turnover rate among its management employees is lower than that generally experienced within the industry.

 

Seasonality

 

The Company’s sales exhibit seasonality with sales levels generally higher in the calendar months of August, November and December, and generally lower in February.

 

Expansion Program

 

The Company is engaged in an ongoing expansion program involving the opening of new stores in both new and existing markets, the expansion or relocation of existing stores and the continuous review of strategic acquisitions. In the 20 year period from the beginning of fiscal 1992 to the end of fiscal 2011, the Company has grown from 34 stores to 1,173 stores. The Company’s 1,173 stores operate in 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Canada, including: 993 BBB stores operating in 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Canada; 71 CTS stores operating in 20 states; 45 Harmon stores operating in four states; and 64 buybuy BABY stores operating in 26 states. Total square footage grew from approximately 0.9 million square feet at the beginning of fiscal 1992 to approximately 36.1 million square feet at the end of fiscal 2011. During fiscal 2011, the Company opened a total of 38 new stores, including 13 BBB stores throughout the United States and Canada and five CTS stores, one Harmon store and 19 buybuy BABY stores throughout the United States, and closed two BBB stores and two Harmon stores, all of which resulted in the aggregate addition of approximately 1.1 million square feet of store space. In addition, the Company is a partner in a joint venture which operates two stores in the Mexico City market under the name “Home & More.”

 

The Company intends to continue its expansion program and believes that the continued growth of the Company is dependent, in large part, on the success of this program. As part of its expansion program, the Company expects to open new stores and expand existing stores as opportunities arise. The Company believes throughout the United States and Canada, there is an opportunity to open in excess of 1,300 BBB stores as well as grow the CTS and buybuy BABY concepts from coast to coast.

 

In determining where to open new stores, the Company evaluates a number of factors, including the availability of real estate, demographic information (such as data relating to income and education levels, age and occupation) and distribution. The Company has built its management structure with a view toward its expansion and believes that, as a result, it has the management depth necessary to support its anticipated expansion program.

 

Competition

 

The Company operates in the fragmented and highly competitive retail industry. The Company competes with many different types of retail stores that sell many or most of the same products. Such competitors include but are not limited to: (i) department stores, which often carry many of the same product lines as the Company’s stores but do not typically have the same depth or breadth of product selection, (ii) specialty stores, which often have a depth of product selection but typically carry only a limited portion of the product lines carried by the Company’s stores, (iii) discount and mass merchandise stores, (iv) national chains and (v) internet online only

 

5



Table of Contents

 

retailers. In addition, the Company’s stores compete, to a more limited extent, with factory outlet stores that typically offer limited quantities or limited lines of quality merchandise at discount prices. Other entities continue to introduce new concepts that include many of the product lines carried by the Company’s stores. There can be no assurance that the operation of competitors will not have a material adverse effect on the Company.

 

Tradenames and Service Marks

 

The Company uses the “Bed Bath & Beyond” name and logo and the “Beyond any store of its kind” tag line as service marks in connection with retail services. The Company has registered these marks and others, including names and logos of CTS, Harmon and buybuy BABY, with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The Company also has registered or has applications pending with the trademark registries of several foreign countries, including having registered the “Bed Bath & Beyond” name and logo and the “Beyond any store of its kind” tag line in Canada. Management believes that its name recognition and service marks are important elements of the Company’s merchandising strategy.

 

Available Information

 

The Company makes available as soon as reasonably practicable after filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), free of charge, through its website, www.bedbathandbeyond.com, the Company’s annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports, electronically filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

 

Executive Officers of the Registrant

 

The following table sets forth the name, age and business experience of the Executive Officers of the Registrant:

 

Name

 

Age

 

Positions

 

 

 

 

 

Warren Eisenberg

 

81

 

Co-Chairman and Director

 

 

 

 

 

Leonard Feinstein

 

75

 

Co-Chairman and Director

 

 

 

 

 

Steven H. Temares

 

53

 

Chief Executive Officer and Director

 

 

 

 

 

Arthur Stark

 

56

 

President and Chief Merchandising Officer

 

 

 

 

 

Matthew Fiorilli

 

55

 

Senior Vice President — Stores

 

 

 

 

 

Eugene A. Castagna

 

46

 

Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

 

Warren Eisenberg is a Co-Founder of the Company and has served as Co-Chairman since 1999. He has served as a Director since 1971. Mr. Eisenberg served as Chairman from 1992 to 1999, and served as Co-Chief Executive Officer from 1971 to 2003.

