XNAS:EBMT Eagle Bancorp Montana Inc Annual Report 10-K Filing - 6/30/2012

Effective Date 6/30/2012

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a50390506.htm
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C.  20549
 
 
FORM 10-K
 
 
(Mark One)
 
[ X ] ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the fiscal year ended
    June 30, 2012
or
 
[     ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from
 
to
 
 
Commission file number
    1-34682

 
Eagle Bancorp Montana, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
 
Delaware
 
27-1449820
State or other jurisdiction of
 
 (I.R.S. Employer
incorporation or organization
 
Identification No.)
 
1400 Prospect Avenue, Helena, MT
 
59601
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code
    406-442-3080
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
 
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common stock, par value $0.01
 
The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
 
 
 
Securities registered pursuant to section 12(g) of the Act:
 
(Title of Class)
 
 
 
(Title of Class)
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
 
 
¨ Yes    x No
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.
 
 
¨ Yes    x No
 
 
 

 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
 
 
x Yes    o No
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
 
 
x Yes    o No
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer ¨
Accelerated filer ¨
   
Non-accelerated filer ¨ (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company x
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).
¨ Yes    x No
 
The aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates of Eagle, computed by reference to the closing price at which the stock was sold as of December 31, 2011 was $31,126,000. The outstanding number of shares of common stock of Eagle as of August 1, 2012, was 3,878,971.
 
 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
 
Portions of the Company’s definitive Proxy Statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the Company’s fiscal year end is incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K.
 
 
 

 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS

   
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CAUTIONARY LANGUAGE ABOUT FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
 
This Annual Report on Form 10-K includes “forward-looking statements” within the meaning and protections of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act.  All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that could be forward-looking statements.  You can identify these forward-looking statements through our use of words such as “may,” “will,” “anticipate,” “assume,” “should,” “indicate,” “would,” “believe,” “contemplate,” “expect,” “estimate,” “continue,” “plan,”  “project,” “could,” “intend,” “target” and other similar words and expressions of the future. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to: (i) statements of our goals, intentions and expectations; (ii) statements regarding our business plans, prospects, growth and operating strategies; (iii) statements regarding the asset quality of our loan and investment portfolios; and (iv) estimates of our risks and future costs and benefits.
 
These forward-looking statements are based on current beliefs and expectations of our management and are inherently subject to significant business, economic and competitive uncertainties and contingencies, many of which are beyond our control. In addition, these forward-looking statements are subject to assumptions with respect to future business strategies and decisions that are subject to change.  The following factors, among others, could cause actual results to differ materially from the anticipated results or other expectations expressed in the forward-looking statements:
 
  
changes in laws or government regulations or policies affecting financial institutions, including changes in regulatory fees and capital requirements;
 
  
general economic conditions, either nationally or in our market areas, that are worse than expected;
 
  
competition among depository and other financial institutions;
 
  
changes in the prices, values and sales volume of residential and commercial real estate in Montana;
 
  
inflation and changes in the interest rate environment that reduce our margins or reduce the fair value of financial instruments;
 
  
adverse changes or volatility in the securities markets;
 
  
our ability to enter new markets successfully and capitalize on growth opportunities;
 
  
our ability to successfully integrate acquired businesses;
 
  
changes in consumer spending, borrowing and savings habits;
 
  
changes in our organization, compensation and benefit plans;
 
  
our ability to continue to increase and manage our commercial and residential real estate, multi-family, and commercial business loans;
 
  
possible impairments of securities held by us, including those issued by government entities and government sponsored enterprises;
 
  
the level of future deposit premium assessments;
 
  
the impact of a recurring recession on our loan portfolio (including cash flow and collateral values), investment portfolio, customers and capital market activities;
 
  
the impact of the current restructuring of the U.S. financial and regulatory system;
 
  
the failure of assumptions underlying the establishment of allowance for possible loan losses and other estimates;
 
  
changes in the financial performance and/or condition of our borrowers and their ability to repay their loans when due; and
 
  
the effect of changes in accounting policies and practices, as may be adopted by the regulatory agencies, as well as the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, the Financial Accounting Standards Board and other accounting standard setters.
 
Because of these and other uncertainties, our actual future results may be materially different from the results indicated by these forward-looking statements. For a further list and description of various risks, relevant factors and uncertainties that could cause future results or events to differ materially from those expressed or implied in our forward-looking statements, see the Item 1A, “Risk Factors” and Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” sections contained elsewhere in this report, as well as other reports that we file with the SEC.
 
 
1

 
 


ITEM 1.       DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS.

General

Eagle Bancorp Montana, Inc. (“Eagle” or “the Company”), is a Delaware corporation that holds 100% of the capital stock of American Federal Savings Bank (“American Federal” or “the Bank”), a federally chartered stock savings bank headquartered in Helena, Montana.  Eagle’s principal business is to hold the capital stock of American Federal.  On April 5, 2010, Eagle completed a second-step conversion from a partially-public mutual holding company structure to a fully publicly-owned stock holding company structure.  As part of that transaction it also completed a related stock offering.  As a result of the conversion and offering, the Company became the stock holding company for American Federal Savings Bank, and Eagle Financial MHC and Eagle Bancorp ceased to exist.  The Company sold a total of 2,464,274 shares of common stock at a purchase price of $10.00 per share in the offering for gross proceeds of $24.6 million.  Concurrent with the completion of the offering, each share of Eagle Bancorp common stock owned by the public was exchanged for 3.800 shares of the Company’s common stock owned immediately prior to completion of the transaction.
 
American Federal was founded in 1922 as a Montana chartered building and loan association and has conducted operations in Helena since that time.  In 1975, the Bank adopted a federal thrift charter.  The Bank currently has six full service offices. We also have seven automated teller machines located in our market area and we participate in the CashCard® and Money Pass® ATM networks.  The Bank’s website can be found at www.americanfederalsavingsbank.com.  The contents on or accessible through, our website are not incorporated into this filing.

Business Strategy

Our strategy is to continue profitable operations through building a diversified loan portfolio and positioning the Bank as a full-service community bank that offers both retail and commercial loan and deposit products in all of its markets. We believe that this focus will enable us to continue to grow our franchise, while maintaining our commitment to customer service, high asset quality, and sustained net earnings. The following are the key elements of our business strategy:
 
  
Continue to diversify our portfolio through growth in commercial real estate and commercial business loans as a complement to our traditional single family residential real estate lending. Such loans now constitute about 45.6% of total loans;
 
  
Continue to emphasize the attraction and retention of lower cost long-term core deposits;
 
  
Seek opportunities where presented to acquire other institutions or expand our branch structure;
 
  
Maintain our high asset quality levels; and
 
  
Operate as a community-oriented independent financial institution that offers a broad array of financial services with high levels of customer service.
 
Our results of operations may be significantly affected by our ability to effectively implement our business strategy including our plans for expansion through strategic acquisitions.  If we are unable to effectively integrate and manage acquired or merged businesses or attract significant new business through our branching efforts, our financial performance may be negatively affected.
 
Montana in the Economic Downturn

Market Area

From our headquarters in Helena, Montana, we operate six full service retail banking offices, including our main office.  Our other full service branches are located in Helena – Neill (opened 1987), Helena – Skyway (opened 2009), Bozeman (opened 1980, relocated 2009), Butte (opened 1979) and Townsend (opened 1979), Montana.  The original Bozeman branch opened in 1980 was closed August 1, 2010 due to reduced use by customers as a result of the new location opened in October 2009 approximately one mile away.
 
