XOTC:FMAO Farmers & Merchants Bancorp Inc Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 3/31/2012

Effective Date 3/31/2012

XOTC:FMAO Fair Value Estimate
Premium
XOTC:FMAO Consider Buying
Premium
XOTC:FMAO Consider Selling
Premium
XOTC:FMAO Fair Value Uncertainty
Premium
XOTC:FMAO Economic Moat
Premium
XOTC:FMAO Stewardship
Premium
 

 

 

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

 

x Quarterly Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2012

OR

 

¨ Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the transition period from              to             

Commission File Number 0-14492

 

 

FARMERS & MERCHANTS BANCORP, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

OHIO   34-1469491

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S Employer

Identification No.)

307 North Defiance Street, Archbold, Ohio   43502
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

(419) 446-2501

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report.)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    x  Yes    ¨  No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨    Accelerated filer   x
Non-accelerated filer   ¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    ¨  Yes    x  No

Indicate the number of shares of each of the issuers classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date:

 

Common Stock, No Par Value

 

4,704,923

Class

  Outstanding as of April 30, 2012

 

 

 


SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10Q

FARMERS & MERCHANTS BANCORP, INC.

INDEX

 

Form 10-Q Items

       Page  

PART I.

  FINANCIAL INFORMATION   

Item 1.

  Financial Statements (Unaudited)   
 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets-March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011

     1   
 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Net Income-Three Months Ended March 31, 2012 and March 31, 2011

     2   
 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows-Three Months Ended March 31, 2012 and March 31, 2011

     3   
  Notes to Condensed Financial Statements      4-14   

Item 2.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     15-26   

Item 3.

  Qualitative and Quantitative Disclosures About Market Risk      26-27   

Item 4.

  Controls and Procedures      27   

PART II.

  OTHER INFORMATION   

Item 1.

  Legal Proceedings      27   

Item 1A.

  Risk Factors      27   

Item 2.

  Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds      28   

Item 3.

  Defaults Upon Senior Securities      28   

Item 4.

  Mine Safety Disclosures      28   

Item 5.

  Other Information      28   

Item 6.

  Exhibits      28   

Signatures

       29-33   

Exhibit 31.

  Certifications Under Section 302   

Exhibit 32.

  Certifications Under Section 906   


ITEM 1 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FARMERS & MERCHANTS BANCORP, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(Unaudited)

(in thousands of dollars)

 

     March 31, 2012     December 31, 2011  

ASSETS:

    

Cash and due from banks

   $ 12,060      $ 17,563   

Interest bearing deposits with banks

     16,121        14,046   

Federal funds sold

     31,056        11,534   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total cash and cash equivalents

     59,237        43,143   

Securities - available for sale (Note 2)

     345,029        327,519   

Other Securities, at cost

     4,365        4,365   

Loans, net (Note 4)

     488,090        501,124   

Bank premises and equipment

     16,883        16,984   

Goodwill

     4,074        4,074   

Mortgage Servicing Rights

     2,061        2,071   

Other Real Estate Owned

     3,567        3,572   

Accrued interest and other assets

     21,477        20,141   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

TOTAL ASSETS

   $ 944,783      $ 922,993   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

    

LIABILITIES:

    

Deposits:

    

Noninterest bearing

   $ 82,827      $ 84,567   

Interest bearing

    

NOW accounts

     202,377        193,137   

Savings

     183,066        170,052   

Time

     295,551        291,626   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total deposits

     763,821        739,382   

Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreement to repurchase

     50,073        52,440   

FHLB Advances

     16,645        16,662   

Dividend Payable

     890        890   

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

     7,879        8,528   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Liabilities

     839,308        817,902   

SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY:

    

Common stock, no par value - authorized 6,500,000 shares; issued & outstanding 5,200,000 shares

     12,677        12,677   

Treasury Stock - 495,077 shares 2012, 483,663 shares 2011

     (10,134     (9,898

Unearned Stock Awards 29,570 shares 2012, 29,715 shares 2011

     (561     (564

Retained Earnings

     97,889        96,495   

Accumulated other comprehensive income

     5,604        6,381   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Shareholders’ Equity

     105,475        105,091   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

   $ 944,783      $ 922,993   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Unaudited Financial Statements.

Note: The December 31, 2011 Balance Sheet has been derived from the audited financial statements of that date.

 

1


FARMERS & MERCHANTS BANCORP, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME

(Unaudited)

(in thousands of dollars, except per share data)

 

     Three Months Ended  
     March 31, 2012     March 31, 2011  

INTEREST INCOME:

    

Loans, including fees

   $ 6,797      $ 8,023   

Debt Securities:

    

U.S. Treasury securities

     81        100   

Securities of U.S. Government Agencies

     1,025        934   

Municipalities

     510        532   

Dividends

     49        49   

Federal funds sold

     7        6   

Other

     7        11   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Interest Income

     8,476        9,655   

INTEREST EXPENSE:

    

Deposits

     1,439        1,883   

Federal Funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase

     61        75   

Borrowed funds

     124        263   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Interest Expense

     1,624        2,221   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

NET INTEREST INCOME BEFORE PROVISION FOR LOAN LOSSES

     6,852        7,434   

PROVISION FOR LOAN LOSSES (Note 4)

     128        772   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

NET INTEREST INCOME AFTER PROVISION FOR LOAN LOSSES

     6,724        6,662   

NONINTEREST INCOME

    

Customer service fees

     1,324        883   

Other service charges and fees

     758        776   

Net gain (loss) on sale of other assets owned

     (67     (648

Net gain on sale of loans

     161        75   

Net gain on sale of securities

     169        339   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Noninterest Income

     2,345        1,425   

NONINTEREST EXPENSE

    

Salaries and wages

     2,286        2,253   

Pension and other employee benefits

     828        815   

Occupancy expense (net)

     405        313   

Furniture and Equipment

     352        392   

Data processing

     265        230   

Franchise Taxes

     237        218   

FDIC Assessment

     130        320   

Mortgage servicing rights amortization

     194        91   

Other general and administrative

     1,158        1,028   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Noninterest Expense

     5,855        5,660   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

INCOME BEFORE FEDERAL INCOME TAX

     3,214        2,427   

FEDERAL INCOME TAXES

     930        446   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

NET INCOME

   $ 2,284      $ 1,981   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (NET OF TAX):

    

Unrealized gains on securities

   $ 5,605      $ 585   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

   $ 7,889      $ 2,566   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

NET INCOME PER SHARE

   $ 0.48      $ 0.42   

Weighted Average Shares Outstanding

     4,714,197        4,693,080   

DIVIDENDS DECLARED

   $ 0.19        0.19   

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Unaudited Financial Statements.

 

2


FARMERS & MERCHANTS BANCORP, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

(in thousands of dollars)

 

     Three Months Ended  
     March 31, 2012     March 31, 2011  

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

    

Net income

   $ 2,284      $ 1,981   

Adjustments to Reconcile Net Income to Net

    

Cash Provided by Operating Activities:

    

Depreciation

     289        338   

Accretion and amortization of securities

     785        692   

Amortization of servicing rights

     194        91   

Amortization of core deposit intangible

     78        78   

Provision for loan losses

     128        772   

Gain on sale of loans held for sale

     (161     (75

Originations of loans held for sale

     (27,634     (9,672

Proceeds from sale of loans held for sale

     29,920        11,383   

Loss on sale of other assets

     67        648   

Gain on sale of investment securities

     (169     (339

Change in Operating Assets and Liabilities, net

     (1,749     (1,403
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities

     4,032        4,494   

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

    

Activity in securities:

    

Maturities, prepayments and calls

     12,614        8,848   

Sales

     24,584        16,361   

Purchases

     (56,500     (40,830

Proceeds from sale of assets

     —          4   

Additions to premises and equipment

     (188     (237

Loan originations and principal collections, net

     10,620        11,894   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Cash (Used) in Investing Activities

     (8,870     (3,960

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

    

Net increase (decrease) in deposits

     24,439        15,819   

Net change in short-term debt

     (2,367     839   

Repayments of long-term debt

     (17     (54

Purchase of Treasury stock

     (233     (93

Cash dividends paid on common stock

     (890     (894
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities

     20,932        15,617   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Increase (Decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

     16,094        16,151   

Cash and cash equivalents - Beginning of year

     43,143        43,379   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents - End of period

   $ 59,237      $ 59,530   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

RECONCILIATION OF CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS:

    

Cash and cash due from banks

   $ 12,060      $ 15,964   

Interest bearing deposits with banks

     16,121        23,077   

Federal funds sold

     31,056        20,489   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 59,237      $ 59,530   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Supplemental Information

    

Cash paid during the period for:

    

Interest

   $ 1,632      $ 2,265   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income Taxes

   $ 426      $ —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Noncash investing activities:

    

Transfer of loans to other real estate owned

   $ 150      $ 1,385   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Unaudited Financial Statements.

 

3


ITEM 1 NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

NOTE 1 BASIS OF PRESENTATION

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles for interim financial information and with the instructions for Form 10Q and Rule 10-01 of Regulation S-X; accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by generally accepted accounting principles for complete financial statements. In the opinion of management, all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring accruals, considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the three months ended March 31, 2012 are not necessarily indicative of the results that are expected for the year ended December 31, 2012. For further information, refer to the consolidated financial statements and footnotes thereto included in the Company’s annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011.

NOTE 2 FAIR VALUE OF INSTRUMENTS

FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

Fair values of financial instruments are management’s estimate of the values at which the instruments could be exchanged in a transaction between willing parties. These estimates are subjective and may vary significantly from amounts that would be realized in actual transactions. In addition, other significant assets are not considered financial assets including deferred tax assets, premises, equipment and intangibles. Further, the tax ramifications related to the realization of the unrealized gains and losses can have a significant effect on the fair value estimates and have not been considered in any of the elements.

The following assumptions and methods were used in estimating the fair value for financial instruments.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

The carrying amounts reported in the balance sheet for cash, cash equivalents and federal funds sold approximate their fair values. Also included in this line item are the carrying amounts of interest-bearing deposits maturing within ninety days which approximate their fair values. Fair values of other interest-bearing deposits are estimated using discounted cash flow analyses based on current rates for similar types of deposits.

Securities and Other Securities

Fair values for securities, excluding Federal Home Loan Bank stock, are based on quoted market price, where available. If quoted market prices are not available, fair values are based on quoted market prices of comparable instruments. The carrying value of Federal Home Loan Bank stock, listed as “other securities”, approximates fair value based on the redemption provisions of the Federal Home Loan Bank.

Loans

Most commercial and real estate mortgage loans are made on a variable rate basis. For those variable-rate loans that re-price frequently, and with no significant change in credit risk, fair values are based on carrying values. The fair values of the fixed rate and all other loans are estimated using discounted cash flow analysis, using interest rates currently being offered for loans with similar terms to borrowers with similar credit quality.

Deposits

The fair values disclosed for deposits with no defined maturities are equal to their carrying amounts, which represent the amount payable on demand. The carrying amounts for variable-rate, fixed term money market accounts and certificates of deposit approximate their fair value at the reporting date. Fair value for fixed-rate certificates of deposit are estimated using a discounted cash flow analysis that applies interest rates currently being offered on certificates to a schedule of aggregated expected monthly maturities on time deposits.

Short-Term Borrowings

The carrying value of short-term borrowings approximates fair values.

FHLB Advances

Fair values of FHLB advances are estimated using discounted cash flow analysis based on the Company’s current incremental borrowing rates for similar types or borrowing arrangements.

 

4


ITEM 1 NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (Continued)

 

Accrued Interest Receivable and Payable

The carrying amounts of accrued interest approximate their fair values.

Dividends Payable

The carrying amounts of dividends payable approximate their fair values and are generally paid within forty days of declaration.

Off Balance Sheet Financial Instruments

Fair values for off-balance sheet, credit related financial instruments are based on fees currently charged to enter into similar agreements, taking into account the remaining terms of the agreements and the counter-parties’ credit standing.