 

Leonard Feinstein is a Co-Founder of the Company and has served as Co-Chairman since 1999. He has served as a Director since 1971. Mr. Feinstein served as President from 1992 to 1999, and served as Co-Chief Executive Officer from 1971 to 2003.

 

Steven H. Temares has been Chief Executive Officer since 2003 and has served as a Director since 1999. Mr. Temares was President and Chief Executive Officer from 2003 to 2006, President and Chief Operating Officer from 1999 to 2003 and Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer from 1997 to 1999. Mr. Temares joined the Company in 1992.

 

6



Table of Contents

 

Arthur Stark has been President and Chief Merchandising Officer since 2006. Mr. Stark has served as Chief Merchandising Officer since 1999 and was a Senior Vice President from 1999 to 2006. Mr. Stark joined the Company in 1977.

 

Matthew Fiorilli has been Senior Vice President - Stores since 1999. Mr. Fiorilli joined the Company in 1973.

 

Eugene A. Castagna has been Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer since 2006. Mr. Castagna served as Assistant Treasurer from 2002 to 2006 and as Vice President - Finance from 2000 to 2006. Mr. Castagna is a certified public accountant and joined the Company in 1994.

 

The Company’s executive officers are elected by the Board of Directors for one-year terms and serve at the discretion of the Board of Directors. No family relationships exist between any of the executive officers or directors of the Company.

 

ITEM 1A — RISK FACTORS

 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. The Company’s actual results and future financial condition may differ materially from those expressed in any such forward-looking statements as a result of many factors. Such factors include the following:

 

General economic factors beyond the Company’s control and changes in the economic climate could adversely affect the Company’s performance.

 

General economic factors that are beyond the Company’s control impact the Company’s forecasts and actual performance. These factors include housing markets, recession, inflation, deflation, consumer credit availability, consumer debt levels, fuel and energy costs, interest rates, tax rates and policy, unemployment trends, the impact of natural disasters, civil disturbances and terrorist activities, conditions affecting the retail environment for the home and other matters that influence consumer spending. Changes in the economic climate could adversely affect the Company’s performance.

 

The Company operates in the highly competitive retail business where any unanticipated changes in the pricing and other practices of competitors may adversely affect the Company’s performance.

 

The retail business is highly competitive. The Company competes for customers, employees, locations, merchandise, services and other important aspects of the business with many other local, regional and national retailers. Those competitors range from specialty retail stores to department stores, discounters and internet online retailers. Unanticipated changes in the pricing and other practices of those competitors, including promotional activity, may adversely affect the Company’s performance.

 

The Company’s failure to anticipate and respond in a timely fashion to changes in consumer preferences and demographic factors could have a material adverse affect on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

 

The Company’s success depends on its ability to anticipate and respond in a timely manner to changing merchandise trends, customer demands and demographics. The Company’s failure to anticipate, identify or react appropriately to changes in customer tastes, preferences, spending patterns and other lifestyle decisions could lead to, among other things, excess inventories or a shortage of products and could have a material adverse affect on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

 

7



Table of Contents

 

Unusual weather patterns could adversely affect the Company’s performance.

 

The Company’s operating results could be negatively impacted by unusual weather patterns. Frequent or unusually heavy snow, ice or rain storms, hurricanes, floods, tornados or extended periods of unseasonable temperatures could adversely affect the Company’s performance.

 

A major disruption of the Company’s information technology systems could negatively impact operating results.

 

The Company’s operating results could be negatively impacted by a major disruption of the Company’s information technology systems. The Company relies heavily on these systems to process transactions, manage inventory replenishment, summarize results and control distribution of products. Despite numerous safeguards and careful contingency planning, the system is still subject to power outages, computer viruses, telecommunication failures, security breaches and other catastrophic events. A major disruption of the system and its backup mechanisms may cause the Company to incur significant costs to repair the systems, experience a critical loss of data and result in business interruptions.

