XNYS:CACI CACI International Inc Class A Annual Report 10-K Filing - 6/30/2012

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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

 

 

(Mark One)

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012

 

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from              to             

 

Commission File Number 001-31400

 

 

 

CACI International Inc

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   54-1345888
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

1100 North Glebe Road, Arlington, VA 22201

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(703) 841-7800

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  x.    No  ¨.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨.    No  x.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x.    No  ¨.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x.    No  ¨.

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K or any amendment to this Annual Report on Form 10-K.  x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer  x

 

Accelerated filer  ¨

 

Non-accelerated filer  ¨

 

Smaller reporting company  ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨.    No  x.

 

The aggregate market value of common shares held by non-affiliates of the registrant on December 31, 2011 was $1,412,432,505, based upon the closing price of the registrant’s common shares as quoted on the New York Stock Exchange composite tape on such date.

 

As of August 24, 2012, the registrant had 22,666,506 shares of common stock issued and outstanding.

 

 

 


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DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

Part III incorporates by reference certain information from the registrant’s proxy statement for its 2012 annual meeting of stockholders. With the exception of the sections of the 2012 Proxy Statement specifically incorporated herein by reference, the 2012 Proxy Statement is not deemed to be filed as part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Unless the context indicates otherwise, the terms “we”, “our”, “the Company” and “CACI” as used in Parts I, II and III include CACI International Inc and its subsidiaries and joint ventures that are more than 50 percent owned or otherwise controlled by it. The term “the registrant” as used in Parts I, II and III refers to CACI International Inc only.

 

INFORMATION RELATING TO FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

Certain information included or incorporated by reference in this document and in press releases, written statements or other documents filed with the United States (U.S.) Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), or in the Company’s communications and discussions through webcasts, telephone calls and conference calls, may not address historical facts and, therefore, could be interpreted to be “forward-looking statements” as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and other federal securities laws. All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that could be deemed forward-looking statements, including projections of financial performance; statements of plans, strategies and objectives of management for future operations; any statement concerning developments, performance or industry rankings relating to products or services; any statements regarding future economic conditions or performance; any statements of assumptions underlying any of the foregoing; and any other statements that address activities, events or developments that CACI intends, expects, projects, believes or anticipates will or may occur in the future. Forward-looking statements may be characterized by terminology such as “believe,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “should,” “intend,” “plan,” “will,” “estimates,” “projects,” “strategy” and similar expressions. These statements are based on assumptions and assessments made by the Company’s management in light of its experience and its perception of historical trends, current conditions, expected future developments and other factors it believes to be appropriate. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that include but are not limited to the factors set forth under Item 1A, Risk Factors in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance, and actual results, developments and business decisions may differ materially from those envisaged by such forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements included herein speak only as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The Company disclaims any duty to update such forward-looking statements, all of which are expressly qualified by the foregoing.

 

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CACI International Inc

 

FORM 10-K

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I

  

Item 1.

   Business      4   

Item 1A.

   Risk Factors      14   

Item 1B.

   Unresolved Staff Comments      26   

Item 2.

   Properties      26   

Item 3.

   Legal Proceedings      26   

Item 4.

   [Reserved]      27   

PART II

  

Item 5.

  

Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

     28   

Item 6.

   Selected Financial Data      30   

Item 7.

   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition & Results of Operations      30   

Item 7A.

   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk      40   

Item 8.

   Financial Statements and Supplementary Data      40   

Item 9.

   Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure      41   

Item 9A.

   Controls and Procedures      41   

PART III

  

Item 10.

  

Officers, Directors and Executive Officers of the Registrant

     43   

Item 11.

   Executive Compensation      43   

Item 12.

   Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management      43   

Item 13.

   Certain Relationships and Related Transactions      43   

Item 14.

   Principal Accounting Fees and Services      43   

PART IV

  

Item 15.

  

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

     44   

SIGNATURES

     94   

 

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PART I

 

Item 1. Business

 

Background

 

CACI International Inc was organized as a Delaware corporation under the name “CACI WORLDWIDE, INC.” on October 8, 1985. By a merger on June 2, 1986, the registrant became the parent of CACI, Inc., a Delaware corporation, and CACI N.V., a Netherlands corporation. Effective April 16, 2001, CACI, Inc. was merged into its wholly-owned subsidiary, CACI, INC.-FEDERAL, such that the registrant is now the corporate parent of CACI, INC.-FEDERAL, a Delaware corporation, and CACI N.V., a Netherlands corporation. The registrant is a holding company and its operations are conducted through subsidiaries, which are located in the U.S. and Europe, and a joint venture which is controlled by the registrant.

 

Our telephone number is (703) 841-7800 and our Internet page can be accessed at www.caci.com. We make our web site content available for information purposes only. It should not be relied upon for investment purposes, nor is it incorporated by reference into this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act are made available free of charge on our Internet website at www.caci.com as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. Documents filed by us with the SEC can also be viewed at www.sec.gov.

 

Overview

 

CACI founded its business in 1962 in simulation technology. With revenue for the year ended June 30, 2012 (FY2012) of $3.8 billion, we serve clients in the U.S. federal government and commercial markets, primarily throughout North America and internationally on behalf of U.S. customers, as well as in the United Kingdom (U.K.) and the Netherlands. We deliver information solutions and services to our clients. Through our service offerings, we provide comprehensive and practical solutions by adapting emerging technologies and continually evolving legacy strengths. As a result of our diverse capabilities and client mission understanding, many of our client relationships have existed for ten years or more.

 

Our reliable and high-quality services have enabled us to successfully compete for and win repeat business, sustain long-term client relationships and compete effectively for new clients and new contracts. We seek competitive business opportunities and have designed our operations to support major programs through centralized business development and business alliances. We have structured our business development organization to respond to the competitive marketplace, particularly within the federal government, and support that activity with full-time marketing, sales, communications, and proposal development specialists.

 

Our primary customers are agencies of the U.S. government. Our services are primarily targeted to the areas of defense, intelligence, homeland security and information technology (IT) modernization. The demand for our services, in large measure, is created by the increasingly complex network, systems and information environments in which governments and businesses operate, and by the need to stay current with emerging technology while increasing productivity and, ultimately, improving performance.

 

At June 30, 2012, CACI had approximately 14,500 employees.

 

Domestic Operations

 

Our domestic operations are conducted through a number of subsidiaries and a joint venture which we control, and account for 100 percent of our U.S. government revenue and 40.6 percent of our commercial

 

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revenue. Some of the contracts performed by our domestic operations involve assignment of employees to international locations. At June 30, 2012, approximately 800 employees were on assignments in international locations. We provide the following information solutions and services to our domestic clients:

 

   

Enterprise IT solutions—We support our clients’ critical networked operational missions by providing tailored, end-to-end, enterprise-wide information solutions and services for the design, development, integration, deployment, operations and management, sustainment, and security of our clients’ infrastructure. Our operational, analytic, consultancy, and transformational services make effective use of leading-edge practices, standards, and innovations to enable and optimize the full lifecycle of the enterprise IT environment – improving the services, increasing the efficiency, and reducing the total cost and complexity of heterogeneous, networked, and geographically-dispersed operations. Our capabilities in network infrastructure design, deployment and management, data center design and management, cloud computing, virtualization, application development and hosting, mobility solutions, and advanced service desk management provide secure and efficient operational environments for our customers.

 

   

Knowledge management solutions—We deliver a full spectrum of information solutions and services that automate the knowledge management lifecycle, from data capture through information analysis and understanding. We provide commercially-based products, custom solutions development, and operations and maintenance services that facilitate information access and sharing, foster innovation and learning, locate and leverage expertise, manage intellectual capital and assets, and help navigate from data to decision. Our information technology solutions are complemented by a suite of analytical expertise support offerings for our clients in the homeland security and intelligence communities, Department of Defense (DoD), Department of Justice (DoJ) and other federal agencies.

 

   

Business systems solutions—We provide the full range of information solutions and services required to plan, manage, architect, develop, deploy, and sustain the complex, integrated system solutions that the DoD and federal civilian agencies need to accomplish their transformation goals and achieve ever-increasing efficiency and effectiveness in their mission functions and business operations. Working in the domains of procurement, financial management, human capital management, and logistics and supply chain management, we have implemented enterprise-level system solutions for over 100 federal agencies. From complex commercial-off-the-shelf enterprise resource planning integrations to custom service-oriented architecture-based solutions that address unique federal mission support needs, we bring disciplined industry best practices, advanced technology, and a deep understanding of federal processes and their unique compliance constraints.

 

   

Logistics and material readiness solutions and services—We offer a full suite of solutions and service offerings that plan for, implement, and control the efficient, effective, and secure flow and storage of goods, services, and information in support of U.S. government agencies. We develop and manage logistics information systems, specialized simulation and modeling toolsets, and provide logistics engineering services. Our operational capabilities span the supply chain, including advanced logistics planning, demand forecasting, total asset visibility (including the use of Radio Frequency Identification technology), and life cycle support for weapons systems. Our logistics services are a critical enabler in support of defense readiness and combat sustainability objectives.

 

   

ISR solutions and services—We provide a full-spectrum of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) solutions and services in support of national defense, intelligence and homeland security missions. Our ISR solutions and services include systems engineering and integration, agile development and deployment and end-to-end life cycle planning and support services that enable complex, leading edge mission capabilities. We provide rapid-response services in support of military missions in a coordinated and controlled operational setting. We integrate sensors, intelligence information systems, data fusion and dissemination systems, and mission applications that connect with our clients’ fixed and mobile networked sites.

 

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Command and Control (C2) solutions and services—We provide a broad range of leading edge information solutions and services that enable our clients to effectively and efficiently conduct mission operations and achieve information dominance. Our C2 offerings support military, homeland security, law enforcement, border security, emergency response and disaster relief missions. Our capabilities integrate the inputs from mission applications and ISR systems to provide comprehensive situational awareness, visualization, and tools to collaboratively plan, rehearse, support decision making, mission delivery, execution and sustainment. We deliver state of the art secure enterprise solutions that leverage advances in commercial networking and information technology, open standards architecture, and advanced security offerings.

 

   

Cyberspace solutions—Our information solutions and services support the full lifecycle of preparing for, protecting against, detecting, reacting to, and actively responding to the full range of cyber threats. We achieve this through comprehensive, consistently managed, risk-based, and cost-effective capabilities, controls, and measures to protect information, systems, and networks operated by the U.S. government. We proactively support information operations and the operational use and availability/reliability of information.

 

   

Integrated security solutions—Our integrated security solutions and services support the U.S. and our international partners and allies in mitigating and countering the effects of natural, technological, and man-made hazards which are unrestrained by political and geographical boundaries, elements of national power, and international law. Our security services and technical solutions assist clients in the development, integration, and sustainment of graduated, flexible capabilities that anticipate and address asymmetric and irregular threats and vulnerabilities. Sought by domestic and international clients for our ability to provide customer value often restricted by silo-centric systems, our services address security policy; definition and capacity building; risk management; critical infrastructure protection; consequence management; critical event and incident preparedness; and training.

 

   

Geospatial solutions—We support the collection, processing, exploitation, analysis and dissemination of geospatial information relating to Defense, Intelligence, Homeland Security, and commercial applications. We use imagery and other collected data from government and commercial sources to produce hardcopy and digital maps, and other value added enhanced imagery and 3-dimensional products. Our geospatial solutions employ advanced analytical training, focused tools and applications development, and feature database extraction and maintenance. We provide time-proven expertise in multi-source data analysis and conflation, diverse sensor exploitation, intelligence analysis, and geographic information system (GIS) integration and deployment. We offer mobile solutions and secure web-based data accessibility and subscription services on an enterprise scale.

 

   

Investigation and litigation support solutions—We support government investigations and litigations in support of the DoJ with full service technology solutions. Using comprehensive training to carefully honed processes and procedures, we help attorneys acquire, organize, develop, control, and present evidence throughout the course of litigations, from pre-filing investigation, through complaint, discovery, and trial, to post-trial briefs, review, and appeals. Our portfolio of legal-support offerings includes: cloud hosting (on-line, evidentiary information management to rapidly enable data storage and accessibility); e-discovery consulting and support; data forensic extraction and analysis; document/data capture and processing; database development, population, and maintenance; pre-trial, trial and post-trial support; case management; training; claims management; and Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) support.

 

   

Healthcare IT solutions—We meet the steadily accelerating demand for new healthcare strategies and technology required by government, industry, and patients. We assist the federal medical community in focusing on the patient, ensuring that systems and processes at the backbone of health organizations are running efficiently. We provide both functional subject matter expertise and health IT services to the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Defense Military Health System, and the Department of Health and Human Services. Our capabilities include medical logistics and facility management, design, development and integration of healthcare information technology systems, including virtual electronic health records, information assurance, and security of personally identifiable information.

 

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Identity management solutions—We provide solutions that enable our clients to manage detect, and protect identities of individuals, entities, organizations, groups, nation states, networks, and associations in both the physical and digital worlds. Our solutions capitalize on our vast experience supporting the Intelligence Community, war fighters, and law enforcement in areas such as biometric collection and identification, human factors analysis, forensics, large-volume identity-related data exploitation and assessment, information management, and managed security services.

 

   

Mobility solutions and services—Our mobility solutions and services provide end-to-end capability for the full lifecycle of mobility enablement, from development through sustainment. This includes a layered set of offerings within a framework that addresses back end provisioning through the cloud infrastructure through mission specific applications. We provide unique hardware and software mobility based solutions for the DoD, U.S. civilian agencies and the Intelligence Community. Our capabilities include end-to-end mobility architecture and design, cloud hosting, cloud provisioning and support, secure wireless transport, secure mobile device configuration and management of leading commercial smartphones and tablets, virtual desktops, and other mobile applications development, provisioning, delivery, and security vetting.

 

   

Program management and system engineering and technical assistance (SETA) services—We support U.S. government Program Executive Offices and Program Management Offices via subject matter experts and comprehensive technical management processes that optimize program resources. This includes translating operational requirements into configured systems, integrating technical inputs, characterizing and managing risk, transitioning technology into program efforts, and verifying that designs meet operational needs, through the application of internationally recognized and accepted standards. Additionally, we provide SETA and advisory and assistance services that include contract and acquisition management, operations support, architecture and system engineering services, project and portfolio management, strategy and policy support, and complex trade analyses.

 

In developing solutions utilizing the technologies of each of these service offerings, we make extensive use of our wide array of modeling and simulation products and services, thereby enabling clients to visualize the impact of proposed changes or new technologies before implementation. Our simulation offerings address client needs in the areas of military training and war-gaming, logistics, manufacturing, wide area networks, including satellites and land lines, local area networks, the study of business processes, and the design of distributed computer systems architecture.

 

International Operations

 

Our international operations are conducted primarily through our operating subsidiaries in Europe, CACI Limited and CACI BV, and account for substantially all revenue generated from international clients and 59.4 percent of our commercial revenue. CACI’s European operations are headquartered in London, England, and operate primarily in support of our knowledge management solutions, business systems solutions, and enterprise IT solutions lines of business.

 

Our international service offerings focus primarily on planning, designing, implementing and managing solutions that resolve specific technical or business needs for commercial and government clients in the telecommunications, education, financial services, healthcare services, logistics planning, digital marketing, and web-based data capture and forms processing areas. Our international operations also concentrate on combining data and technology in software products and services that provide strategic information on customers, buying patterns and market trends for clients who are engaged in retail sales of consumer products, direct marketing campaigns, franchise or branch site location projects, and similar endeavors.

 

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Competition

 

We operate in a highly competitive industry that includes many firms, some of which are larger in size and have greater financial resources than we do. We obtain much of our business on the basis of proposals submitted in response to requests from potential and current customers, who may also receive proposals from other firms. Additionally, we face indirect competition from certain government agencies that perform services for themselves similar to those marketed by us. We know of no single competitor that is dominant in our fields of technology. We have a relatively small share of the available worldwide market for our products and services and intend to achieve growth and increasing market share both organically and through strategic acquisitions.

 

Strengths and Strategy

 

We offer substantially our entire range of information solutions and services and proprietary products to defense, intelligence and civilian agencies of the U.S. government. Our work for U.S. government agencies may combine a wide range of skills drawn from our service, solutions and product offerings. We occasionally contract through both our domestic and international operations to supply services, solutions and/or products to governments of other nations. As with other government contractors, our business is subject to government client funding decisions and actions that are beyond our control.

 

Although we are a supplier of proprietary computer-based technology products and marketing systems products, we are not primarily focused on being a software product developer-distributor (see discussion following under “Patents, Trademarks, Trade Secrets and Licenses”).

 

Our international commercial client base consists primarily of large enterprises in the U.K. and the Netherlands. This market is the primary target of our proprietary marketing systems software and database products.

 

In order to effectively perform on our existing client contracts and secure new client contracts within the U.S. government, we must maintain expert knowledge of agency policies, operations and challenges. We combine this comprehensive knowledge with significant expertise in the design, integration, development and implementation of advanced information technology and communications solutions. This capability provides us with opportunities either to compete directly for, or to support other bidders in competition for, multi-million dollar and multi-year award contracts from the U.S. government.

 

We have strategic business relationships with a number of companies associated with the information technology industry. These strategic partners have business objectives compatible with ours and offer products and services that complement ours. We intend to continue development of these kinds of relationships wherever they support our growth objectives.

 

Our marketing and new business development is conducted by virtually all of our officers and managers including the Chief Executive Officer, executive officers, vice presidents, and division managers. We employ marketing professionals who identify and qualify major contract opportunities, primarily in the federal government market. Our proprietary software and marketing systems are sold primarily by full-time sales people. We also have established agreements for the resale of certain third party software and data products.

 

Much of our business is won through submission of formal competitive bids. Government and commercial clients typically base their decisions regarding contract awards on their assessment of the quality of past performance, responsiveness to proposal requirements, price, and other factors. Commercial bids are frequently negotiated as to terms and conditions for schedule, specifications, delivery and payment. The terms, conditions and form of contract of government bids, however, are in most cases specified by the client. In situations in which the client-imposed contract type and/or terms appear to expose us to inappropriate risk or do not offer us a sufficient financial return, we may seek alternate arrangements or opt not to bid for the work. Essentially all contracts with the U.S. government, and many contracts with other government entities, permit the government

 

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client to terminate the contract at any time for the convenience of the government or for default by the contractor. Although we operate under the risk that such terminations may occur and have a material impact on operations, such terminations have been rare and, generally, have not materially affected operations.

 

Our contracts and subcontracts are composed of a wide range of contract types, including firm fixed-price, cost reimbursement, time-and-materials (T&M), indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity (IDIQ) and government wide acquisition contracts (known as GWACS) such as General Services Administration (GSA) schedule contracts. By company policy, significant fixed-price contracts require the approval of at least two of our senior officers.

 

At any one time, we may have several thousand separate active contracts and/or task orders. In FY2012, the ten top revenue-producing contracts accounted for 43.6 percent of our revenue, or $1.6 billion.

 

In FY2012, 94.5 percent of our revenue came from U.S. government prime contracts or subcontracts consisting of 78.0 percent from DoD contracts and 16.5 percent from U.S. government civilian agency clients. The remaining 5.5 percent of revenue came from commercial businesses, both domestic and international, and state and local governments.

 

Industry Trends

 

The federal government is the largest consumer of information technology services and solutions in the United States. We believe that the following trends will impact the federal government’s future spending on the types of services we provide:

 

   

Federal government budget trends, pressures and opportunities

 

   

U.S. Fiscal Considerations—Weak tax revenues and spending programs, when combined with a weak economy, have produced historically high federal debt levels. The efforts to control deficits as well as last year’s debt ceiling debate have compounded the need to reduce federal spending. These trends may limit funding of complex programs that have long payout periods.

 

   

Sequestration—If the Executive and Legislative branches are unable to reach a debt reduction consensus by the end of calendar year 2012, significant and equal reductions in both security and non-security spending will be automatically triggered and will take effect in January 2013. The ensuing period may include procurement delays and, in some cases, cancellations, as agencies re-program their budgets for the government’s fiscal year (GFY) 2013. Alignment with national priorities and mission critical solutions may shield us from some, but not all, of the government’s debt reduction initiatives.