The estimated fair values, and related carrying or notional amounts, for on and off-balance sheet financial instruments as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 are reflected below.

 

     (In Thousands)  
     March 2012      December 2011  
     Carrying
Amount
     Fair
Value
     Carrying
Amount
     Fair
Value
 

Financial Assets:

           

Cash and Cash Equivalents

   $ 59,237       $ 59,237       $ 43,143       $ 43,143   

Securities - available for sale

     345,029         345,029         327,519         327,519   

Other Securities

     4,365         4,365         4,365         4,365   

Loans, net

     488,090         488,709         501,124         504,804   

Accrued interest receivable

     4,154         4,154         3,481         3,481   

Financial Liabilities:

           

Deposits

   $ 763,821       $ 767,421       $ 739,382       $ 741,975   

Short-term debt

           

Repurchase agreement sold

     50,073         50,073         52,440         52,440   

Federal Home Loan Bank advances

     16,645         16,625         16,662         16,638   

Accrued interest payable

     334         334         342         342   

Dividends payable

     890         890         890         890   

Fair Value Measurements

The following table presents information about the Company’s assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis at March 31, 2012, December 31, 2011, and the valuation techniques used by the Company to determine those fair values.

In general, fair values determined by Level 1 inputs use quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities in active markets that the Company has the ability to access.

Available-for-sale securities- When quoted prices are available in an active market, securities are valued using the quoted price and are classified as Level 1. The quoted prices are not adjusted.

Fair values determined by Level 2 inputs use other inputs that are observable, either directly or indirectly. These Level 2 inputs include quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, and other inputs such as interest rates and yield curves that are observable at commonly quoted intervals.

Available-for-sale securities classified as Level 2 are valued using the prices obtained from an independent pricing service. The prices are not adjusted. Securities of obligations of state and political subdivisions are valued using a type of matrix, or grid, pricing in which securities are benchmarked against the treasury rate base on credit rating. Substantially all assumptions used by the independent pricing service are observable in the marketplace, can be derived from observable data, or are supported by observable levels at which transactions are executed in the market place.

Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs, including inputs that are available in situations where there is little, if any, market activity for the related asset or liability. During 2010, local municipals were purchased that the Bank evaluates based on the credit strength of the underlying project such as hospital or retirement home. The fair value is determined by valuing similar credit payment streams at similar rates.

In instances where inputs used to measure fair value fall into different levels in the above fair value hierarchy, fair value measurements in their entirety are categorized based on the lowest level input that is significant to the valuation. The Company’s assessment of the significance of particular inputs to these fair value measurements requires judgment and considers factors specific to each asset.

 

5


ITEM 1 NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (Continued)

Fair Value Measurements (Continued)

 

The following summarizes financial assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 segregated by level or the valuation inputs within the fair value hierarchy utilized to measure fair value:

 

Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair Value on a Recurring Basis (In  Thousands)

 
    Quoted Prices in Active
Markets for Identical
    Significant
Observable Inputs
    Significant
Unobservable Inputs
 
    Assets (Level 1)     (Level 2)     (Level 3)  
March 31, 2012                  

Assets-Securities Available for Sale

     

U.S. Treasury

  $ 31,438       

U.S. Government agency

    $ 182,910     

Mortgage-backed securities

      62,195     

State and local governments

    —          54,850      $ 13,636   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Securities Available for Sale

  $ 31,438      $ 299,955      $ 13,636   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
    Quoted Prices in Active
Markets for Identical
    Significant
Observable Inputs
    Significant
Unobservable Inputs
 
    Assets (Level 1)     (Level 2)     (Level 3)  
December 31, 2011                  

Assets-Securities Available for Sale

     

U.S. Treasury

  $ 26,691       

U.S. Government agency

    $ 177,797     

Mortgage-backed securities

      55,413     

State and local governments

    —          53,917      $ 13,701   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Securities Available for Sale

  $ 26,691      $ 287,127      $ 13,701   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Most of the Company’s available for sale securities, including any bonds issued by local municipalities, have CUSIP numbers or have similar characteristics of those in the municipal markets, making them marketable and comparable as Level 2.

At March 31, 2012 and beginning as of December 31, 2011, the Company classified only US Treasuries as Level 1 and considered all Government Agency and Mortgage-backed securities as Level 2. The Company does not believe the availability of quoted prices in active markets for these securities is any less available than in 2010. The Company is recognizing the interpretation of most other public companies as classifying as Level 2.

The Company also has assets that, under certain conditions, are subject to measurement at fair value on a non-recurring basis. At March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, such assets consist primarily of impaired loans. Impaired loans categorized as Level 3 assets consist of non-homogeneous loans that are considered impaired. The Company estimates the fair value of the loans based on the present value of expected future cash flows using management’s best estimate of key assumptions. These assumptions include future payment ability, timing of payment streams, and estimated realizable values of available collateral (typically based on outside appraisals.)

At March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, impaired loans categorized as Level 3 were $1.87 and $1.85 million, respectively. The specific allocation for impaired loans was $191 and $175 thousand as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively, which are accounted for in the allowance for loan losses (see Note 4).

Other real estate is reported at either the fair value of the real estate minus the estimated costs to sell the asset or the cost of the asset. The determination of fair value of the real estate relies primarily on appraisals from third parties. If the fair value of the real estate, minus the estimated costs to sell the asset, is less than the asset’s cost, the deficiency is recognized as a valuation allowance against the asset through a charge to expense. The valuation allowance is therefore increased or decreased, through charges or credits to expense, for changes in the asset’s fair value or estimated selling costs.

 

The following table presents impaired loans and other real estate owned as recorded at fair value:

 

     Assets Measured at Fair Value on a Nonrecurring Basis at  March 31, 2012 (In Thousands)  
     Balance at
March 31, 2012
     Quoted Prices in Active
Markets for

Identical
Assets (Level 1)
     Significant
Observable Inputs
(Level 2)
     Significant
Unobservable Inputs
(Level 3)
     Change in
fair value for
three-month period
ended Mar. 31,  2012
 

Impaired loans

   $ 1,867       $ —         $ —         $ 1,867       $ —     

Other real estate owned - residential mortgages

   $ 996       $ —         $ —         $ 996       $ (12

Other real estate owned - commercial

   $ 2,571       $ —         $ —         $ 2,571       $ —     
              

 

 

 
               $ (12
              

 

 

 

 

6


ITEM 1 NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (Continued)

Fair Value Measurements (Continued)

 

    Assets Measured at Fair Value on a Nonrecurring Basis at December 31, 2011 (In Thousands)  
    Balance at
December 31, 2011
    Quoted Prices in Active
Markets for

Identical
Assets (Level 1)
    Significant
Observable Inputs
(Level 2)
    Significant
Unobservable Inputs
(Level 3)
    Change in
fair value  for

twelve-month period
ended Dec. 31, 2011
 

Impaired loans

  $ 1,854      $ —        $ —        $ 1,854      $ (150

Other real estate owned - residential mortgages

  $ 958      $ —        $ —        $ 958      $ (145

Other real estate owned commercial

  $ 2,614      $ —        $ —        $ 2,614      $ (633
         

 

 

 
          $ (928
         

 

 

 

The Company also has other assets, which under certain conditions, are subject to measurement at fair value. These assets include loans held for sale, bank owned life insurance, and mortgage servicing rights. The Company estimated the fair values of these assets utilizing Level 3 inputs, including, the discounted present value of expected future cash flows. At March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, the Company estimates that there is no impairment of these assets and therefore, no impairment charge to other expense was required to adjust these assets to their estimated fair values.

NOTE 3 ASSET PURCHASE

On July 9, 2010, the Bank completed its purchase of a branch office in Hicksville, Ohio from First Place Bank. Deposits of close to $28 million and loans of $14 million were included in the purchase. The new office is located within the Bank’s current market area, shortening the distance between offices in the Ohio and Indiana market area. The following table summarizes the estimated values of the assets acquired and the liabilities assumed:

 

     (In Thousands)  

Cash

   $ 114   

Loans, Net of Discount

     13,792   

Accrued Interest on Loans

     64   

Premises and Equipment

     1,803   

Core Deposit Intangible

     1,087   

Other Assets

     11   
  

 

 

 

Total Assets Acquired

   $ 16,871   
  

 

 

 

Deposits

   $ 27,749   

Accrued Interest on Deposits

     13   

Other Liabilities

     10   
  

 

 

 

Total Liabilities Assumed

   $ 27,772   
  

 

 

 

Net Liabilities Assumed

   $ 10,901   
  

 

 

 

In connection with a December 31, 2007 Knisely acquisition, the Company recognized a core deposit intangible asset of $1.1 million, which is being amortized on a straight line basis over 7 years, which represents the estimated remaining economic useful life of the deposits.

The Company also recognized core deposit intangible assets of $1.09 million with the purchase of the Hicksville office. These are being amortized over an estimated remaining economic useful life of the deposits of 7 years on a straight line basis.

The amortization expense for the year ended December 31, 2011 was $312 thousand. Of the $312 thousand to be expensed in 2012, $78 thousand has been expensed in the first quarter.

Amortization expense of the core deposit intangible assets remaining is as follows:

 

     (In Thousands)         
     Knisely      Hicksville      Total  

2012

   $ 157       $ 155       $ 312   

2013

     157         155       $ 312   

2014

     157         155       $ 312   

2015

     —           155       $ 155   

2016

     —           155       $ 155   

Thereafter

     —           77         77   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 471       $ 852       $ 1,323   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

7


ITEM 1 NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

 

LOANS

NOTE 4 LOANS

Loan balances as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011:

 

     (In Thousands)  
     March 31, 2012     December 31, 2011  

Loans:

    

Commercial real estate

   $ 200,865      $ 201,158   

Agricultural real estate

     31,814        31,993   

Consumer real estate

     79,716        81,585   

Commercial and industrial

     103,915        114,497   

Agricultural

     54,084        52,598   

Consumer

     21,839        23,375   

Industrial Development Bonds

     1,196        1,196   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 493,429      $ 506,402   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Less: Net deferred loan fees and costs

     (187     (187
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
     493,242        506,215   

Less: Allowance for loan losses

     (5,152     (5,091
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loans - Net

   $ 488,090      $ 501,124   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The following is a maturity schedule by major category of loans as of March 31, 2012:

 

     (In Thousands)  
     Within
One Year
     After One
Year Within
Five Years
     After
Five Years
 

Commercial Real Estate

   $ 23,416       $ 110,639       $ 66,810   

Agricultural Real Estate

     2,723         10,209         18,882   

Consumer Real Estate

     6,496         14,788         58,432   

Commercial/Industrial

     66,676         33,762         3,477   

Agricultural

     36,670         15,115         2,299   

Consumer

     4,998         14,693         1,961   

Industrial Development Bonds

     25         279         892   

The distribution of fixed rate loans and variable rate loans by major loan category is as follows as of March 31, 2012. Variable rate loans whose current rates are equal to their floor or ceiling are classified as fixed in this table.

 

     (In Thousands)  
     Fixed
Rate
     Variable
Rate
 

Commercial Real Estate

   $ 86,111       $ 114,754   

Agricultural Real Estate

     10,891         20,923   

Consumer Real Estate

     11,266         68,450   

Commercial/Industrial

     24,725         79,190   

Agricultural

     3,595         50,489   

Consumer

     4,254         17,398   

Industrial Development Bonds

     —           1,196   

As of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 one to four family residential mortgage loans amounting to $66.8 and $67.4 million, respectively, have been pledged as security for loans the Bank has received from the Federal Home Loan Bank.

The percentage of delinquent loans has trended downward since the beginning of 2010 from a high of 2.85% of total loans in January to a low of .64% as of the end of March 2012. These percentages do not include nonaccrual loans which are not past due (nonaccruals are not considered past due if current). This level of delinquency is due in part to an adherence to sound underwriting practices over the course of time, an improvement in the financial status of companies to which the Bank extends credit, continued financial stability in the agricultural loan portfolio, and the writing down of uncollectable credits in a timely manner.

Industrial Development Bonds are included in the commercial and industrial category for the remainder of the tables in this Note 4.