 
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Montana is one of the largest states in terms of land mass but ranks as one of the least populated states.  According to U.S. Census Bureau data for 2010, it had a population of 989,415.  Helena, where we are headquartered, is Montana’s state capital.  It is also the county seat of Lewis and Clark County, which has a population of approximately 63,395 and is located within 120 miles of four of Montana’s other five largest cities:  Missoula, Great Falls, Bozeman and Butte.  It is approximately midway between Yellowstone and Glacier National Parks.  Its economy has shown moderate growth, in terms of both employment and income.  State government and the numerous offices of the federal government comprise the largest employment sector.  Helena also has significant employment in the service industries.  Specifically, it has evolved into a central health care center with employment in the medical and the supporting professions as well as the medical insurance industry.  The local economy is also dependent to a lesser extent upon ranching and agriculture.  These have been more cyclical in nature and remain vulnerable to severe weather conditions, increased competition, both domestic and international, as well as commodity prices.

Bozeman is approximately 95 miles southeast of Helena.  It is located in Gallatin County, which has a population of approximately 89,513.  Bozeman is home to Montana State University and experienced fairly significant growth from 1990 to 2007, in part due to the growth of the University as well as the increased tourism for resort areas in and near Bozeman.  Agriculture, however, remains an important part of Bozeman’s economy.  Bozeman has also become an attractive location for retirees, primarily from the West Coast, owing to its many winter and summer recreational opportunities and the presence of the University.  Of the four communities that we serve, Bozeman has experienced the largest impact of the national and global economic downturn.

Butte, Montana is approximately 64 miles southwest of Helena.  Butte and the surrounding Silver-Bow County have a population of approximately 34,200.  Butte’s economy is somewhat reliant on the mining industry.  Butte’s economy has been volatile from the fluctuations in metal and mineral commodity prices.

Townsend is the smallest community in which we operate.  It has a population of about 1,878.  Townsend is located in Broadwater County which has a population of approximately 5,612.  Many of its residents commute to other Montana locations for work.  Other employment in Townsend is primarily in agriculture and services.  Townsend is approximately 32 miles southeast of Helena.

On July 2, 2012, we announced the execution of a definitive agreement with Sterling Savings Bank of Spokane, Washington, to acquire certain liabilities and assets of Sterling’s seven branch operations in Montana.  This transaction is subject to approval of federal bank regulators and is expected to close in late 2012.

Competition

We face strong competition in our primary market area for the attraction of retail deposits and the origination of loans.  Historically, Montana was a unit banking state.  This means that the ability of Montana state banks to create branches was either prohibited or significantly restricted.  As a result of unit banking, Montana has a significant number of independent financial institutions serving a single community in a single location.  While the state’s population is approximately 989,000 people, there are 57 credit unions in Montana as well as two federally chartered thrift institutions, and 74 commercial banks as of June 30, 2012.  Our most direct competition for depositors has historically come from locally owned and out-of-state commercial banks, thrift institutions and credit unions operating in our primary market area.  The number of such competitor locations has increased significantly in recent years.  Our competition for loans also comes from banks, thrifts and credit unions in addition to mortgage bankers and brokers.  Our principal market areas can be characterized as markets with moderately increasing incomes, relatively low unemployment, increasing wealth (particularly in the growing resort areas such as Bozeman), and moderate population growth.

Lending Activities

General.
American Federal Savings Bank primarily originates one- to four-family residential real estate loans and, to a lesser extent, commercial real estate loans, real estate construction loans, home equity loans, consumer loans and commercial business loans.  Commercial real estate loans include loans on multi-family dwellings, loans on nonresidential property and loans on developed and undeveloped land.  Home equity loans include loans secured by the borrower’s primary residence.  Typically, the property securing such loans is subject to a prior lien.  Consumer loans consist of loans secured by collateral other than real estate, such as automobiles, recreational vehicles and boats.  Personal loans and lines of credit are made on deposits held by the Bank and on an unsecured basis.  Commercial business loans consist of business loans and lines of credit on a secured and unsecured basis.
 
 
3

 
 
Loan Portfolio Composition.
The following table analyzes the composition of the Bank’s loan portfolio by loan category at the dates indicated:

   
At June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
   
Amount
   
Percent of
Total
   
Amount
   
Percent of
Total
 
Real estate loans:
                       
Residential mortgage (one- to four-family) (1)
  $ 61,671       35.11 %   $ 70,003       37.34 %
Commercial real estate
    64,672       36.82 %     64,701       34.52 %
Real estate construction
    1,455       0.83 %     5,020       2.68 %
Total real estate loans
    127,798       72.76 %     139,724       74.54 %
                                 
Other loans:
                               
Home equity
    23,709       13.50 %     27,816       14.84 %
Consumer
    8,778       5.00 %     9,343       4.98 %
Commercial
    15,343       8.74 %     10,564       5.64 %
Total other loans
    47,830       27.24 %     47,723       25.46 %
                                 
Total loans
    175,628       100.00 %     187,447       100.00 %
                                 
Less:
                               
Deferred loan fees (expenses)
    164               176          
Allowance for loan losses
    1,625               1,800          
                                 
Total loans, net
  $ 173,839             $ 185,471          
                                 
(1)  Excludes loans held for sale.
                               

Fee Income.
American Federal Savings Bank receives lending related fee income from a variety of sources.  Its principal source of this income is from the origination and servicing of sold mortgage loans.  Fees generated from mortgage loan servicing, which generally consists of collecting mortgage payments, maintaining escrow accounts, disbursing payments to investors and foreclosure processing for loans held by others, were $891,000 and $830,000 for the years ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively.  Other loan related fee income for contract collections, late charges, credit life commissions and credit card fees were $86,000 and $78,000 for the years ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

Loan Maturity Schedule.
The following table sets forth the estimated maturity of the loan portfolio of the Bank at June 30, 2012.  Balances exclude deferred loan fees and allowance for loan losses.  Scheduled principal repayments of loans do not necessarily reflect the actual life of such assets.  The average life of a loan is typically substantially less than its contractual terms because of prepayments.  In addition, due on sale clauses on loans generally give American Federal Savings Bank the right to declare loans immediately due and payable in the event, among other things, that the borrower sells the real property, subject to the mortgage, and the loan is not paid off.  All mortgage loans are shown to be maturing based on the date of the last payment required by the loan agreement, except as noted.
 
 
4

 
 
Loans having no stated maturity, those without a scheduled payment, demand loans and matured loans, are shown as due within six months.

   
Within 6
Months
   
6 to 12
Months
   
More than
1 year to
2 years
   
More than
2 years to
5 years
   
Over 5
years
   
Total
 
               
(In thousands)
             
Residential mortgage (one- to four-family) (1)
  $ -     $ 30     $ 1,014     $ 2,208     $ 69,032     $ 72,284  
Commercial real estate and land
    369       3,286       2,263       6,703       52,051       64,672  
Real estate construction
    -       1,455       -       -       -       1,455  
Home equity
    242       3,318       3,519       9,844       6,786       23,709  
Consumer
    281       1,058       978       4,826       1,635       8,778  
Commercial
    184       4,865       1,872       3,231       5,191       15,343  
                                                 
Total loans (1)
  $ 1,076     $ 14,012     $ 9,646     $ 26,812     $ 134,695     $ 186,241  
                                                 
(1)  Includes loans held for sale.
                                               


The following table sets forth the dollar amount of all loans, at June 30, 2012, due after June 30, 2013, which have fixed interest rates and which have floating or adjustable interest rates:

   
Fixed
   
Adjustable
   
Total
   
   
(Dollars in thousands)
   
                     
Residential mortgage (one- to four-family)
  $ 61,053     $ 11,094     $ 72,147    
Commercial real estate and land
    55,495       5,522       61,017    
Home equity
    14,290       5,859       20,149    
Consumer
    6,684       755       7,439    
Commercial
    6,362       3,933       10,295    
                           
Total loans (1)
  $ 143,884     $ 27,163     $ 171,047    
                           
Percent of total
    84.12 %     15.88 %     100.00 %  
                           
(1)  Due after June 30, 2013.
                         