 

A privacy breach of the Company’s data security systems or those of its third party service providers could have a negative impact on the Company’s operating results and financial performance due to possible loss of consumer confidence, as well as potential government penalties and private litigation.

 

The Company stores certain information about its customers and employees in the ordinary course of business. The Company invests considerable resources in protecting this sensitive information but is still subject to a possible security event. A breach of its security systems or those of its third party service providers resulting in unauthorized access to stored personal information could negatively impact the Company’s operating results and financial performance. Certain aspects of the business, particularly the Company website, heavily depend on consumers entrusting personal financial information to be transmitted securely over public networks. A loss of consumer confidence could result in lost future sales and have a material adverse effect on the Company’s reputation. In addition, a privacy breach could cause the Company to incur significant costs to restore the integrity of its systems, and could result in significant costs in government penalties and private litigation.

 

A failure of the Company’s suppliers to adhere to appropriate laws or standards could negatively impact its reputation.

 

The Company purchases substantially all of its merchandise in the United States, the majority from domestic sources and the balance from importers.  The Company purchases a small amount of its merchandise directly from overseas sources.  The failure of one of the Company’s domestic or foreign suppliers to adhere to labor, environmental, health and safety laws and standards could negatively impact the Company’s reputation and have an adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations.

 

Changes in statutory, regulatory, and other legal requirements at a local, state and national level could potentially impact the Company’s operating and financial results.

 

The Company is subject to numerous statutory, regulatory and legal requirements at a local, state and national level. The Company’s operating results could be negatively impacted by developments in these areas due to the costs of compliance in addition to possible government penalties and litigation in the event of deemed noncompliance. Changes in the regulatory environment in the area of product safety, environmental protection, privacy and information security, wage and hour laws, among others, could potentially impact the Company’s operations and financial results.

 

8



Table of Contents

 

Changes to accounting rules, regulations and tax laws, or new interpretations of existing accounting standards or tax laws could negatively impact the Company’s operating results and financial position.

 

The Company’s operating results and financial position could be negatively impacted by changes to accounting rules and regulations or new interpretations of existing accounting standards. These changes may include, without limitation, changes to lease accounting standards.  The Company’s effective income tax rate could be impacted by changes in accounting standards as well as changes in tax laws or the interpretations of these tax laws by courts and taxing authorities which could negatively impact the Company’s financial results.

 

The success of the Company is dependent, in part, on managing costs of labor, merchandise and other expenses that are subject to factors beyond the Company’s control.

 

The Company’s success depends, in part, on its ability to manage operating costs and to look for opportunities to reduce costs. The Company’s ability to meet its labor needs while controlling costs is subject to external factors such as unemployment levels, prevailing wage rates, minimum wage legislation, labor organizing activities and changing demographics. The Company’s ability to find qualified vendors and obtain access to products in a timely and efficient manner can be adversely affected by political instability, the financial instability of suppliers, suppliers’ noncompliance with applicable laws, transportation costs and other factors beyond the Company’s control.

 

The Company depends upon its employees in all areas of the organization to execute its business plan and, ultimately, to satisfy its customers.

 

The Company’s ability to attract and retain qualified employees in all areas of the organization may be affected by a number of factors, including geographic relocation of employees, operations or facilities and the highly competitive markets in which the Company operates, including the markets for the types of skilled individuals needed to support the Company’s continued growth domestically, interactively and, over the longer term, internationally.

 

The Company’s growth depends, in part, on its ability to open new stores, execute its interactive strategies and operate profitably.

 

The Company’s growth depends, in part, on its ability to open new stores, execute its interactive strategies and operate profitably. The Company’s ability to open additional stores successfully will depend on a number of factors, including its identification and availability of suitable store locations; its success in negotiating leases on acceptable terms; its hiring and training of skilled store operating personnel, especially management; and its timely development of new stores, including the availability of construction materials and labor and the absence of significant construction and other delays in store openings based on weather or other events. This increases the cost of doing business and the risk that the Company’s business practices could result in liabilities that may adversely affect its performance, despite the exercise of reasonable care.