 

   

Most federal agencies are operating under a relatively normal GFY 2012 environment while anticipating changes emanating from the upcoming election and fiscal debate. Customers remain cautious about the continuation of funding and about initiating new program starts as GFY 2013 approaches. These concerns are causing procurement delays in the short term and are expected to impact us throughout the first half of our year ending June 30, 2013. However, over the longer term, the large market in which we operate continues to present many opportunities, both organic and acquired, for us to expand our presence in existing as well as new market segments.

 

   

Apart from the specifics of the debt reduction resolution mentioned above, we anticipate that federal budgets will begin contracting in GFY 2013 and, barring unforeseen circumstances, we do not expect that this contraction will level off prior to at least GFY 2015.

 

   

Macroeconomic and financial developments in the U.S., Europe and emerging markets will have a significant impact on U.S. Gross Domestic Product growth and, in turn, U.S. fiscal deficits for the foreseeable future. These circumstances also have the potential to affect stock prices, including ours, as investor enthusiasm may wane due to uncertainty in global markets.

 

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“Affordability” will be a key procurement parameter of all U.S. government federal programs for the foreseeable future. Successful government contractors will have to devise business models to accommodate the government’s desire for affordability.

 

   

Technology Market Drivers—The widespread use and the complexity of technology and applications will continue to rapidly evolve. There are four categories of the most significant technologies and application areas that we expect to drive the markets in which we participate. These categories are C4ISR, intelligence expertise, cyber solutions, and federal healthcare IT.

 

   

Market Opportunities

 

   

Government Wide Market Opportunities—As federal government agencies seek to make spending reductions, opportunities to achieve cost reductions through improved operational efficiency will receive higher priority. Many IT initiatives emerging in both DoD and Office of Management and Budget (OMB) directed programs for civilian agencies are based on infrastructure consolidation and cost effective upgrades. These initiatives include infrastructure modernization, adoption of innovative commercial applications, and increased use of commercially provided infrastructure.

 

We continue to expect to see a steady stream of funding for transformational activities that yield results in a shorter timeframe to maximize investments with more stable and predictable information system outcomes. As the amount of data and information grows, and persistent threats to our national security continue, the demands for applications will grow as well, putting a higher value on faster and more efficient/effective technologies. We expect this demand to result in an increasing need for rapid deployment of cyber solutions, cloud computing, and mobile applications. An additional area of cyber emphasis is the security of the supply chain. While technology provides part of the answer, the integration of processes and personnel using forward-looking systems and sound architectures is more likely to provide cost savings and performance efficiencies.

 

   

National Security Market Opportunities

 

   

Counterterrorism, counter proliferation, cyber security, and counterintelligence are at the immediate forefront of U.S. security concerns and they are all inextricably linked. Additionally, man-made and natural disasters are routinely addressed by applying the military and civilian resources of the U.S.

 

   

The world is increasingly interconnected and interdependent. Instability can arise quickly and spread rapidly beyond borders. This phenomenon is readily apparent in events in the Pacific Rim, the Middle East and North Africa. As the U.S. reduces its conventional defense forces, as expected, the need for intelligence and surveillance of potential adversaries of all types will continue or grow.

 

   

The Middle East will continue to be unstable even as U.S. national security organizations are executing a strategic shift toward Asia-Pacific. This shift will create opportunities as well as threats as the contractor community adapts to the changing needs of Defense, Intelligence, Homeland Security, State, and U.S. partners.

 

   

Funding to support the use of military and intelligence assets, particularly special operating forces, to combat these threats is not likely to change dramatically. There is little pressure to declare a “peace dividend”. While we expect that supplemental funding will ultimately decline, we do not expect it to materially impact our work with our Defense, Intelligence and Homeland Security customers. The base budgets and the government’s dependence on contractors should continue to produce opportunities for us.

 

   

Logistics and force protection operations will continue. We anticipate a continuing need to re-set and modernize equipment and infrastructure as forces return from deployments.

 

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Non-Security Market Opportunities

 

   

The intersection of law enforcement and intelligence is expected to continue to create opportunities in support of the Departments of Homeland Security, Justice, and State.

 

   

The intersection of compatible needs between the Veteran’s Administration and the DoD should continue to fuel opportunities related to healthcare IT.

 

   

Federal Acquisition Policy—The government has continued to change the manner in which it purchases goods and services. We believe the following aspects of this are most relevant to us.

 

   

The increased emphasis on the use of low priced, technically acceptable proposal evaluations represents a challenge to maintain value added differentiation to our solutions.

 

   

The use of T&M and sole-source contracts are now greatly reduced. The use of award fees is diminishing. In addition, more scrutiny is being placed on the amount of fee bid on cost reimbursable type contracts. Better requirements definition and value based solutions should allow for more fixed price contracts where the contractor assumes more of the risk. Our fixed priced risk review process and emphasis on qualified program managers should allow us to understand the risks and maintain margins. For cost reimbursable contracts, we may experience pricing pressures. Pricing is taking on an increasing role in best value determinations with more detailed pricing oversight.

 

   

Increased engagement by competition advocates maximizes the use of multiple-source, continuously competitive contracts.

 

   

Fees for subcontract management are being limited to reflect actual value provided, i.e., risk assumed by prime and continuous subcontractor risk reduction.

 

   

In many cases, periods of performance on task orders are being limited to two years and periods of performance for contracts are being limited to four years. Waivers are often required for contract ceilings above $100 million.

 

   

Size thresholds for small business have been revised upward to include businesses that exceed the current revenue thresholds.

 

   

Oversight at the Congressional level and audit scrutiny at the agency level have increased with the increased use of government contractors since 2001. Some high profile cases of alleged and proven contractor fraud and abuse has placed greater emphasis on making programs transparent to avoid overspending and to focus on performance and best value. Added program oversight and transparency often delay procurements while the government evaluates program performance. Further, companies have increased costs associated with audits of business management systems. While delays are inevitable, and often costly, we believe they will result in better requirements definition, greater demand for stronger value-based solutions/services, and the diversion of spending from poorly performing areas to well performing areas.

 

   

We continue to experience a number of protests of contracts awarded to us, especially those involving large, multiple award, IDIQ contracts. The protest process causes delays in awarding contracts, and sometimes task orders, affecting our backlog and revenue. However, once awarded, these multiple award IDIQ contracts allow the government to issue task order requests to a selected group of qualified companies and, often, more rapidly award task orders.

 

   

Many of our federal government contracts require us to have security clearances and employ personnel with specific levels of education and work experience. Depending on the level, security clearances can be difficult and time-consuming to obtain, and competition for skilled personnel in the information technology services industry is intense.

 

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As budgets are diverted from weapons systems platforms to system upgrades and services for the warfighter, increasing competitive pressures from large aerospace firms and traditional original equipment manufacturing companies are anticipated. We expect to continue to build scalable capabilities and functional solutions, to exhibit superior responsiveness and flexibility, and to selectively acquire companies whose presence will yield competitive advantage in targeted accounts.

 

   

A major national security or economic event could disrupt the opportunity pipeline. To mitigate this risk, we will continue to focus on enduring needs in both the mission and mission-enabling areas. These enduring needs are likely to be candidates for growth and programmatic emphasis.

 

Recent Significant Acquisitions

 

During the past three fiscal years, we completed a total of eleven acquisitions, seven in the U.S. and four in the U.K. including:

 

   

The October 3, 2011 acquisition of Advanced Programs Group, LLC, a provider of Oracle e-Business Services to the U.S. government, for $66.0 million.

 

   

The September 1, 2011 acquisition of Paradigm Solutions Corporation, a provider of cybersecurity and enterprise IT solutions to clients in federal civilian agencies, the DoD, and the Intelligence Community, for $61.5 million.

 

   

The July 1, 2011 acquisition of Pangia Technologies, LLC, a software engineering services company that provides technical solutions in the areas of computer network operations, information assurance, mission systems, software and systems engineering, and IT infrastructure support, for $41.0 million.

 

   

The November 2010 acquisition of Applied Systems Research, Inc., a provider of technical services and products to the U.S. government, for $25.1 million.

 

   

The November 2010 acquisition of TechniGraphics, Inc., a provider of imaging and geospatial services to the U.S. government, for $104.6 million.

 

   

The February 2010 acquisition of SystemWare Incorporated, which provides signal acquisition and analysis systems for cyber security and counterintelligence application, for $23.6 million.

 

   

The October 2009 acquisition of a business in the United States which provides commercial security technology services, for $78.3 million.

 

Seasonal Nature of Business

 

Our business in general is not seasonal, although the summer and holiday seasons affect our revenue because of the impact of holidays and vacations on our labor and on product and service sales by our international operations. Variations in our business also may occur at the expiration of major contracts until such contracts are renewed or new business obtained.

 

The U.S. government’s fiscal year ends on September 30 of each year. It is not uncommon for government agencies to award extra tasks or complete other contract actions in the weeks before the end of a fiscal year in order to avoid the loss of unexpended funds. Moreover, in years when the U.S. government does not complete the budget process for the next fiscal year before the end of September, government operations whose appropriations legislation has not been signed into law are funded under a continuing resolution that authorizes them to continue to operate, but traditionally does not authorize new spending initiatives.

 

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CACI Employment and Benefits

 

Our employees are our most valuable resource. We are in continuing competition for highly skilled professionals in virtually all of our business areas. The success and growth of our business is significantly correlated with our ability to recruit, train, promote and retain high quality people at all levels of the organization. For these reasons, we endeavor to maintain competitive salary structures, incentive compensation programs, fringe benefits, opportunities for growth, and individual recognition and award programs. Fringe benefits are generally consistent across our subsidiaries, and include paid vacations, sick leave and holidays; medical, dental, disability and life insurance; tuition reimbursement for job-related education and training; and other benefits under various retirement savings and stock purchase plans.

 

We have published policies that set high standards for the conduct of our business. We require all of our employees, independent contractors working on client engagements, officers, and directors annually to execute and affirm to the code of ethics applicable to their activities. In addition, we require annual ethics and compliance training for all of our employees to provide them with the knowledge necessary to maintain our high standards of ethics and compliance.

 

Patents, Trademarks, Trade Secrets and Licenses

 

We own 11 patents and patent applications in the United States. While we believe our patents are valid, we do not consider that our business is dependent on patent protection in any material way. We claim copyright, trademark and other proprietary rights in a variety of intellectual property, including each of our proprietary computer software and data products and the related documentation. We presently own 22 registered trademarks and service marks and applications in the U.S. and 36 registered trademarks and service marks in other countries, primarily the U.K. All of our registered trademarks and service marks may be renewed indefinitely. In addition, we assert copyrights in essentially all of our electronic and hard copy publications, our proprietary software and data products and in software produced at the expense of the U.S. government, which rights can be maintained for up to 75 years. Because most of our business involves providing services to government entities, our operations generally are not substantially dependent upon obtaining and/or maintaining copyright or trademark protections, although our operations make use of such protections and benefit from them as discriminators in competition. We are also a party to agreements that give us the right to distribute computer software, data and other products owned by other companies, and to receive income from such distribution. As a systems integrator, it is important that we maintain access to software, data and products supplied by such third parties, but we generally have experienced little difficulty in doing so. The durations of such agreements vary according to the terms of the agreements themselves.

 

We maintain a number of trade secrets that contribute to our success and competitive distinction and endeavor to accord such trade secrets protection adequate to ensure their continuing availability to us. From time to time, we are required to assert our rights against former employees or other third parties who attempt to misappropriate our trade secrets and confidential information for their own personal or professional gain. We take such matters seriously and pursue claims against such individuals to the extent necessary to adequately protect our rights. While retaining protection of our trade secrets and vital confidential information is important, we are not materially dependent on maintenance of a specific trade secret.

 

Backlog

 

Our backlog as of June 30, 2012, which consists primarily of contracts with the U.S. government, was $7.2 billion, of which $2.0 billion was for funded orders. Total backlog as of June 30, 2011 was $6.8 billion. We presently anticipate, based on current revenue projections, that the majority of the funded backlog as of June 30, 2012 will result in revenue during the fiscal year ending June 30, 2013.

 

Our backlog represents the aggregate contract revenue we estimate will be earned over the remaining life of our contracts. We include in estimated remaining contract value only the contract revenue we expect to earn over the remaining term of the contract, even in cases where more than one company is awarded work under a given

 

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contract. Funded backlog is based upon amounts appropriated by a customer for payment for goods and services and as the U.S. government operates under annual appropriations, agencies of the U.S. government generally fund contracts on an incremental basis. As a result, the majority of our estimated remaining contract value is not funded backlog. The estimates used to compile remaining contract value are based on our experience under contracts, and we believe the estimates are reasonable. However, there can be no assurance that existing contracts will result in earned revenue in any future period or at all.

 

Business Segments, Foreign Operations, and Major Customers

 

Additional business segment, foreign operations and major customer information is provided in our Consolidated Financial Statements contained in this Report. In particular, see Note 16, Business Segment, Customer and Geographic Information, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Revenue by Contract Type

 

The following information is provided on the amounts of our revenue attributable to cost reimbursable contracts, firm fixed-price contracts (including proprietary software product sales) and T&M contracts during each of the last three fiscal years:

 

     Year ended June 30,  
     2012     2011     2010  
     (dollars in thousands)  

Cost reimbursable

   $ 1,659,764         44.0   $ 1,277,326         35.7   $ 1,033,480         32.8

Firm fixed-price

     1,057,663         28.0        877,270         24.5        648,095         20.6   

Time and materials

     1,057,046         28.0        1,423,184         39.8        1,467,556         46.6   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 3,774,473         100.0   $ 3,577,780         100.0   $ 3,149,131         100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

You should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described below, together with the information included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and other documents we file with the SEC. The risks and uncertainties described below are those that we have identified as material, but are not the only risks and uncertainties facing us. Our business is also subject to general risks and uncertainties that affect many other companies, such as overall U.S. and non-U.S. economic and industry conditions including a global economic slowdown, geopolitical events, changes in laws or accounting rules, fluctuations in interest and exchange rates, terrorism, international conflicts, major health concerns, natural disasters or other disruptions of expected economic and business conditions. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently believe are immaterial also may impair our business operations and liquidity.

 

We depend on contracts with the federal government for a substantial majority of our revenue, and our business could be seriously harmed if the government significantly decreased or ceased doing business with us.

 

We derived 94.5 percent of our total revenue in FY2012 and 94.9 percent of our total revenue in FY2011 from federal government contracts, either as a prime contractor or a subcontractor. We derived 78.0 percent of our total revenue in FY2012 and 79.9 percent of our total revenue in FY2011 from contracts with agencies of the DoD. We expect that federal government contracts will continue to be the primary source of our revenue for the foreseeable future. If we were suspended or debarred from contracting with the federal government generally, the General Services Administration, or any significant agency in the intelligence community or the DoD, or if our reputation or relationship with government agencies were to be impaired, or if the government otherwise ceased doing business with us or significantly decreased the amount of business it does with us, our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results could be materially and adversely affected.

 

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Our business could be adversely affected by delays caused by our competitors protesting major contract awards received by us, resulting in the delay of the initiation of work.

 

It can take many months to resolve protests by one or more of our competitors of contract awards we receive. The resulting delay in the start up and funding of the work under these contracts may cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

Our business could be adversely affected by changes in budgetary priorities of the federal government.

 

Because we derive a substantial majority of our revenue from contracts with the federal government, we believe that the success and development of our business will continue to depend on our successful participation in federal government contract programs. Changes in federal government budgetary priorities could directly affect our financial performance. A significant decline in government expenditures, a shift of expenditures away from programs that we support or a change in federal government contracting policies could cause federal government agencies to reduce their purchases under contracts, to exercise their right to terminate contracts at any time without penalty or not to exercise options to renew contracts.

 

During 2011, the federal government was unable to reach agreement on budget reduction measures required by the Budget Control Act of 2011 (Budget Act) passed by Congress. Unless Congress and the Administration take further action, the Budget Act will trigger automatic reductions in both defense and discretionary spending in January 2013. While the impact of sequestration is yet to be determined, automatic across-the-board cuts would approximately double the $487 billion top-line reduction already reflected in the defense funding over a ten-year period, with a $52 billion reduction occurring in the government’s fiscal year 2013. The resulting automatic across-the-board budget cuts in sequestration could have significant consequences to our business and industry. In December 2011, Congress passed an omnibus appropriations act for fiscal year 2012 to finance all federal government activities through September 30, 2012, the end of its fiscal year. This full year method of financing eliminated much of the uncertainty and inefficiency in procurement of products and services that characterized the government’s first quarter of fiscal year 2012 when the operations of the federal government were financed through a series of continuing resolution temporary funding measures.

 

In years when Congress does not complete its budget process before the end of its fiscal year (September 30), government operations are funded through a continuing resolution (CR) that temporarily funds federal agencies. Recent CRs have generally provided funding at the levels provided in the previous fiscal year and have not authorized new spending initiatives. When the federal government operates under a CR, delays can occur in the procurement of products and services. Historically, such delays have not had a material effect on our business; however, should funding of the federal government by CR be prolonged or extended through the entire government 2013 fiscal year, and sequestration take place in January 2013 as part of the implementation of the Budget Act, it could have significant consequences to our business and our industry. At times, we may continue to work without funding, and use our funds, in order to meet our customer’s desired delivery dates for products or services. It is uncertain at this time which of our programs’ funding could be reduced in future years or whether new legislation will be passed by Congress in the next fiscal year that could result in additional or alternative funding cuts.

 

Additionally, our business could be seriously affected if the demand for and priority of funding for combat operations in Afghanistan decreases which may reduce the demand for our services on contracts supporting some operations and maintenance activities in the DoD or if we experience an increase in set-asides for small businesses, which could result in our inability to compete directly for prime contracts.

 

Our federal government contracts may be terminated by the government at any time and may contain other provisions permitting the government not to continue with contract performance, and if lost contracts are not replaced, our operating results may differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

We derive substantially all of our revenue from federal government contracts that typically span one or more base years and one or more option years. The option periods typically cover more than half of the contract’s

 

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potential duration. Federal government agencies generally have the right not to exercise these option periods. In addition, our contracts typically also contain provisions permitting a government client to terminate the contract for its convenience. A decision not to exercise option periods or to terminate contracts for convenience could result in significant revenue shortfalls from those anticipated.

 

Federal government contracts contain numerous provisions that are unfavorable to us.

 

Federal government contracts contain provisions and are subject to laws and regulations that give the government rights and remedies, some of which are not typically found in commercial contracts, including allowing the government to:

 

   

cancel multi-year contracts and related orders if funds for contract performance for any subsequent year become unavailable;

 

   

claim rights in systems and software developed by us;

 

   

suspend or debar us from doing business with the federal government or with a governmental agency;

 

   

impose fines and penalties and subject us to criminal prosecution; and

 

   

control or prohibit the export of our data and technology.

 

If the government terminates a contract for convenience, we may recover only our incurred or committed costs, settlement expenses and profit on work completed prior to the termination. If the government terminates a contract for default, we may be unable to recover even those amounts, and instead may be liable for excess costs incurred by the government in procuring undelivered items and services from another source. Depending on the value of a contract, such termination could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated. Certain contracts also contain organizational conflict of interest (OCI) clauses that limit our ability to compete for or perform certain other contracts. OCIs arise any time we engage in activities that (i) make us unable or potentially unable to render impartial assistance or advice to the government; (ii) impair or might impair our objectivity in performing contract work; or (iii) provide us with an unfair competitive advantage. For example, when we work on the design of a particular system, we may be precluded from competing for the contract to develop and install that system. Depending upon the value of the matters affected, an OCI issue that precludes our participation in or performance of a program or contract could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

As is common with government contractors, we have experienced and continue to experience occasional performance issues under certain of our contracts. Depending upon the value of the matters affected, a performance problem that impacts our performance of a program or contract could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

If we fail to establish and maintain important relationships with government entities and agencies, our ability to successfully bid for new business may be adversely affected.

 

To facilitate our ability to prepare bids for new business, we rely in part on establishing and maintaining relationships with officials of various government entities and agencies. These relationships enable us to provide informal input and advice to government entities and agencies prior to the development of a formal bid. We may be unable to successfully maintain our relationships with government entities and agencies, and any failure to do so may adversely affect our ability to bid successfully for new business and could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

We derive significant revenue from contracts and task orders awarded through a competitive bidding process. If we are unable to consistently win new awards over any extended period, our business and prospects will be adversely affected.