 
 
5

 
 
The following table sets forth information with respect to our loan originations, purchases and sales activity for the periods indicated:

   
Year Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(In thousands)
 
             
Net loans receivable at beginning of period (1)
  $ 187,255     $ 177,197  
                 
Loans originated:
               
Residential mortgage (one- to four-family)
    117,248       115,030  
Commercial real estate and land
    9,609       38,131  
Real estate construction
    3,355       13,180  
Home equity
    5,611       16,550  
Consumer
    4,483       6,068  
Commercial
    11,272       15,311  
                 
Total loans originated
    151,578       204,270  
                 
Loans sold:
               
Whole loans
    99,507       112,444  
                 
Principal repayments and loan refinancings
    55,061       80,853  
                 
Deferred loan fees decrease (increase)
    12       (215 )
                 
Allowance for losses decrease (increase)
    175       (700 )
                 
Net loan increase (decrease)
    (2,803 )     10,058  
                 
Net loans receivable at end of period (1)
  $ 184,452     $ 187,255  
                 
(1)  Includes loans held for sale.
               
 
Residential Lending.
The Bank’s primary lending activity consists of the origination of one- to four-family residential mortgage loans secured by property located in the Bank’s market area.  Approximately 35.1% of the Bank’s loans as of June 30, 2012 were comprised of such loans. American Federal generally originates one- to four-family residential mortgage loans in amounts of up to 80% of the lesser of the appraised value or the selling price of the mortgaged property without requiring private mortgage insurance.  A mortgage loan originated by the Bank, whether fixed rate or adjustable rate, can have a term of up to 30 years.  The Bank holds substantially all of its adjustable rate and its 8, 10 and 12-year fixed rate loans in portfolio.  Adjustable rate loans limit the periodic interest rate adjustment and the minimum and maximum rates that may be charged over the term of the loan.  The Bank’s fixed rate 15-year and 20-year loans are held in portfolio or sold in the secondary market depending on market conditions.  Generally, all 30-year fixed rate loans are sold in the secondary market.  The volume of loan sales is dependent on the volume, type and term of loan originations.
 
 
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The Bank obtains a significant portion of its noninterest income from servicing of loans that it has sold.  The Bank offers many of the fixed rate loans it originates for sale in the secondary market on a servicing retained basis.  This means that we process the borrower’s payments and send them to the purchaser of the loan.  This retention of servicing enables the Bank to increase fee income and maintain a relationship with the borrower.  Servicing income was $891,000 for the year ended June 30, 2012.  At June 30, 2012, American Federal Savings Bank had $338.9 million in residential mortgage loans and $16.1 million in commercial real estate loans sold with servicing retained.  American Federal Savings Bank does not ordinarily purchase home mortgage loans from other financial institutions.
 
Property appraisals on real estate securing the Bank’s single-family residential loans are made by state certified and licensed independent appraisers who are approved annually by the board of directors.  Appraisals are performed in accordance with applicable regulations and policies.  American Federal Savings Bank generally obtains title insurance policies on all first mortgage real estate loans originated.  On occasion, refinancings of mortgage loans are approved using title reports instead of title insurance.  Title reports are also allowed on home equity loans.  Borrowers generally remit funds with each monthly payment of principal and interest, to a loan escrow account from which American Federal Savings Bank makes disbursements for such items as real estate taxes and hazard and mortgage insurance premiums as they become due.

Home Equity Loans.
American Federal Savings Bank also originates home equity loans.  These loans are secured by the borrowers’ primary residence, but are typically subject to a prior lien, which may or may not be held by the Bank.  At June 30, 2012, $23.7 million or 13.5% of our total loans were home equity loans.  Borrowers may use the proceeds from the Bank’s home equity loans for many purposes, including home improvement, debt consolidation, or other purchasing needs.  The Bank offers fixed rate, fixed payment home equity loans as well as variable and fixed rate home equity lines of credit. Fixed rate home equity loans typically have terms of not longer than 15 years.

Although home equity loans are secured by real estate, they carry a greater risk than first lien residential mortgages because of the existence of a prior lien on the property securing the loan, as well as the flexibility the borrower has with respect to the loan proceeds.  American Federal Savings Bank attempts to minimize this risk by maintaining conservative underwriting policies on such loans.  We generally make home equity loans for up to only 85% of appraised value of the underlying real estate collateral, less the amount of any existing prior liens on the property securing the loan.

Commercial Real Estate and Land Loans.
American Federal Savings Bank originates commercial real estate mortgage and land loans, including both developed and undeveloped land loans, and loans on multi-family dwellings.  Commercial real estate and land loans made up 36.8% of the Bank’s total loan portfolio, or $64.7 million at June 30, 2012.  The majority of these loans are non-residential commercial real estate loans.  American Federal Savings Bank’s commercial real estate mortgage loans are primarily permanent loans secured by improved property such as office buildings, retail stores, commercial warehouses and apartment buildings.  The terms and conditions of each loan are tailored to the needs of the borrower and based on the financial strength of the project and any guarantors.  Generally, commercial real estate loans originated by the Bank will not exceed 75% of the appraised value or the selling price of the property, whichever is less.  The average loan size is approximately $311,000 and is typically made with fixed rates of interest and 5- to 15-year maturities.  Upon maturity, the loan is repaid or the terms and conditions are renegotiated.  Generally, all originated commercial real estate loans are secured by property located in the state of Montana and within the market area of the Bank.  American Federal Savings Bank’s largest single commercial real estate loan had a balance of approximately $11.5 million ($10.4 million is guaranteed by Rural Development of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, leaving approximately $1.1 million unguaranteed) on June 30, 2012, and is secured by a detention facility.

Real Estate Construction Lending.
American Federal Savings Bank also lends funds for the construction of one-to-four-family homes and commercial real estate.  Real estate construction loans are made both to individual homeowners for the construction of their primary residence and, to a lesser extent, to local builders for the construction of pre-sold houses or houses that are being built for sale in the future.  Real estate construction loans accounted for $1.5 million or 0.8% of the Bank’s loan portfolio at June 30, 2012.

Consumer Loans.
As part of its strategy to invest in higher yielding shorter term loans, American Federal Savings Bank emphasized growth of its consumer lending portfolio in recent years.  This portfolio includes personal loans secured by collateral other than real estate, unsecured personal loans and lines of credit, and loans secured by deposits held by the Bank.  As of June 30, 2012, consumer loans totaled $8.8 million or 5.0% of the Bank’s total loan portfolio.  These loans consist primarily of auto loans, RV loans, boat loans, personal loans and credit lines and deposit account loans.  Consumer loans are originated in the Bank’s market area and generally have maturities of up to 7 years.  For loans secured by savings accounts, American Federal Savings Bank will lend up to 90% of the account balance on single payment loans and up to 100% for monthly payment loans.

 
7

 
 
Consumer loans have a shorter term and generally provide higher interest rates than residential loans.  Consumer loans can be helpful in improving the spread between average loan yield and cost of funds and at the same time improve the matching of the maturities of rate sensitive assets and liabilities.  Although the amount of such loans declined slightly over 2011 levels, increasing consumer loans continues to be a major part of the Bank’s strategy of operating more like a commercial bank than a traditional savings bank.