 

8


ITEM 1 NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

NOTE 4 LOANS (Continued)

 

The following table represents the contractual aging of the recorded investment in past due loans by class or loans as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 net of deferred fees:

 

     (In Thousands)  
      30-59 Days
Past Due
     60-89 Days
Past Due
     Greater Than
90 Days

Past Due
     Total
Past Due
     Current      Total
Financing
Receivables
     Recorded
Investment

> 90 Days
and Accruing
 

March 31, 2012

                    

Consumer real estate

   $ 292       $ 140       $ 443       $ 875       $ 78,841       $ 79,716       $ —     

Agricultural real estate

     97         —           —           97         31,717         31,814         —     

Agricultural

     —           —           —           —           54,084         54,084         —     

Commercial Real Estate

     20         —           1,455         1,475         199,390         200,865         —     

Commercial and Industrial

     97         —           553         650         104,461         105,111         —     

Consumer

     22         15         —           37         21,615         21,652         —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 528       $ 155       $ 2,451       $ 3,134       $ 490,108       $ 493,242       $ —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
      30-59 Days
Past Due
     60-89 Days
Past Due
     Greater Than
90 Days

Past Due
     Total
Past Due
     Current      Total
Financing
Receivables
     Recorded
Investment

> 90 Days
and Accruing
 

December 31, 2011

                    

Consumer real estate

   $ 753       $ 248       $ 441       $ 1,442       $ 80,143       $ 81,585       $ —     

Agricultural real estate

     —           —           —           —           31,993         31,993         —     

Agricultural

     7         —           —           7         52,591         52,598         —     

Commercial Real Estate

     46         611         927         1,584         199,574         201,158         —     

Commercial and Industrial

     78         —           420         498         115,195         115,693         —     

Consumer

     24         —           —           24         23,164         23,188         —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 908       $ 859       $ 1,788       $ 3,555       $ 502,660       $ 506,215       $ —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table presents the recorded investment in nonaccrual loans by class or loans as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011:

 

     (In Thousands)  
     March 31
2012
     December 31
2011
 

Consumer real estate

   $ 841       $ 700   

Agricultural real estate

     —           —     

Agricultural

     —           7   

Commercial Real Estate

     1,529         1,003   

Commercial and Industrial

     553         421   

Consumer

     —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 2,923       $ 2,131   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

The Bank uses a nine tier risk rating system to grade its loans. The grade of a loan may change during the life of the loan.

The risk ratings are described as follows.

 

  1. Zero (0) Unclassified. Any loan which has not been assigned a classification.

 

  2. One (1) Excellent. Credit to premier customers having the highest credit rating based on an extremely strong financial condition, which compares favorably with industry standards (upper quartile of RMA ratios). Financial statements indicate a sound earnings and financial ratio trend for several years with satisfactory profit margins and excellent liquidity exhibited. Prime credits may also be borrowers with loans fully secured by highly liquid collateral such as traded stocks, bonds, certificates of deposit, savings account, etc. No credit or collateral exceptions exist and the loan adheres to the Bank’s loan policy in every respect. Financing alternatives would be readily available and would qualify for unsecured credit. This grade is summarized by high liquidity, minimum risk, strong ratios, and low handling costs.

 

  3. Two (2) Good. Desirable loans of somewhat less stature than Grade 1, but with strong financial statements. Loan supported by financial statements containing strong balance sheets, generally with a leverage position less than 1.50, and a history of profitability. Probability of serious financial deterioration is unlikely. Possessing a sound repayment source (and a secondary source), which would allow repayment in a reasonable period of time. Individual loans backed by liquid personal assets, established history and unquestionable character.

 

9


ITEM 1 NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

NOTE 4 LOANS (Continued)

 

  4. Three (3) Satisfactory. Satisfactory loans of average or slightly above average risk – having some deficiency or vulnerability to changing economic conditions, but still fully collectible. Projects should normally demonstrate acceptable debt service coverage. Generally, customers should have a leverage position less than 2.00. May be some weakness but with offsetting features of other support readily available. Loans that are meeting the terms of repayment.

Loans may be graded 3 when there is no recent information on which to base a current risk evaluation and the following conditions apply:

At inception, the loan was properly underwritten and did not possess an unwarranted level of credit risk:

 

  a. At inception, the loan was secured with collateral possessing a loan value adequate to protect the Bank from loss;

 

  b. The loan exhibited two or more years of satisfactory repayment with a reasonable reduction of the principal balance;

 

  c. During the period that the loan has been outstanding, there has been no evidence of any credit weakness. Some examples of weakness include slow payment, lack of cooperation by the borrower, breach of loan covenants, or the business is in an industry which is known to be experiencing problems. If any of the credit weaknesses is observed, a lower risk grade is warranted.

 

  5. Four (4) Satisfactory / Monitored. A “4” (Satisfactory/Monitored) risk grade may be established for a loan considered satisfactory but which is of average credit risk due to financial weakness or uncertainty. The loans warrant a higher than average level of monitoring to ensure that weaknesses do not advance. The level of risk in Satisfactory/Monitored classification is considered acceptable and within normal underwriting guidelines, so long as the loan is given management supervision.

 

  6. Five (5) Special Mention. Loans that possess some credit deficiency or potential weakness which deserves close attention, but which do not yet warrant substandard classification. Such loans pose unwarranted financial risk that, if not corrected, could weaken the loan and increase risk in the future. The key distinctions of a 5 (Special Mention) classification are that (1) it is indicative of an unwarranted level of risk, and (2) weaknesses are considered “potential”, versus “defined”, impairments to the primary source of loan repayment and collateral.

 

  7. Six (6) Substandard. One or more of the following characteristics may be exhibited in loans classified substandard:

 

  a. Loans, which possess a defined credit weakness and the likelihood that a loan will be paid from the primary source, are uncertain. Financial deterioration is underway and very close attention is warranted to ensure that the loan is collected without loss.

 

  b. Loans are inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the borrower.

 

  c. The primary source of repayment is weakened, and the Bank is forced to rely on a secondary source of repayment such as collateral liquidation or guarantees.

 

  d. Loans are characterized by the distinct possibility that the Bank will sustain some loss if deficiencies are not corrected.

 

  e. Unusual courses of action are needed to maintain a high probability of repayment.

 

  f. The borrower is not generating enough cash flow to repay loan principal; however, continues to make interest payments.

 

  g. The lender is forced into a subordinate position or unsecured collateral position due to flaws in documentation.

 

  h. Loans have been restructured so that payment schedules, terms and collateral represent concessions to the borrower when compared to the normal loan terms.

 

  i. The lender is seriously contemplating foreclosure or legal action due to the apparent deterioration in the loan.

 

  j. There is significant deterioration in the market conditions and the borrower is highly vulnerable to these conditions.

 

  8. Seven (7) Doubtful. One or more of the following characteristics may be exhibited in loans classified Doubtful:

 

  a. Loans have all of the weaknesses of those classified as Substandard. Additionally, however, these weaknesses make collection or liquidation in full based on existing conditions improbable.

 

  b. The primary source of repayment is gone, and there is considerable doubt as to the quality of the secondary source of repayment.

 

  c. The possibility of loss is high, but, because of certain important pending factors which may strengthen the loan, loss classification is deferred until its exact status is known. A Doubtful classification is established deferring the realization of the loss.

 

10


ITEM 1 NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

NOTE 4 LOANS (Continued)

 

  9. Eight (8) Loss. Loans are considered uncollectable and of such little value that continuing to carry them as assets on the institution’s financial statements is not feasible. Loans will be classified Loss when it is neither practical nor desirable to defer writing off or reserving all or a portion of a basically worthless asset, even though partial recovery may be possible at some time in the future.

The following table represents the risk category of loans by class based on the most recent analysis performed as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 (in thousands):

 

     Agriculture
Real Estate
     Agriculture      Commercial
Real Estate
     Commercial
and Industrial
     Industrial
Development
Bonds
 

March 31, 2012

              

1-2

   $ 922       $ 1,505       $ 4,171       $ 511       $ 188   

3

     11,286         26,824         22,876         25,721         622   

4

     19,015         25,693         161,944         69,261         386   

5

     381         55         6,544         3,908         —     

6

     210         7         4,633         4,021         —     

7

     —           —           697         493         —     

8

     —           —           —           —        
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 31,814       $ 54,084       $ 200,865       $ 103,915       $ 1,196   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
     Agriculture
Real Estate
     Agriculture      Commercial
Real Estate
     Commercial
and Industrial
     Industrial
Development
Bonds
 

December 31, 2011

              

1-2

   $ 1,059       $ 1,500       $ 3,545       $ 710       $ 188   

3

     12,613         25,019         23,346         22,506         622   

4

     17,255         26,008         162,788         82,745         386   

5

     383         57         6,098         3,897         —     

6

     683         7         4,677         4,219         —     

7

     —           7         704         420         —     

8

     —           —           —           —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 31,993       $ 52,598       $ 201,158       $ 114,497       $ 1,196   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

For consumer residential real estate, and other, the Company also evaluates credit quality based on the aging status of the loan, which was previously stated, and by payment activity. The following tables present the recorded investment in those classes based on payment activity and assigned grading as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011.

 

     (In Thousands)  
     Consumer
Real Estate
     Consumer
Real Estate
 
     March 31
2012
     December 31
2011
 

Grade

     

Pass

   $ 79,377       $ 81,062   

Special Mention (5)

     —           —     

Substandard (6)

     155         240   

Doubtful (7)

     184         283   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 79,716       $ 81,585   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

     (In Thousands)  
     Consumer
Credit
     Consumer
Credit
     Consumer
Other
     Consumer
Other
 
     March 31
2012
     December 31
2011
     March 31
2012
     December 31
2011
 

Performing

   $ 3,325       $ 3,607       $ 18,327       $ 19,531   

Nonperforming

     —           —           —           50   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 3,325       $ 3,607       $ 18,327       $ 19,581   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

11


ITEM 1 NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

NOTE 4 LOANS (Continued)

 

The Bank had approximately $207 thousand of its impaired loans classified as troubled debt restructured as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011.

 

March 31, 2012

Troubled Debt Restructurings

   Number of
Contracts
     Pre-
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment
     Post-
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment
 

Commercial Real Estate

     5       $ 3,940       $ 3,214   

Ag Real Estate

     2       $ 154       $ 150   

Commercial and Industrial

     1       $ 148       $ 23   

Troubled Debt Restructurings

That Subsequently Defaulted

   Number of
Contracts
     Recorded
Investment
        

Commercial Real Estate

     1       $ 207      

Ag Real Estate

     —         $ —        

Commercial and Industrial

     —         $ —        

December 31, 2011

Troubled Debt Restructurings

   Number of
Contracts
     Pre-
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment
     Post-
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment
 

Commercial Real Estate

     5       $ 3,940       $ 3,219   

Ag Real Estate

     2       $ 154       $ 150   

Commercial and Industrial

     1       $ 148       $ 25   

Troubled Debt Restructurings

That Subsequently Defaulted

   Number of
Contracts
     Recorded
Investment
        

Commercial Real Estate

     1       $ 207      

Ag Real Estate

     —         $ —        

Commercial and Industrial

     —         $ —        

For the majority of the Bank’s impaired loans, the Bank will apply the observable market price methodology. However, the Bank may also utilize a measurement incorporating the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective rate of interest. To determine observable market price, collateral asset values securing an impaired loan are periodically evaluated. Maximum time for re-evaluation is every 12 months for chattels and titled vehicles and every two years for real estate. In this process, third party evaluations are obtained and heavily relied upon. Until such time that updated appraisals are received, the Bank may discount the collateral value used.