 

Substantially all of our contracts and task orders with the federal government are awarded through a competitive bidding process. We expect that much of the business that we will seek in the foreseeable future will

 

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continue to be awarded through competitive bidding. Budgetary pressures and changes in the procurement process have caused many government clients to increasingly purchase goods and services through IDIQ contracts, GSA schedule contracts and other government-wide acquisition contracts. These contracts, some of which are awarded to multiple contractors, have increased competition and pricing pressure, requiring that we make sustained post-award efforts to realize revenue under each such contract. In addition, in consideration of the practice of agencies awarding work under such contracts that is arguably outside the intended scope of the contracts, both the GSA and the DoD have initiated programs aimed to ensure that all work fits properly within the scope of the contract under which it is awarded. The net effect of such programs may reduce the number of bidding opportunities available to us. Moreover, even if we are highly qualified to work on a particular new contract, we might not be awarded business because of the federal government’s policy and practice of maintaining a diverse contracting base.

 

This competitive bidding process presents a number of risks, including the following:

 

   

we bid on programs before the completion of their design, which may result in unforeseen technological difficulties and cost overruns;

 

   

we expend substantial cost and managerial time and effort to prepare bids and proposals for contracts that we may not win;

 

   

we may be unable to estimate accurately the resources and cost structure that will be required to service any contract we win; and

 

   

we may encounter expense and delay if our competitors protest or challenge awards of contracts to us in competitive bidding, and any such protest or challenge could result in the resubmission of bids on modified specifications, or in the termination, reduction or modification of the awarded contract.

 

If we are unable to win particular contracts, we may be prevented from providing to clients services that are purchased under those contracts for a number of years. If we are unable to consistently win new contract awards over any extended period, our business and prospects will be adversely affected and that could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated. In addition, upon the expiration of a contract, if the client requires further services of the type provided by the contract, there is frequently a competitive rebidding process. There can be no assurance that we will win any particular bid, or that we will be able to replace business lost upon expiration or completion of a contract, and the termination or non-renewal of any of our significant contracts could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

Our business may suffer if we or our employees are unable to obtain the security clearances or other qualifications we and they need to perform services for our clients.

 

Many of our federal government contracts require us to have security clearances and employ personnel with specified levels of education, work experience and security clearances. Depending on the level of clearance, security clearances can be difficult and time-consuming to obtain. If we or our employees lose or are unable to obtain necessary security clearances, we may not be able to win new business and our existing clients could terminate their contracts with us or decide not to renew them. To the extent we cannot obtain or maintain the required security clearances for our employees working on a particular contract, we may not derive the revenue anticipated from the contract, which could cause our results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

We must comply with a variety of laws and regulations, and our failure to comply could cause our actual results to differ materially from those anticipated.

 

We must observe laws and regulations relating to the formation, administration and performance of federal government contracts which affect how we do business with our clients and may impose added costs on our business. For example, the Federal Acquisition Regulation and the industrial security regulations of the DoD and related laws include provisions that:

 

   

allow our federal government clients to terminate or not renew our contracts if we come under foreign ownership, control or influence;

 

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require us to divest work if an OCI related to such work cannot be mitigated to the government’s satisfaction;

 

   

require us to disclose and certify cost and pricing data in connection with contract negotiations; and

 

   

require us to prevent unauthorized access to classified information.

 

Our failure to comply with these or other laws and regulations could result in contract termination, loss of security clearances, suspension or debarment from contracting with the federal government, civil fines and damages and criminal prosecution and penalties, any of which could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

The federal government may change its procurement or other practices in a manner adverse to us.

 

The federal government may change its procurement practices, such as in proposed acquisition reforms, or adopt new contracting rules and regulations, such as cost accounting standards. It could also adopt new contracting methods relating to GSA contracts or other government-wide contracts, or adopt new socio-economic requirements. In all such cases, there is uncertainty surrounding the changes and what actual impacts they may have on contractors. These changes could impair our ability to obtain new contracts or win re-competed contracts. Any new contracting methods could be costly or administratively difficult for us to satisfy and, as a result, could cause actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

Restrictions on or other changes to the federal government’s use of service contracts may harm our operating results.

 

We derive a significant amount of revenue from service contracts with the federal government. The government may face restrictions from new legislation, regulations or government union pressures, on the nature and amount of services the government may obtain from private contractors (i.e., insourcing versus outsourcing). Any reduction in the government’s use of private contractors to provide federal services could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

Our contracts and administrative processes and systems are subject to audits and cost adjustments by the federal government, which could reduce our revenue, disrupt our business or otherwise adversely affect our results of operations.

 

Federal government agencies, including the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA), routinely audit and investigate government contracts and government contractors’ administrative processes and systems. These agencies review our performance on contracts, pricing practices, cost structure and compliance with applicable laws, regulations and standards. They also review our compliance with government regulations and policies and the adequacy of our internal control systems and policies, including our purchasing, accounting, estimating, compensation and management information processes and systems. Any costs found to be improperly allocated to a specific contract will not be reimbursed, and any such costs already reimbursed must be refunded and certain penalties may be imposed. Moreover, if any of the administrative processes and systems is found not to comply with requirements, we may be subjected to increased government scrutiny and approval that could delay or otherwise adversely affect our ability to compete for or perform contracts or collect our revenue in a timely manner. Therefore, an unfavorable outcome of an audit by the DCAA or another government agency could cause actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated. If a government investigation uncovers improper or illegal activities, we may be subject to civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions, including termination of contracts, forfeitures of profits, suspension of payments, fines and suspension or debarment from doing business with the federal government. In addition, we could suffer serious reputational harm if allegations of impropriety were made against us. Each of these results could cause actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated. DCAA audits for costs incurred on work performed after June 30, 2005 have not yet been completed. In addition, DCAA audits for costs incurred by our recent

 

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acquisitions for certain periods prior to acquisition have not yet been completed. We do not know the outcome of any existing or future audits and if any future audit adjustments significantly exceed our estimates our profitability could be adversely affected.

 

Failure to maintain strong relationships with other contractors could result in a decline in our revenue.

 

We derive substantial revenue from contracts in which we act as a subcontractor or from teaming arrangements in which we and other contractors bid on particular contracts or programs. As a subcontractor or teammate, we often lack control over fulfillment of a contract, and poor performance on the contract could impact our customer relationship, even when we perform as required. We expect to continue to depend on relationships with other contractors for a portion of our revenue in the foreseeable future. Moreover, our revenue and operating results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated if any prime contractor or teammate chose to offer directly to the client services of the type that we provide or if they team with other companies to provide those services.

 

We may not receive the full amounts authorized under the contracts included in our backlog, which could reduce our revenue in future periods below the levels anticipated.

 

Our backlog consists of funded backlog, which is based on amounts actually committed by a client for payment for goods and services, and unfunded backlog, which is based upon management’s estimate of the future potential of our existing contracts and task orders, including options, to generate revenue. Our backlog may not result in actual revenue in any particular period, or at all, which could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

The maximum contract value specified under a government contract or task order awarded to us is not necessarily indicative of the revenue that we will realize under that contract. For example, we derive a substantial portion of our revenue from government contracts in which we are not the sole provider, meaning that the government could turn to other companies to fulfill the contract. We also derive revenue from IDIQ contracts, which do not require the government to purchase a pre-determined amount of goods or services under the contract. Action by the government to obtain support from other contractors or failure of the government to order the quantity of work anticipated could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

Without additional Congressional appropriations, some of the contracts included in our backlog will remain unfunded, which could significantly harm our prospects.

 

Although many of our federal government contracts require performance over a period of years, Congress often appropriates funds for these contracts for only one year at a time. As a result, our contracts typically are only partially funded at any point during their term, and all or some of the work intended to be performed under the contracts will remain unfunded pending subsequent Congressional appropriations and the obligation of additional funds to the contract by the procuring agency. Nevertheless, we estimate our share of the contract values, including values based on the assumed exercise of options relating to these contracts, in calculating the amount of our backlog. Because we may not receive the full amount we expect under a contract, our estimate of our backlog may be inaccurate and we may generate results that differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

Employee misconduct, including security breaches, could result in the loss of clients and our suspension or debarment from contracting with the federal government.

 

We may be unable to prevent our employees from engaging in misconduct, fraud or other improper activities that could adversely affect our business and reputation. Misconduct could include the failure to comply with federal government procurement regulations, regulations regarding the protection of classified information

 

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and legislation regarding the pricing of labor and other costs in government contracts. Many of the systems we develop involve managing and protecting information involved in national security and other sensitive government functions. A security breach in one of these systems could prevent us from having access to such critically sensitive systems. Other examples of employee misconduct could include time card fraud and violations of the Anti-Kickback Act. The precautions we take to prevent and detect this activity may not be effective, and we could face unknown risks or losses. As a result of employee misconduct, we could face fines and penalties, loss of security clearance and suspension or debarment from contracting with the federal government, which could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

Our failure to attract and retain qualified employees, including our senior management team, could adversely affect our business.

 

Our continued success depends to a substantial degree on our ability to recruit and retain the technically skilled personnel we need to serve our clients effectively. Our business involves the development of tailored solutions for our clients, a process that relies heavily upon the expertise and services of our employees. Accordingly, our employees are our most valuable resource. Competition for skilled personnel in the information technology services industry is intense, and technology service companies often experience high attrition among their skilled employees. There is a shortage of people capable of filling these positions and they are likely to remain a limited resource for the foreseeable future. Recruiting and training these personnel require substantial resources. Our failure to attract and retain technical personnel could increase our costs of performing our contractual obligations, reduce our ability to efficiently satisfy our clients’ needs, limit our ability to win new business and cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

In addition to attracting and retaining qualified technical personnel, we believe that our success will depend on the continued employment of our senior management team and its ability to generate new business and execute projects successfully. Our senior management team is very important to our business because personal reputations and individual business relationships are a critical element of obtaining and maintaining client engagements in our industry, particularly with agencies performing classified operations. The loss of any of our senior executives could cause us to lose client relationships or new business opportunities, which could cause actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

Our markets are highly competitive, and many of the companies we compete against have substantially greater resources.

 

The markets in which we operate include a large number of participants and are highly competitive. Many of our competitors may compete more effectively than we can because they are larger, better financed and better known companies than we are. In order to stay competitive in our industry, we must also keep pace with changing technologies and client preferences. If we are unable to differentiate our services from those of our competitors, our revenue may decline. In addition, our competitors have established relationships among themselves or with third parties to increase their ability to address client needs. As a result, new competitors or alliances among competitors may emerge and compete more effectively than we can. There is also a significant industry trend towards consolidation, which may result in the emergence of companies which are better able to compete against us. The results of these competitive pressures could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

Our quarterly revenue and operating results could be volatile due to the unpredictability of the federal government’s budgeting process and policy priorities.

 

Our quarterly revenue and operating results may fluctuate significantly and unpredictably in the future. In particular, if the federal government does not adopt, or delays adoption of, a budget for each fiscal year beginning on October 1, or fails to pass a continuing resolution, federal agencies may be forced to suspend our contracts and delay the award of new and follow-on contracts and orders due to a lack of funding. Further, the

 

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rate at which the federal government procures technology may be negatively affected following changes in presidential administrations and senior government officials. Therefore, period-to-period comparisons of our operating results may not be a good indication of our future performance.

 

Our quarterly operating results may not meet the expectations of securities analysts or investors, which in turn may have an adverse effect on the market price of our common stock.

 

We may lose money or generate less than anticipated profits if we do not accurately estimate the cost of an engagement which is conducted on a fixed-price basis.

 

We perform a portion of our engagements on a variety of fixed-price contract vehicles. We derived 28.0 percent of our total revenue in FY2012 and 24.5 percent of our total revenue in FY2011 from fixed-price contracts. Fixed-price contracts require us to price our contracts by predicting our expenditures in advance. In addition, some of our engagements obligate us to provide ongoing maintenance and other supporting or ancillary services on a fixed-price basis or with limitations on our ability to increase prices. Many of our engagements are also on a T&M basis. While these types of contracts are generally subject to less uncertainty than fixed-price contracts, to the extent that our actual labor costs are higher than the contract rates, our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

When making proposals for engagements on a fixed-price basis, we rely on our estimates of costs and timing for completing the projects. These estimates reflect our best judgment regarding our capability to complete the task efficiently. Any increased or unexpected costs or unanticipated delays in connection with the performance of fixed-price contracts, including delays caused by factors outside our control, could make these contracts less profitable or unprofitable. From time to time, unexpected costs and unanticipated delays have caused us to incur losses on fixed-price contracts, primarily in connection with state government clients. On rare occasions, these losses have been significant. In the event that we encounter such problems in the future, our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

Our earnings and margins may vary based on the mix of our contracts and programs.

 

At June 30, 2012, our backlog included cost reimbursable, T&M and fixed-price contracts. Cost reimbursable and T&M contracts generally have lower profit margins than fixed-price contracts. Our earnings and margins may vary materially and adversely depending on the types of long-term government contracts undertaken, the costs incurred in their performance, the achievement of other performance objectives and the stage of performance at which the right to receive fees, particularly under incentive and award fee contracts, is finally determined.

 

Systems failures may disrupt our business and have an adverse effect on our results of operations.

 

Any systems failures, including network, software or hardware failures, whether caused by us, a third party service provider, unauthorized intruders and hackers, computer viruses, natural disasters, power shortages or terrorist attacks, could cause loss of data or interruptions or delays in our business or that of our clients. In addition, the failure or disruption of our mail, communications or utilities could cause us to interrupt or suspend our operations or otherwise harm our business. Our property and business interruption insurance may be inadequate to compensate us for all losses that may occur as a result of any system or operational failure or disruption and, as a result, our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

The systems and networks that we maintain for our clients, although highly redundant in their design, could also fail. If a system or network we maintain were to fail or experience service interruptions, we might experience loss of revenue or face claims for damages or contract termination. Our errors and omissions liability insurance may be inadequate to compensate us for all the damages that we might incur and, as a result, our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

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We may have difficulty identifying and executing acquisitions on favorable terms and therefore may grow at slower than anticipated rates.

 

One of our key growth strategies has been to selectively pursue acquisitions. Through acquisitions, we have expanded our base of federal government clients, increased the range of solutions we offer to our clients and deepened our penetration of existing markets and clients. We may encounter difficulty identifying and executing suitable acquisitions. To the extent that management is involved in identifying acquisition opportunities or integrating new acquisitions into our business, our management may be diverted from operating our core business. Without acquisitions, we may not grow as rapidly as the market expects, which could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated. We may encounter other risks in executing our acquisition strategy, including:

 

   

increased competition for acquisitions may increase the costs of our acquisitions;

 

   

our failure to discover material liabilities during the due diligence process, including the failure of prior owners of any acquired businesses or their employees to comply with applicable laws or regulations, such as the Federal Acquisition Regulation and health, safety and environmental laws, or their failure to fulfill their contractual obligations to the federal government or other customers; and

 

   

acquisition financing may not be available on reasonable terms or at all.

 

Each of these types of risks could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

We may have difficulty integrating the operations of any companies we acquire, which could cause actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

The success of our acquisition strategy will depend upon our ability to continue to successfully integrate any businesses we may acquire in the future. The integration of these businesses into our operations may result in unforeseen operating difficulties, absorb significant management attention and require significant financial resources that would otherwise be available for the ongoing development of our business. These integration difficulties include the integration of personnel with disparate business backgrounds, the transition to new information systems, coordination of geographically dispersed organizations, loss of key employees of acquired companies, and reconciliation of different corporate cultures. For these or other reasons, we may be unable to retain key clients of acquired companies. Moreover, any acquired business may fail to generate the revenue or net income we expected or produce the efficiencies or cost-savings we anticipated. Any of these outcomes could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

If our subcontractors fail to perform their contractual obligations, our performance as a prime contractor and our ability to obtain future business could be materially and adversely impacted and our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

Our performance of government contracts may involve the issuance of subcontracts to other companies upon which we rely to perform all or a portion of the work we are obligated to deliver to our clients. A failure by one or more of our subcontractors to satisfactorily deliver on a timely basis the agreed-upon supplies, perform the agreed-upon services, or appropriately manage their vendors may materially and adversely impact our ability to perform our obligations as a prime contractor.

 

A subcontractor’s performance deficiency could result in the government terminating our contract for default. A default termination could expose us to liability for excess costs of reprocurement by the government and have a material adverse effect on our ability to compete for future contracts and task orders. Depending upon the level of problem experienced, such problems with subcontractors could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

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The federal government’s appropriation process and other factors may delay the collection of our receivables, and our business may be adversely affected if we cannot collect our receivables in a timely manner.

 

We depend on the collection of our receivables to generate cash flow, provide working capital, pay debt and continue our business operations. If the federal government, any of our other clients or any prime contractor for whom we are a subcontractor fails to pay or delays the payment of their outstanding invoices for any reason, our business and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected. The government may fail to pay outstanding invoices for a number of reasons, including lack of appropriated funds or lack of an approved budget. In addition, the DCAA may revoke our direct billing privileges, which would adversely affect our ability to collect our receivables in a timely manner. Contracting officers have the authority to impose contractual withholdings, which can also adversely affect our ability to collect timely. A new Defense Federal Acquisition Regulations interim rule became effective May 18, 2011, applying to solicitations issued on or after that date, requiring DoD contracting officers to impose contractual withholdings at no less than certain minimum levels if a contracting officer determines that one or more of a contractor’s business systems have one or more significant deficiencies. On February 24, 2012, a final DFARS rule became effective, with no substantive changes from the interim rule. Some prime contractors for whom we are a subcontractor have significantly less financial resources than we do, which may increase the risk that we may not be paid in full or payment may be delayed. If we experience difficulties collecting receivables, it could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

We have substantial investments in recorded goodwill as a result of prior acquisitions, and changes in future business conditions could cause these investments to become impaired, requiring substantial write-downs that would reduce our operating income.

 

Goodwill accounts for $1.4 billion of our recorded total assets. We evaluate the recoverability of recorded goodwill amounts annually, or when evidence of potential impairment exists. The annual impairment test is based on several factors requiring judgment. Principally, a decrease in expected reporting unit cash flows or changes in market conditions may indicate potential impairment of recorded goodwill. If there is an impairment, we would be required to write down the recorded amount of goodwill, which would be reflected as a charge against operating income.

 

Our operations involve several risks and hazards, including potential dangers to our employees and to third parties that are inherent in aspects of our federal business (i.e., counterterrorism training services). If these risks and hazards are not adequately insured, it could adversely affect our operating results.

 

Our federal business includes the maintenance of global networks and the provision of special operations services (i.e., counterterrorism training) that require us to dispatch employees to various countries around the world. These countries may be experiencing political upheaval or unrest, and in some cases war or terrorism. It is possible that certain of our employees or executives will suffer injury or bodily harm, or be killed or kidnapped in the course of these deployments. We could also encounter unexpected costs for reasons beyond our control in connection with the repatriation of our employees or executives. Any of these types of accidents or other incidents could involve significant potential claims of employees, executives and/or third parties who are injured or killed or who may have wrongful death or similar claims against us.

 

We maintain insurance policies that mitigate against risk and potential liabilities related to our operations. This insurance is maintained in amounts that we believe are reasonable. However, our insurance coverage may not be adequate to cover those claims or liabilities, and we may be forced to bear significant costs from an accident or incident. Substantial claims in excess of our related insurance coverage could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

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Our failure to adequately protect our confidential information and proprietary rights may harm our competitive position.

 

Our success depends, in part, upon our ability to protect our proprietary information and other intellectual property. Although our employees are subject to confidentiality obligations, this protection may be inadequate to deter misappropriation of our confidential information. In addition, we may be unable to detect unauthorized use of our intellectual property in order to take appropriate steps to enforce our rights. If we are unable to prevent third parties from infringing or misappropriating our copyrights, trademarks or other proprietary information, our competitive position could be harmed and our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

We face additional risks which could harm our business because we have international operations.