The underwriting standards employed by American Federal Savings Bank for consumer loans include a determination of the applicant’s credit history and an assessment of the applicant’s ability to meet existing obligations and payments on the proposed loan.  The stability of the applicant’s monthly income may be determined by verification of gross monthly income from primary employment, and additionally from any verifiable secondary income.  Creditworthiness of the applicant is of primary consideration; however, the underwriting process also includes a comparison of the value of the collateral in relation to the proposed loan amount.

Commercial Business Loans.
Commercial business loans amounted to $15.3 million, or 8.7% of the Bank’s total loan portfolio at June 30, 2012.  American Federal Savings Bank’s commercial business loans are traditional business loans and are not secured by real estate.  Such loans may be structured as unsecured lines of credit or may be secured by inventory, accounts receivable or other business assets.  While the commercial business loan portfolio amounted to only 8.7% of the total portfolio at June 30, 2012, American Federal intends to increase such lending by focusing on market segments which it has not previously emphasized, such as business loans to doctors, lawyers, architects and other professionals as well as to small businesses within its market area.  Our management believes that this strategy provides opportunities for growth, without significant additional cost outlays for staff and infrastructure.

Commercial business loans of this nature usually involve greater credit risk than one- to four-family residential mortgage loans.  The collateral we receive is typically related directly to the performance of the borrower’s business which means that repayment of commercial business loans is dependent on the successful operations and income stream of the borrower’s business.  Such risks can be significantly affected by economic conditions.  In addition, commercial lending generally requires substantially greater oversight efforts compared to residential real estate lending.

Loans to One Borrower.
Under federal law, savings institutions have, subject to certain exemptions, lending limits to one borrower in an amount equal to the greater of $500,000 or 15% of the institution’s unimpaired capital and surplus.  As of June 30, 2012, our largest aggregation of loans to one borrower was approximately $17.7 million.  This consisted of two commercial real estate loans secured by two separate detention facilities.  The first commercial real estate loan had a principal balance of $6.1 million, but 90.0%, or $5.5 million of the principal balance was sold to the Montana Board of Investments, leaving a net principal balance to the Bank of $600,000.  The second commercial real estate loan is to the same borrower for another detention facility.  As of June 30, 2012, the principal balance on this loan was $11.5 million with 90.0% of the loan guaranteed by the USDA Rural Development.  Due to the USDA Rural Development guarantee, 90.0% of this loan, or $10.4 million, is not required to be included in the Bank’s limitations to a single borrower, thus leaving approximately $1.1 million subject to the lending limit described above, thereby making a combined amount of $1.7 million subject to the lending limit.  The Bank entered into an interest rate swap with a third party to change the underlying cash flows of the second loan to be a variable market rate tied to one-month LIBOR.   At June 30, 2012, these loans were performing in accordance with their terms.  The Bank maintains the servicing for both these loans.

Loan Solicitation and Processing.
Our customary sources of mortgage loan applications include repeat customers, walk-ins, and referrals from home builders and real estate brokers.  We also advertise in local newspapers and on local radio and television.  We currently have the ability to accept online mortgage loan applications and provide pre-approvals through our website.  Our branch managers and loan officers located at our headquarters and in branches, have authority to approve certain types of loans when presented with a completed application.  Other loans must be approved at our main offices as disclosed below.  No loan consultants or loan brokers are currently utilized for either residential or commercial lending activities.

After receiving a loan application from a prospective borrower, a credit report and verifications are obtained to confirm specific information relating to the loan applicant’s employment, income and credit standing.  When required by our policies, an appraisal of the real estate intended to secure the proposed loan is undertaken by an independent fee appraiser.  In connection with the loan approval process, our staff analyze the loan applications and the property involved.  Officers and branch managers are granted lending authority based on the nature of the loan and the managers’ level of experience.  We have established a series of loan committees to approve any loans which may exceed the lending authority of particular officers or branch managers.  A quorum (five directors) of the board of directors is required for approval of any loan, or aggregation of loans to a single borrower, that exceeds $1,250,000.

 
8

 
 
Loan applicants are promptly notified of the decision by a letter setting forth the terms and conditions of the decision.  If approved, these terms and conditions include the amount of the loan, interest rate basis, amortization term, a brief description of real estate to be mortgaged, tax escrow and the notice of requirement of insurance coverage to be maintained.  We generally require title insurance on first mortgage loans and fire and casualty insurance on all properties securing loans, which insurance must be maintained during the entire term of the loan.

Loan Commitments.
We generally provide commitments to fund fixed and adjustable-rate single-family mortgage loans for periods up to 60 days at a specified term and interest rate, and other loan categories for shorter time periods.  The total amount of our commitments to extend credit as of June 30, 2012, was approximately $6.48 million, all of which was for residential mortgage loans.

Nonperforming Loans and Problem Assets

Collection Procedures.
Generally, our collection procedures provide that when a loan is 15 or more days delinquent, the borrower is sent a past due notice.  If the loan becomes 30 days delinquent, the borrower is sent a written delinquency notice requiring payment.  If the delinquency continues, subsequent efforts are made to contact the delinquent borrower, including face to face meetings and counseling to resolve the delinquency.  All collection actions are undertaken with the objective of compliance with the Fair Debt Collection Act.

For mortgage loans and home equity loans, if the borrower is unable to cure the delinquency or reach a payment agreement, we will institute foreclosure actions.  If a foreclosure action is taken and the loan is not reinstated, paid in full or refinanced, the property is sold at judicial sale at which we may be the buyer if there are no adequate offers to satisfy the debt.  Any property acquired as the result of foreclosure, or by deed in lieu of foreclosure, is classified as real estate owned until such time as it is sold or otherwise disposed of.  When real estate owned is acquired, it is recorded at its fair market value less estimated selling costs.  The initial recording of any loss is charged to the allowance for loan losses.  As of June 30, 2012, American Federal Savings Bank had $2.7 million of real estate owned ($2.4 million net of valuation loss allowance).

Loans are reviewed on a quarterly basis and are placed on non-accrual status when they are 90 days or more delinquent.  Loans may be placed on non-accrual status at any time if, in the opinion of management, the collection of additional interest is doubtful.  Interest accrued and unpaid at the time a loan is placed on non-accrual status is charged against interest income.  Subsequent payments are either applied to the outstanding principal balance or recorded as interest income, depending on the assessment of the ultimate collectibility of the loan.  At June 30, 2012, we had $1.8 million ($1.8 million net of specific reserves for loan losses) of loans that were nonperforming and held on non-accrual status.

 
9

 
 
Delinquent Loans.
The following table provides information regarding the Bank’s loans that are delinquent 30 to 89 days as of the date indicated:
 
   
At June 30, 2012
 
   
Number
   
Amount
   
Percentage of
Total
Delinquent
Loans
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
                   
Loan type:
                 
  Residential mortgage (one- to four-family)
    5     $ 613       44.84 %
  Real estate construction
    -       -       0.00 %
  Commercial real estate and land
    -       -       0.00 %
  Home equity
    13       362       26.48 %
  Consumer
    29       221       16.17 %
  Commercial business
    6       171       12.51 %
                         
Total
    53     $ 1,367       100.00 %
 
Nonperforming Assets.
The following table sets forth information regarding American Federal Savings Bank’s nonperforming assets as of the dates indicated.
 