The Bank uses the following guidelines as stated in policy to determine when to realize a charge-off, whether a partial or full loan balance. A charge-off in whole or in part is realized when unsecured consumer loans, credit card credits and overdraft lines of credit reach 90 days delinquency. At 120 days delinquent, secured consumer loans are charged down to the value of the collateral, if repossession of the collateral is assured and/or in the process of repossession. Consumer mortgage loan deficiencies are charged down upon the sale of the collateral or sooner upon the recognition of collateral deficiency. Commercial and agricultural credits are charged down at 120 days delinquency, unless an established and approved work-out plan is in place or litigation of the credit will likely result in recovery of the loan balance. Upon notification of bankruptcy, unsecured debt is charged off. Additional charge-off may be realized as further unsecured positions are recognized.

 

12


ITEM 1 NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

NOTE 4 LOANS (Continued)

 

The following table presents loans individually evaluated for impairment by class of loans as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 (in thousands):

 

March 31, 2012    Recorded
Investment
     Unpaid
Principal
Balance
     Related
Allowance
     Average
Recorded
Investment
     Interest
Income
Recognized
 

With no related allowance recorded:

              

Consumer real estate

   $ 155       $ 155       $ —         $ 158       $ 3   

Agriculture real estate

     —           —           —           —           —     

Agriculture

     —           —           —           —           —     

Commercial real estate

     207         384         —           207         —     

Commercial and industrial

     —           —           —           —           —     

Consumer

     —           —           —           —           —     

With a specific allowance recorded:

              —        

Consumer real estate

     312         312         65         390         3   

Agriculture real estate

     —           —           —           —           —     

Agriculture

     —           —           —           —           —     

Commercial real estate

     696         846         22         702         —     

Commercial and industrial

     493         493         104         493         —     

Consumer

     4         4         —           4         2   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Totals:

              

Consumer real estate

   $ 467       $ 467       $ 65       $ 548       $ 6   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Agriculture real estate

     —           —           —         $ —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Agriculture

   $ —         $ —           —         $ —         $ —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Commercial real estate

   $ 903       $ 1,230         22       $ 909       $ —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Commercial and industrial

     493         493         104       $ 493       $ —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Consumer

     4         4         —           4         2   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
December 31, 2011    Recorded
Investment
     Unpaid
Principal
Balance
     Related
Allowance
     Average
Recorded
Investment
     Interest
Income
Recognized
 

With no related allowance recorded:

              

Consumer real estate

   $ 239       $ 239       $ —         $ 156       $ 36   

Agriculture real estate

     —           —           —           180         15   

Agriculture

     —           —           —           2,683         1,156   

Commercial real estate

     207         384         —           1,381         22   

Commercial and industrial

     —           —           —           485         1   

Consumer

     —           —           —           1         —     

With a specific allowance recorded:

              

Consumer real estate

     283         308         54         431         —     

Agriculture real estate

     —           —           —           —           —     

Agriculture

     —           —           —           —           —     

Commercial real estate

     704         854         29         144         —     

Commercial and industrial

     420         420         91         402         —     

Consumer

     —           —           —           —           —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Totals:

              

Consumer real estate

   $ 522       $ 547       $ 54       $ 587       $ 36   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Agriculture real estate

   $ —         $ —         $ —         $ 180       $ 15   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Agriculture

   $ —         $ —         $ —         $ 2,683       $ 1,156   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Commercial real estate

   $ 911       $ 1,238       $ 29       $ 1,525       $ 22   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Commercial and industrial

   $ 420       $ 420       $ 91       $ 887       $ 1   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Consumer

   $ —         $ —         $ —         $ 1       $ —     
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The ALLL has a direct impact on the provision expense. An increase in the ALLL is funded through recoveries and provision expense. The following tables summarize the activities in the allowance for credit losses.

 

     (In Thousands)        
     March 31, 2012     December 31, 2011  

Allowance for Loan Losses

    

Balance at beginning of year

   $ 5,091      $ 5,706   

Provision for loan loss

     128        1,715   

Loans charged off

     (126     (2,681

Recoveries

     59        351   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Allowance for Loan & Leases Losses

   $ 5,152      $ 5,091   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Allowance for Unfunded Loan Commitments & Letters of Credit

   $ 140      $ 130   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Allowance for Credit Losses

   $ 5,292      $ 5,221   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

13


ITEM 1 NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

NOTE 4 LOANS (Continued)

 

The Company segregates its Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses (ALLL) into two reserves: The ALLL and the Allowance for Unfunded Loan Commitments and Letters of Credit (AULC). When combined, these reserves constitute the total Allowance for Credit Losses (ACL).

The AULC is reported within other liabilities on the balance sheet while the ALLL is netted within the loans, net asset line. The ACL presented above represents the full amount of reserves available to absorb possible credit losses.

The following table breaks down the activity within ALLL for each loan portfolio segment and shows the contribution provided by both the recoveries and the provision along with the reduction of the allowance caused by charge-offs.

Additional analysis related to the allowance for credit losses as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 is as follows (in thousands):

 

    Consumer
Real Estate
    Agriculture
Real Estate
    Agriculture     Commercial
Real Estate
    Commercial     Consumer (incl.
Credit Cards)
    Unfunded Loan
Commitment &
Letters of Credit
    Unallocated     Total  

March 31, 2012

                 

ALLOWANCE FOR CREDIT LOSSES:

                 

Beginning balance

  $ 261      $ 140      $ 266      $ 2,088      $ 1,947      $ 315      $ 130      $ 74      $ 5,221   

Charge Offs

    (40     —          0        0        0        (86       ($ 126

Recoveries

    3        —          7        4        15        30          $ 59   

Provision

    209        (51     (1     (522     (103     34        —          562      $ 128   

Other Non-interest expense related to unfunded

  $ —          —          —          —          —          —          10        —        $ 10   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending Balance

  $ 433      $ 89      $ 272      $ 1,570      $ 1,859      $ 293      $ 140      $ 636      $ 5,292   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: individually evaluated for impairment

  $ 65        —          —          22      $ 104        —            $ 191   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

 

Ending balance: collectively evaluated for impairment

  $ 368      $ 89      $ 272      $ 1,548      $ 1,755      $ 293      $ 140      $ 636      $ 5,101   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: loans acquired with deteriorated credit quality

    2        —          —          —          —          —            $ 2   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

 

FINANCING RECEIVABLES:

                 

Ending balance

  $ 79,716      $ 31,814      $ 54,084      $ 200,865      $ 105,111      $ 21,652          $ 493,242   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

 

Ending balance: individually evaluated for impairment

  $ 467      $ —        $ —        $ 903        493        4          $ 1,867   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

 

Ending balance: collectively evaluated for impairment

  $ 79,249      $ 31,814      $ 54,084      $ 199,962      $ 104,618      $ 21,648          $ 491,375   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

 

Ending balance: loans acquired with deteriorated credit quality

  $ 709      $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ —            $ 709   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

 

 

    Consumer
Real Estate
    Agriculture
Real Estate
    Agriculture     Commercial
Real Estate
    Commercial     Consumer (incl.
Credit Cards)
    Unfunded Loan
Commitment &
Letters of Credit
    Unallocated     Total  

December 31, 2011

                 

ALLOWANCE FOR CREDIT LOSSES:

                 

Beginning balance

  $ 258      $ 122      $ 327      $ 1,868      $ 2,354      $ 380      $ 153      $ 397      $ 5,859   

Charge Offs

    (422     —          (24     (360     (1,500     (375     —          —          (2,681

Recoveries

    61        —          67        32        19        172        —          —          351   

Provision

    364        18        (104     548        1,074        138        —          (323     1,715   

Other Non-interest expense related to unfunded

    —          —          —          —          —          —          (23     —          (23
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending Balance

  $ 261      $ 140      $ 266      $ 2,088      $ 1,947      $ 315      $ 130      $ 74      $ 5,221   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: individually evaluated for impairment

  $ 55        —          —        $ 29      $ 91        —        $ —        $ —        $ 175   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: collectively evaluated for impairment

  $ 206      $ 140      $ 266      $ 2,059      $ 1,856      $ 315      $ 130      $ 74      $ 5,046   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: loans acquired with deteriorated credit quality

  $ 2        —          —          —          —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ 2   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

FINANCING RECEIVABLES:

                 

Ending balance

  $ 81,585      $ 31,993      $ 52,598      $ 201,158      $ 115,693      $ 23,188      $ —        $ —        $ 506,215   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: individually evaluated for impairment

  $ 523      $ —        $ —        $ 911      $ 420        —        $ —        $ —        $ 1,854   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: collectively evaluated for impairment

  $ 81,062      $ 31,993      $ 52,598      $ 200,247      $ 115,273      $ 23,188      $ —        $ —        $ 504,361   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending balance: loans acquired with deteriorated credit quality

  $ 856        —          —          —          —        $ —        $ —        $ —        $ 856   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

14


ITEM 2 MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS INTRODUCTION

Farmers & Merchants Bancorp, Inc. (Company) is a bank holding company incorporated under the laws of Ohio in in 1985. Our primary subsidiary, The Farmers & Merchants State Bank (Bank) is a community bank operating in Northwest Ohio since 1897. We report our financial condition and net income on a consolidated basis and we report only one segment.

Our executive offices are located at 307 North Defiance Street, Archbold, Ohio 43502, and our telephone number is (419)446-2501.

For a discussion of the general development of the Company’s business throughout 2012, please see the portion of Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations captioned “2012 in Review”.

The Bank’s primary service area, Northwest Ohio and Northeast Indiana, continued to experience high unemployment. After reaching a high of 11% unemployment for Ohio in March, 2010, the unemployment rate decreased in each of the ensuing months and closed the 2011 year at 8.1% for Ohio and 9% for Indiana. National and State unemployment reports for first quarter 2012, show a slight improvement while the market areas served by the Company did not report improvement and in some cases experienced a slight increase. The agricultural industry continued its strong performance in 2011 evidenced by strengthened financial statements. Automotive showed improvement with car dealers in our marketing area ending with more profitable numbers than in recent years. Overall, business profits are improving, however borrowing activity remains sluggish. 1-4 family residential and construction remain weak.

The Farmers & Merchants State Bank engages in general commercial banking and savings business. Their activities include commercial, agricultural and residential mortgage, consumer and credit card lending activities. Because the Bank’s offices are located in Northwest Ohio and Northeast Indiana, a substantial amount of the loan portfolio is comprised of loans made to customers in the farming industry for such things as farm land, farm equipment, livestock and operating loans for seed, fertilizer, and feed. Other types of lending activities include loans for home improvements, and loans for such items as autos, trucks, recreational vehicles, motorcycles, etc.

The Bank also provides checking account services, as well as savings and time deposit services such as a certificates of deposits. In addition ATM’s (Automated teller machines) are provided at most branch locations along with other independent locations such as major employers and hospitals in the market area. The Bank has custodial services for IRA’s (Individual Retirement Accounts) and HSA’s (Health Savings Accounts). The Bank provides on-line banking access for consumer and business customers. For consumers, this includes bill-pay and on-line statement opportunities. For business customers, it provides the option of electronic transaction origination such as wire and ACH file transmittal. In addition the Bank offers remote deposit capture or electronic deposit processing.

The Bank’s underwriting policies exercised through established procedures facilitates operating in a safe and sound manner in accordance with supervisory and regulatory guidance. Within this sphere of safety and soundness, the Bank’s practice has been not to promote innovative, unproven credit products which will not be in the best interest of the Bank or its customers. The Bank does offer a hybrid mortgage loan. Hybrid loans are loans that start out as a fixed rate mortgage but after a set number of years automatically adjust to an adjustable rate mortgage. The Bank offers a three year fixed rate mortgage after which the interest rate will adjust annually. The majority of the Bank’s adjustable rate mortgages are of this type. In order to offer longer term fixed rate mortgages, the Bank does participate in the Freddie Mac, Farmer Mac and Small Business Lending programs. The Bank does also retain the servicing on these partially or 100% sold loans. In order for the customer to participate in these programs they must meet the requirements established by these agencies.

The Bank does not have a program to fund sub-prime loans. Sub-prime loans are characterized as a lending program or strategy that target borrowers who pose a significantly higher risk of default than traditional retail banking customers.