 

The continued uncertainty in the financial markets could have an adverse effect on the Company’s ability to access its cash and cash equivalents.

 

The Company may have amounts of cash and cash equivalents at financial institutions that are in excess of federally insured limits.  While the Company closely manages its cash and cash equivalents balances to minimize risk, with the current financial environment and instability of financial institutions, the Company can not be assured that it will not experience losses on its deposits.

 

Funds associated with auction rate securities held by the Company may not be liquid or readily available.

 

The Company’s investment in securities consists partially of auction rate securities that are not currently liquid or readily available to convert to cash and, therefore, the Company has classified such auction rate securities as long term investment securities.  The Company does not anticipate that any potential lack of liquidity in these auction rate securities, even for an extended period of time, will affect its ability to finance its operations, including its expansion program, share repurchase program and planned capital expenditures. However, if the interest rate environment changes, the Company may incur further temporary impairment losses.

 

9



Table of Contents

 

If uncertainties in the credit and capital markets continue and these markets deteriorate further, the Company may conclude that the decline in value is other than temporary and incur realized losses, including up to the full amount of the investments in auction rate securities, which could negatively affect the Company’s financial position, cash flow and results of operations.

 

ITEM 1B — UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None.

 

ITEM 2 - PROPERTIES

 

Most of the Company’s stores are located in suburban areas of medium and large-sized cities. These stores are situated in strip and power strip shopping centers, as well as in major off-price and conventional malls, and in free standing buildings.

 

The Company’s 1,173 stores are located in 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Canada and range in size from approximately 5,000 to 100,000 square feet, but are predominantly between 20,000 and 50,000 square feet. Approximately 85% to 90% of store space is used for selling areas and the balance for warehouse, receiving and office space.

 

10



Table of Contents

 

The table below sets forth the locations of the Company’s stores as of February 25, 2012:

 

Alabama

 

16

Alaska

 

2

Arizona

 

27

Arkansas

 

7

California

 

116

Colorado

 

25

Connecticut

 

23

Delaware

 

3

Florida

 

80

Georgia

 

30

Hawaii

 

1

Idaho

 

7

Illinois

 

44

Indiana

 

23

Iowa

 

8

Kansas

 

9

Kentucky

 

9

Louisiana

 

13

Maine

 

8

Maryland

 

20

Massachusetts

 

43

Michigan

 

37

Minnesota

 

12

Mississippi

 

7

Missouri

 

16

Montana

 

6

Nebraska

 

5

Nevada

 

8

New Hampshire

 

14

New Jersey

 

80

New Mexico

 

5

New York

 

91

North Carolina

 

33

North Dakota

 

2

Ohio

 

40

Oklahoma

 

8

Oregon

 

10

Pennsylvania

 

42

Rhode Island

 

5

South Carolina

 

15

South Dakota

 

2

Tennessee

 

20

Texas

 

81

Utah

 

13

Vermont

 

3

Virginia

 

33

Washington

 

23

West Virginia

 

3

Wisconsin

 

11

Wyoming

 

2

District of Columbia

 

2

Puerto Rico

 

3

Alberta, Canada

 

7

British Columbia, Canada

 

6

Novia Scotia, Canada

 

1

Ontario, Canada

 

12

Prince Edward Island, Canada

 

1

Total

 

1,173

 

The Company leases primarily all of its existing stores. The leases provide for original lease terms that generally range from 10 to 15 years and most leases provide for renewal options, often at increased rents. The Company evaluates leases on an ongoing basis which may lead to renegotiated lease terms, including rents during renewal options, or the possible relocation of stores. Certain leases provide for scheduled rent increases (which, in the case of fixed increases, the Company accounts for on a straight-line basis over the expected lease term, beginning when the Company obtains possession of the premises) and/or for contingent rent (based upon store sales exceeding stipulated amounts).

 

In addition, the Company leases storage space in 14 locations, totaling approximately 1.6 million square feet, that provide supplemental merchandise storage space and fulfillment of the Company’s E-Service activities. This space is used to supplement the warehouse facilities in the Company’s stores in proximity to these locations. In addition, the Company also owns two distribution centers totaling approximately 1.5 million square feet.  In fiscal 2012, a new 800,000 square foot E-Service fulfillment center in Georgia is planned to become operational.