   
At June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
             
Non-accrual loans
           
Real estate loans:
           
Residential mortgage (one- to four-family)
  $ 660     $ 1,424  
Real estate construction
    -       650  
Commercial real estate and land
    833       186  
Home equity
    265       376  
Consumer
    36       56  
Commercial business
    20       247  
Accruing loans delinquent 90 days or more
    -       -  
Restructured loans:
               
Commercial business
    90       -  
Commercial real estate and land
    1,314       -  
Total nonperforming loans
    3,218       2,939  
Real estate owned and other repossed property, net
    2,361       1,181  
Total nonperforming assets
  $ 5,579     $ 4,120  
                 
Total nonperforming loans to total loans
    1.85 %     1.57 %
Total nonperforming loans to total assets
    0.98 %     0.89 %
Total allowance for loan loss to non-performing loans
    50.50 %     61.25 %
Total nonperforming assets to total assets
    1.70 %     1.24 %
 
 
10

 
 
During the year ended June 30, 2012, the Bank had one foreclosed real estate property resulting in a loss of $11,000 upon sale and one resulting in a gain of $2,000 after incurring valuation losses of $58,000, and 5 other foreclosed real estate properties that incurred a provision for valuation losses of $111,000.  During the year ended June 30, 2012, a minimal amount of interest was recorded on loans previously accounted for on a non-accrual basis.

Classified Assets.
Management, in compliance with regulatory guidelines, conducts an internal loan review program, whereby loans are placed or classified in categories depending upon the level of risk of nonpayment or loss.  These categories are special mention, substandard, doubtful or loss.  When a loan is classified as substandard or doubtful, management is required to establish an allowance for loan losses in an amount that is deemed prudent.  When management classifies a loan as a loss asset, an allowance equal up to 100% of the loan balance is required to be established or the loan is required to be charged-off.  The allowance for loan losses is composed of an allowance for both inherent risk associated with lending activities and specific problem assets.

Management’s evaluation of the classification of assets and the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses is reviewed by the Board on a regular basis and by the regulatory agencies as part of their examination process.  In addition, each loan that exceeds $500,000 and each group of loans that exceeds $500,000 is monitored more closely.  The following table reflects our classified assets as of the dates indicated:
 
 
11

 
 
   
At June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
Residential mortgage (one- to four-family):
           
Special Mention
  $ -     $ -  
Substandard
    923       1,300  
Doubtful
    -       -  
Loss
    -       111  
                 
Commercial Real Estate and Land:
               
Special Mention
    51       -  
Substandard
    782       738  
Doubtful
    -       -  
Loss
    -       260  
                 
Real Estate construction:
               
Special Mention
    -       -  
Substandard
    -       721  
Doubtful
    -       -  
Loss
    -       -  
                 
Home equity loans:
               
Special Mention
    -       -  
Substandard
    242       233  
Doubtful
    148       -  
Loss
    -       378  
                 
Consumer loans:
               
Special Mention
    -       -  
Substandard
    76       121  
Doubtful
    15       -  
Loss
    2       14  
                 
Commercial loans:
               
Special Mention
    5       1,454  
Substandard
    1,492       446  
Doubtful
    -       -  
Loss
    -       125  
                 
Securities available for sale:
               
Special Mention
    -       -  
Substandard
    209       436  
Doubtful
    -       -  
Loss
    -       -  
                 
Real estate owned/repossessed property:
               
Special Mention
    -       -  
Substandard
    2,361       1,181  
Doubtful
    -       -  
Loss
    300       189  
                 
Total classified loans and real estate owned
  $ 6,606     $ 7,707  
 
 
12

 
 
Allowance for Loan Losses and Real Estate Owned.
The Bank segregates its loan portfolio for loan losses into the following broad categories:  real estate loans (residential mortgages [one- to four-family], real estate construction, commercial real estate and land) home equity loans, consumer loans, and commercial business loans.  The Bank provides for a general allowance for losses inherent in the portfolio in the categories referenced above, which consists of two components:  General loss percentages which are calculated based on historical analyses and other factors such as volume and severity of delinquencies, local and national economy, underwriting standards, and other factors.  This portion of the allowance is calculated for inherent losses which probably exist as of the evaluation date even though they might not have been identified by the more objective processes used.  This is due to the risk of error and/or inherent imprecision in the process.  This portion of the allowance is subjective in nature and requires judgments based on qualitative factors which do not lend themselves to exact mathematical calculations such as:  trends in delinquencies and non-accruals; trends in volume; terms and portfolio mix; new credit products; changes in lending policies and procedures; and changes in the outlook for the local, regional and national economy.

At least quarterly, the management of the Bank evaluates the need to establish an allowance against losses on loans and other assets based on estimated losses on specific loans and on any real estate owned when a finding is made that a loss is estimable and probable.  Such evaluation includes a review of all loans for which full collectibility may not be reasonably assured and considers, among other matters:  the estimated market value of the underlying collateral of problem loans; prior loss experience; economic conditions; and overall portfolio quality.

Provisions for, or adjustments to, estimated losses are included in earnings in the period they are established.  We had $1,625,000 in allowances for loan losses and $300,000 in allowance for valuation losses for other real estate owned at June 30, 2012.

While we believe we have established our existing allowance for loan losses in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, there can be no assurance that bank regulators, in reviewing our loan portfolio, will not request that we significantly increase our allowance for loan losses, or that general economic conditions, a deteriorating real estate market, or other factors will not cause us to significantly increase our allowance for loan losses, therefore negatively affecting our financial condition and earnings.

In making loans, we recognize that credit losses will be experienced and that the risk of loss will vary with, among other things, the type of loan being made, the creditworthiness of the borrower over the term of the loan and, in the case of a secured loan, the quality of the security for the loan.

It is our policy to review our loan portfolio, in accordance with regulatory classification procedures, on at least a quarterly basis.
 
 
13

 

The following table sets forth information with respect to our allowance for loan losses at the dates and for the periods indicated:
 
   
For the Years Ended
 
   
June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
             
Balance at beginning of period
  $ 1,800     $ 1,100  
                 
Provision for loan losses
    1,101       948  
Loans charged-off
               
Real estate loans
    (125 )     (75 )
Commercial real estate and land
    (309 )     (130 )
Real estate construction
    (239 )     -  
Home equity
    (351 )     (30 )
Consumer
    (33 )     (17 )
Commercial business loans
    (239 )     -  
Recoveries
               
Real estate loans
    -       -  
Commercial real estate and land
    8       -  
Real estate construction
    -       -  
Home equity
    -       -  
Consumer
    12       4  
Commercial business loans
            -  
Net loans charged-off
    (1,276 )     (248 )
                 
Balance at end of period
  $ 1,625     $ 1,800  
                 
Allowance for loan losses to total loans
    0.93 %     0.96 %
Allowance for loan losses to total non-performing
         
loans
    50.50 %     61.25 %
Net recoveries (charge-offs) to average loans
               
outstanding during the period
    -0.68 %     -0.13 %
 
 
14

 
 
The following table presents our allocation of the allowance for loan losses by loan category and the percentage of loans in each category to total loans at the periods indicated:
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
   
Amount
   
Percentage
of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
   
Loan
Category
to Total
Loans
   
Amount
   
Percentage
of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
   
Loan
Category
 to Total
Loans
 
  Real estate loans:
                                   
  Residential mortgage (one- to four-family)
  $ 403       24.80 %     35.11 %   $ 369       20.56 %     37.34 %
  Commercial real estate and land
    772       47.51 %     36.82 %     652       36.22 %     34.52 %
  Real estate construction
    10       0.62 %     0.83 %     18       0.94 %     2.68 %
  Total real estate loans
    1,185       72.92 %     72.76 %     1,039       57.72 %     74.54 %
                                                 
Other loans:
                                               
  Home equity
    156       9.60 %     13.50 %     481       26.72 %     14.84 %
  Consumer
    78       4.80 %     5.00 %     57       3.17 %     4.98 %
  Commercial business
    206       12.68 %     8.74 %     223       12.39 %     5.64 %
  Total other loans
    440       27.08 %     27.24 %     761       42.28 %     25.46 %
                                                 
Total
  $ 1,625       100.00 %     100.00 %   $ 1,800       100.00 %     100.00 %
 
 
15

 
 
INVESTMENT ACTIVITIES

General.
Federally chartered savings banks such as American Federal Savings Bank have the authority to invest in various types of investment securities, including United States Treasury obligations, securities of various Federal agencies (including securities collateralized by mortgages), certificates of deposits of insured banks and savings institutions, municipal securities, corporate debt securities and loans to other banking institutions.