Following are the characteristics and underwriting criteria for each major type of loan the Bank offers:

Commercial Real Estate –Construction, purchase, and refinance of business purpose real estate. Risks include loan amount in relation to construction delays and overruns, vacancies, collateral value subject to market value fluctuations, interest rate, market demands, borrower’s ability to repay in orderly fashion, and others. The Bank does employ stress testing on higher balance loans to mitigate risk by ensuring the customer’s ability to repay in a changing rate environment before granting loan approval.

Agricultural Real Estate – Purchase of farm real estate or for permanent improvements to the farm real estate. Cash flow from the farm operation is the repayment source and is therefore subject to the financial success of the farm operation.

Consumer Real Estate – Purchase, refinance, or equity financing of one to four family owner occupied dwelling. Success in repayment is subject to borrower’s income, debt level, character in fulfilling payment obligations, employment, and others.

Commercial/Industrial – Loans to proprietorships, partnerships, or corporations to provide temporary working capital and seasonal loans as well as long term loans for capital asset acquisition. Risks include adequacy of cash flow, reasonableness of profit projections, financial leverage, economic trends, management ability, and others. The Bank does employ stress testing on higher balance loans to mitigate risk by ensuring the customer’s ability to repay in a changing rate environment before granting loan approval.

Agricultural – Loans for the production and housing of crops, fruits, vegetables, and livestock or to fund the purchase or re- finance of capital assets such as machinery and equipment, and livestock. The production of crops and livestock is especially vulnerable to commodity prices and weather. The vulnerability to commodity prices is offset by the farmers ability to hedge their position by using the future contracts. The risk related to weather is often mitigated by requiring federal crop insurance.

 

15


ITEM 2 MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

INTRODUCTION (Continued)

 

Consumer – Funding for individual and family purposes. Success in repayment is subject to borrower’s income, debt level, character in fulfilling payment obligations, employment, and others.

Industrial Development Bonds – Funds for public improvements in the Bank’s service area. Repayment ability is based on the continuance of the taxation revenue as the source of repayment.

All loan requests are reviewed as to credit worthiness and are subject to the Bank’s underwriting guidelines as to secured versus unsecured credit. Secured loans are in turn subject to loan to value (LTV) requirements based on collateral types as set forth in the Bank’s Loan Policy. In addition, credit scores of principal borrowers are reviewed and an approved exception from an additional officer is required should a credit score not meet the Bank’s Loan Policy guidelines.

Consumer Loans:

Maximum loan to value (LTV) for cars, trucks and light trucks vary from 90% to 110% depending on whether direct or indirect.

Loans above 100% are generally due to additional charges for extended warranties and/or insurance coverage periods of lost wages or death.

Boats, campers, motorcycles, RV’s and Motor Coaches range from 80%-90% based on age of vehicle.

1st or 2nd mortgages on 1-4 family homes range from 75%-90% with “in-house” first real estate mortgages requiring private mortgage insurance on those exceeding 80% LTV.

Raw land LTV maximum ranges from 65%-75% depending on whether or not the property has been improved.

Commercial/Agriculture/Real Estate:

Maximum LTVs range from 70%-80% depending on type.

Accounts Receivable:

Up to 80% LTV

Inventory:

Agriculture:

Livestock and grain up to 80% LTV, crops (insured) up to 75% and Warehouse Receipts up to 87% Commercial:

Maximum LTV of 50% on raw and finished goods

Used vehicles, new recreational vehicles and manufactured homes not to exceed (NTE) 80% LTV

Equipment:

New not to exceed 80% of invoice, used NTE 50% of listed book or 75% of appraised value.

Restaurant equipment up to 35% of market value

Heavy trucks, titled trailers, NTE 75% LTV and aircraft up to 75% of appraised value

We also provide checking account services, as well as savings and time deposit services such as certificates of deposits. In addition ATM’s (automated teller machines) are provided at our Ohio offices in Archbold, Wauseon, Stryker, West Unity, Bryan, Delta, Napoleon, Montpelier, Swanton, Defiance, and Perrysburg, along with ones at our Auburn and Angola, Indiana offices. Two ATM’s are located at Sauder Woodworking Co., Inc., a major employer in Archbold. Additional locations in Ohio are at Northwest State Community College, Archbold; Community Hospitals of Williams County, Bryan; Fairlawn Haven Wyse Commons, Archbold; R&H Restaurant, Fayette; Delta Eagles, Bryan Eagles; Sauder Village, Archbold; Fulton County Health Center, Wauseon; downtown Defiance; and a mobile trailer ATM. In Indiana, four additional ATM’s are located at St. Joe; at Kaiser’s Supermarket and Therma-Tru in Butler; and at DeKalb Memorial Hospital in Auburn.

F&M Investment Services, the brokerage department of the Bank, opened for business in April, 1999. Securities are offered through Raymond James Financial Services Inc.

The Company is a bank holding company within the meaning of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956. Our subsidiary bank is in turn regulated and examined by the Ohio Division of Financial Institutions, and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The activities of our bank subsidiary are also subject to other federal and state laws and regulations.

The Bank’s primary market includes communities located in the Ohio counties of Defiance, Fulton, Henry, Williams and Wood and in the Indiana counties of DeKalb and Steuben. The commercial banking business in this market is highly competitive with approximately 17 other depository institutions currently doing business in the Bank’s primary market. In our banking activities, we compete directly with other commercial banks, credit unions and farm credit services and savings and loan institutions in each of their operating localities. In a number of locations, we compete against entities which are much larger than us. The primary factors in competing for loans and deposits are the rates charged as well as location and quality of serviced provided. On December 31, 2007, the Bank acquired the Knisely Bank of Indiana, expanding its market with the addition of offices in Butler and Auburn, Indiana, both located in DeKalb County. An additional office was opened in the summer of 2008 in Angola, Indiana, located in Steuben County. On July 9, 2010 the Bank purchased a branch office in Hicksville, Ohio shortening the distance between our Ohio and Indiana office.

At March 31, 2012, we had 250 full time equivalent employees. The employees are not represented by a collective bargaining unit. We provide our employees with a comprehensive benefit program, some of which are contributory. We consider our employee relations to be excellent.

 

16


ITEM 2 MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND RESULTS OF OPERATION (Continued)

 

2012 IN REVIEW

The Company has begun 2012 with strong first quarter results, even outpacing the first quarter of 2011 which was a vast improvement over 2010’s first quarter. Improvement occurred in the noninterest income segment of the income statement. Pressure continues on the net interest margin and a lower net interest position is also evident on the income statement. Asset quality continued to improve and lower costs due to the improvement also occurred.

Short-term rates remain low and are expected to remain low throughout 2012. This has enabled the Company to continue to sell investment securities and recognize a gain without compromising the yield while modestly increasing the duration of the investment portfolio. As of March 31, 2012, the favorable gain produced from the sale of securities was $169 thousand. Most of the securities sold were agencies maturing in a shorter time period than the securities that were purchased to replace them. As of March 31, 2011, the favorable gain was at $339 thousand and the securities sold were out of state municipals and agencies. The Bank was able to continue to capitalize on the steepness of the yield curve and the unrealized market gain position at the start of 2012.

During the first quarter of 2011, the Bank received a payoff on a large nonaccrual loan. The collection of which included over $600 thousand of interest and a reimbursement of over $300 thousand in legal fees. The collection process took almost three years to complete. This boost to income is evident throughout from net interest margin, improved asset quality to lower non-interest expense for the quarter. It also offsets tightening margins due to soft loan demand and high liquidity caused from higher deposit growth. As was expected, the first quarter numbers for 2012, as they relate to interest earnings, were lower in yield than first quarter 2011 without an additional large influx of nonaccrual interest collection. However, the Bank was able to realize improvement in a lower loan provision requirement. As compared to a year ago, provision expense was $644 thousand lower for the first three months. This contributed to ROA and ROE remaining higher than a year ago.

A large amount of write-downs and losses on the sale of other real estate owned (ORE) hampered 2011 as compared to the same time period 2012. The balance in ORE is at $3.6 million which is $422 thousand lower as of March 31, 2012 compared to March 31, 2011. While March 31, 2012 recognized $67 thousand in write-downs and losses from sales of ORE, as of March 31, 2011, the Bank had recognized $648 thousand in a compilation of write-downs and losses on ORE. This impact is evidenced by in the higher non-interest income for the first quarter 2012.

The impact of new legislation, such as Health Care and Dodd-Frank Financial Reform (collectively, “Financial Reform legislation”), weighs heavily on the minds of bankers along with their customers during its implementation. Legislation has impacted the collection of fees related to discretionary overdraft protection during the second half of 2011 and the first quarter of 2012. The cost is hidden by the growth in the number of checking accounts from which fees are generated. The growth masks the loss as actual dollars collected for the first quarter of 2012 as compared to 2011 is only down by $4 thousand. The increase in the number of checking accounts however is $1.2 thousand. Taking the income generated per account at the 2011 level and multiplying by the increase number of checking accounts, reveals additional cost or loss of revenue of $24 thousand for the first quarter 2012 has occurred.

Another concern stemming from the impact of new legislation relates to debit card interchange fees. Currently the regulation for banks has a carve out for banks under $10 billion in assets as it relates to those fees. This may help to maintain the debit card program through the remainder of 2012. In terms of revenue, the increase in number of checking accounts mentioned above and customers’ increased usage of the debit card has enabled the Bank to earn $101 thousand more in interchange and ATM fees in first quarter 2012 as compared to first quarter 2011. This explains our primary concern at this point on the impact of future revenue and expenses and how quickly it will be felt should the carve out provide only short term relief.

The majority of the Bank’s commercial borrowers have experienced slight improvement, although a few still lag. As the economic recovery remains fragile and consumer confidence remains at lower levels, consumer sensitive industries and the retail sector may continue to experience pressures as well.

The Company remains strong, stable and well capitalized and has the capacity to continue to cover the increased costs of doing business in a tough economy and is seeking good loans to improve profitability. The Company continues to look for new opportunities to generate and protect revenue and provide additional channels through which to serve our customers and maintain our high level of customer satisfaction.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICY AND ESTIMATES

The Company’s consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, and the Company follows general practices within the industry in which it operates. At times the application of these principles requires Management to make assumptions, estimates and judgments that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements. These assumptions, estimates and judgments are based on information available as of the date of the financial statements. As this information changes, the financial statements could reflect different assumptions, estimates and judgments. Certain policies inherently have a greater reliance on assumptions, estimates and judgments and as such have a greater possibility of producing results that could be materially different than originally reported. Examples of critical assumptions, estimates and judgments are when assets and liabilities are required to be recorded at fair value, when a decline in the value of an asset not required to be recorded at fair value warrants an impairment write-down or valuation reserve to be established, or when an asset or liability must be recorded contingent upon a future event.

 

17


ITEM 2 MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICY AND ESTIMATES (Continued)

 

Based on the valuation techniques used and the sensitivity of financial statement amounts to assumptions, estimates, and judgments underlying those amounts, management has identified the determination of the Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses (ALLL) and the valuation of its Mortgage Servicing Rights and Other Real Estate Owned (OREO) as the accounting areas that require the most subjective or complex judgments, and as such have the highest possibility of being subject to revision as new information becomes available.

The ALLL represents management’s estimate of credit losses inherent in the Bank’s loan portfolio at the report date. The estimate is a composite of a variety of factors including past experience, collateral value and the general economy. ALLL includes a specific portion, a formula driven portion, and a general nonspecific portion.

The Bank’s ALLL methodology captures trends in leading, current, and lagging indicators which will have a direct affect on the Bank’s allocation amount. Trends in such leading indicators as delinquency, unemployment, changes in the Bank’s service area, experience and ability of staff, regulatory trends, and credit concentrations are referenced. A current indicator such as the total Watch List loan amount to Capital, and a lagging indicator such as the charge off amount are referenced as well. A matrix is formed by loan type from these indicators that is responsive in making ALLL adjustments.

