PINX:ERSO Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 6/30/2012

Effective Date 6/30/2012

 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)
 
   x
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
   
For the quarterly period ended: June 30, 2012
   
OR
   
   o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from     to

Commission file number: 333-179245

EMPIRE RESOURCES, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware
 
22-3136782
(State or other jurisdiction of
 
(I.R.S. Employer
incorporation or organization)
 
Identification No.)

One Parker Plaza
Fort Lee, New Jersey 07024
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)

(201) 944-2200
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x No ¨
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer o
 
Accelerated filer o
     
Non-accelerated filer o
 
Smaller reporting company x
 
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
   
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No x
 
The number of shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.01 par value, outstanding as of August 8, 2012: 8,549,654
 
 
 

 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS

   
Page
 
PART I
 
ItemItem 1.
Financial Statements
3
Item 2.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
16
ItemItem 4.
Controls and Procedures
21
 
PART II
 
Item 1.
Legal Proceedings
22
Item 1A.
Risk Factors
22
ItemItem 6.
Exhibits
30
 
 
-2-

 
 
PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1.
Financial Statements

EMPIRE RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(In thousands except share amounts)

   
June 30, 2012
   
December 31, 2011
 
ASSETS
           
Current assets:
           
     Cash
  $ 4,159     $ 4,274  
     Trade accounts receivable (less allowance for doubtful
        accounts of $519 and $527)
    68,566       56,504  
     Inventories
    156,528       184,113  
     Deferred tax assets
    3,393       3,384  
     Advance to supplier, net of imputed interest of $161 and $0,
        respectively
    1,505       0  
     Other current assets
    12,247       11,053  
          Total current assets
    246,398       259,328  
     Advance to supplier, net of imputed interest of $542 and $521,
        respectively, net of current maturities
    7,792       4,479  
     Preferential supply agreement
    962       521  
     Long-term financing costs, net of amortization
    1,151       1,360  
     Property and equipment, net
    4,001       4,040  
Total assets
  $ 260,304     $ 269,728  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY
               
Current liabilities:
               
     Notes payable - banks
  $ 157,679     $ 154,424  
     Current maturities of mortgage payable
    166       160  
     Trade accounts payable
    35,146       50,054  
     Income taxes payable
    5,068       4,060  
     Accrued expenses and derivative liabilities
    5,529       4,089  
     Dividends payable
    215       231  
          Total current liabilities
    203,803       213,018  
                 
Mortgage payable, net of current maturities
    1,377       1,461  
Subordinated convertible debt net of unamortized discount
   of $2,216 and $2,499 respectively
    9,784       9,501  
Derivative liability for embedded conversion option
    1,983       1,934  
Deferred taxes payable
    188       212  
          Total Liabilities
    217,135       226,126  
                 
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 18)
               
                 
Stockholders' equity:
               
     Common stock $.01 par value, 20,000,000 shares authorized and
        11,749,651 shares issued at June 30, 2012
        and December 31, 2011
    117       117  
     Additional paid-in capital
    11,937       11,937  
     Retained earnings
    36,825       35,271  
     Accumulated other comprehensive loss
    (269 )     (214 )
     Treasury stock 3,154,997 and 2,511,245 shares
        at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011
    (5,441 )     (3,509 )
          Total stockholders' equity
    43,169       43,602  
Total liabilities and stockholders' equity
  $ 260,304     $ 269,728  

See notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements
 
 
-3-

 
 
EMPIRE RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income (Unaudited)
(In thousands except per share amounts)

   
Three Months Ended June 30,
   
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2012
   
2011
 
Net sales
  $ 145,692     $ 126,606     $ 291,301     $ 240,133  
Cost of goods sold
    139,271       121,312       278,526       229,116  
Gross profit
    6,421       5,294       12,775       11,017  
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    3,307       2,863       6,759       5,635  
Operating income
    3,114       2,431       6,016       5,382  
Other income/(expenses)
                               
   Change in value of derivative liability
    195       0       (49 )     0  
Interest expense, net
    (1,413 )     (694 )     (2,741 )     (1,101 )
Income before income taxes
    1,896       1,737       3,226       4,281  
Income taxes
    728       682       1,227       1,648  
Net income
  $ 1,168     $ 1,055     $ 1,999     $ 2,633  
Weighted average shares outstanding:
                               
     Basic
    9,230       9,259       9,205       9,259  
     Diluted
    12,117       10,285       12,096       9,920  
Earnings per share:
                               