Eagle maintains liquid assets that may be invested in specified short-term securities and other investments.  Liquidity levels may be increased or decreased depending on the yields on investment alternatives.  They may also be increased based on management’s judgment as to the attractiveness of the yields then available in relation to other opportunities.  Liquidity levels can also change based on management’s expectation of future yield levels, as well as management’s projections as to the short-term demand for funds to be used in the Bank’s loan origination and other activities.  Eagle maintains an investment securities portfolio and a mortgage-backed securities portfolio as part of its investment portfolio.

Investment Policies.
The investment policy of Eagle, which is established by the board of directors, is designed to foster earnings and liquidity within prudent interest rate risk guidelines, while complementing American Federal’s lending activities.  The policy provides for available-for-sale (including those accounted for under FASB ASC 825), held-to-maturity, and trading classifications.  However, Eagle currently does not hold any securities for purposes of trading or held-to-maturity.  The policy permits investments in high credit quality instruments with diversified cash flows while permitting us to maximize total return within the guidelines set forth in our interest rate risk and liquidity management policies. Permitted investments include but are not limited to U.S. government obligations, government agency or government-sponsored agency obligations, state, county and municipal obligations, and mortgage-backed securities.  Collateralized mortgage obligations, investment grade corporate debt securities, and commercial paper are also included.  We also invest in Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) overnight deposits and federal funds, but these instruments are not considered part of the investment portfolio.

Our investment policy also includes several specific guidelines and restrictions to ensure adherence with safe and sound activities.  The policy prohibits investments in high-risk mortgage derivative products (as defined within the policy) without prior approval from the board of directors.  To secure such approval, management must demonstrate the business advantage of such investments.

We do not participate in the use of off-balance sheet derivative financial instruments, except interest rate caps and certain financial instruments designated as cash flow hedges related to loans committed to be sold in the secondary market and interest rate swaps designated as fair-value hedges.  Further, Eagle does not invest in securities which are not rated investment grade at time of purchase.

The Board, through its asset liability committee, has charged the President and CEO with implementation of the investment policy.  All transactions are reported to the board of directors monthly, as well as the current composition of the portfolio, including market values and unrealized gains and losses.

Investment Securities.
We maintain a portfolio of investment securities, classified as either available-for-sale (including those accounted for under FASB ASC 825) or held-to-maturity to enhance total return on investments.  At June 30, 2012, our investment securities included U.S. government and agency obligations, Small Business Administration pools, municipal securities, mortgage-backed securities, collateralized mortgage obligations and corporate obligations, all with varying characteristics as to rate, maturity and call provisions.  Investment securities held-to-maturity represented none of Eagle’s total investment portfolio.  Securities available-for-sale totaled 83% of Eagle’s total investment portfolio.  The remaining percentage is comprised of interest-bearing deposits in banks and stock in the FHLB of Seattle.  The Bank does not expect to alter the mix of U.S. Treasury obligations it will hold and purchase, notwithstanding the downgrade of U.S. Treasury debt obligations to AA+ by Standard & Poors.  It will, however, continue to monitor developments.
 
 
16

 

The following table sets forth the carrying value of our investment securities portfolio at the dates indicated:

   
At June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in Thousands)
 
   
Carrying
Value
   
Percentage
of Total
   
Carrying
Value
   
Percentage
of Total
 
Securities available-for-sale, at fair value:
                       
  U.S. Government and agency obligations
  $ 21,055       19.58 %   $ 26,208       23.50 %
  Corporate obligations
    3,945       3.67 %     6,216       5.57 %
  Municipal obligations
    42,060       39.10 %     39,186       35.13 %
  Collateralized mortgage obligations
    15,370       14.29 %     24,718       22.16 %
  Mortgage-backed securities
    6,847       6.37 %     6,372       5.71 %
                                 
Total securities available for sale
    89,277       83.00 %     102,700       92.07 %
                                 
                                 
  Interest-bearing deposits
    16,280       15.14 %     1,837       1.65 %
                                 
  Federal funds sold
    -       0.00 %     5,000       4.48 %
                                 
  Federal Home Loan Bank capital stock, at cost
    2,003       1.86 %     2,003       1.80 %
                                 
Total
  $ 107,560       100.00 %   $ 111,540       100.00 %
 
 
17

 
 
The following table sets forth information regarding the carrying values, weighted average yields and maturities of our investment securities portfolio at June 30, 2012:

   
At June 30, 2012
 
   
One Year or Less
   
One to Five Years
   
More than Five to Ten Years
   
More than Ten Years
   
Total Investment Securities
 
                                     
Securities available-for-sale:
 
Carrying
Value
   
Annualized
Weighted
Average
Yield
   
Carrying
Value
   
Annualized
Weighted
Average
Yield
   
Carrying
Value
   
Annualized
Weighted
Average
Yield
   
Carrying
Value
   
Annualized
Weighted
Average
Yield
   
Carrying
Value
   
Approximate
Market
Value
   
Annualized
Weighted
Average
Yield
 
U.S. Government and agency
                                                                 
obligations
  $ 2,564       1.71 %   $ 13,152       2.36 %   $ 2,913       1.32 %   $ 2,426       2.42 %   $ 21,055     $ 21,055       2.14 %
Corporate obligations
    -       -       3,945       3.19       -       -       -       -       3,945       3,945       3.19  
Municipal obligations
    -       -       5,719       3.89       15,933       4.99       20,408       6.27       42,060       42,060       5.46  
Private collateralized mortgage obligations
    -       -       -       -       -       -       169       7.01       169       169       7.01  
Collateralized mortgage obligations
    -       -       359       3.38       2,552       3.75       12,290       3.46       15,201       15,201       3.51  
Mortgage-backed securities
    10       4.34       33       5.32       376       3.39       6,428       3.60       6,847       6,847       3.60  
                                                                                         
Total securities available for sale
    2,574       1.72       23,208       2.90       21,774       4.33       41,721       4.81       89,277       89,277       4.11  
                                                                                         
Interest-bearing deposits
    16,280       0.02       -       -       -       -       -       -       16,280       16,280       0.02  
                                                                                         
Federal funds sold
    0       -       -       -       -       -       -       -       0       -       -  
                                                                                         
Federal Home Loan Bank
                                                                                       
capital stock
    -       -       -       -       2,003       -       -       -       2,003       2,003       -  
                                                                                         
Total
  $ 18,854       0.25 %   $ 23,208       2.90 %   $ 23,777       3.96 %   $ 41,721       4.81 %   $ 107,560     $ 107,560       3.41 %
 
 
18

 
 
SOURCES OF FUNDS

General.
Deposits are the major source of our funds for lending and other investment purposes.  Borrowings (principally from the FHLB of Seattle) are also used to compensate for reductions in the availability of funds from other sources.  In addition to deposits and borrowings, we derive funds from loan and mortgage-backed securities principal repayments, and proceeds from the maturity, call and sale of mortgage-backed securities and investment securities and from the sale of loans.  Loan and mortgage-backed securities payments are a relatively stable source of funds, while loan prepayments and deposit inflows are significantly influenced by general interest rates and financial market conditions.