Servicing assets are recognized as separate assets when rights are acquired through purchase or through sale of financial assets. Capitalized servicing rights are reported in other assets and are amortized into noninterest expense in proportion to, and over the period of, the estimated future servicing income of the underlying financial assets. Servicing assets are evaluated for impairment based upon the fair value of the rights as compared to the amortized cost. Impairment is deter- mined using prices for similar assets with similar characteristics, when available, or based upon discounted cash flows using market based assumptions. Impairment is recognized through a valuation allowance for an individual stratum, to the extent that fair value is less than the capitalized amount for the stratum. Fees received for servicing loans owned by investors are based on a percentage of the outstanding monthly principal balance of such loans and are included in operating income as loan payments are received. Costs of servicing loans are charged to expense as incurred. The Bank utilizes a third party vendor to estimate the fair value of their mortgage servicing rights which utilizes national prepayment speeds in its calculations.

MATERIAL CHANGES IN FINANCIAL CONDITION,

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

In comparing the balance sheet of March 31, 2012 to that of December 31, 2011, the liquidity of the Bank has increased by approximately $33.6 million and remains strong with additional funds being moved from cash to short-term Bank deposits, Federal Funds sold and to a higher yielding security portfolio. The Bank has taken advantage of the Federal Reserve paying interest on its checking account and placed $17.5 million in the investment portfolio. The Bank may use these excess funds to fund new loan growth. During the first quarter 2012, net loans have decreased just over $13 million.

Overall, cash and cash equivalents increased almost $16.1 million and securities increased $17.5 million over yearend 2011. The Company’s increased liquidity came from a decrease of $13 million in the Bank’s loan portfolio due to regular payments, pay downs on line usage, payoffs and charge offs. The Company has an unsecured borrowing capacity of $45 million through correspondent banks and over $162.2 million of unpledged securities which may be sold or used as collateral. The strength of the security portfolio is shown in the tables to follow. With the exception of stock, all of the Bank’s security portfolio is categorized as available for sale and as such is recorded at market value. The charts that follow do not include stock.

Investment securities will at times depreciate to an unrealized loss position. The Bank utilizes the following criteria to assess whether or not an impaired security is other than temporary. No one item by itself will necessarily signal that a security should be recognized as other than temporary impairment.

 

1. The fair value of the security has significantly declined from book value.

 

2. A down grade has occurred that lowers the credit rating to below investment grade (below Baa3 by Moody and BBB- by Standard and Poors).

 

3. Dividends have been reduced or eliminated or scheduled interest payments have not been made.

 

4. The underwater security has longer than 10 years to maturity and the loss position had existed for more than 3 years.

 

5. Management does not possess both the intent and ability to hold the security for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in fair value.

If the impairment is judged to be other than temporary, the cost basis of the individual security shall be written down to fair value, thereby establishing a new cost basis. The amount of the write down shall be included in earnings as a realized loss. The new cost basis shall not be changed for subsequent recoveries in fair value. The recovery in fair value shall be recognized in earnings when the security is sold. The first table is presented by category of security and length of time in a

 

18


ITEM 2 MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

MATERIAL CHANGES IN FINANCIAL CONDITION, LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES (Continued)

 

continuous loss position. Municipalities may be more likely to be in a loss position greater than 12 months due to their length to maturity and are not indicative of an issue with safety and soundness of the municipality. The Bank currently does not hold any securities with other than temporary impairment.

 

March 31, 2012

   (In Thousands)  
      Less Than Twelve Months      Twelve Months & Over  
     Gross Unrealized
Losses
    Fair
Value
     Gross Unrealized
Losses
     Fair
Value
 

U.S. Treasury

   $ —        $ —         $ —         $ —     

U.S. Government agency

     (442     42,808         —           —     

Mortgage-backed securities

     —          —           —           —     

State and local governments

     (11     1,564         —           —     

The following chart shows the breakdown of the unrealized gain or loss associated within each category of the investment portfolio as of March 31, 2012.

 

March 31, 2012

   (In Thousands)  
     Amortized
Cost
     Gross
Unrealized
Gains
     Gross
Unrealized
Losses
    Estimated
Market
Value
 

Available-for-Sale:

          

U.S. Treasury

   $ 30,956       $ 482       $ —        $ 31,438   

U.S. Government agency

     180,484         2,868         (442   $ 182,910   

Mortgage-backed securities

     60,704         1,491         —        $ 62,195   

State and local governments

     64,393         4,104         (11   $ 68,486   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 336,537       $ 8,945       $ (453   $ 345,029   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

The following table shows the maturity schedule of the security portfolio with the largest portion due within less than 5 years. Management feels confident that loan growth can easily be funded from an orderly runoff of the investment portfolio.

 

     (In Thousands)  
     March 31, 2012  
     Amortized Cost      Fair Value  

One year or less

   $ 13,482       $ 13,625   

After one year through five years

     198,748         202,551   

After five years through ten years

     52,069         53,609   

After ten years

     11,534         13,049   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Subtotal

   $ 275,833       $ 282,834   

Mortgage Backed Securities

     60,704         62,195   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 336,537       $ 345,029   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

As previously stated, net loans show a decrease of $13 million for the three months ended March 31, 2012. $126 thousand was charged-off during the three month period indicating the decrease was not due to charged-offs. The balance of the decrease in loans was due to the pay down, payoff or refinancing of loans. Loan sales into the secondary market has also impacted the consumer and agricultural real estate. During the first quarter almost $30 million of these sales occurred with only $27.6 million of the loans originated in the same period. The loan watch list decreased slightly. The trend of decreasing loan balances is not unique to this quarter as the chart to follow shows the trend during the last three years.

The chart below shows the breakdown of the loan portfolio by category less deferred loan fees and costs as of March 31 for the last three years.

 

     (In Thousands)  
     March 2012
Amount
     March 2011
Amount
     March 2010
Amount
 

Commercial Real Estate

   $ 200,865       $ 195,754       $ 194,268   

Agricultural Real Estate

     31,814         31,948         33,650   

Consumer Real Estate

     79,716         83,115         86,036   

Commercial and Industrial

     103,915         113,415         117,344   

Agricultural

     54,084         60,508         65,400   

Consumer, Overdrafts and other loans

     21,652         26,552         29,008   

Industrial Development Bonds

     1,196         1,965         1,965   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total Loans

   $ 493,242       $ 513,257       $ 527,671   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

19


ITEM 2 MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

MATERIAL CHANGES IN FINANCIAL CONDITION, LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES (Continued)

 

All categories of loans experienced a decrease in balances over the time periods shown with the exception of commercial real estate and a small thousand dollar increase in Industrial Development Bonds.

Overall, total assets of the Company increased $21.8 million from December 31, 2011 to March 31, 2012.

Deposits increased $24.4 million with the largest increase in the savings portfolio due to the introduction of the KASASA Saver program. The mix of the portfolio continued to transition to a higher level of core deposits as a result primarily of the Bank’s offering of a high interest bearing transaction account along with an increase in health savings accounts. In 2010, the Bank strengthened its line of deposit products by adding additional products which added additional options to its already highly successful Reward Checking, which was renamed KASASA Cash. The additional options include KASASA Saver, KASASA Giver and KASASA ITunes. KASASA Saver, whose product utilizes a higher yielding rate than the Bank’s regular saving account, is the reason behind the retention and increase of dollars in savings. These continue to be the deposits of choice and attract not only new money from existing customers but new customers to the Bank.

The Certificate of Deposit (COD) portfolio has increased $3.9 million during the first three months of 2012, a small piece of the increase which is why the Bank continues to decrease the cost of funds. This is demonstrated below in the section of this MD&A captioned “MATERIAL CHANGES IN RESULTS OF OPERATION—Interest Expense”.

The Bank paid off $13.2 million in FHLB advances which had matured during 2011 and made principal payments of just $17 thousand so far in 2012. Securities sold under agreement to repurchase decreased almost $2.4 million during the first three months of 2012 as compared to yearend.

Capital increased approximately $384 thousand from year-end during the three months of 2012. Positive earnings being greater than the decrease in accumulated other comprehensive income are the factors behind the increase. Comprehensive income decreased $777 thousand which encompassed the shift of $169 thousand from unrealized gain to realized gain with the sale of securities. Dividends paid were equivalent to the same period last year.

The Company continues to be well-capitalized in accordance with Federal regulatory capital requirements as the capital ratios below show:

 

Primary Ratio

     10.69

Tier I Leverage Ratio

     10.18

Risk Based Capital Tier I

     16.01

Total Risk Based Capital

     16.91

Stockholders’ Equity/Total Assets

     11.16

MATERIAL CHANGES IN RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Interest Income

Annualized interest income and yield on earning assets is down in 2012 as compared to March 31, 2011. While total assets were only slightly higher than yearend, the decrease in interest income resulted primarily from the transition of the Company’s earning assets from high yield to lower yield assets offset by the large collection of nonaccrual interest collected in first quarter 2011. As the table that follows confirms, the shift of funds within the interest earning portfolios from loans to investments and the collection of nonaccrual interest in 2011 almost equally caused a lower March, 2012 yield in loans thereby causing lower interest income. The increased volume in the security portfolio did offset the loss in interest income due to rate changes. However, the portfolio continues to have calls due to the low rate environment. Prepayment speeds remain high on mortgage-backed securities.

Overall, interest income from loans was down $1.23 million in comparing the three months ended March 31, 2012 to same period 2011 which accounts for the overall drop in interest income of $1.18 million. This emphasizes the impact of declining loan balances and the need to find good loans with which to rebuild the portfolio. The overall asset yield decreased 66 basis points between the two periods.

The yields on tax-exempt securities and the portion of tax-exempt IDB loans included in loans have been tax adjusted based on a 34% tax rate in the charts to follow.

 

20


ITEM 2 MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

MATERIAL CHANGES IN RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

 

 

     (In Thousands)        
     March 31, 2012     March 31, 2011  
     Average Balance      Interest/Dividends      Yield/Rate     Yield/Rate  

Interest Earning Assets:

          

Loans

   $ 491,969       $ 6,797         5.56     6.29

Taxable Investment Securities

     277,503         1,198         1.73     1.86

Tax-exempt Investment Securities

     63,241         467         4.48     5.03

Fed Funds Sold & Interest Bearing

          

Deposits

     43,555         14         0.13     0.16
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Interest Earning Assets

   $ 876,268       $ 8,476         4.00     4.66
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Change in March 31, 2012 Interest Income Compared to March 31, 2011 (In Thousands)

 

     Change     Due to
Volume
    Due to
Rate
 

Interest Earning Assets:

      

Loans

   $ (1,226   $ (591   $ (635

Taxable Investment Securities

     93        347        (254

Tax-exempt Investment Securities

     (43     40        (83

Fed Funds Sold & Interest Bearing Deposits

     (3     1        (4
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Interest Earning Assets

   $ (1,179   $ (203   $ (976
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Interest Expense

Interest expense continued to be lower than the comparable three months from 2011. Interest expense related to deposits was down $444 thousand while the average interest-bearing deposit balance increased by $8.5 million in comparing the balances of each first three months. Time deposits continue to reprice down and the Bank continues to try and lengthen the duration of the portfolio with specials offered in terms longer than thirty-six months. However, depositors continue to place more funds in shorter term deposits or move funds elsewhere. KASASA Cash and Saver helped to increase the savings average deposit balances by $25.4 million.

Interest on borrowed funds was $139 thousand lower for the three month periods ended March 31, 2012 and 2011. Borrowings from Federal Home Loan Bank were paid off during 2011, making the balance in other borrowed money considerably lower in 2012 in comparison. Thus the largest decrease in cost of funds for other borrowed money was due to the decreased volume which also impacted the rate of the remaining borrowings portfolio. Fed Funds Purchased and Securities Sold under Agreement to Repurchase had similar balances in 2012 and 2011 making the decrease in cost due mainly to lower rates.

The decrease in interest expense did not outpace the decrease in interest income as it did last year and remains a focus for improvement in 2012. Asset yield decreased 66 basis points while cost of funds decreased 32 basis points. The main focus is to increase asset yield by using excess cash and investments to fund loan growth.