 

We conduct the majority of our international operations in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. Our U.K.-based operations comprised 3.0 percent of our revenue in FY2012 and 3.3 percent of our revenue in FY2011. Our U.K.-based operations are subject to risks associated with operating in a foreign country. These risks include fluctuations in the value of the British pound and the Euro, longer payment cycles, changes in foreign tax laws and regulations and unexpected legislative, regulatory, economic or political changes.

 

Our U.K.-based operations are also subject to risks associated with operating a commercial as opposed to a government contracting business, including the effects of general economic conditions in the United Kingdom on the telecommunications, computer software and computer services sectors and the impact of more concentrated and intense competition for the reduced volume of work available in those sectors. We are marketing our services to clients in industries that are new to us and our efforts in that regard may be unsuccessful. Other factors that may adversely affect our international operations are difficulties relating to managing our business internationally, integrating recent acquisitions, multiple tax structures and adverse changes in foreign exchange rates. Any of these factors could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

Our business could be adversely affected by the outcome of the various investigations/proceedings regarding our interrogation services work in Iraq.

 

In May 2004, press accounts disclosed an internal U.S. government report, the Taguba Report, which, among other things, alleged that one of our employees was involved in the alleged mistreatment of Iraqi prisoners at the Abu Ghraib facility. Another government report, the Jones/Fay Report, alleged that three of our employees, including the employee identified in the Taguba Report, acted improperly in performing their assigned duties in Iraq. The Jones/Fay Report included a recommendation that the information in the report regarding these employees be forwarded to the General Counsel of the U.S. Army for determination of whether each of them should be referred to the U.S. Department of Justice for prosecution and to the contracting officer for appropriate contractual action. Our investigation into these matters has not to date confirmed the allegations of abuse contained in either the Taguba Report or the Jones/Fay Report. To date, no charges have been brought by the government against us or any of our employees in connection with the Abu Ghraib allegations.

 

The results of the investigations and proceedings regarding our interrogation services in Iraq could affect our relationships with our clients and could cause our actual results to differ materially and adversely from those anticipated.

 

Our senior secured credit facility (the Credit Facility) imposes certain restrictions on our ability to take certain actions which may have an impact on our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

The Credit Facility imposes certain operating and financial restrictions on us and requires us to meet certain financial tests. These restrictions may significantly limit or prohibit us from engaging in certain transactions, including the following:

 

   

incurring or guaranteeing certain amounts of additional debt;

 

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paying dividends or other distributions to our stockholders or redeeming, repurchasing or retiring our capital stock in excess of specific limits;

 

   

making certain investments, loans and advances;

 

   

exceeding specific levels of liens on our assets;

 

   

issuing or selling equity in our subsidiaries;

 

   

transforming or selling certain assets currently held by us, including certain sale and lease-back transactions;

 

   

amending or modifying certain agreements, including those related to indebtedness; and

 

   

engaging in certain mergers, consolidations or acquisitions.

 

The failure to comply with any of these covenants would cause a default under the Credit Facility. A default, if not waived, could cause our debt to become immediately due and payable. In such situations, we may not be able to repay our debt or borrow sufficient funds to refinance it, and even if new financing is available, it may not contain terms that are acceptable to us.

 

Despite our outstanding debt, we may incur additional indebtedness.

 

The Credit Facility consists of a $600.0 million revolving credit facility and a $150.0 million term loan facility. At June 30, 2012, $125.0 million was outstanding under the revolving credit facility and $138.8 million was outstanding under the term loan. In addition, we have $300.0 million outstanding under our convertible senior subordinated notes due 2014 (the Notes). We are able to incur additional debt in the future by drawing down on the unused portion of the revolving credit facility and have flexibility under the Credit Facility to increase the term loan facility or the revolving credit facility in an aggregate amount up to $300.0 million with applicable lender approvals. In addition, the terms of the Credit Facility allow us to incur additional indebtedness from other sources so long as we satisfy the covenants in the agreement governing the Credit Facility. If new debt is added to our current debt levels, the risks related to our ability to service that debt could increase.

 

Servicing our debt requires a significant amount of cash, and we may not have sufficient cash flow from our business to pay our substantial debt.

 

Interest payments on the Notes are due each May and November and the outstanding principal amount comes due in May 2014. The Credit Facility expires in November 2016. Principal payments under the term loan facility are due in quarterly installments. Our business may not generate cash flow from operations sufficient to service our debt and make necessary capital expenditures. If we are unable to generate such cash flow, we may be required to adopt one or more alternatives, such as selling assets, restructuring debt or obtaining additional equity capital on terms that may be onerous or highly dilutive.

 

A change in control or fundamental change may adversely affect us.

 

The Credit Facility provides that certain change in control events with respect to us will constitute a default. Certain fundamental changes, as defined under the Notes, will constitute a change of control under the Credit Facility, and therefore will constitute a default under such facility. Furthermore, the fundamental change provisions, including the provisions requiring the increase to the conversion rate for conversions under the Notes in connection with certain fundamental changes, may in certain circumstances make more difficult or discourage a takeover of our company and the removal of incumbent management.

 

The conditional conversion features of the Notes, if triggered, may adversely affect our financial condition and operating results.

 

In the event the conditional conversion features of the Notes are triggered, holders of the Notes will be entitled to convert the Notes at any time during specified periods at their option. If one or more holders elect to

 

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convert their notes, we would be required to settle any converted principal through the payment of cash, which could adversely affect our liquidity. In addition, even if holders do not elect to convert their notes, we could be required under applicable accounting rules to reclassify all or a portion of the outstanding principal of the Notes as a current rather than long-term liability, which would result in a material reduction of our net working capital. As of June 30, 2012, we had $475.0 million available under our revolving credit facility, which we could use to satisfy payment obligations arising from conversions of the Notes. However, there can be no assurance that all or any portion of this facility will be available at the time any such conversion obligations arise. Our failure to pay the required cash upon conversion as required under the Notes would constitute an event of default which, if not waived, would result in the immediate acceleration of our payment obligations under all of the Notes. Any such default would also result in an event of default under the Credit Facility. In such a situation, we may not be able to repay our debt or borrow sufficient funds to refinance it, and, even if new financing is available, it may be available on terms less favorable than the terms of our existing debt and, potentially, on terms that are unacceptable to us. A material deterioration in our financial condition or operating results could inhibit our access to additional investment capital and may cause the price of our common stock to decline.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

 

None.

 

Item 2. Properties

 

As of June 30, 2012, we leased office space at 120 U.S. locations containing an aggregate of approximately 2.2 million square feet located in 30 states and the District of Columbia. In five countries outside the U.S., we leased office space at 16 locations containing an aggregate of approximately 83,000 square feet. Our leases expire primarily within the next five years, with the exception of seven leases in Northern Virginia and three leases outside of Northern Virginia, which will expire within the next six to 10 years. We anticipate that most of these leases will be renewed or replaced by other leases. All of our offices are in reasonably modern and well-maintained buildings. The facilities are substantially utilized and adequate for present operations.

 

We maintain our corporate headquarters in approximately 117,000 square feet of space at 1100 North Glebe Road, Arlington, Virginia. See Note 14, Leases, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information regarding our lease commitments.

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

 

Al Shimari, et al. v. L-3 Services, Inc. et al.

 

On June 30, 2008, Plaintiff Al Shimari filed a twenty-count complaint in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio. Plaintiff Al Shimari is an Iraqi who claims that he suffered significant physical injury and emotional distress while held at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. The lawsuit names CACI International Inc, CACI Premier Technology, Inc. and former CACI employee Timothy Dugan as Defendants, along with L-3 Services, Inc. The complaint alleges that the Defendants conspired with U.S. military personnel to engage in illegal treatment of Iraqi detainees. The complaint does not allege any interaction between Plaintiff Al Shimari and any CACI employee. Plaintiff Al Shimari seeks, inter alia, compensatory damages, punitive damages, and attorney’s fees. On August 8, 2008, the court granted CACI’s motion to transfer the action to the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia. Thereafter, an amended complaint was filed adding three plaintiffs. On September 12, 2008, Mr. Dugan was dismissed from the case without prejudice. On October 2, 2008, CACI filed a motion to dismiss the case. CACI also moved to stay discovery pending further proceedings. The court granted CACI’s motion to stay discovery. On March 18, 2009, the court granted in part and denied in part CACI’s motion to dismiss. On March 23, 2009, CACI filed a notice of appeal with respect to the March 18, 2009 decision. Plaintiffs filed a motion to strike CACI’s notice of appeal and a motion to lift the stay on discovery. The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia denied both motions. On April 27, 2009, Plaintiffs filed a motion to dismiss the appeal in the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.

 

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The United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit deferred any ruling on Plaintiffs’ motion and issued a briefing schedule. Plaintiffs filed a notice of cross-appeal, which CACI moved to dismiss. The Court of Appeals dismissed the Plaintiffs’ cross-appeal. On October 26, 2010, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit heard oral argument in the appeal and took the matter under advisement. On September 21, 2011, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit reversed the decision of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia and remanded the action with instructions to dismiss the action. On October 5, 2011, Plaintiffs filed a petition for a rehearing en banc, which the Court of Appeals granted. The Court of Appeals also invited the United States to participate in the en banc rehearing of the appeal as amicus curiae. The United States participated in that capacity in the en banc rehearing. On January 27, 2012, the Court of Appeals, sitting en banc, heard oral argument. On May 11, 2012, the Court of Appeals, in a 11-3 decision, held that it lacked jurisdiction over the appeal and dismissed the appeal. The action has returned to the district court for further proceedings.

 

The Al Shimari case is the last of eight cases naming CACI as a defendant in lawsuits in which Plaintiffs have sought damages relating to alleged activities at the Abu Ghraib prison. All of the other cases have been dismissed.

 

We are vigorously defending the above-described legal proceeding, and, based on our present knowledge of the facts, believe the lawsuit is completely without merit.

 

Item 4. [Reserved.]

 

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PART II

 

Item 5. Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

Our common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol “CACI”.

 

The ranges of high and low sales prices of our common stock quoted on the New York Stock Exchange for each quarter during the fiscal years ended June 30, 2012 and 2011 were as follows:

 

     2012      2011  

Quarter

   High      Low      High      Low  

1st

   $ 66.49       $ 46.63       $ 48.70       $ 40.00   

2nd

   $ 59.45       $ 46.36       $ 54.11       $ 43.61   

3rd

   $ 63.11       $ 54.95       $ 62.75       $ 50.91   

4th

   $ 63.02       $ 41.29       $ 64.40       $ 58.15   

 

We have never paid a cash dividend. Our present policy is to retain earnings to provide funds for the operation and expansion of our business. We do not intend to pay any cash dividends at this time. The Board of Directors will determine whether to pay dividends in the future based on conditions then existing, including our earnings, financial condition and capital requirements, as well as economic and other conditions as the board may deem relevant. In addition, our ability to declare and pay dividends on our common stock is restricted by the provisions of Delaware law and covenants in the Credit Facility.

 

As of August 24, 2012, the number of stockholders of record of our common stock was approximately 325. The number of stockholders of record is not representative of the number of beneficial stockholders due to the fact that many shares are held by depositories, brokers, or nominees.

 

The following table provides certain information with respect to our purchases of shares of CACI International Inc’s common stock during the three months ended June 30, 2012:

 

Period

   Total Number
of Shares
Purchased
     Average Price
Paid Per Share
     Total Number of  Shares
Purchased As Part of
Publicly Announced
Programs
     Maximum Number of
Shares that May Yet Be
Purchased Under the
Plans or Programs(1)
 

April 2012

     —         $ —           —           —     

May 2012

     —           —           —           —     

June 2012

     2,000,000         51.43         2,000,000         2,000,000   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total

     2,000,000       $ 51.43         2,000,000      
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

(1) In June 2012, our Board of Directors authorized a stock repurchase program (the Program) under which we could repurchase up to 4 million shares of our common stock, where the total expenditure for the purchase of shares under the Program did not exceed $240.0 million. The remaining 2 million shares as of June 30, 2012 were repurchased in July 2012. The average price for all 4 million shares repurchased under the Program was $53.72 per share.

 

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The following graph compares the cumulative 5-year total return to shareholders on CACI International Inc’s common stock relative to the cumulative total returns of the Russell 1000 index and the Dow Jones U.S. Computer Services Total Stock Market index. The graph assumes that the value of the investment in our common stock and in each of the indexes (including reinvestment of dividends) was $100 on June 30, 2007 and tracks it through June 30, 2012.

 

Comparison of Five Year Cumulative Total Returns

Performance Graph for

CACI International Inc

 

LOGO

 

    June 30,  
    2007     2008     2009     2010     2011     2012  

CACI International Inc

    100.00        93.69        87.44        86.96        129.12        112.61   

Russell 1000

    100.00        87.64        64.25        74.03        97.12        101.37   

Dow Jones U.S. Computer Services Total Stock Market

    100.00        106.38        93.19        114.46        160.45        179.71   

 

The stock price performance included in this graph is not necessarily indicative of future stock price performance.

 

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Item 6. Selected Financial Data

 

The selected financial data set forth below is derived from our audited financial statements for each of the fiscal years in the five year period ended June 30, 2012. This information should be read in conjunction with Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and our consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto, included in Part II in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Income Statement Data

 

    Year ended June 30,  
    2012     2011     2010     2009
(As  Adjusted(1))
    2008
(As  Adjusted(1))
 
    (amounts in thousands, except per share data)  

Revenue

  $ 3,774,473      $ 3,577,780      $ 3,149,131      $ 2,730,162      $ 2,420,537   

Costs of revenue

    3,474,624        3,326,379        2,954,349        2,546,048        2,257,708   

Net income attributable to CACI

    167,454        144,218        106,515        89,698        77,935   

Earnings per common share and common share equivalent:

         

Basic:

         

Weighted-average shares outstanding

    27,077        30,281        30,138        29,976        30,058   

Earnings per share

  $ 6.18      $ 4.76      $ 3.53      $ 2.99      $ 2.59   

Diluted:

         

Weighted-average shares and equivalent shares outstanding

    28,111        31,300        30,676        30,427        30,606   

Earnings per share

  $ 5.96      $ 4.61      $ 3.47      $ 2.95      $ 2.55   

 

Balance Sheet Data

 

     Year ended June 30,  
     2012      2011      2010      2009
(As  Adjusted(1))
     2008
(As  Adjusted(1))
 
     (amounts in thousands)  

Total assets

   $ 2,392,876       $ 2,320,131       $ 2,244,766       $ 2,006,079       $ 1,892,222   

Long-term liabilities

     743,502         573,294         413,188         658,567         642,886   

Working capital

     200,863         344,857         182,323         406,928         312,555   

Shareholders’ equity

     1,164,445         1,309,616         1,173,155         1,029,608         959,067   

 

(1) Certain amounts as of and for the years ended June 30, 2008 and June 30, 2009 have been adjusted to reflect the retroactive application of new accounting standards. See Note 3 in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2011 for additional information.

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition & Results of Operations

 

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is provided to enhance the understanding of, and should be read together with, our consolidated financial statements and the notes to those statements that appear elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. This discussion contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Unless otherwise specifically noted, all years refer to our fiscal year which ends on June 30.

 

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Overview

 

We are a leading provider of information solutions and services to the U.S. government. We derived 94.5 percent of our revenue during the year ended June 30, 2012 from contracts with U.S. government agencies, including 78.0 percent from DoD customers and 16.5 percent from U.S. federal civilian agency customers including the Department of Homeland Security. We also provide services to state and local governments and commercial customers.

 

For the year ended June 30, 2012, 88.4 percent of our revenue was from contracts where we were the lead, or “prime,” contractor. Our contract base has approximately 625 active contracts and 1,800 active task orders. We have a diverse mix of contract types, with 44.0 percent, 28.0 percent, and 28.0 percent of our revenue for the year ended June 30, 2012, derived from cost-reimbursable, T&M and fixed-price contracts, respectively. We generally do not pursue fixed-price software development contracts that may create financial risk.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Critical accounting policies are defined as those that are reflective of significant judgments and uncertainties, and potentially result in materially different results under different assumptions and conditions. Application of these policies is particularly important to the portrayal of our financial condition and results of operations. The following are considered our critical accounting policies:

 

Revenue Recognition/Contract Accounting

 

We generate almost all of our revenue from three different types of contractual arrangements: cost-plus-fee contracts, T&M contracts, and fixed-price contracts. Revenue on cost-plus-fee contracts is recognized to the extent of allowable costs incurred plus an estimate of the applicable fees earned. We consider fixed fees under cost-plus-fee contracts to be earned in proportion to the allowable costs incurred in performance of the contract. For cost-plus-fee contracts that include performance based fee incentives, and that are subject to the provisions of Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Section 605-35, Revenue Recognition—Construction-Type and Production-Type Contracts (ASC 605-35), we recognize the relevant portion of the expected fee to be awarded by the customer at the time such fee can be reasonably estimated, based on factors such as our prior award experience and communications with the customer regarding performance. For such cost-plus-fee contracts subject to the provisions of ASC 605-10-S99, Revenue Recognition—SEC Materials (ASC 605-10-S99), we recognize the relevant portion of the fee upon customer approval. Revenue on T&M contracts is recognized to the extent of billable rates times hours delivered for services provided, to the extent of material cost for products delivered to customers, and to the extent of expenses incurred on behalf of the customers. Shipping and handling fees charged to the customers are recognized as revenue at the time products are delivered to the customers.

 

We have four basic categories of fixed price contracts: fixed unit price, fixed price-level of effort, fixed price-completion, and fixed price-license. Revenue on fixed unit price contracts, where specified units of output under service arrangements are delivered, is recognized as units are delivered based on the specified price per unit. Revenue on fixed unit price maintenance contracts is recognized ratably over the length of the service period. Revenue for fixed price-level of effort contracts is recognized based upon the number of units of labor actually delivered multiplied by the agreed rate for each unit of labor.

 

A significant portion of our fixed price-completion contracts involve the design and development of complex client systems. For these contracts that are within the scope of ASC 605-35, revenue is recognized on the percentage of completion method using costs incurred in relation to total estimated costs. For fixed price-completion contracts that are not within the scope of ASC 605-35, revenue is generally recognized ratably over the service period. Our fixed price-license agreements and related services contracts are primarily executed in our international operations. As the agreements to deliver software require significant production, modification or customization of software, revenue is recognized using the contract accounting guidance of ASC 605-35. For agreements to deliver data under license and related services, revenue is recognized as the data is delivered and

 

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services are performed. Except for losses on contracts accounted for under ASC 605-10-S99, provisions for estimated losses on uncompleted contracts are recorded in the period such losses are determined. Losses on contracts accounted for under ASC 605-10-S99 are recognized as the services and materials are provided.

 

Our contracts may include the provision of more than one of our services. In these situations, revenue recognition includes the proper identification of separate units of accounting and the allocation of revenue across all elements based on relative fair values, with proper consideration given to the guidance provided by other authoritative literature.

 

Contract accounting requires judgment relative to assessing risks, estimating contract revenue and costs, and making assumptions for schedule and technical issues. Due to the size and nature of many of our contracts, the estimation of total revenue and cost at completion is complicated and subject to many variables. Contract costs include material, labor, subcontracting costs, and other direct costs, as well as an allocation of allowable indirect costs. Assumptions have to be made regarding the length of time to complete the contract because costs also include expected increases in wages and prices for materials. For contract change orders, claims or similar items, we apply judgment in estimating the amounts and assessing the potential for realization. These amounts are only included in contract value when they can be reliably estimated and realization is considered probable. Incentives or penalties related to performance on contracts are considered in estimating sales and profit rates, and are recorded when there is sufficient information for us to assess anticipated performance. Estimates of award fees for certain contracts may also be a factor in estimating revenue and profit rates based on actual and anticipated awards.