Deposits.
We offer a variety of deposit accounts.  Deposit account terms vary, primarily as to the required minimum balance amount, the amount of time that the funds must remain on deposit and the applicable interest rate.

Our current deposit products include certificates of deposit accounts ranging in terms from 90 days to five years as well as checking, savings and money market accounts.  Individual retirement accounts (IRAs) are included in certificates of deposit.

Deposits are obtained primarily from residents of Helena, Bozeman, Butte and Townsend.  We believe we are able to attract deposit accounts by offering outstanding service, competitive interest rates and convenient locations and service hours.  We use traditional methods of advertising to attract new customers and deposits, including radio, television, print media advertising and sales training and incentive programs for employees.  Management believes that non-residents of Montana hold an insignificant number and amount of deposit accounts.

We pay interest rates on deposits which are competitive in our market.  Interest rates on deposits are set by senior management, based on a number of factors, including:  projected cash flow; a current survey of a selected group of competitors’ rates for similar products; external data which may influence interest rates; investment opportunities and loan demand; and scheduled certificate maturities and loan and investment repayments.

Core deposits are deposits that are more stable and somewhat less sensitive to rate changes.  They also represent a lower cost source of funds than rate sensitive, more volatile accounts such as certificates of deposit.  We believe that our core deposits are our checking, as well as NOW accounts, savings accounts, money market accounts and IRA accounts.  Based on our historical experience, we include IRA accounts funded by certificates of deposit as core deposits because they exhibit the principal features of core deposits in that they are stable and generally are not rate sensitive.  Core deposits amounted to $163.6 million or 74.35% of the Bank’s deposits at June 30, 2012 ($138.6 million or 63.0% if IRA certificates of deposit are excluded).  The presence of a high percentage of core deposits and, in particular, transaction accounts, is part of our strategy to restructure our liabilities to more closely resemble the lower cost liabilities of a commercial bank.  However, a significant portion of our deposits remains in certificate of deposit form.  These certificates of deposit, if they mature and are renewed at higher rates, would result in an increase in our cost of funds.
 
 
19

 
 
The following table sets forth American Federal’s distribution of deposit accounts at the dates indicated and the weighted average interest rate on each category of deposit represented:
 
   
At June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
               
Weighted
               
Weighted
 
         
Percent
   
Average
         
Percent
   
Average
 
   
Amount
   
of Total
   
Rate
   
Amount
   
of Total
   
Rate
 
                                     
Noninterest checking
  $ 23,425       10.65 %     0.00 %   $ 19,052       9.11 %     0.00 %
Savings
    40,591       18.45 %     0.10 %     36,945       17.66 %     0.10 %
NOW account/Interest bearing
                                               
  checking
    46,125       20.97 %     0.05 %     40,352       19.29 %     0.05 %
Money market accounts
    28,489       12.95 %     0.14 %     28,284       13.51 %     0.12 %
                                                 
    Total
    138,630       63.02 %     0.08 %     124,633       59.58 %     0.07 %
Certificates of deposit accounts:
                                               
   IRA certificates
    24,941       11.34 %     0.98 %     25,020       11.96 %     1.07 %
   Brokered certificates
    -       0.00 %     0.00 %     -       0.00 %     0.00 %
   Other certificates
    56,418       25.65 %     1.18 %     59,533       28.46 %     1.38 %
Total certificates of deposit
    81,359       36.98 %     1.12 %     84,553       40.42 %     1.29 %
                                                 
    Total deposits
  $ 219,989       100.00 %     0.46 %   $ 209,186       100.00 %     0.57 %

The following table sets forth the amounts and maturities of our certificates of deposit as of June 30, 2012, for the maturity dates indicated:
 
                     
After
       
   
June 30,
   
June 30,
   
June 30,
   
June 30,
       
   
2013
   
2014
   
2015
   
2015
   
Total
 
                               
under 0.51%
  $ 21,615     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 21,615  
0.51-0.75%
    11,655       1,105       12       -       12,772  
0.76-1.00%
    1,761       906       522       6       3,195  
1.01-1.25%
    14,779       8,135       891       97       23,902  
1.26-1.50%
    374       298       348       908       1,928  
1.51-2.00%
    52       343       967       3,015       4,377  
2.01% and higher
    4,512       3,908       3,237       1,913       13,570  
                                         
Total
  $ 54,748     $ 14,695     $ 5,977     $ 5,939     $ 81,359  
 
 
20

 
 
The following table shows the amount of certificates of deposit with balances of $100,000 to $250,000 and of more than $250,000 by time remaining until maturity as of June 30, 2012:
 
     
Balance
       
  (In thousands)        
Greater
       
        $100 - $250    
than $250
   
Total
 
3 months or less
  $ 3,910     $ 1,011     $ 4,921  
Over 3 to 6 months
    3,446       512       3,958  
Over 6 to 12 months
    5,123       2,666       7,789  
Over 12 months
    8,080       1,608       9,688  
                           
  Total
    $ 20,559     $ 5,797     $ 26,356  
 
The following table sets forth the net changes in deposit accounts for the periods indicated:

   
Year Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
             
Opening balance
  $ 209,186     $ 197,939  
Deposits, net
    9,748       9,867  
Interest credited
    1,055       1,380  
                 
Ending balance
  $ 219,989     $ 209,186  
                 
Net increase
  $ 10,803     $ 11,247  
                 
Percent increase
    5.16 %     5.68 %
                 
Weighted average cost of
               
  deposits during the period
    0.56 %     0.75 %
                 
Weighted average cost of
               
  deposits at end of period
    0.46 %     0.57 %

Our depositors are primarily residents of the state of Montana.

Borrowings.
Deposits are the primary source of funds for our lending and investment activities and for general business purposes.  However, as the need arises, or in order to take advantage of funding opportunities, we also borrow funds in the form of advances from the FHLB of Seattle and other borrowings from PNC Financial Services, Inc. (PNC) to supplement our supply of lendable funds and to meet deposit withdrawal requirements.

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 2006, our predecessor entity formed a special purpose subsidiary, Eagle Bancorp Statutory Trust I (the “Trust”), for the purpose of issuing trust preferred securities in the amount of $5.0 million.  Our predecessor entity has issued subordinated debentures to the Trust, and the coupon on the debentures matches the dividend payment on the trust preferred securities.  Upon the closing of the second-step conversion and reorganization, we assumed the obligations of our predecessor in connection with the subordinated debentures and trust preferred securities.  For regulatory purposes, the securities qualify as Tier 1 Capital, while for accounting purposes they are recorded as long term debt.  The securities have a 30 year maturity and carried a fixed coupon of 6.02% for the first five years, at which time the coupon became variable, at a spread of 142 basis points over 3 month LIBOR.  At June 30, 2012 the rate was 1.881%.
 