 

    (In Thousands)
March 31, 2012
        March 31, 2011      
        Average Balance             Interest/Expense             Yield/Rate         Yield/Rate  

Interest Bearing Liabilities:

       

Savings Deposits

  $ 366,524      $ 539        0.59     0.66

Other Time Deposits

    294,302        900        1.22     1.70

Other Borrowed Money

    16,656        124        2.98     3.52

Fed Funds Purchased & Securities Sold under Agreement to Repurch.

    50,820        61        0.48     0.60
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Interest Bearing Liabilities

  $ 728,302      $ 1,624        0.89     1.21
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Change in March 31, 2012 Interest Expense Compared to March 31, 2011 (In Thousands)

 

     Change     Due to Volume     Due to Rate  

Interest Bearing Liabilities:

      

Savings Deposits

   $ (23   $ 75      $ (98

Other Time Deposits

     (422     (104     (318

Other Borrowed Money

     (139     (197     58   

Fed Funds Purchased & Securities Sold under Agreement to Repurch.

     (14     2        (16
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Interest Bearing Liabilities

   $ (598   $ (224   $ (374
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

21


ITEM 2 MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

MATERIAL CHANGES IN RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

 

Net Interest Income

Net interest income is lower in the three month comparison, reversing the positive position of the yearend 2011’s comparison. This comes as no surprise as the first quarter 2011 was boosted by the collection of $600 thousand of nonaccrual interest income. If that amount was subtracted from 2011, the net interest dollars would be very similar to 2012. The issue of earning less per earning asset dollars, however, would still remain as evidenced by the lower net interest margin ratio.

Net interest income, in comparison to 2011, may remain behind throughout the year as 2011 was further aided by an additional collection of $5 million in nonaccrual loans in the fourth quarter. Nonaccrual interest was also collected on those loans in the fourth quarter. The Bank continues to attempt to add spread on renewing loans and loan growth is needed to improve the overall numbers. Interest expense on time deposits should also continue to show a decrease until depositors begin to transition back into longer-term deposits. The rate environment is predicted to remain low throughout 2012. Should rates begin to rise sooner, the challenge will be to delay the pricing up of deposits.

Provision Expense

Provision for loan loss was almost $644 thousand lower for the three months ended March 31, 2012 as compared to the same 2011 period. The decrease in the average balance in nonaccrual loans, along with improving asset quality and low loan growth warranted the lower provision to the loan loss reserve. The balance in nonaccrual loans decreased $226 thousand along with a decrease of almost $1.8 million in impaired loan balances as of March 31, 2012 as compared to the balances as of March 31, 2011. The overall loan portfolio was also $20.0 million lower as of March 31, 2012 compared to March 31, 2011. The Bank continues to focus on the commercial and commercial real estate portfolios for both asset quality and growth. As the charts below will show for 2012 and 2011, a large portion of the provision was also to replace the reserve balance depleted from the net charge-offs during the period and 2011 had a larger net charge-off position than 2012. Should the recovery stop or continue to slow even further, it is more likely additional credits may encounter cash flow problems and the Bank remains diligent in providing funds to offset future losses. In the immediate future, the Bank would expect to fund the loan loss reserve for any loan growth that may occur.

The Bank uses the following guidelines as stated in policy to determine when to realize a charge-off, whether a partial or full loan balance. A charge down in whole or in part is realized when unsecured consumer loans, credit card credits and overdraft lines of credit reach 90 days delinquency. At 120 days delinquent, secured consumer loans are charged down to the value of the collateral, if repossession of the collateral is assured and/or in the process of repossession. Consumer mortgage loan deficiencies are charged down upon the sale of the collateral or sooner upon the recognition of collateral deficiency. Commercial and agricultural credits are charged down at 120 days delinquency, unless an established and approved work-out plan is in place or litigation of the credit will likely result in recovery of the loan balance. Upon notification of bankruptcy, unsecured debt is charged off. Additional charge-off may be realized as further unsecured positions are recognized.

Looking at the balance in impaired loans, it shows the Bank has recognized a slight increase in the overall balance of impaired loans when looking at March 2012 compared to December 2011. However, a positive factor can also been seen: A significant decrease in the current average balance during 2012. This is due mainly to the collection of principal from the sale of collateral from two borrowers and the remainder from charge-off activity within this classification of loans during 2011.

An increase in the impaired loans with a valuation allowance relates to one relationship of just over $200 thousand which the Bank added during the first quarter 2012. A collection of the collateral may have a short fall.

 

22


ITEM 2 MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

MATERIAL CHANGES IN RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Provision Expense (Continued)

 

The following table tracks the change in impaired loans and their valuation allowance along with nonaccrual balances as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 upon which the previous comments were made.

 

     (In Thousands)  
     Three months
March 31, 2012
     Year Ended
December 31, 2011
     Three months
March 31, 2011
 

Impaired loans without a valuation allowance

   $ 362       $ 446       $ 1,761   

Impaired loans with a valuation Allowance

     1,505         1,408         1,875   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total impaired loans

   $ 1,867       $ 1,854       $ 3,636   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Valuation allowance related to impaired loans

   $ 191       $ 175       $ 575   

Total non-accrual loans

   $ 2,923       $ 2,131       $ 3,149   

Total loans past-due ninety days or more and still accruing

   $ —         $ —         $ 31   

Average investment in impaired loans

   $ 1,954       $ 5,466       $ 3,872   

The Bank had $207 thousand of its loans classified as troubled debt restructured during the first quarter of 2012, the same $207 thousand as at December 31, 2011.

In determining the allocation for impaired loans the Bank applies the observable market price of the collateral securing the asset, reduced by applying a discount for estimated costs of collateral liquidation. In some instances where the discounted market value is less than the loan amount, a specific impairment allocation is assigned, which may be reduced or eliminated by the write down of the credit’s active principal outstanding balance.

For the majority of the Bank’s impaired loans, the Bank will apply the observable market price methodology. However, the Bank may also utilize a measurement incorporating the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective rate of interest. To determine observable market price, collateral asset values securing an impaired loan are periodically evaluated. Maximum time of re-evaluation is every 12 months for chattels and titled vehicles and every two years for real estate. In this process, third party evaluations are obtained and heavily relied upon. Until such time that updated appraisals are received, the Bank may discount the collateral value used.

The ALLL has a direct impact on the provision expense. The increase in the ALLL is funded through recoveries and provision expense. The following tables both deal with the allowance for credit losses. The first table breaks down the activity within ALLL for each loan portfolio segment and shows the contribution provided by both the recoveries and the provision along with the reduction of the allowance caused by charge-offs. The second table discloses how much of ALLL is attributed to each segment of the loan portfolio, as well as the percent that each particular segment of the loan portfolio represents to the entire loan portfolio in the aggregate. As was mentioned in previous discussion, the commercial and commercial real estate portfolios are having a major impact on the ALLL and the provision expense.

 

23


ITEM 2 MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

MATERIAL CHANGES IN RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Provision Expense (Continued)

 

 

     (In Thousands)  
     March-12     March-11     March-10  

Loans

   $ 493,242      $ 513,257      $ 556,348   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Daily average of outstanding loans

   $ 491,969      $ 513,208      $ 561,650   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Allowance for Loan Losses—Jan 1

   $ 5,091      $ 5,706      $ 6,008   

Loans Charged off:

      

Commercial Real Estate

     —          88        —     

Ag Real Estate

     —          —          —     

Consumer Real Estate

     40        94        36   

Commercial and Industrial

     —          471        49   

Agricultural

     —          24        100   

Consumer & other loans

     86        115        81   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
     126        792        266   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loan Recoveries

      

Commercial Real Estate

     4        1        —     

Ag Real Estate

     —          —          —     

Consumer Real Estate

     3        18        2   

Commercial and Industrial

     15        5        2   

Agricultural

     7        3        1   

Consumer & other loans

     30        39        34   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
     59        66        39   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Charge Offs

     67        726        227   

Provision for loan loss

     128        772        1,690   

Acquisition provision for loan loss

     —          —          —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Allowance for Loan & Lease Losses—March 31

   $ 5,152      $ 5,752      $ 7,471   

Allowance for Unfunded Loan Commitments & Letters of Credit March 31

     140        152        221   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Allowance for Credit Losses—March 31

   $ 5,292      $ 5,904      $ 7,692   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ratio of net charge-offs to average Loans outstanding

     0.01     0.14     0.04
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ratio of Allowance for Loan Loss to Nonperforming Loans

     170.43     182.70     48.85
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

* Nonperforming loans are defined as all loans on nonaccrual, plus any loans past due 90 days not on nonaccrual.

 

     March-2012      March-2011  
     Amount
(000’s)
     %
of Portfolio
     Amount
(000’s)
     %
of Portfolio
 

Balance at End of Period Applicable To:

           

Commercial Real Estate

   $ 1,570         40.72       $ 2,150         38.14   

Ag Real Estate

     89         6.45         154         6.22   

Consumer Real Estate

     433         16.16         266         16.19   

Commercial and Industrial

     1,859         21.07         2,520         22.10   

Agricultural

     272         10.97         312         11.79   

Consumer, Overdrafts and other loans

     293         4.39         332         5.17   

Unallocated

     636         0.24         18         0.38   
  

 

 

       

 

 

    

Allowance for Loan & Lease Losses

   $ 5,152          $ 5,752      

Off Balance Sheet Commitments

   $ 140          $ 152      
  

 

 

       

 

 

    

Total Allowance for Credit Losses

   $ 5,292          $ 5,904      
  

 

 

       

 

 

    

The percentage of delinquent loans has trended downward since the beginning of 2010 from a high of 2.85% of total loans in January to .64% as of the end of March 2012. These percentages do not include nonaccrual loans which are not past due. This level of delinquency is due in part to an adherence to sound underwriting practices over the course of time, an improvement in the financial status of companies to which the Bank extends credit, continued financial stability in the agricultural loan portfolio, and the write down of uncollectable credits in a timely manner.

 

24


ITEM 2 MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

MATERIAL CHANGES IN RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

 

Non-interest Income

Non-interest income was higher for the three months ended March 31, 2012 as compared to same period in March 31, 2011. 2011 was hurt from the loss on other assets owned of $648 thousand. This had come from not only sales but from write-downs to the Bank’s ORE as new appraisals were obtained. While both years show this line item in a loss position, 2011 is higher by $581 thousand. The total in the line item is made up of loss on sale of ORE and loss on sale or disposal of fixed assets, though fixed assets sales are inconsequential. Completely offsetting this loss in 2012 is the gain on sale of securities, $169 thousand so far in 2012 and $339 thousand gain partially offset the March 31, 2011 loss.

Improvement in non-interest income was reached in customer service fees and net gain on sale of loans. The increase in the checking and savings portfolios in terms of number of accounts in 2012 as compared to 2011 has been the one of the main factors behind the additional collection of fees. With implementation of Regulation E on August 15, 2010, the increase in the number of accounts was not enough to offset the regulatory changes and year-to-date overdraft fee income is $4 thousand lower than during the same period last year. Increases came from debit card usage with first quarter 2012 being $101 thousand higher in revenue than first quarter 2011. This revenue stream is very important to the Bank and its ability to offer ‘free’ checking accounts to our customers.

Another factor for the improvement of non-interest income stems from the activity of selling real estate loans into the secondary market. 1-4 family and agricultural real estate loans have benefited from the low rate environment. This activity impacts many areas of non-interest income from gain on the sale of loans, up $86 thousand in comparing first quarter 2012 to 2011, servicing income, higher by $165 thousand for the same comparison and the capitalization of mortgage servicing rights, $119 thousand higher as shown in chart to follow. The servicing rights and capitalization of the rights is included in the customer service fees line on the income statement.

The impact of mortgage servicing rights, both to income and expense, is shown in the following table which reconciles the value of mortgage servicing rights. The capitalization runs through non-interest income while the amortization thereof is included in non-interest expense. A slight impairment in the valuation of the ten year segment occurred in first quarter 2011.