 

As of February 25, 2012, the Company occupied approximately 465,000 square feet of office space at five locations for procurement

and corporate office functions. Two owned facilities in Union, New Jersey and one owned facility in Middleboro, Massachusetts comprise approximately 345,000 square feet with the remaining 120,000 square feet within leased facilities in Farmingdale and

 

11



Table of Contents

 

Garden City, New York. The relocation of the Company’s offices from Farmingdale and Garden City, New York to its Union, New Jersey corporate headquarters’ buildings will be substantially completed by the end of the summer of fiscal 2012.

 

ITEM 3 - LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

The Company is party to various legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business, which the Company does not believe to be material to the Company’s business or financial condition.

 

ITEM 4 — MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not Applicable.

 

12



Table of Contents

 

PART II

 

ITEM 5 -

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

The following table sets forth the high and low reported closing prices of the Company’s common stock on the NASDAQ National Market System for the periods indicated.

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

Fiscal 2011:

 

 

 

 

 

1st Quarter

 

$

57.30

 

$

45.07

 

2nd Quarter

 

60.31

 

49.73

 

3rd Quarter

 

63.44

 

55.26

 

4th Quarter

 

63.22

 

57.46

 

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

Fiscal 2010:

 

 

 

 

 

1st Quarter

 

$

48.25

 

$

41.08

 

2nd Quarter

 

45.87

 

36.01

 

3rd Quarter

 

45.13

 

35.96

 

4th Quarter

 

50.82

 

43.74

 

 

The common stock is quoted through the NASDAQ National Market System under the symbol BBBY. On March 24, 2012, there were approximately 5,400 shareholders of record of the common stock (without including individual participants in nominee security position listings). On March 24, 2012, the last reported sale price of the common stock was $66.11.

 

The Company has not paid cash dividends on its common stock since its 1992 initial public offering and does not currently plan to pay dividends on its common stock. The payment of any future dividends will be determined by the Board of Directors in light of conditions then existing, including the Company’s earnings, financial condition and requirements, business conditions and other factors. See Item 8 - Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

 

Since 2004 through the end of fiscal 2011, the Company has repurchased approximately $4.0 billion of its common stock through several share repurchase programs. The Company’s purchases of its common stock during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011 were as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approximate Dollar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Number of

 

Value of Shares

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares Purchased as

 

that May Yet Be

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part of Publicly

 

Purchased Under

 

 

 

Total Number of

 

Average Price

 

Announced Plans

 

the Plans or

 

Period

 

Shares Purchased (1)

 

Paid per Share (2)

 

or Programs (1)

 

Programs (1) (2)

 

November 27, 2011 - December 24, 2011

 

1,710,100

 

$

60.97

 

1,710,100

 

$

1,173,610,779

 

December 25, 2011 - January 21, 2012

 

1,908,700

 

$

59.20

 

1,908,700

 

$

1,060,618,133

 

January 22, 2012 - February 25, 2012

 

2,322,200

 

$

60.87

 

2,322,200

 

$

919,256,214

 

Total

 

5,941,000

 

$

60.36

 

5,941,000

 

$

919,256,214

 

 


(1) Between December 2004 and December 2010, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized, through several share repurchase programs, the repurchase of $4.950 billion of its shares of common stock. The Company has authorization to make repurchases from time to time in the open market or through other parameters approved by the Board of Directors pursuant to existing rules and regulations. Shares purchased indicated in this table also include the withholding of a portion of restricted shares to cover taxes on vested restricted shares.

 

(2) Excludes brokerage commissions paid by the Company.

 

13



Table of Contents

 

Stock Price Performance Graph

 

The graph shown below compares the performance of the Company’s common stock with that of the S&P 500 Index, the S&P Specialty Retail Index and the S&P Retail Composite Index over the same period (assuming the investment of $100 in the Company’s common stock and each of the three Indexes on March 3, 2007, and the reinvestment of dividends, if any).