 
21

 
 
The following table sets forth information concerning our borrowing from the FHLB of Seattle and PNC at the end of, and during, the periods indicated:
 
   
Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
   
(Dollars in thousands)
 
FHLB Advances:
           
  Average balance
  $ 35,973     $ 41,008  
  Maximum balance at any month-end
    37,879       45,346  
  Balance at period end
    33,696       37,896  
  Weighted average interest rate during the period
    3.25 %     3.47 %
  Weighted average interest rate at period end
    3.19 %     3.26 %
                 
Repurchase Agreements:
               
  Average balance
  $ 17,678     $ 23,000  
  Maximum balance at any month-end
    23,000       23,000  
  Balance at period end
    9,000       23,000  
  Weighted average interest rate during the period
    4.66 %     4.66 %
  Weighted average interest rate at period end
    4.61 %     4.66 %
                 
Other:
               
  Average balance
  $ -     $ -  
  Maximum balance at any month-end
    -       -  
  Balance at period end
    -       -  
  Weighted average interest rate during the period
    n/a       n/a  
  Weighted average interest rate at period end
    n/a       n/a  
                 
Total borrowings:
               
  Average balance
  $ 53,651     $ 64,008  
  Maximum balance at any month-end
    60,879       68,346  
  Balance at period end
    42,696       60,896  
  Weighted average interest rate during the period
    3.49 %     3.90 %
  Weighted average interest rate at period end
    3.49 %     3.79 %

SUBSIDIARY ACTIVITY

We are permitted to invest in the capital stock of, or originate secured or unsecured loans to, subsidiary corporations.  We do not have any subsidiaries, except for American Federal Savings Bank and Eagle Bancorp Statutory Trust I.

Personnel

As of June 30, 2012, we had 83 full-time employees and 7 part-time employees.  The employees are not represented by a collective bargaining unit.  We believe our relationship with our employees to be good.
 
 
22

 
 
REGULATION

Set forth below is a brief description of certain laws and regulations applicable to Eagle and American Federal. These descriptions of laws and regulations as well as those contained elsewhere do not purport to be complete and are qualified in their entirety by reference to applicable laws and regulations. Legislative or regulatory changes in the future could adversely affect our operations or financial condition.
 
General
 
As a federally-chartered savings institution, American Federal is subject to extensive regulation, examination and supervision by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”) which assumed jurisdiction over Eagle and American Federal after the close of Eagle’s June 30, 2011 fiscal year as its primary federal regulator, and the FDIC, as the insurer of its deposits. American Federal is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank, or FHLB System, and its deposit accounts are insured up to applicable limits by the Deposit Insurance Fund, which is administered by the FDIC. There are periodic examinations to evaluate American Federal’s safety and soundness and compliance with various regulatory requirements. Under certain circumstances, the FDIC may also examine American Federal.  This regulatory structure is intended primarily for the protection of the insurance fund and depositors. The regulatory structure also gives the regulatory authorities extensive discretion in connection with their supervisory and enforcement activities and examination policies, including policies with respect to the classification of assets and the establishment of adequate allowance for loan losses for regulatory purposes. Eagle, as a savings and loan holding company, was required to file certain reports with, is subject to examination by, and otherwise comply with the rules and regulations of the Office of Thrift Supervision which have been adopted by the OCC. The Federal Reserve Board assumed regulatory responsibility for Eagle during this year. Eagle is also subject to the rules and regulations of the SEC under the federal securities laws.  See “—Holding Company Regulation.”
 
Dodd-Frank Act
     
On July 21, 2010, the President signed into law the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”). The Dodd-Frank Act will significantly change the current bank regulatory structure and affect the lending, investment, trading and operating activities of financial institutions and their holding companies.  Regulations implementing the changes described below have not been promulgated by the federal banking agencies, so we cannot determine the full impact on our business and operations at this time. However, one important change is the transfer of regulatory jurisdiction over federal savings association regulation from the Office of Thrift Supervision to the OCC.  The FDIC will regulate state-chartered savings associations.

On July 21, 2011, under the requirements of the Dodd-Frank Act, our primary federal regulator, the Office of Thrift Supervision, was merged with and into the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the primary federal regulator for national banks). As a result, shortly after the conclusion of Eagle’s fiscal year of June 30, 2011, all federal savings associations (including American Federal) came under the principal jurisdiction of a different, federal bank regulatory agency, the OCC, which has historically regulated the national banks. The OCC has extensive experience in the regulation of community banks such as American Federal but it is unclear without more experience how the change in federal regulatory agencies will impact American Federal. American Federal will retain its federal thrift charter under the OCC, but may evaluate other charter options in the future. The Dodd-Frank Act also authorizes the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System to supervise and regulate all savings and loan holding companies like Eagle, in addition to bank holding companies which it currently regulates. As a result, the Federal Reserve Board’s current regulations applicable to bank holding companies, including, in the future, holding company capital requirements, will apply to savings and loan holding companies like Eagle. The capital requirements are expected to take effect in five years. The Dodd-Frank Act will require the Federal Reserve Board to set minimum capital levels for depository institution holding companies that are as stringent as those required for the insured depository subsidiaries, and the components of Tier 1 capital would be restricted to capital instruments that are currently considered to be Tier 1 capital for insured depository institutions. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, the proceeds of trust preferred securities are excluded from Tier 1 capital unless such securities were issued prior to May 19, 2010 by bank or savings and loan holding companies with less than $15 billion of assets.

The Dodd-Frank Act also created a new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau with broad powers to supervise and enforce consumer protection laws. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has broad rule-making authority for a wide range of consumer protection laws that apply to all banks and savings institutions such as American Federal Savings Bank, including the authority to prohibit “unfair, deceptive or abusive” acts and practices. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has examination and enforcement authority over all banks and savings institutions with more than $10 billion in assets. Banks and savings institutions with $10 billion or less in assets will continue to be examined by their applicable bank regulators. The new legislation also weakens the federal preemption available for national banks and federal savings associations, and gives state attorneys general the ability to enforce applicable federal consumer protection laws.

 
23

 
 
The legislation also broadens the base for Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insurance assessments. Assessments will now be based on the average consolidated total assets less tangible equity capital of a financial institution. The Dodd-Frank Act also permanently increases the maximum amount of deposit insurance for banks, savings institutions and credit unions to $250,000 per depositor, retroactive to January 1, 2009, and non-interest bearing transaction accounts have unlimited deposit insurance through December 31, 2012. Lastly, the Dodd-Frank Act directs the Federal Reserve Board to promulgate rules prohibiting excessive compensation paid to bank holding company executives, regardless of whether the company is publicly traded or not.
 
Federal Regulation of Savings Institutions
 
The following description relates to both Eagle and American Federal’s regulation through the completion of the fiscal year ending June 30, 2012, and a description of certain historical regulatory aspects. The information related to the Office of Thrift Supervision is expected to a significant degree to be descriptive of regulations and policies of the OCC which has adopted virtually all of the Office of Thrift Supervision rules. However, because neither Eagle nor American Federal has had any experience with federal bank regulators other than the Office of Thrift Supervision, and the FDIC with respect to insurance of accounts, the descriptions that follow refer to Eagle and American Federal’s past experience through the end of its fiscal year of June 30, 2012.
 
Office of Thrift Supervision.  The Office of Thrift Supervision had extensive authority over the operations of savings institutions.  As part of this authority, American Federal was required to file periodic reports with the Office of Thrift Supervision and is subject to periodic examinations. The Office of Thrift Supervision also had extensive enforcement authority over all savings institutions and their holding companies, including American Federal and Eagle. Authority over Eagle has been transferred to the Federal Reserve Board as a result of enactment of the Dodd-Frank Act. Enforcement authority over Eagle includes, among other things, the ability to assess civil money penalties, issue cease-and-desist or removal orders and initiate prompt corrective action orders.  In general, these enforcement actions may be initiated for violations of laws and regulations and unsafe or unsound practices.  Other actions or inactions may provide the basis for enforcement action, including misleading or untimely reports filed with federal bank regulatory agencies. Except under certain circumstances, public disclosure of final enforcement actions is required.