 

     (In Thousands)  
     2012     2011  

Beginning Balance, January 1

   $ 2,071      $ 2,178   

Capitalized Additions

     184        65   

Amortizations

     (194     (89

Valuation Allowance

     —          (2
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending Balance, March 31

   $ 2,061      $ 2,152   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The Bank was able to continue to take advantage of the opportunity to recognize gains from the sales of securities without impacting the yield of the investment portfolio by marginally extending the maturity duration. The gain in first quarter 2012 was based on security sales of $24.6 million while 2011’s gain was based on security sales of $16.4 million. There were not any securities sold at a loss in either period.

Overall non-interest income improved $920 thousand for the first three months of operations in 2012 as compared to 2011. The improvement is expected to continue through 2012, specifically in the area of loss on sale or other assets owned.

The movement of income from comprehensive income to realized gain on sale of securities is disclosed in the table to follow. Since the Bank classifies its entire investment portfolio, with the exception of stock, as available for sale, the majority of any gain/loss on the sale is a direct shift of funds from unrealized gain to realized gain. Since the purchase of additional or replacement securities occurs at the same time, those new securities immediately impact the other comprehensive income.

 

     (In Thousands)  
     Three Months Ended
March 31, 2012
    Three Months Ended
March 31, 2011
 

Net Unrealized gain on available-for-sale securities

   $ (1,006   $ 1,226   

Reclassification adjustment for gain on sale of available-for-sale securities

     (169     (339
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net unrealized gains

     (1,175     887   

Tax Effect

     400        (302
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income

   $ (775   $ 585   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

25


ITEM 2 MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

MATERIAL CHANGES IN RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

 

Non-Interest Expense

Non-interest expense for the quarter ended March 31, 2012 was only $195 thousand higher than for the same period of 2011. The largest individual increase in expense related to the mortgage servicing rights. Amortization expense was $103 thousand higher in 2012 due to the refinancing activity. When a mortgage is refinanced, any unamortized servicing right is fully expensed and therefore, drives the amortization expense higher within that period. 1-4 family loans sold during the first quarter 2012 were $22.1 million compared to 2011’s first quarter sales of $11.4 million.

Salaries and wages were higher by $33 thousand during the quarter which was expected with the improved performance of the Company as a whole over 2011 and the likelihood of paying an incentive. Base pay was higher in 2012 than 2011 with the number of full time equivalent employees having increased from 248 as of March 31, 2011 to 250 as of March 31, 2012. Pension and other employee benefits increased by $13 thousand in the same time periods. Occupancy expense increased $92 thousand over first quarter 2011 with all areas from real estate taxes to utilities incurring increases.

One bright spot in the non-interest expense was the decrease in FDIC assessment costs. March 2012’s $130 thousand was $190 thousand lower than March 2011’s $320 thousand. In June 2011, the FDIC began assessing fees based on total asset size rather than deposit size in order to have large banks incur a fairer share of the burden. This has resulted in a decrease of cost for the majority of community banks such as ours.

Other general and administrative was higher during the quarter for 2012 by $130 thousand; however first quarter 2011 included the collection of $300 thousand in loan collection costs. Taking the 2011 adjustment into account, first quarter 2012 was in fact lower by $170 thousand from normal operations. Overall non-interest expense was just $195 thousand higher in first quarter 2012 than in 2011 with 2011 having benefited from the recapture of collection costs on one large loan. The Company continues to monitor costs to safeguard profitability.

Net Income

Overall, net income was up $304 thousand for the three months ended March 31, 2012, compared to the same period of 2011. The improvement in asset quality that has occurred over the last year and a half along with lower loan balances enabled the Company to have $644 thousand less in provision expense in 2012 as compared to 2011. This coupled with the decrease on ORE write-down and losses summarized in gain/loss on sale of other assets owned of $581 thousand less in 2012 than in 2011, are the largest factors behind the improvement. Obviously, the gain on sale of securities plays a role in the improvement and the Company is fortunate that the opportunity existed to capture income that has been used to improve the profitability of the last two years. The decrease in net interest income for the quarter is proof of the importance of the effect of balance sheet mix as the decreased loan balances continues to impact overall asset yield.

The Company remains positioned for continued improvement in the net interest margin while rates remain low, if loan demand would increase. It will be a challenge to maintain the margin once short term rates begin to rise. However, the Bank remains focused on improving the asset yield through improved asset quality and added spread to prime on variable and adjustable rate loans. As with the rest of the banking industry, the Company is also limited from achieving higher profitability by the cost of increased regulatory requirements such as Regulation E, Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and any other additional regulations that may be enacted during 2012 and their corresponding cost of compliance. The Company will continue to seek to enhance existing products and services to increase revenue, improve efficiency and increase customer satisfaction.

FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

Statements contained in this portion of the Company’s report may be forward-looking statements, as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements may be identified by the use of words such as “intend,” “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “should,” “planned,” “estimated,” and “potential.” Such forward-looking statements are based on current expectations, but may differ materially from those currently anticipated due to a number of factors, which include, but are not limited to, factors discussed in documents filed by the Company with the Securities and Exchange Commission from time to time. Other factors which could have a material adverse effect on the operations of the Company and its subsidiaries which include, but are not limited to, changes in interest rates, general economic conditions, legislative and regulatory changes, monetary and fiscal policies of the U.S. Government, including policies of the U.S. Treasury and the Federal Reserve Board, the quality and composition of the loan or investment portfolios, demand for loan products, deposit flows, competition, demand for financial services in the Bank’s market area, changes in relevant accounting principles and guidelines and other factors over which management has no control. The forward-looking statements are made as of the date of this report, and the Company assumes no obligation to update the forward-looking statements or to update the reasons why actual results differ from those projected in the forward-looking statements.

ITEM 3 QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Market risk is the exposure to loss resulting from changes in interest rates and equity prices. The primary market risk to which the Company is subject is interest rate risk. The majority of the our interest rate risk arises from the instruments, positions and transactions entered into for purposes, other than trading such as loans, available for sale securities, interest bearing deposits, short term borrowings and long term borrowings. Interest rate risk occurs when interest bearing

 

26


ITEM 3 QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK (Continued)

 

assets and liabilities re-price at different times as market interest rates change. For example, if fixed rate assets are funded with variable rate debt, the spread between asset and liability rates will decline or turn negative if rates increase.

Interest rate risk is managed within an overall asset/liability framework. The principal objectives of asset/liability management are to manage sensitivity of net interest spreads and net income to potential changes in interest rates. Funding positions are kept within predetermined limits designed to ensure that risk-taking is not excessive and that liquidity is properly managed. In the event that our asset/liabilities management strategies are unsuccessful, our profitably may be adversely affected. The Company employs a sensitivity analysis utilizing interest rate shocks to help in this analysis.

The Company also reviews shocks with a 4.0% fluctuation with a delayed time frame of 10 months. The shocks presented below assume an immediate change of rate in the percentages and directions shown:

 

Interest Rate Shock on Net Interest Margin           Interest Rate Shock on Net Interest Income
Net Interest Margin
(Ratio)
 

% Change

to

Flat Rate

 

Rate

Direction

 

Rate

Changes by

 

Cumulative

Total ($000)

 

% Change

to

Flat Rate

2.69%

  -19.40%   Rising   3.00%   23,731   -20.01%

2.91%

  -12.65%   Rising   2.00%   25,743   -13.23%

3.13%

  -6.19%   Rising   1.00%   27,713   -6.59%

3.33%

  0.00%   Flat   0.00%   29,667   0.00%

3.19%

  -4.40%   Falling   -1.00%   28,626   -3.51%

2.97%

  -10.91%   Falling   -2.00%   27,062   -8.78%

2.69%

  -19.34%   Falling   -3.00%   24,887   -16.11%

The net interest margin represents the forecasted twelve month margin. It also shows what effect rate changes will have on both the margin and the net interest income. The goal of the Company is to lengthen some of the liabilities or sources of funds to decrease the exposure to a rising rate environment. The Bank has offered higher rates on certificates of deposits for longer periods during 2011 and so far in 2012. Of course, customer desires also drive the ability to capture longer term deposits. Currently, the customer looks for terms twelve months and under while the Bank would prefer 24 months and longer. It is often a meeting in the middle that satisfies both.

The Bank continues to remain focused on gaining more relationships per customer as a way to help control the cost of funds also. In the flat and rising rate environment scenario, the model cannot take into account the addition of floors and increased spread on the loan accounts. These are added as the note is renewed and cannot be captured until then. To the extent the Bank is successful in this endeavor, the flat and rising rate scenario will be less costly than forecasted here.

Overall, what the chart shows is that the Company cannot remain stagnant in its choices. Changes in portfolio and/or balance sheet composition are needed for the margin to improve regardless of any rate shock.

ITEM 4 CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

As of March 31, 2012, an evaluation was performed under the supervision and with the participation of the Company’s management including the CEO and CFO, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures. Based on that evaluation, the Company’s management, including the CEO and CFO, concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of March 31, 2012. There have been no changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the quarter ended March 31, 2012 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting

PART II OTHER INFORMATION

ITEM 1 LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

None

ITEM 1A RISK FACTORS

There have been no material changes in the risk factors disclosed by Registrant in its Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011.

 

27


PART II OTHER INFORMATION (Continued)

 

ITEM 2 UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

 

Period

   (a) Total Number
of Shares Purchased
     (b) Average Price
Paid per Share
     (c) Total Number of Shares
Purchased as Part of
Publicly Announced Plan
or Programs
     (d) Maximum Number of Shares
that may yet be purchased under
the Plans or Programs
 

1/1/2012 to 1/31/2012

              200,000   

2/1/2012 to 2/29/2012

              200,000   

3/1/2012 to 3/31/2012

     11,269         20.65         11,269         188,731   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     11,269         20.65         11,269         188,731   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) The Company purchased shares in the market pursuant to a stock repurchase program publicly announced on January 20, 2012. On that date, the Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of 200,000 common shares between January 20, 2012 and December  31, 2012.

ITEM 3 DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES

None

ITEM 4 MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable

ITEM 5 OTHER INFORMATION

ITEM 6 EXHIBITS

 

3.1    Amended Articles of Incorporation of the Registrant (incorporated by reference to Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Commission on August 1, 2006)
3.2    Code of Regulations of the Registrant (incorporated by reference to Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Commission on May 10, 2004)
31.1    Rule 13-a-14(a) Certification - CEO
31.2    Rule 13-a-14(a) Certification - CFO
32.1    Section 1350 Certification - CEO
32.2    Section 1350 Certification - CFO

 

28


SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

  Farmers & Merchants Bancorp, Inc.,
Date:        April 30, 2012   By:  

/s/ Paul S. Siebenmorgen

    Paul S. Siebenmorgen
    President and CEO
Date:        April 30, 2012   By:  

/s/ Barbara J. Britenriker

    Barbara J. Britenriker
    Exec. Vice-President and CFO

 

29

XOTC:FMAO Farmers & Merchants Bancorp Inc Quarterly Report 10-Q Filling

Farmers & Merchants Bancorp Inc XOTC:FMAO Stock - Get Quarterly Report SEC Filing of Farmers & Merchants Bancorp Inc XOTC:FMAO stocks, including company profile, shares outstanding, strategy, business segments, operations, officers, consolidated financial statements, financial notes and ownership information.

Content Partners
XOTC:FMAO Farmers & Merchants Bancorp Inc Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 3/31/2012
Name |  Ticker |  Star Rating |  Market Cap |  Stock Type |  Sector |  Industry Star Rating |  Investment Style |  Total Assets |  Category |  Top Holdings |  Top Sectors |  Symbol |  Title Star Rating |  Category |  Total Assets |  Top Holdings |  Top Sectors |  Symbol |  Name Title |  Date |  Author |  Collection |  Interest |  Popularity Topic |  Sector |  Key Indicators |  User Interest |  Market Cap |  Industry Name |  Ticker |  Star Rating |  Market Cap |  Stock Type |  Sector |  Industry Star Rating |  Investment Style |  Total Assets |  Category |  Top Holdings |  Top Sectors |  Symbol / Ticker |  Title Star Rating |  Category |  Total Assets |  Symbol / Ticker |  Name Title |  Date |  Author |  Collection |  Popularity |  Interest T