 

Long-term development and production contracts make up a large portion of our business, and therefore the amounts we record in our financial statements using contract accounting methods are material. For our federal contracts, we follow U.S. government procurement and accounting standards in assessing the allowability and the allocability of costs to contracts. Due to the significance of the judgments and estimation processes, it is likely that materially different amounts could be recorded if we used different assumptions or if the underlying circumstances were to change. We closely monitor compliance with, and the consistent application of, our critical accounting policies related to contract accounting. Business operations personnel conduct periodic contract status and performance reviews. When adjustments in estimated contract revenue or costs are required, any significant changes from prior estimates are included in earnings in the current period. Also, regular and recurring evaluations of contract cost, scheduling and technical matters are performed by management personnel who are independent from the business operations personnel performing work under the contract. Costs incurred and allocated to contracts with the U.S. government are scrutinized for compliance with regulatory standards by our personnel, and are subject to audit by the DCAA.

 

From time to time, we may proceed with work based on client direction prior to the completion and signing of formal contract documents. We have a formal review process for approving any such work. Revenue associated with such work is recognized only when it can be reliably estimated and realization is probable. We base our estimates on previous experiences with the client, communications with the client regarding funding status, and our knowledge of available funding for the contract or program.

 

Costs of Revenue

 

Costs of revenue include all direct contract costs as well as indirect overhead costs and selling, general and administrative expenses that are allowable and allocable to contracts under federal procurement standards. Costs of revenue also include costs and expenses that are unallowable under applicable procurement standards, and thus are not allocable to contracts for billing purposes. Such costs and expenses do not directly generate revenue, but are necessary for business operations.

 

Allowance For Doubtful Accounts

 

Management establishes bad debt reserves against certain billed receivables based upon the latest information available to determine whether invoices are ultimately collectible. Whenever judgment is involved in

 

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determining the estimates, there is the potential for bad debt expense and the fair value of accounts receivable to be misstated. Given that we primarily serve the U.S. government and that, in our opinion, we have sufficient controls in place to properly recognize revenue, we believe the risk to be relatively low that a misstatement of accounts receivable would have a material impact on our financial results. Accounts receivable balances are written-off when the balance is deemed uncollectible after exhausting all reasonable means of collection.

 

Goodwill

 

Goodwill represents the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of identifiable net assets acquired in business combinations. Goodwill and intangible assets acquired in a business combination and determined to have an indefinite useful life are not amortized, but instead tested for impairment at least annually or if impairment indicators are present. The evaluation includes comparing the fair value of the relevant reporting unit to the carrying value, including goodwill, of such unit. If the fair value exceeds the carrying value, no impairment loss is recognized. However, if the carrying value of the reporting unit exceeds its fair value, the goodwill of the reporting unit may be impaired. Impairment is measured by comparing the derived fair value of the goodwill to its carrying value. Separately identifiable intangible assets with estimable useful lives are amortized over their respective estimated useful lives to their estimated residual values, and reviewed for impairment if impairment indicators are present.

 

We have two reporting units—domestic operations and international operations. Our reporting units are the same as our operating segments. Approximately 94 percent of our goodwill is attributable to our domestic operations. We estimate the fair value of our reporting units using both an income approach and a market approach. The valuation process considers our estimates of the future operating performance of each reporting unit. Companies in similar industries are researched and analyzed and we consider the domestic and international economic and financial market conditions, both in general and specific to the industry in which we operate, prevailing as of the valuation date. The income approach utilizes discounted cash flows. We calculate a weighted average cost of capital for each reporting unit in order to estimate the discounted cash flows. We perform our annual testing for impairment of goodwill and other indefinite life intangible assets as of June 30 of each year. The fair value of each of our reporting units as of June 30, 2012 exceeded its carrying value. Changes in estimates and assumptions made in the goodwill assessment could effect the estimated fair value of one or both reporting units.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

Under our 2006 Stock Incentive Plan, we issue equity instruments on an annual basis to our directors and key employees. These instruments may take the form of, among others, shares of restricted stock, restricted stock units (RSUs), stock settled stock appreciation rights (SSARs) and non-qualified stock options (NQSOs). We also issue equity instruments in the form of RSUs under our Management Stock Purchase Plan and Director Stock Purchase Plan.

 

We account for share-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock awards and purchases under employee stock purchase plans, in accordance with ASC 718, Compensation—Stock Compensation, which requires that share-based payments (to the extent they are compensatory) be recognized in our consolidated statements of operations based on their fair values. We determine the fair value of our NQSOs and SSARs at the date of grant using option-pricing models such as the Black-Scholes or binomial lattice model. We determine the fair value of our market-based and performance-based RSUs at the date of grant using generally accepted valuation techniques and the closing market price of our stock. Stock-based compensation cost is recognized as expense over the requisite service period.

 

Under the terms of the various equity instrument agreements, vesting of awards may accelerate to varying degrees based on the age of the grantee and the type of equity instrument. Depending on the instrument, vesting may accelerate upon retirement at either age 62 or 65 with the amount of acceleration based on the length of service provided.

 

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Results of Operations

 

The following table sets forth the relative percentages that certain items of expense and earnings bear to revenue.

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations

Years ended June 30,

 

          Year to Year Change  
    2012     2011     2010     2012     2011     2010     2011 to 2012     2010 to 2011  
    Dollars     Percentages     Dollars     Percent     Dollars     Percent  
    (dollar amounts in thousands)  

Revenue

  $ 3,774,473      $ 3,577,780      $ 3,149,131        100.0     100.0     100.0   $ 196,693        5.5   $ 428,649        13.6
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

Costs of revenue

                   

Direct costs

    2,598,890        2,528,660        2,207,574        68.9        70.7        70.1        70,230        2.8        321,086        14.5   

Indirect costs and selling expenses

    819,772        741,652        693,736        21.7        20.7        22.0        78,120        10.5        47,916        6.9   

Depreciation and amortization

    55,962        56,067        53,039        1.5        1.6        1.7        (105     (0.2     3,028        5.7   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

Total costs of revenue

    3,474,624        3,326,379        2,954,349        92.1        93.0        93.8        148,245        4.5        372,030        12.6   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

Income from operations

    299,849        251,401        194,782        7.9        7.0        6.2        48,448        19.3        56,619        29.1   

Interest expense and other, net

    24,101        23,144        26,353        0.6        0.6        0.9        957        4.1        (3,209     (12.2
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

Income before income taxes

    275,748        228,257        168,429        7.3        6.4        5.3        47,491        20.8        59,828        35.5   

Income taxes

    107,537        83,105        61,171        2.9        2.4        1.9        24,432        29.4        21,934        35.9   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

Net income including portion attributable to noncontrolling interest in earnings of joint venture

    168,211        145,152        107,258        4.4        4.0        3.4        23,059        15.9        37,894        35.3   

Noncontrolling interest in earnings of joint venture

    (757     (934     (743     (0.0     (0.0     (0.0     177        (19.0     (191     25.7   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

Net income attributable to CACI

  $ 167,454      $ 144,218      $ 106,515        4.4     4.0     3.4   $ 23,236        16.1   $ 37,703        35.4
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

Revenue

 

For FY2012, our total revenue increased by $196.7 million, or 5.5 percent. Approximately 2.4 percent, or $87.0 million, of revenue growth was organic and resulted from an increase in services and solutions provided to a broad base of DoD, intelligence, and federal civilian agency customers. The remaining 3.1 percent increase, or $109.7 million, was from acquisitions completed in FY2012 and FY2011.

 

During FY2011, total revenue increased by $428.6 million, or 13.6 percent. Approximately 11.6 percent, or $364.5 million, of revenue growth was organic and resulted primarily from increases in services and solutions provided to our DoD, intelligence and federal civilian agency customers. The remaining 2.0 percent, or $64.1 million, of the FY2011 revenue growth was generated by acquisitions completed in FY2011 and FY2010.

 

Revenue generated from the date a business is acquired through the first anniversary of that date is considered acquired revenue. Our acquired revenue for FY2012 and FY2011 is as follows (in millions):

 

Business Acquired

   2012      2011  

Paradigm Solutions Corporation

   $ 27.5       $ —     

Advanced Programs Group, Inc.

     26.7         —     

Pangia Technologies, LLC

     21.8         —     

TechniGraphics, Inc

     12.3         27.6   

Applied Systems Research, Inc.

     4.9         10.2   

SystemWare Incorporated

     —           15.6   

Others

     16.5         10.7   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 109.7       $ 64.1   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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The following table summarizes revenue earned by each of the customer groups for the three most recent fiscal years:

 

     Year ended June 30,  
     2012     2011     2010  
     (dollar amounts in thousands)  

Department of Defense

   $ 2,944,924         78.0   $ 2,858,721         79.9   $ 2,450,463         77.8

Federal civilian agencies

     620,870         16.5        537,687         15.0        535,467         17.0   

Commercial and other

     193,840         5.1        166,966         4.7        146,839         4.7   

State and local governments

     14,839         0.4        14,406         0.4        16,362         0.5   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 3,774,473         100.0   $ 3,577,780         100.0   $ 3,149,131         100.0
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

Revenue from DoD customers increased 3.0 percent, or $86.2 million, to $2.9 billion for FY2012 as compared to FY2011. $48.0 million of the increase was attributable to acquired DoD revenue and the remaining $38.2 million of the increase was attributable to revenue from existing operations. DoD revenue includes that earned for services provided to the U.S. Army, our largest customer, where our services focus on supporting readiness, tactical military intelligence, and communications systems. DoD revenue also includes work with the U.S. Navy, such as services to support the Navy’s automatic identification technologies and a mine countermeasure program that protects its fleet.

 

Revenue from DoD customers increased 16.7 percent, or $408.3 million, to $2.9 billion for FY2011 as compared to FY2010. $40.5 million of the increase was attributable to acquired DoD revenue and the remaining $367.8 million of the increase was attributable to revenue from existing operations.

 

Revenue from federal civilian agencies increased $83.2 million, to $620.9 million during FY2012 as compared to FY2011. Of the federal civilian agency revenue growth, $40.1 million was attributable to acquisitions. Approximately 16.6 percent of federal civilian agency revenue for the year was derived from the Department of Justice (DoJ), for whom we provide litigation support services. Revenue from DoJ was $102.8 million in FY2012 versus $90.8 million in FY2011. Federal civilian agency revenue also includes services provided to non-DoD national intelligence agencies.

 

Revenue from federal civilian agencies increased $2.2 million, to $537.7 million during FY2011 as compared to FY2010. Of the federal civilian agency revenue growth, $1.8 million was attributable to acquisitions. Approximately 16.9 percent of federal civilian agency revenue for the year was derived from DoJ. Revenue from DoJ was $90.8 million in FY2011 versus $79.8 million in FY2010.

 

Commercial and other revenue increased 16.1 percent, or $26.9 million, to $193.8 million in FY2012 as compared to FY2011. This revenue growth came from both acquisitions and a $12.0 million product sale which was completed in the first quarter of the fiscal year. Commercial revenue is derived from both international and domestic operations. In FY2012, international operations accounted for 59.4 percent, or $115.1 million, of the total commercial revenue, while domestic operations accounted for 40.6 percent, or $78.7 million.

 

Commercial and other revenue increased 13.7 percent, or $20.1 million, to $167.0 million in FY2011 as compared to FY2010. This revenue growth came primarily from acquisitions. In FY2011, international operations accounted for 70.7 percent, or $118.1 million, of the total commercial revenue, while domestic operations accounted for 29.3 percent, or $48.9 million.

 

Revenue from state and local governments increased by 3.0 percent, or $0.4 million during FY2012, as compared to FY2011. In FY2011 as compared to FY2010, revenue from state and local governments decreased by 12.0 percent, or $2.0 million. Revenue from state and local governments represented less than one percent of our total revenue in each of FY2012, FY2011, and FY2010. Our continued focus on DoD and federal civilian agency opportunities has resulted in a relatively reduced emphasis on state and local government business.

 

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Income from Operations

 

Income from operations increased 19.3 percent or $48.4 million, in FY2012 as compared to FY2011. Our operating margin was 7.9 percent, up from 7.0 percent during the same period a year ago. Operating margin was favorably impacted by a changing mix of our direct costs, greater than expected profitability on a large fixed price contract, and the commercial product sale described previously. Income from operations increased 29.1 percent, or $56.6 million, in FY2011 as compared to FY2010. Our operating margin in FY2011 of 7.0 percent increased from 6.2 percent in FY2010. The increase in margin rate related primarily to strong direct labor growth.

 

During the fiscal years ended June 30, 2012, 2011, and 2010, as a percentage of revenue, total direct costs were 68.9 percent, 70.7 percent, and 70.1 percent, respectively. The year-to-year changes in direct costs as a percentage of revenue were driven primarily by a change in the mix of direct labor versus other direct costs (ODCs), primarily material purchases and subcontracted activities. ODCs are common in our industry and may vary from period to period.

 

The single largest component of direct costs, direct labor, was $977.7 million, $888.0 million and $810.6 million in FY2012, FY2011, and FY2010, respectively. The increase in direct labor during the last three fiscal years is attributable to the organic growth in our federal government business, both in the DoD and federal civilian agencies, and to acquisitions. ODCs, which include subcontractor labor and materials along with equipment purchases and travel expenses, were $1.6 billion, $1.6 billion, and $1.4 billion in FY2012, FY2011, and FY2010, respectively.

 

Indirect costs and selling expenses include fringe benefits (attributable to both direct and indirect labor), marketing and bid and proposal costs, indirect labor and other discretionary costs. As a percentage of revenue, indirect costs and selling expenses were 21.7 percent, 20.7 percent and 22.0 percent for FY2012, FY2011, and FY2010, respectively.

 

Indirect expense in FY2012, FY2011 and FY2010 reflected a reduction of expense associated with the reduction in the fair value of acquisition-related contingent consideration liabilities related to acquisitions completed in FY2010. The reduction recorded was $0.4 million in FY2012, $9.6 million in FY2011 and $2.0 million in FY2010. Indirect expense in FY2010 also reflected the benefit of higher forfeitures available to offset Company contributions under our 401(k) Plan. This higher level of forfeitures resulted from an amendment to the 401(k) Plan during FY2010 that provided that non-vested balances are forfeited upon the earlier of a distribution being taken or December 31 of the year the participant terminates employment. Previously, non-vested balances were forfeited upon the earlier of a distribution being taken or December 31 following a five year break in service.

 

A component of indirect costs and selling expenses is stock compensation. Total stock compensation expense was $15.5 million, $17.9 million, and $30.8 million for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2012, 2011, and 2010, respectively. The decrease in stock compensation expense from FY2010 to FY2011 was due primarily to a higher level of forfeitures in FY2011 and a decrease in stock compensation expense associated with the issuance of performance-based RSUs in FY2009 and FY2010. The decrease in stock compensation expense from FY2011 to FY2012 was due primarily to a higher level of forfeitures in FY2012 and a further decrease in stock compensation expense associated with the FY2009 and FY2010 performance-based RSUs.

 

Depreciation and amortization expense decreased $0.1 million, or 0.2 percent, in FY2012 as compared to FY2011. The decrease was attributable to decreased amortization of intangible assets offset by increases in depreciation and amortization expense associated with our growing infrastructure. Software amortization on externally marketed software also increased in FY2012. In FY2011 as compared to FY2010, depreciation and amortization expense increased $3.0 million, or 5.7 percent. The increase was attributable to depreciation and amortization of both tangible and intangible assets, and included an increase in depreciation and leasehold amortization expense associated with a new lease in Northern Virginia. These costs were partially offset by a decrease in software amortization on externally marketed software.

 

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Net interest expense and other increased $1.0 million, or 4.1 percent in FY2012, as compared to FY2011 primarily as a result of an increase in interest expense related to higher outstanding debt which was partially offset by a decrease in amortization of deferred financing costs. Interest expense and other includes a reduction for our share of the net income of AC First, LLC, a joint venture between us and AECOM Government Services, Inc. of $1.7 million in FY2012 and $1.8 million in FY 2011. Net interest expense and other decreased $3.2 million, or 12.2 percent, in FY2011 as compared to FY2010 primarily as a result of lower interest rates, lower days sales outstanding, and the prepayment of certain debt outstanding at the beginning of the year.

 

The effective income tax rates in FY2012, FY2011, and FY2010, were 39.1 percent, 36.6 percent, and 36.5 percent, respectively. The tax rate in each year benefitted from tax benefits related to deductions claimed for income from qualified domestic production activities and non-taxable gains on assets invested in corporate-owned life insurance (COLI) policies.

 

Quarterly Financial Information

 

Quarterly financial data for the two most recent fiscal years is provided in Note 25, Quarterly Financial Data, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Effects of Inflation

 

During FY2012, 44.0 percent of our business was conducted under cost-reimbursable contracts which automatically adjust revenue to cover costs that are affected by inflation. 28.0 percent of our revenue was earned under T&M contracts, where labor rates for many of the services provided are often fixed for several years. Under certain T&M contracts containing IDIQ procurement arrangements, we do adjust labor rates annually as permitted. The remaining portion of our business is fixed-price and may span multiple years. We generally have been able to price our T&M and fixed-price contracts in a manner that accommodates the rates of inflation experienced in recent years.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Historically, our positive cash flow from operations and our available credit facilities have provided adequate liquidity and working capital to fund our operational needs. Cash flows from operations totaled $266.7 million, $226.0 million and $209.3 million for the years ended June 30, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

 

The Credit Facility is a $750.0 million credit facility, which includes a $600.0 million revolving credit facility (the Revolving Facility), and a $150.0 million term loan (the Term Loan). The Revolving Facility has subfacilities of $50.0 million for same-day swing line borrowings and $25.0 million for stand-by letters of credit. At June 30, 2012, $138.8 million was outstanding under the Term Loan, $125.0 was outstanding under the Revolving Facility, we had no borrowings on the swing line and no letters of credit were outstanding. The Credit Facility has an accordion feature that will allow the facility to be expanded by an additional $300.0 million with applicable lender approvals.

 

The Term Loan is a five-year secured facility under which principal payments are due in quarterly installments of $1.9 million through September 30, 2015 and $3.8 million thereafter through September 30, 2016, with the balance due in full on November 18, 2016.

 

The interest rates applicable to loans under the Credit Facility are floating interest rates that, at our option, equal a base rate or a Eurodollar rate plus, in each case, an applicable margin based upon our consolidated total leverage ratio.

 

The Credit Facility requires us to comply with certain financial covenants, including a maximum senior secured leverage ratio, a maximum total leverage ratio and a minimum fixed charge coverage ratio. The Credit Facility also includes customary negative covenants restricting or limiting our ability to guarantee or incur additional indebtedness, grant liens or other security interests to third parties, make loans or investments, transfer

 

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assets, declare dividends or redeem or repurchase capital stock or make other distributions, prepay subordinated indebtedness and engage in mergers, acquisitions or other business combinations, in each case except as expressly permitted under the Credit Facility. Since the inception of the Credit Facility, we have been in compliance with all of the financial covenants. A majority of our assets serve as collateral under the Credit Facility.

 

Effective May 16, 2007, we issued the Notes, which mature on May 1, 2014, in a private placement pursuant to Rule 144A of the Securities Act of 1933. The Notes are subordinate to our senior secured debt, and interest on the Notes is payable on May 1 and November 1 of each year.

 

Holders may convert their notes at a conversion rate of 18.2989 shares of CACI common stock for each $1,000 of note principal (an initial conversion price of $54.65 per share) under the following circumstances: 1) if the last reported sale price of CACI stock is greater than or equal to 130 percent of the conversion price for at least 20 trading days in the period of 30 consecutive trading days ending on the last trading day of the preceding fiscal quarter; 2) during the five consecutive business day period immediately after any ten consecutive trading day period (the note measurement period) in which the average of the trading price per $1,000 principal amount of convertible note was equal to or less than 97 percent of the average product of the closing price of a share of our common stock and the conversion rate of each date during the note measurement period; 3) upon the occurrence of certain corporate events, as defined; or 4) during the last three-month period prior to maturity. We are required to satisfy 100 percent of the principal amount of these notes solely in cash, with any amounts above the principal amount to be satisfied in common stock. As of June 30, 2012, none of the conditions permitting conversion of the Notes had been satisfied.

 

In the event of a fundamental change, as defined, holders may require us to repurchase the Notes at a price equal to the principal amount plus any accrued interest. Also, if certain fundamental changes occur prior to maturity, we will in certain circumstances increase the conversion rate by a number of additional shares of common stock or, in lieu thereof, we may in certain circumstances elect to adjust the conversion rate and related conversion obligation so that these notes are convertible into shares of the acquiring or surviving company. We are not permitted to redeem the Notes.