 

 

14



Table of Contents

 

ITEM 6 - SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

 

Consolidated Selected Financial Data

 

Fiscal Year Ended (1)

 

(in thousands, except per share

 

February 25,

 

February 26,

 

February 27,

 

February 28,

 

March 1,

 

and selected operating data)

 

2012

 

2011

 

2010

 

2009

 

2008 (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statement of Earnings Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

9,499,890

 

$

8,758,503

 

$

7,828,793

 

$

7,208,340

 

$

7,048,942

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross profit

 

3,930,933

 

3,622,929

 

3,208,119

 

2,873,236

 

2,925,231

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating profit

 

1,568,369

 

1,288,458

 

980,687

 

673,896

 

838,022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings

 

989,537

 

791,333

 

600,033

 

425,123

 

562,808

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings per share - Diluted

 

$

4.06

 

$

3.07

 

$

2.30

 

$

1.64

 

$

2.10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selected Operating Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of stores open (at period end)

 

1,173

 

1,139

 

1,100

 

1,037

 

971

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total square feet of store space (at period end)

 

36,125,000

 

35,055,000

 

33,740,000

 

32,050,000

 

30,181,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage increase in comparable store sales

 

5.9

%

7.8

%

4.4

%

(2.4

)%

1.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comparable store net sales (in 000’s)

 

$

9,157,183

 

$

8,339,112

 

$

7,409,203

 

$

6,746,472

 

$

6,457,268

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of comparable stores

 

1,076

 

1,013

 

942

 

874

 

792

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance Sheet Data (at period end):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working capital

 

$

2,803,809

 

$

2,751,398

 

$

2,413,791

 

$

1,609,831

 

$

1,065,599

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

5,724,546

 

5,646,193

 

5,152,130

 

4,268,843

 

3,844,093

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term debt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shareholders’ equity (3) (4)

 

$

3,922,528

 

$

3,931,659

 

$

3,652,904

 

$

3,000,454

 

$

2,561,828

 

 


(1) Each fiscal year represents 52 weeks.

(2) On March 22, 2007, the Company acquired Buy Buy BABY, Inc.

(3) The Company has not declared any cash dividends in any of the fiscal years noted above.

(4) In fiscal 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 and 2007, the Company repurchased approximately $1.218 billion, $688 million, $95 million, $48 million and $734 million of its common stock, respectively.

 

15



XNAS:BBBY Bed Bath & Beyond Inc Annual Report 10-K Filling

Bed Bath & Beyond Inc XNAS:BBBY Stock - Get Annual Report SEC Filing of Bed Bath & Beyond Inc XNAS:BBBY stocks, including company profile, shares outstanding, strategy, business segments, operations, officers, consolidated financial statements, financial notes and ownership information.

XNAS:BBBY Bed Bath & Beyond Inc Annual Report 10-K Filing - 2/25/2012
Name |  Ticker |  Star Rating |  Market Cap |  Stock Type |  Sector |  Industry Star Rating |  Investment Style |  Total Assets |  Category |  Top Holdings |  Top Sectors |  Symbol |  Title Star Rating |  Category |  Total Assets |  Top Holdings |  Top Sectors |  Symbol |  Name Title |  Date |  Author |  Collection |  Interest |  Popularity Topic |  Sector |  Key Indicators |  User Interest |  Market Cap |  Industry Name |  Ticker |  Star Rating |  Market Cap |  Stock Type |  Sector |  Industry Star Rating |  Investment Style |  Total Assets |  Category |  Top Holdings |  Top Sectors |  Symbol / Ticker |  Title Star Rating |  Category |  Total Assets |  Symbol / Ticker |  Name Title |  Date |  Author |  Collection |  Popularity |  Interest Title |  Date |  Company |  Symbol |  Interest |  Popularity Topic |  Sector |  Key Indicators |  User Interest |  Market Cap |  Industry Name |  Ticker |  Popularity |  Our Choices |  Most Recent Title |  Date |  Company |  Symbol |  Interest |  Popularity

Previous: XNAS:BASI Bioanalytical Systems Inc Quarterly Report 10-Q/A Filing - 6/30/2012  |  Next: XNAS:BBBY Bed Bath & Beyond Inc Insider Activity 4 Filing - 2/25/2012