 

In connection with the issuance of the Notes, we purchased in a private transaction at a cost of $84.4 million call options (the Call Options) to purchase approximately 5.5 million shares of our common stock at a price equal to the conversion price of $54.65 per share. The Call Options allow us to receive shares of our common stock from the counterparties equal to the amount of common stock related to the excess conversion value that we would pay the holders of the Notes upon conversion. In addition, we sold warrants (the Warrants) to issue approximately 5.5 million shares of CACI common stock at an exercise price of $68.31 per share. The proceeds from the sale of the Warrants totaled $56.5 million. On a combined basis, the Call Options and the Warrants are intended to reduce the potential dilution of CACI’s common stock in the event that the Notes are converted by effectively increasing the conversion price of these notes from $54.65 to $68.31. The Call Options and the Warrants are separate and legally distinct instruments that bind us and the counterparties and have no binding effect on the holders of the Notes.

 

Cash and cash equivalents were $15.7 million and $164.8 million as of June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively. The decrease in cash and cash equivalents was primarily attributable to cash used for acquisitions and the repurchase of company stock. Working capital was $200.9 million and $334.9 million as of June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively. Our operating cash flow was $266.7 million for FY2012, compared to $226.0 million for the same period a year ago. The current year increase in operating cash flow results from profits earned during the year and differences in our year-end cash position. In the current year, we maintained lower cash balances as more cash was utilized for business acquisitions and share repurchases. As a result, outstanding checks were required to be classified within accounts payable, increasing operating cash flow by $31.5 million. In prior years, when we maintained higher year-end cash balances, outstanding checks were recorded as a reduction of our cash balances. Days-sales outstanding were 58 at June 30, 2012, compared to 52 for the same period a year ago.

 

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Table of Contents

We used $204.4 million and $149.2 million of cash in investing activities during FY2012 and FY2011, respectively. The increase in FY2012 was attributed primarily to the acquisitions completed during the year. Purchases of office and computer related equipment of $18.3 million and $14.4 million in FY2012 and FY2011, respectively, accounted for a majority of the remaining funds used in investing activities. Generally, we have relatively low capital expenditure requirements for our business, and expect these expenditures in the coming years to remain consistent with the levels reported in FY2012.

 

Cash flows used in financing activities were $210.9 million during FY2012 and $167.7 million during FY2011. During FY2011, we prepaid our then outstanding term loan in connection with entering into the Credit Facility and used $50.0 million of cash to repurchase 1.0 million shares of our company stock. During FY2012, we paid $21.6 million in settlement of contingent consideration for acquisitions that were completed during the year ended June 30, 2010. During the year ended June 30, 2012 we had net borrowings of $125.0 million under the Revolving Facility. These borrowings along with our available cash balance and our operating cash flow funded our repurchase of 5.8 million shares of company stock for $316.6 million and our acquisition program. Cash flows from financing activities continued to benefit from proceeds received from the exercise of stock options and purchases of stock under the CACI International Inc Employee Stock Purchase Plan (ESPP). Proceeds from these activities totaled $11.6 million and $26.2 million during FY2012 and FY2011, respectively.

 

We believe that the combination of internally generated funds, available bank borrowings, and cash and cash equivalents on hand will provide the required liquidity and capital resources necessary to fund on-going operations, customary capital expenditures, debt service obligations, and other working capital requirements over the next twelve months. Over the longer term, our ability to generate sufficient cash flows from operations necessary to fulfill the obligations under the Credit Facility and the Notes will depend on our future financial performance which will be affected by many factors outside of our control, including current worldwide economic conditions.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements and Contractual Obligations

 

We use off-balance sheet arrangements to finance the lease of operating facilities. We have financed the use of all of our current office and warehouse facilities through operating leases. Operating leases are also used to finance the use of computers, servers, phone systems, and to a lesser extent, other fixed assets, such as furnishings, that are obtained in connection with business acquisitions. We generally assume the lease rights and obligations of companies acquired in business combinations and continue financing equipment under operating leases until the end of the lease term following the acquisition date. We generally do not finance capital expenditures with operating leases, but instead finance such purchases with available cash balances. For additional information regarding our operating lease commitments, see Note 14 in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The Credit Facility provides for stand-by letters of credit aggregating up to $25.0 million that reduce the funds available under the Revolving Facility when issued. As of June 30, 2012, we had no outstanding letters of credit. We have no other material off-balance sheet financing arrangements.

 

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The following table summarizes our contractual obligations as of June 30, 2012 that require us to make future cash payments:

 

     Payments Due By Period  
     Total      Less than
1 year
     1 to 3
years
     3 to 5
years
     More than
5 years
 
     (amounts in thousands)  

Contractual obligations(1):

  

Bank credit facility-term loan(2)

   $ 138,750       $ 7,500       $ 15,000       $ 116,250       $ —     

Convertible notes(2)

     300,000         —           300,000         —           —     

Bank credit facility-revolver loan(2)

     125,000         —           —           125,000         —     

Operating leases(3)

     235,786         41,316         75,190         53,412         65,868   

Other long-term liabilities reflected on our balance sheet under generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP)

              

Deferred compensation(4)

     76,560         3,384         4,169         1,931         67,076   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 876,096       $ 52,200       $ 394,359       $ 296,593       $ 132,944   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) The liability related to unrecognized tax benefits has been excluded from the contractual obligations table because a reasonable estimate of the timing and amount of cash out flows from future tax settlements cannot be determined. See Note 19 in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information regarding taxes and related matters.
(2) See Note 13 to our consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding debt and related matters.
(3) See Note 14 to our consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding operating lease commitments.
(4) This liability is substantially offset by investments held by the plan provider to be reimbursed to us upon the payment of the liability to the plan participant. See Note 20 to our consolidated financial statements.

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk

 

The interest rates on both the Term Loan and the Revolving Facility are affected by changes in market interest rates. We have the ability to manage these fluctuations in part through interest rate hedging alternatives in the form of interest rate swaps. We have maintained hedging relationships with various counterparties in recent years, including two interest rate swap agreements that expired in December 2009 which allowed us to exchange a portion of our variable rate debt for fixed rate debt. In April 2012, we entered into floating-to-fixed interest rate swap agreements for an aggregate notional amount of $100 million related to a portion of our floating rate indebtedness. The agreements are effective beginning July 1, 2013 and mature July 1, 2017. All outstanding balances under our Term Loan, and any amounts that may be borrowed under our Revolving Facility, are currently subject to interest rate fluctuations. With every one percent fluctuation in the applicable interest rates, interest expense on our variable rate debt for the year ended June 30, 2012 would have fluctuated by approximately $2.9 million.

 

Approximately 3.0 percent and 3.3 percent of our total revenue in FY2012 and FY2011, respectively, was derived from our international operations headquartered in the U.K. Our practice in the U.K.-headquartered operation is to negotiate contracts in the same currency in which the predominant expenses are incurred, thereby mitigating the exposure to foreign currency exchange fluctuations. It is not possible to accomplish this in all cases; thus, there is some risk that profits will be affected by foreign currency exchange fluctuations. As of June 30, 2012, we held a combination of euros and pounds sterling in the U.K. and in the Netherlands equivalent to approximately $9.1 million. This allows us to better utilize our cash resources on behalf of our foreign subsidiaries, thereby mitigating foreign currency conversion risks.

 

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

The Consolidated Financial Statements of CACI International Inc and subsidiaries are provided in Part IV in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

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Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

We had no disagreements with our independent registered public accounting firm on accounting principles, practices or financial statement disclosure during and through the date of the consolidated financial statements included in this report.

 

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

 

  A. Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in the Exchange Act Ruling 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e), that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our periodic filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Our disclosure controls and procedures are also designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and Chief Financial Officer (CFO), as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

The effectiveness of a system of disclosure controls and procedures is subject to various inherent limitations, including cost limitations, judgments used in decision making, assumptions about the likelihood of future events, the soundness of internal controls, and fraud. Due to such inherent limitations, there can be only reasonable, and not absolute, assurance that any system of disclosure controls and procedures will be successful in detecting or preventing all errors or fraud, or in making all material information known in a timely manner to the appropriate levels of management.

 

We performed an evaluation of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures under the supervision of the CEO and CFO, as of June 30, 2012. Based on the evaluation procedures, our management, including the CEO and CFO, concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable assurance level as of June 30, 2012.

 

  B. Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

The management of CACI International Inc is responsible for establishing and maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f), and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting.

 

We maintain internal controls over financial reporting that are designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting, and the preparation of financial statements. CACI International Inc’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that 1) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles; 2) ensure the maintenance of records that accurately and fairly reflect our transactions; 3) ensure that our receipts, expenditures and asset dispositions are made in accordance with director and management authorizations; and 4) provide reasonable assurance that our assets are properly safeguarded.

 

With the participation of our CEO and CFO, we performed an evaluation of the effectiveness of the internal control over financial reporting to comply with the rules on internal control over financial reporting issued pursuant to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. In making this evaluation, management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control—Integrated Framework. Based on the evaluation procedures, our management, including the CEO and CFO, concluded that, as of June 30, 2012, our internal control over financial reporting was effective based on those criteria. In addition, our independent registered public accounting firm evaluated the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, and the independent auditors’ report on internal control over financial reporting, are included in Part IV of this report.

 

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  C. Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, an evaluation was also performed of any changes in our internal control procedures over financial reporting that occurred during our last fiscal quarter. Based on this evaluation, management determined there were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during our last fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART III

 

The Information required by Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 of Part III of Form 10-K has been omitted in reliance on General Instruction G(3) and is incorporated herein by reference to our proxy statement to be filed with the SEC pursuant to Regulation 14A promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as set forth below:

 

Item 10. Officers, Directors and Executive Officers of the Registrant

 

Except for the specific disclosures below, the information required by this Item 10 is included under the headings “Executive Officers” and “Corporate Governance” in our 2012 Proxy Statement for the annual meeting to be held with respect to the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012 (2012 Proxy Statement) and is incorporated by reference.

 

Code of Ethics

 

We have adopted a code of ethics that applies to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer and persons performing similar functions. That code, our Standards of Ethics and Business Conduct, is posted in the “Investors” section of our website at www.caci.com and a printed copy of such code will be furnished free of charge to any shareholder who requests a copy.

 

We intend to disclose any amendment to the Standards of Ethics and Business Conduct that relates to any element of the code of ethics definition enumerated in Item 406(b) of Regulation S-K, and any waiver from a provision of the Standards of Ethics and Business Conduct granted to any director, principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer, or any other executive officer of the Company, in the “Investors” section of our website at www.caci.com within four business days following the date of such amendment or waiver.

 

Corporate Governance Guidelines

 

We have adopted a set of corporate governance guidelines in accordance with the requirements of Section 303A of the New York Stock Exchange Listed Company Manual. Those guidelines can be found posted on our website at www.caci.com and a printed copy will be furnished free of charge to any shareholder who requests a copy.

 

Item 11. Executive Compensation

 

The information required by this Item 11 is included in the text and tables under the headings “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” and “Executive Compensation” in our 2012 Proxy Statement and is incorporated by reference.

 

Item 12. Security Ownership Of Certain Beneficial Owners And Management

 

The information required by this Item 12 is included under the headings “Security Ownership of Directors, Executive Officers, Certain Beneficial Owners and Management” and “Equity Compensation Plan Information” in our 2012 Proxy Statement and is incorporated by reference.

 

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions

 

The information required by this Item 13 is included under the headings “Corporate Governance”, “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” and “Executive Compensation” in our 2012 Proxy Statement and is incorporated by reference.

 

Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services

 

The information required by this Item 14 is included under the heading “Independent Auditor Fees” in our 2012 Proxy Statement and is incorporated by reference.

 

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PART IV

 

Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

(a) Documents filed as part of this Report

 

  1. Financial Statements

 

  A. Report of Management on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

  B. Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

  C. Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

  D. Consolidated Statements of Operations for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2012, 2011 and 2010

 

  E. Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2012 and 2011

 

  F. Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2012, 2011 and 2010

 

  G. Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2012, 2011 and 2010

 

  H. Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2012, 2011 and 2010

 

  I. Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

  2. Supplementary Financial Data

 

Schedule II—Valuation and Qualifying Accounts for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2012, 2011 and 2010

 

All other schedules for which provision is made in the applicable accounting regulation of the Securities and Exchange Commission are not required under the related instructions or are inapplicable and therefore have been omitted.

 

(b) Exhibits

 

Exhibit No.

    

Description

  

Filed
with this
Form 10-K

 

Incorporated by Reference

       

Form

 

Filing Date

 

Exhibit No.

  3.1       Certificate of Incorporation of CACI International Inc, as amended to date.      10-K   September 13, 2006   3.1
  3.2       Amended and Restated By-laws of CACI International Inc, amended as of March 5, 2008.      8-K   March 7, 2008   3.1
  4.1       Clause FOURTH of CACI International Inc’s Certificate of Incorporation, incorporated above as Exhibit 3.1.      10-K   September 13, 2006   4.1
  4.2       The Rights Agreement dated July 11, 2003 between CACI International Inc and American Stock Transfer & Trust Company.      8-K   July 11, 2003   4.1

 

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Exhibit No.

    

Description

  

Filed
with this
Form 10-K

 

Incorporated by Reference

       

Form

 

Filing Date

 

Exhibit No.

  4.3       Indenture, dated as of May 16, 2007, between CACI International Inc and The Bank of New York, including the form of Note.      8-K   May 16, 2007   4.1
  4.4       Registration Rights Agreement, dated as of May 16, 2007, among CACI International Inc and J.P. Morgan Securities Inc., Banc of America Securities LLC, Morgan Stanley & Co. Incorporated, Raymond James & Associates, Inc., SunTrust Capital Markets, Inc. and Wachovia Capital Markets, LLC.      8-K   May 16, 2007   4.2
  4.5       Letter Agreement re Call Option Transaction dated as of May 10, 2007, by and between CACI International Inc and Morgan Stanley & Co. International plc, as amended May 11, 2007.      8-K   May 16, 2007   4.3
  4.6       Letter Agreement re Warrants dated as of May 10, 2007, by and between CACI International Inc and Morgan Stanley & Co. International plc, as amended May 11, 2007.      8-K   May 16, 2007   4.4
  4.7       Letter Agreement re Call Option Transaction dated as of May 10, 2007, by and between CACI International Inc and J.P. Morgan Chase Bank, National Association, as amended May 11, 2007.      8-K   May 16, 2007   4.5
  4.8       Letter Agreement re Warrants dated as of May 10, 2007, by and between CACI International Inc and J.P. Morgan Chase Bank, National Association, as amended May 11, 2007.      8-K   May 16, 2007   4.6
  4.9       Letter Agreement re Call Option Transaction dated as of May 10, 2007, by and between CACI International Inc and Bank of America, N.A., as amended May 11, 2007.      8-K   May 16, 2007   4.7

 

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Exhibit No.

    

Description

  

Filed
with this
Form 10-K

 

Incorporated by Reference

       

Form

 

Filing Date

 

Exhibit No.

  4.10       Letter Agreement re Warrants dated as of May 10, 2007, by and between CACI International Inc and Bank of America, N.A., as amended May 11, 2007.      8-K   May 16, 2007   4.8
  10.1       The 1996 Stock Incentive Plan of CACI International Inc.*      S-8   February 15, 2005   4.3
  10.2       Form of Stock Option Agreement between CACI International Inc and certain employees.*      10-K   September 27, 2002   10.10
  10.3       Form of Performance Accelerated Stock Option Agreement between CACI International Inc and certain employees.*      10-K   September 27, 2002   10.11
  10.4       The 2002 Employee Stock Purchase Plan of CACI International Inc, as amended.*      Def 14A   October 7, 2009   Appendix A
  10.5       Amended and Restated Management Stock Purchase Plan of CACI International Inc.*      10-K   August 27, 2008   10.5
  10.6       Amended and Restated Director Stock Purchase Plan of CACI International Inc.*      10-K   August 25, 2010   10.6
  10.7       Purchase Agreement, dated May 10, 2007, among CACI International Inc and J.P. Morgan Securities Inc., Banc of America Securities LLC, Morgan Stanley & Co. Incorporated, Raymond James & Associates, Inc., SunTrust Capital Markets, Inc. and Wachovia Capital Markets, LLC.      8-K   May 16, 2007   10.1
  10.8       Amended and Restated Employment Agreement dated July 1, 2007 between J.P. London and CACI International Inc.*      10-K   August 29, 2007   10.21
  10.9       Employment Agreement dated July 1, 2007 between Paul M. Cofoni and CACI International Inc.*      10-K   August 29, 2007   10.22

 

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Exhibit No.

    

Description

  

Filed
with this
Form 10-K

 

Incorporated by Reference

       

Form

 

Filing Date

 

Exhibit No.

  10.10       Severance Compensation Agreement dated July 1, 2007 between William M. Fairl and CACI International Inc.*      10-K   August 29, 2007   10.24
  10.11       Severance Compensation Agreement dated October 1, 2007 between Thomas A. Mutryn and CACI International Inc.*      S-1/A   October 9, 2007   10.25
  10.12       Severance Compensation Agreement dated June 16, 2008 between Gregory R. Bradford and CACI International Inc.*      10-K   August 27, 2008   10.23
  10.13       CACI International Inc 2006 Stock Incentive Plan, as amended and restated.*      Def 14A   October 7, 2009   Appendix B
  10.14       Form of Performance Restricted Stock Unit Grant Agreement for Grantees Who are Grandfathered Executives.*      S-8   February 4, 2009   10.2
  10.15       Form of Performance Restricted Stock Unit Grant Agreement for Grantees who are Not Eligible for Grandfathered Retirement.*      S-8   February 4, 2009   10.3
  10.16       Form of Restricted Stock Unit Grant Agreement for Grantees Who are Grandfathered Executives.*      S-8   February 4, 2009   10.4
  10.17       Form of Restricted Stock Unit Grant Agreement for Grantees Who are Not Eligible for Grandfathered Retirement.*      S-8   February 4, 2009   10.5
  10.18       Form of Stock-Settled Stock Appreciation Rights Grant Agreement.*      S-8   February 4, 2009   10.6
  10.19       Form of Non-Employee Director Restricted Stock Unit Grant Agreement.*      S-8   February 4, 2009   10.7
  10.20       CACI International Inc Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan for Paul M. Cofoni, President and Chief Executive Officer.*      10-Q   February 5, 2009   10.1

 

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Exhibit No.

    

Description

  

Filed
with this
Form 10-K

 

Incorporated by Reference

       

Form

 

Filing Date

 

Exhibit No.

  10.21       Amendment to the CACI International Inc 2006 Stock Incentive Plan dated June 23, 2010.*      10-K   August 25, 2010   10.33
  10.22       Amendment to the CACI International Inc Management Stock Purchase Plan dated June 23, 2010.*      10-K   August 25, 2010   10.34
  10.23       Form of Indemnification Agreement between CACI International Inc and its directors and certain executive officers.      10-K   August 25, 2010   10.35
  10.24       Credit Agreement by and among CACI International Inc as borrower; Bank of America, N.A. as administrative agent, swing line lender and L/C issuer; JP Morgan Chase Bank, N.A., as syndication agent; and each of the lenders named therein.*      10-Q   November 4, 2010   10.1
  10.25       Form of Performance Restricted Stock Unit Grant Agreement between CACI International Inc and certain employees.*      10-Q   February 4, 2011   10.2
  10.26       Form of Non-Employee Director Restricted Stock Unit Grant Agreement.*      10-Q   February 4, 2011   10.3
  10.27       Form of Restricted Stock Unit Grant Agreement for Grantees enrolled in the Management Stock Purchase Plan of CACI International Inc.*      10-Q   February 4, 2011   10.4
  10.28       Addendum to Employee Agreement and Severance Compensation Agreement dated December 3, 2010 between Randall C. Fuerst and CACI International Inc.*      10-Q   February 4, 2011   10.5
  10.29       Form of CACI International Inc 2006 Stock Incentive Plan Restricted Stock Unit (RSU) Grant Agreement.*      10-Q   May 6, 2011   10.1
  10.30       Form of Non-Employee Director Restricted Stock Unit Grant Agreement.*      10-K   August 29, 2011   10.30

 

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Exhibit No.

   

Description

  

Filed
with this
Form 10-K

 

Incorporated by Reference

      

Form

 

Filing Date

 

Exhibit No.

  10.31      Severance Compensation Agreement between CACI International Inc and Daniel D. Allen dated October 3, 2011.*      10-Q   November 7, 2011   10.1
  10.32      Amendment dated November 18, 2011 to the Credit Agreement dated October 21, 2010, between CACI International Inc, Bank of America, N.A. and a consortium of participating banks.*      8-K   November 22, 2011   10.3
  10.33      Form of Restricted Stock Unit (RSU) Agreement under CACI International Inc Management Stock Purchase Plan.*      S-8   February 6, 2012   10.13
  10.34      Form of Performance RSU Grant Agreement under CACI International Inc 2006 Stock Incentive Plan.*      S-8   February 6, 2012   10.14
  10.35      Form of Stock Grant Agreement under CACI International Inc Director Stock Purchase Plan.*      S-8   February 6, 2012   10.15
  10.36      Amended and Restated Director Stock Purchase Plan of CACI International Inc.*      10-Q   May 4, 2012   10.1
  10.37      CACI International Inc Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan for Daniel D. Allen    X      
  10.38      Severance Compensation Agreement dated July 1, 2012 between John S. Mengucci and CACI International Inc.*    X      
  10.39      Confirmation from Bank of America, N.A. to CACI International Inc dated August 24, 2011, regarding Issuer Forward Repurchase Transaction.    X      
  10.40      Employment Agreement dated as of July 1, 2012 between Paul M. Cofoni and CACI International Inc.*    X      
  21.1      Significant Subsidiaries of the Registrant.    X      
  23.1      Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.    X      

 

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Exhibit No.

    

Description

  

Filed
with this
Form 10-K

 

Incorporated by Reference

       

Form

 

Filing Date

 

Exhibit No.

  31.1       Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) of the Securities and Exchange Commission.    X      
  31.2       Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) of the Securities and Exchange Commission.    X      
  32.1       Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350.    X      
  32.2       Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350.    X      
  99.1       Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Regulation 303A.12(b) of the New York Stock Exchange.    X      
  101       The following materials from the CACI International Inc Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2012 formatted in eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL): (i) Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended June 30, 2012, 2011 and 2010, (ii) Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2012 and 2011, (iii) Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended June 30, 2012, 2011 and 2010, (iv) Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for the years ended June 30, 2012, 2011 and 2010, (v) Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the years ended June 30, 2012, 2011 and 2010, and (vi) Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.**         

 

* Denotes a management contract, compensatory plan, or arrangement.
** Submitted electronically herewith.

 

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Report of Management on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

August 28, 2012

 

To the Stockholders

CACI International Inc

 

The management of CACI International Inc is responsible for establishing and maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for assessing the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting. Management maintains a comprehensive system of internal controls intended to ensure that transactions are executed in accordance with management’s authorization, that assets are safeguarded, and that financial records are reliable. CACI International Inc’s internal control system is designed to provide reasonable assurance to Company management and its Board of Directors regarding the preparation and fair presentation of consolidated financial statements for external purposes in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

 

Due to inherent limitations, internal control systems can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation, and may not prevent or detect financial statement misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of internal control effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that existing controls may become inadequate because of changing conditions, or that the degree of compliance with existing policies and procedures may deteriorate.

 

The Company’s management, with the participation of its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of CACI International Inc’s internal control over financial reporting based on the framework and criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework, issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Based on this evaluation, our management has concluded that CACI International Inc’s internal control over financial reporting was effective as of June 30, 2012.

 

Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, has audited the Company’s consolidated financial statements included herein and has reported on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2012.

 

/s/    DANIEL D. ALLEN        

   

/s/    THOMAS A. MUTRYN        

Daniel D. Allen     Thomas A. Mutryn
President and     Executive Vice President and
Chief Executive Officer     Chief Financial Officer

 

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Board of Directors and Stockholders

CACI International Inc

 

We have audited CACI International Inc’s internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2012, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (the COSO criteria). CACI International Inc’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying Report of Management on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

In our opinion, CACI International Inc maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2012, based on the COSO criteria.

 

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of CACI International Inc as of June 30, 2012 and 2011, and the related consolidated statements of operations, shareholders’ equity, cash flows, and comprehensive income for each of the three years in the period ended June 30, 2012 of CACI International Inc, and our report dated August 28, 2012 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

 

     /s/    ERNST & YOUNG LLP        

 

McLean, Virginia

August 28, 2012

 

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

Board of Directors and Stockholders

CACI International Inc

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of CACI International Inc as of June 30, 2012 and 2011, and the related consolidated statements of operations, shareholders’ equity, cash flows, and comprehensive income for each of the three years in the period ended June 30, 2012. Our audits also included the financial statement schedule listed in the Index at Item 15(a). These financial statements and schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and schedule based on our audits.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of CACI International Inc at June 30, 2012 and 2011, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended June 30, 2012, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also, in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly in all material respects the information set forth therein.

 

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), CACI International Inc’s internal control over financial reporting as of June 30, 2012, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated August 28, 2012, expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

 

    /s/    ERNST & YOUNG LLP        

 

McLean, Virginia

August 28, 2012

 

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CACI INTERNATIONAL INC

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(amounts in thousands, except per share data)

 

     Fiscal year ended June 30,  
     2012     2011     2010  

Revenue

   $ 3,774,473      $ 3,577,780      $ 3,149,131   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Costs of revenue:

      

Direct costs

     2,598,890        2,528,660        2,207,574   

Indirect costs and selling expenses

     819,772        741,652        693,736   

Depreciation and amortization

     55,962        56,067        53,039   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs of revenue

     3,474,624        3,326,379        2,954,349   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income from operations

     299,849        251,401        194,782   

Interest expense and other, net

     24,101        23,144        26,353   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income before income taxes

     275,748        228,257        168,429   

Income taxes

     107,537        83,105        61,171   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income including portion attributable to noncontrolling interest in earnings of joint venture

     168,211        145,152        107,258   

Noncontrolling interest in earnings of joint venture

     (757     (934     (743
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income attributable to CACI

   $ 167,454      $ 144,218      $ 106,515   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Basic earnings per share

   $ 6.18      $ 4.76      $ 3.53   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Diluted earnings per share

   $ 5.96      $ 4.61      $ 3.47   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted-average basic shares outstanding

     27,077        30,281        30,138   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted-average diluted shares outstanding

     28,111        31,300        30,676   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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CACI INTERNATIONAL INC

 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(amounts in thousands, except per share data)

 

     June 30,  
     2012     2011  

ASSETS

    

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 15,740      $ 164,817   

Accounts receivable, net

     628,842        573,042   

Deferred income taxes

     16,747        16,080   

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

     24,463        28,139   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     685,792        782,078   

Goodwill

     1,406,953        1,266,285   

Intangible assets, net

     114,816        108,102   

Property and equipment, net

     67,449        62,755   

Supplemental retirement savings plan assets

     77,371        66,880   

Accounts receivable, long-term

     9,942        8,657   

Other long-term assets

     30,553        25,374   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 2,392,876      $ 2,320,131   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

    

Current liabilities:

    

Current portion of long-term debt

   $ 7,500      $ 7,500   

Accounts payable

     149,549        98,893   

Accrued compensation and benefits

     180,871        173,586   

Other accrued expenses and current liabilities

     147,009        157,242   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     484,929        437,221   

Long-term debt, net of current portion

     531,961        402,437   

Supplemental retirement savings plan obligations, net of current portion

     73,176        64,868   

Deferred income taxes

     86,414        68,123   

Other long-term liabilities

     51,951        37,866   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     1,228,431        1,010,515   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies

    

Shareholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock $0.10 par value, 10,000 shares authorized, no shares issued

     —          —     

Common stock $0.10 par value, 80,000 shares authorized, 40,626 and 40,273 shares issued, respectively

     4,062        4,027   

Additional paid-in capital

     525,121        504,156   

Retained earnings

     1,105,949        938,495   

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     (7,834     (3,115

Treasury stock, at cost (15,988 and 10,077 shares, respectively)

     (465,303     (136,631
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total CACI shareholders’ equity

     1,161,995        1,306,932   

Noncontrolling interest in joint venture

     2,450        2,684   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity

     1,164,445        1,309,616   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

   $ 2,392,876      $ 2,320,131   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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CACI INTERNATIONAL INC

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(amounts in thousands)

 

     Fiscal year ended June 30,  
     2012     2011     2010  

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

      

Net income including portion attributable to noncontrolling interest in earnings of joint venture

   $ 168,211      $ 145,152      $ 107,258   

Reconciliation of net income including portion attributable to noncontrolling interest to net cash provided by operating activities:

      

Depreciation and amortization

     55,962        56,067        53,039   

Non-cash interest expense

     12,024        11,235        10,499   

Amortization of deferred financing costs

     2,237        2,785        2,356   

Stock-based compensation expense

     15,499        17,915        30,750   

Deferred income tax expense (benefit)

     10,653        7,587        (4,703

Undistributed earnings of unconsolidated joint venture

     (1,728     (1,755     —     

Other

     1,322        —          —     

Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of effect of business acquisitions:

      

Accounts receivable, net

     (33,919     (23,624     (49,291

Prepaid expenses and other assets

     (11,064     (18,391     (11,628

Accounts payable and other accrued expenses

     41,879        (8,394     49,910   

Accrued compensation and benefits

     (4,532     13,085        9,423   

Income taxes payable and receivable

     930        8,590        3,288   

Deferred rent

     (2,878     809        (145

Supplemental retirement savings plan obligations and other long-term liabilities

     12,092        14,903        8,588   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

     266,688        225,964        209,344   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

      

Capital expenditures

     (18,284     (14,388     (22,503

Cash paid for business acquisitions, net of cash acquired

     (185,926     (129,689     (87,943

Investment in unconsolidated joint venture, net

     —          (5,964     (2,428

Other

     (158     798        (3
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

     (204,368     (149,243     (112,877
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

      

Proceeds from borrowings under bank credit facilities, net of financing costs

     1,093,751        343,978        —     

Payments made under bank credit facilities

     (977,500     (482,403     (53,600

Payment of contingent consideration

     (21,611     (3,345     —     

Proceeds from employee stock purchase plans

     4,095        4,116        4,501   

Proceeds from exercise of stock options

     7,466        22,077        5,589   

Repurchases of common stock

     (316,563     (53,647     (3,496

Other

     (584     1,546        (7
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

     (210,946     (167,678     (47,013
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

     (451     1,231        (3,399
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

     (149,077     (89,726     46,055   

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year

     164,817        254,543        208,488   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents, end of year

   $ 15,740      $ 164,817      $ 254,543   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION

      

Cash paid for income taxes, net of refunds

   $ 94,994      $ 65,875      $ 66,713   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash paid for interest

   $ 12,447      $ 10,709      $ 13,694   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-cash financing and investing activities:

      

Landlord-financed leasehold improvements

   $ 5,010      $ 2,853      $ 16,815   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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CACI INTERNATIONAL INC

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(amounts in thousands)

 

    Preferred
Stock
    Common Stock     Additional
Paid-in
Capital
    Retained
Earnings
    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
    Treasury Stock     Total CACI
Shareholders’
Equity
    Noncontrolling
Interest in
Joint Venture
    Total
Shareholders’
Equity
 
    Shares     Amount     Shares     Amount           Shares     Amount        

BALANCE, June 30, 2009

    —        $ —          39,091      $ 3,909      $ 425,993      $ 687,762      $ (3,248     9,118      $ (86,683   $ 1,027,733        1,875      $ 1,029,608   

Net income attributable to CACI

    —          —          —          —          —          106,515        —          —          —          106,515        —          106,515   

Noncontrolling interest in earnings of joint venture

    —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          743        743   

Stock-based compensation expense

    —          —          —          —          30,750        —          —          —          —          30,750        —          30,750   

Exercise of stock options and vesting of restricted stock units

    —          —          275        28        4,554        —          —          —          —          4,582        —          4,582   

Adjustment for unrecognized tax benefit

    —          —          —          —          7,775        —          —          —          —          7,775        —          7,775   

Currency translation adjustment

    —          —          —          —          —          —          (7,751     —          —          (7,751     —          (7,751

Change in fair value of interest rate swap agreements, net

    —          —          —          —          —          —          1,045        —          —          1,045        —          1,045   

Repurchases of common stock

    —          —          —          —          —          —          —          75        (3,496     (3,496     —          (3,496

Treasury stock issued under stock purchase plans

    —          —          —          —          (113     —          —          (76     3,526        3,413        —          3,413   

Post-retirement benefit costs

    —          —          —          —          —          —          147        —          —          147        —          147   

Net distributions to noncontrolling interest

    —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          (176     (176
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

BALANCE, June 30, 2010

    —          —          39,366        3,937        468,959        794,277        (9,807     9,117        (86,653     1,170,713        2,442        1,173,155   

Net income attributable to CACI

    —          —          —          —          —          144,218        —          —          —          144,218        —          144,218   

Noncontrolling interest in earnings of joint venture

    —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          934        934   

Stock-based compensation expense

    —          —          —          —          17,915        —          —          —          —          17,915        —          17,915   

Exercise of stock options and vesting of restricted stock units

    —          —          907        90        16,773        —          —          —          —          16,863        —          16,863   

Adjustment for unrecognized tax benefit

    —          —          —          —          335        —          —          —          —          335        —          335   

Currency translation adjustment

    —          —          —          —          —          —          6,716        —          —          6,716        —          6,716   

Repurchases of common stock

    —          —          —          —          —          —          —          1,041        (53,647     (53,647     —          (53,647

Treasury stock issued under stock purchase plans

    —          —          —          —          174        —          —          (81     3,669        3,843        —          3,843   

Post-retirement benefit costs

    —          —          —          —          —          —          (24     —          —          (24     —          (24

Net distributions to noncontrolling interest

    —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          (692     (692
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

BALANCE, June 30, 2011

    —          —          40,273        4,027        504,156        938,495        (3,115     10,077        (136,631     1,306,932        2,684        1,309,616   

Net income attributable to CACI

    —          —          —          —          —          167,454        —          —          —          167,454        —          167,454   

Noncontrolling interest in earnings of joint venture

    —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          757        757   

Stock-based compensation expense

    —          —          —          —          15,499        —          —          —          —          15,499        —          15,499   

Exercise of stock options and vesting of restricted stock units

    —          —          353        35        1,170        —          —          —          —          1,205        —          1,205   

Currency translation adjustment

    —          —          —          —          —          —          (3,105     —          —          (3,105     —          (3,105

Change in fair value of interest rate swap agreements, net

    —          —          —          —          —          —          (1,332     —          —          (1,332     —          (1,332

Repurchases of common stock

    —          —          —          —          —          —          —          6,000        (328,890     (328,890     —          (328,890

Treasury stock issued under stock purchase plans

    —          —          —          —          4,296        —          —          (89     218        4,514        —          4,514   

Post-retirement benefit costs

    —          —          —          —          —          —          (282     —          —          (282     —          (282

Net distributions to noncontrolling interest

    —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          —          (991     (991
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

BALANCE, June 30, 2012

    —        $ —          40,626      $ 4,062      $ 525,121      $ 1,105,949      $ (7,834     15,988      $ (465,303   $ 1,161,995      $ 2,450      $ 1,164,445   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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CACI INTERNATIONAL INC

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

(amounts in thousands)

 

     Fiscal year ended June 30,  
     2012     2011     2010  

Net income including portion attributable to noncontrolling interest in earnings of joint venture

   $ 168,211      $ 145,152      $ 107,258   

Change in foreign currency translation adjustment

     (3,105     6,716        (7,751

Effect of changes in actuarial assumptions and recognition of prior service cost

     (282     (24     147   

Change in fair value of interest rate swap agreements

     (1,332     —          1,045   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive income

   $ 163,492      $ 151,844      $ 100,699   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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CACI INTERNATIONAL INC

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTE 1. ORGANIZATION AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION

 

Business Activities

 

CACI International Inc, along with its wholly-owned subsidiaries and joint ventures that are more than 50 percent owned or otherwise controlled by it (collectively, the Company), is an international information solutions and services provider to its clients, primarily the U.S. government. Other customers include state and local governments, commercial enterprises and agencies of foreign governments.

 

The Company’s operations are subject to certain risks and uncertainties including, among others, the dependence on contracts with federal government agencies, dependence on revenue derived from contracts awarded through competitive bidding, existence of contracts with fixed pricing, dependence on subcontractors to fulfill contractual obligations, dependence on key management personnel, ability to attract and retain qualified employees, ability to successfully integrate acquired companies, and current and potential competitors with greater resources.

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements of the Company have been prepared pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and include the assets, liabilities, results of operations and cash flows for the Company, including its subsidiaries and joint ventures that are more than 50 percent owned or otherwise controlled by the Company. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company generates almost all of its revenue from three different types of contractual arrangements: cost-plus-fee contracts, time and materials contracts, and fixed price contracts. Revenue on cost-plus-fee contracts is recognized to the extent of costs incurred plus an estimate of the applicable fees earned. The Company considers fixed fees under cost-plus-fee contracts to be earned in proportion to the allowable costs incurred in performance of the contract. For cost-plus-fee contracts that include performance based fee incentives, and that are subject to the provisions of Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 605-35, Revenue Recognition—Construction-Type and Production-Type Contracts (ASC 605-35), the Company recognizes the relevant portion of the expected fee to be awarded by the customer at the time such fee can be reasonably estimated, based on factors such as the Company’s prior award experience and communications with the customer regarding performance. For such cost-plus-fee contracts subject to the provisions of ASC 605-10-S99, Revenue Recognition—SEC Materials (ASC 605-10-S99), the Company recognizes the relevant portion of the fee upon customer approval. Revenue on time and material contracts is recognized to the extent of billable rates times hours delivered for services provided, to the extent of material cost for products delivered to customers, and to the extent of expenses incurred on behalf of the customers. Shipping and handling fees charged to the customers are recognized as revenue at the time products are delivered to the customers.

 

The Company has four basic categories of fixed price contracts: fixed unit price, fixed price-level of effort, fixed price-completion, and fixed price-license. Revenue on fixed unit price contracts, where specified units of output under service arrangements are delivered, is recognized as units are delivered based on the specified price per unit. Revenue on fixed unit price maintenance contracts is recognized ratably over the length of the service period. Revenue for fixed price-level of effort contracts is recognized based upon the number of units of labor actually delivered multiplied by the agreed rate for each unit of labor.

 

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CACI INTERNATIONAL INC

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

 

A significant portion of the Company’s fixed price-completion contracts involve the design and development of complex client systems. For these contracts that are within the scope of ASC 605-35, revenue is recognized on the percentage-of-completion method using costs incurred in relation to total estimated costs. For fixed price-completion contracts that are not within the scope of ASC 605-35, revenue is generally recognized ratably over the service period. The Company’s fixed price-license agreements and related services contracts are primarily executed in its international operations. As the agreements to deliver software require significant production, modification or customization of software, revenue is recognized using the contract accounting guidance of ASC 605-35. For agreements to deliver data under license and related services, revenue is recognized as the data is delivered and services are performed. Except for losses on contracts accounted for under ASC 605-10-S99, provisions for estimated losses on uncompleted contracts are recorded in the period such losses are determined. Losses on contracts accounted for under ASC 605-10-S99 are recognized as the services and materials are provided.

 

The Company’s contracts may include the provision of more than one of its services. In these situations, and for applicable arrangements, revenue recognition includes the proper identification of separate units of accounting and the allocation of revenue across all elements based on relative fair values, with proper consideration given to the guidance provided by other authoritative literature.

 

Contract accounting requires judgment relative to assessing risks, estimating contract revenue and costs, and making assumptions for schedule and technical issues. Due to the size and nature of many of the Company’s contracts, the estimation of total revenue and cost at completion is complicated and subject to many variables. Contract costs include material, labor, subcontracting costs, and other direct costs, as well as an allocation of allowable indirect costs. Assumptions have to be made regarding the length of time to complete the contract because costs also include expected increases in wages and prices for materials. For contract change orders, claims or similar items, the Company applies judgment in estimating the amounts and assessing the potential for realization. These amounts are only included in contract value when they can be reliably estimated and realization is considered probable. Incentives or penalties related to performance on contracts are considered in estimating sales and profit rates, and are recorded when there is sufficient information for the Company to assess anticipated performance. Estimates of award fees for certain contracts are also a factor in estimating revenue and profit rates based on actual and anticipated awards.

 

Long-term development and production contracts make up a large portion of the Company’s business, and therefore the amounts recorded in the Company’s financial statements using contract accounting methods are material. For federal government contracts, the Company follows U.S. government procurement and accounting standards in assessing the allowability and the allocability of costs to contracts. Due to the significance of the judgments and estimation processes, it is likely that materially different amounts could be recorded if the Company used different assumptions or if the underlying circumstances were to change. The Company closely monitors compliance with, and the consistent application of, its critical accounting policies related to contract accounting. Business operations personnel conduct thorough periodic contract status and performance reviews. When adjustments in estimated contract revenue or costs are required, any changes from prior estimates are generally included in earnings in the current period. Also, regular and recurring evaluations of contract cost, scheduling and technical matters are performed by management personnel who are independent from the business operations personnel performing work under the contract. Costs incurred and allocated to contracts with the U.S. government are scrutinized for compliance with regulatory standards by Company personnel, and are subject to audit by the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA).

 

From time to time, the Company may proceed with work based on client direction prior to the completion and signing of formal contract documents. The Company has a formal review process for approving any such work. Revenue associated with such work is recognized only when it can be reliably estimated and realization is probable. The Company bases its estimates on previous experiences with the client, communications with the client regarding funding status, and its knowledge of available funding for the contract or program.

 

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The Company’s U.S. government contracts (94.5 percent of total revenue in the year ended June 30, 2012) are subject to subsequent government audit of direct and indirect costs. Incurred cost audits have been completed through June 30, 2005. Management does not anticipate any material adjustment to the consolidated financial statements in subsequent periods for audits not yet started or completed.

 

Costs of Revenue

 

Costs of revenue include all direct contract costs as well as indirect overhead costs and selling, general and administrative expenses that are allowable and allocable to contracts under federal procurement standards. Costs of revenue also include costs and expenses that are unallowable under applicable procurement standards, and are not allocable to contracts for billing purposes. Such costs and expenses do not directly generate revenue, but are necessary for business operations.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all investments with an original maturity of three months or fewer on their trade date to be cash equivalents. The Company classifies investments with an original maturity of more than three months but fewer than twelve months on their trade date as short-term marketable securities.

 

Investments in Marketable Securities

 

From time to time, the Company invests in marketable securities that are classified as available-for-sale and are reported at fair value. Unrealized gains and losses as a result of changes in the fair value of the available-for-sale investments are recorded as a separate component within accumulated other comprehensive income in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. For securities classified as trading securities, unrealized gains and losses are reported in the consolidated statement of operations and impact net earnings.

 

The fair value of marketable securities is determined based on quoted market prices at the reporting date for those securities. The cost of securities sold is determined using the specific identification method. Premiums and discounts are amortized over the period from acquisition to maturity, and are included in investment income, along with interest and dividends.

 

Allowance For Doubtful Accounts

 

The Company establishes bad debt reserves against certain billed receivables based upon the latest information available to determine whether invoices are ultimately collectible. Whenever judgment is involved in determining the estimates, there is the potential for bad debt expense and the fair value of accounts receivable to be misstated. Given that the Company primarily serves the U.S. government and that, in management’s opinion, the Company has sufficient controls in place to properly recognize revenue, the Company believes the risk to be relatively low that a misstatement of accounts receivable would have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements. Accounts receivable balances are written-off when the balance is deemed uncollectible after exhausting all reasonable means of collection.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market using the specific identification cost method, and are recorded within prepaid expenses and other current assets on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.

 

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Goodwill

 

Goodwill represents the excess of costs over the fair value of assets of businesses acquired. Goodwill and intangible assets acquired in a business combination and determined to have an indefinite useful life are not amortized, but instead tested for impairment at least annually or if impairment indicators are present. The evaluation includes comparing the fair value of the relevant reporting unit to the carrying value, including goodwill, of such unit. If the fair value exceeds the carrying value, no impairment loss is recognized. However, if the carrying value of the reporting unit exceeds its fair value, the goodwill of the reporting unit may be impaired. Impairment is measured by comparing the derived fair value of the goodwill to its carrying value.

 

The Company has two reporting units—domestic operations and international operations. Its reporting units are the same as its operating segments. Approximately 94 percent of the Company’s goodwill is attributable to its domestic operations. The Company estimates the fair value of its reporting units using both an income approach and a market approach. The valuation process considers management’s estimates of the future operating performance of each reporting unit. Companies in similar industries are researched and analyzed and management considers the domestic and international economic and financial market conditions, both in general and specific to the industry in which the Company operates, prevailing as of the valuation date. The income approach utilizes discounted cash flows. The Company calculates a weighted average cost of capital for each reporting unit in order to estimate the discounted cash flows. The Company performs its annual testing for impairment of goodwill and other indefinite life intangible assets as of June 30 of each year. The fair value of each of the Company’s reporting units as of June 30, 2012 exceeded its carrying value.

 

Long-Lived Assets (Excluding Goodwill)

 

Long-lived assets such as property and equipment and intangible assets subject to amortization are reviewed for impairment whenever events or circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be fully recoverable. An impairment loss would be recognized if the sum of the long-term undiscounted cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the long-lived asset being evaluated. Any write-downs are treated as permanent reductions in the carrying amount of the assets. Property and equipment is recorded at cost. Depreciation of equipment and furniture has been provided over the estimated useful life of the respective assets (ranging from three to eight years) using the straight-line method. Leasehold improvements are generally amortized using the straight-line method over the remaining lease term or the useful life of the improvements, whichever is shorter. Repairs and maintenance costs are expensed as incurred. Separately identifiable intangible assets with estimable useful lives are amortized over their respective estimated useful lives to their estimated residual values. The Company believes that the carrying values of its long-lived assets as of June 30, 2012 and 2011 are fully realizable.

 

External Software Development Costs

 

Costs incurred in creating a software product to be sold or licensed for external use are charged to expense when incurred as indirect costs and selling expenses until technological feasibility has been established for the software. Technological feasibility is established upon completion of a detailed program design or, in its absence, completion of a working software version. Thereafter, all such software development costs are capitalized and subsequently reported at the lower of unamortized cost or estimated net realizable value. Capitalized costs are amortized on a straight-line basis over the remaining estimated economic life of the product.

 

Supplemental Retirement Savings Plan

 

The Company maintains the CACI International Inc Group Executive Retirement Plan (the Supplemental Savings Plan) and maintains the underlying assets in a Rabbi Trust. The Supplemental Savings Plan is a

 

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non-qualified defined contribution supplemental retirement savings plan for certain key employees whereby participants may elect to defer and contribute a portion of their compensation, as permitted by the plan. Each participant directs his or her investments in the Supplemental Savings Plan (see Note 20).

 

A Rabbi Trust is a grantor trust established to fund compensation for a select group of management. The assets of this trust are available to satisfy the claims of general creditors in the event of bankruptcy of the Company. The assets held by the Rabbi Trust are invested in both corporate owned life insurance (COLI) products and in non-COLI products. The COLI products are recorded at cash surrender value in the consolidated financial statements as supplemental retirement savings plan assets and the non-COLI products are recorded at fair value in the consolidated financial statements as supplemental retirement savings plan assets. The amounts due to participants are based on contributions, participant investment elections, and other participant activity and are recorded as supplemental retirement savings plan obligations.

 

Income Taxes

 

Income taxes are accounted for using the asset and liability method whereby deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the consolidated financial statement carrying amounts of assets and liabilities, and their respective tax bases, and operating loss and tax credit carry forwards. The Company accounts for tax contingencies in accordance with updates made to ASC 740-10-25, Income Taxes – Recognition. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities due to a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. Estimates of the realizability of deferred tax assets are based on the scheduled reversal of deferred tax liabilities, projected future taxable income, and tax planning strategies. Any interest or penalties incurred in connection with income taxes are recorded as part of income tax expense for financial reporting purposes.

 

Costs of Acquisitions

 

Costs associated with legal, financial and other professional advisors related to acquisitions, whether successful or unsuccessful, are expensed as incurred.

 

Foreign Currency Translation

 

The assets and liabilities of the Company’s foreign subsidiaries whose functional currency is other than the U.S. dollar are translated at the exchange rate in effect on the reporting date, and income and expenses are translated at the weighted-average exchange rate during the period. The Company’s primary practice is to negotiate contracts in the same currency in which the predominant expenses are incurred, thereby mitigating the exposure to foreign currency fluctuations. The net translation gains and losses are not included in determining net income, but are accumulated as a separate component of shareholders’ equity. Foreign currency transaction gains and losses are included in determining net income, but are insignificant. These costs are included as indirect costs and selling expenses in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations.

 

Earnings Per Share

 

Basic earnings per share excludes dilution and is computed by dividing income by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted earnings per share reflects potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock but not securities that are anti-dilutive, including stock options and stock settled stock appreciation rights

 

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(SSARs) with an exercise price greater than the average market price of the Company’s common stock. Using the treasury stock method, diluted earnings per share includes the incremental effect of SSARs, stock options, restricted shares, and those restricted stock unit (RSUs) that are no longer subject to a market or performance condition. When applicable, diluted earnings per share reflects the dilutive effects of shares issuable under the Company’s $300.0 million of 2.125 percent convertible senior subordinated notes that were issued on May 16, 2007 and mature on May 1, 2014 (the Notes), and warrants to issue 5.5 million shares of CACI common stock at an exercise price of $68.31 per share that were issued in May 2007. Information about the weighted-average number of basic and diluted shares is presented in Note 23.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The carrying amounts of cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable and amounts included in other current assets and current liabilities that meet the definition of a financial instrument approximate fair value because of the short-term nature of these amounts.

 

The fair value of the Company’s debt under its bank credit facility approximates its carrying value at June 30, 2012. The fair value of the Company’s debt under its bank credit facility was estimated using market data on companies with a corporate rating similar to CACI’s that have recently priced credit facilities. The fair value of the Notes is based on quoted market prices using Level 1 inputs (see Notes 13 and 22).

 

Concentrations of Credit Risk

 

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to credit risk include accounts receivable and cash equivalents. Management believes that credit risk related to the Company’s accounts receivable is limited due to a large number of customers in differing segments and agencies of the U.S. government. Accounts receivable credit risk is also limited due to the credit worthiness of the U.S. government. Management believes the credit risk associated with the Company’s cash equivalents is limited due to the credit worthiness of the obligors of the investments underlying the cash equivalents. In addition, although the Company maintains cash balances at financial institutions that exceed federally insured limits, these balances are placed with high quality financial institutions.

 

Comprehensive Income

 

Comprehensive income is the change in equity of a business enterprise during a period from transactions and other events and circumstances from non-owner sources. Other comprehensive income refers to revenue, expenses, and gains and losses that under U.S. GAAP are included in comprehensive income, but excluded from the determination of net income. The elements within other comprehensive income consist of foreign currency translation adjustments; the changes in the fair value of interest rate swap agreements, net of tax; and differences between actual amounts and estimates based on actuarial assumptions and the effect of changes in actuarial assumptions made under the Company’s post-retirement benefit plans, net of tax (see Note 15).

 

As of June 30, 2012 and 2011, accumulated other comprehensive loss included a loss of $5.5 million and $2.4 million, respectively, related to foreign currency translation adjustments and a loss of $1.0 million and $0.7 million, respectively, related to unrecognized post-retirement medical plan costs. Accumulated other comprehensive loss as of June 30, 2012 also included $1.3 million of losses related to the fair value of its interest rate swaps agreements.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and

 

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expenses during the reported periods. The significant management estimates include estimated costs to complete fixed-price contracts, estimated award fees for contracts accounted for under ASC 605-35, amortization periods for long-lived intangible assets, recoverability of long-lived assets, reserves for accounts receivable, reserves for contract related matters, reserves for unrecognized tax benefits, and loss contingencies. Actual results could differ from these estimates.

 

Commitments and Contingencies

 

Liabilities for loss contingencies arising from claims, assessments, litigation, fines and penalties and other sources are recorded when it is probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the assessment and/or remediation can be reasonably estimated.

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain reclassifications have been made to the prior years’ financial statements in order to conform to the current presentation.

 

NOTE 3. RECENTLY ISSUED ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

In June 2011, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2011-05, Presentation of Comprehensive Income (ASU 2011-05) which amends ASC Topic 220, Comprehensive Income. This accounting update requires companies to present the total of comprehensive income, the components of net income, and the components of other comprehensive income either in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. ASU 2011-05 is effective for the Company beginning July 1, 2012. The adoption of ASU 2011-05 will impact disclosures only and will not impact the Company’s financial position or results of operations.

 

In September 2011, the FASB issued ASU No. 2011-08, Intangibles-Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Testing Goodwill for Impairment (ASU 2011-08), which simplifies how an entity tests goodwill for impairment. The amendments permit an entity to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is necessary to perform the two-step quantitative goodwill impairment test. Accordingly, an entity will no longer be required to calculate the fair value of a reporting unit in the step one test unless the entity determines, based on a qualitative assessment, that it is more likely than not that its fair value is less than its carrying amount. ASU 2011-08 is effective for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011, with early adoption permitted. The adoption of this ASU is not expected to significantly impact the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

NOTE 4. ACQUISITIONS

 

Year Ended June 30, 2012

 

During the year ended June 30, 2012, the Company completed acquisitions of five businesses that have added to the Company’s portfolio of cyber security and information technology modernization solutions, three in the United States and two in Europe, as follows:

 

   

On July 1, 2011, the acquisition of 100 percent of Pangia Technologies, LLC (Pangia), a United States-based company that provides technical solutions in the areas of computer network operations, information assurance, mission systems, software and systems engineering, and IT infrastructure support to the US government;

 

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On September 1, 2011, the acquisition of 100 percent of Paradigm Holdings, Inc., the parent of Paradigm Solutions Corporation (Paradigm), a United States-based company that provides cybersecurity and enterprise IT solutions to clients in federal civilian agencies, the Department of Defense, and the Intelligence Community;

 

   

On October 3, 2011, the acquisition of 100 percent of Advanced Programs Group, LLC (APG), a United States-based company that provides Oracle e-Business Services in the Federal market;

 

   

On February 1, 2012, the acquisition of 100 percent of Tomorrow Communications Ltd (TCL), a United Kingdom company specializing in the design, implementation and on-going management and support of data networks operated by large commercial companies; and

 

   

On May 25, 2012, the acquisition of 100 percent of PSB Informatiesystemen BV (PSB), a Dutch company that sells and maintains its proprietary ‘OSIRIS’ student administration system used throughout the Dutch higher education sector.

 

The combined initial purchase consideration paid to acquire these five businesses was approximately $187.1 million, of which $10.0 million was deposited into escrow accounts pending final determination of the net worth of the assets acquired and to secure the sellers’ indemnification obligations for the United States-based acquisitions and approximately $2.4 million was retained by the Company to secure the European-based sellers’ indemnification obligations (collectively, Indemnification Amounts). Remaining Indemnification Amounts, if any, at the end of the indemnification periods will be distributed to the sellers. All remaining Indemnification Amounts, if any, are expected to be distributed to the sellers by May 2014.

 

Subsequent to the dates of the acquisitions, the Company and the sellers of each company agreed on the net worth of the assets acquired in each acquisition and, as a result, the Company paid an additional $6.1 million of purchase consideration. In addition, the Company may be required to pay to the sellers of TCL additional consideration of up to approximately $6.2 million based upon events to occur in the first year subsequent to the acquisition date. The acquisition date fair value of the contingent consideration was $5.9 million.

 

The Company has completed its detailed valuations of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed. Based on the Company’s valuations, the total consideration of $199.1 million has been allocated to assets acquired, including identifiable intangible assets and goodwill, and liabilities assumed, as follows (in thousands):

 

Cash

   $ 8,136   

Accounts receivable

     20,856   

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

     7,374   

Property and equipment

     617   

Customer contracts, customer relationships, non-compete agreements

     43,166   

Goodwill

     142,163   

Other assets

     51   

Accounts payable

     (3,482

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

     (11,626

Long-term deferred taxes

     (8,202
  

 

 

 

Total consideration paid

   $ 199,053   
  

 

 

 

 

The value attributed to customer contracts, customer relationships and non-compete agreements is being amortized on an accelerated basis over periods ranging from four to 15 years. The weighted average amortization period is 10 years.

 

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During the year ended June 30, 2012, these five businesses generated $89.6 million of revenue from the dates of acquisition through the Company’s fiscal year end.

 

Year Ended June 30, 2011

 

During the year ended June 30, 2011, the Company completed acquisitions of three businesses, two in the United States and one in the United Kingdom. The total consideration recorded to acquire these three businesses, including the amounts paid at closing, and additional payments made subsequent to closing based on the final agreed net worth of the assets acquired in each acquisition, was approximately $134.6 million. The Company recognized fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed and allocated $98.8 million to goodwill and $37.9 million to other intangible assets, primarily customer relationships, with the balance allocated to net tangible assets and liabilities assumed. These fair values represent management’s calculations of the fair values as of the acquisition dates and are based on analysis of supporting information.

 

Year Ended June 30, 2010

 

During the year ended June 30, 2010, the Company completed acquisitions of three businesses, two in the United States and one in the United Kingdom. The total consideration recorded to acquire these three businesses, including the amounts paid at closing, additional payments made subsequent to closing based on the final agreed net worth of the assets acquired in each acquisition, and the fair value at the date of each acquisition attributable to contingent consideration which may have been paid to the sellers of each acquisition based on events to occur in the first two years subsequent to each acquisition date, was approximately $129.1 million. The Company recognized fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed and allocated $83.0 million to goodwill and $48.2 million to other intangible assets, primarily customer relationships and acquired technologies, with the balance allocated to net tangible assets and liabilities assumed. These fair values represented management’s calculations of the fair values as of the acquisition dates and were based on analysis of supporting information.

 

The maximum contingent consideration that could have been paid in connection of all three acquisitions was $49.0 million, and the combined acquisition date fair value was $35.8 million. During the years ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, $20.3 million and $3.3 million, respectively, of contingent consideration was earned and paid in connection with these acquisitions. No further consideration will be paid for these acquisitions. See Note 22 for additional information.

 

NOTE 5. CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

 

Cash and cash equivalents consisted of the following (cost approximates fair value) (in thousands):

 

     June 30,  
     2012      2011  

Cash

   $ 12,815       $ 163,788   

Money market funds

     2,925         1,029   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total cash and cash equivalents

   $ 15,740       $ 164,817   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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NOTE 6. ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

 

Total accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $3.6 million and $3.7 million at June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively, consisted of the following (in thousands):

 

     June 30,  
     2012      2011  

Billed receivables

   $ 481,268       $ 452,533   

Billable receivables at end of period

     84,243         66,587   

Unbilled receivables pending receipt of contractual documents authorizing billing

     63,331         53,922   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total accounts receivable, current

     628,842         573,042   

Unbilled receivables, retainages and fee withholdings expected to be billed beyond the next 12 months

     9,942         8,657   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total accounts receivable

   $ 638,784       $ 581,699   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

NOTE 7. GOODWILL

 

For the year ended June 30, 2012, goodwill increased $140.7 million, consisting of $142.2 million attributable to current year acquisitions (see Note 4) and $0.9 million attributable to an acquisition made during the year ended June 30, 2009, offset by a $2.4 million foreign currency translation adjustment. Of the $140.7 million net change, $125.7 million related to the Company’s domestic operations and $15.0 million related to the Company’s international operations. Many of the acquisitions completed by the Company are structured in a manner whereby goodwill is deductible for income tax purposes. As of June 30, 2012, the Company had $520.5 million of goodwill which is deductible for income tax purposes, of which $88.3 million related to acquisitions completed in the year ended June 30, 2012.

 

NOTE 8. INTANGIBLE ASSETS

 

Intangible assets consisted of the following (in thousands):