     Basic
  $ 0.13     $ 0.11     $ 0.22     $ 0.28  
     Diluted
  $ 0.11     $ 0.11     $ 0.21     $ 0.27  

See notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements
 
 
-4-

 

 
EMPIRE RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Unaudited)
(In thousands)

   
Three Months Ended June 30,
   
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2012
   
2011
 
Net Income
  $ 1,168     $ 1,055     $ 1,999     $ 2,633  
Other comprehensive income before tax
                               
   Foreign currency translation adjustments
    (153 )     77       (69 )     230  
   Decrease in value of interest rate swap liability
    13       (12 )     24       10  
   Increase (decrease) in value of marketable
      securities
    (2 )     1       (1 )     (2 )
Other comprehensive income before tax
    (142 )     66       (46 )     238  
Income tax related to components of other comprehensive income
    (5 )     3       (9 )     (4 )
Other comprehensive income, net of tax
    (147 )     69       (55 )     234  
Comprehensive income
  $ 1,021     $ 1,124     $ 1,944     $ 2,867  

See notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements
 
 
-5-

 
 
EMPIRE RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (Unaudited)
(In thousands)

   
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
 
Cash flows from operating activities:
           
     Net income
  $ 1,999     $ 2,633  
     Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided
        by/(used in)  operating activities:
               
               Depreciation and amortization
    271       132  
               Change in value of derivative liability
    49       0  
               Amortization of convertible note discount
    283       0  
               Imputed interest on vendor advance
    (259 )     0  
               Provision for doubtful accounts
    0       216  
               Deferred income taxes
    (39 )     (81 )
               Foreign exchange loss, and other
    35       (362 )
               Changes in:
               
                    Trade accounts receivable
    (12,148 )     (14,633 )
                    Inventories
    27,423       (1,660 )
                    Other current assets
    (1,197 )     (5,507 )
                    Trade accounts payable
    (14,905 )     11,075  
                    Income taxes payable
    1,008       1,730  
                    Accrued expenses and derivative liabilities
    1,476       (12,750 )
                 Net cash  provided by/(used in) operating activities
    3,996       (19,207 )
Cash flows used in investing activities:
               
    Advance related to supply agreement
    (5,000 )     (5,000 )
    Purchases of property and equipment
    (20 )     (29 )
                 Net cash used in investing activities
    (5,020 )     (5,029 )
Cash flows provided by financing activities:
               
     Proceeds from subordinated convertible debt
    0       12,000  
     Proceeds from notes payable – banks
    3,398       16,330  
     Repayments - mortgage payable
    (79 )     (74 )
     Dividends paid
    (461 )     (231 )
     Deferred financing costs
    (2 )     (1,202 )
     Treasury stock purchased
    (1,932 )     0  
                 Net cash provided by financing activities
    924       26,823  
Net (decrease)/increase in cash
    (100 )     2,587  
        Effect of exchange rate
    (15 )     25  
Cash at beginning of year
    4,274       1,270  
Cash at end of the year
  $ 4,159     $ 3,882  
Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:
               
     Cash paid during the period for:
               
          Interest
  $ 2,697     $ 955  
          Income taxes
  $ 2,221     $ 2,402  
Non cash financing activities:
               
      Dividend declared but not yet paid
  $ 215     $ 231  

See notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements
 
 
-6-

 
 
EMPIRE RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Stockholders’ Equity (Unaudited)
(In thousands)

   
Common Stock Number of Shares
   
Common Stock
 Amount
   
Additional Paid-in Capital
   
Retained Earnings
   
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income/(Loss)
   
Treasury Stock
   
Total Stockholders' Equity
 
Balance at December 31, 2011
    11,750     $ 117     $ 11,937     $ 35,271     $ (214 )   $ (3,509 )   $ 43,602  
Treasury stock acquired
                                            (1,932 )     (1,932 )
Net change in cumulative translation adjustment
                                    (69 )             (69 )
Decrease in value of interest rate swap liability, net of deferred tax of $9
                                    15               15  
Decrease in value of marketable securities
                                    (1 )             (1 )
Dividends declared and/or paid ($0.05 per share)
                            (445 )                     (445 )
Net income
                            1,999                       1,999  
Balance at June 30, 2012
    11,750     $ 117     $ 11,937     $ 36,825     $ (269 )   $ (5,441 )   $ 43,169  

See notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements
 
 
-7-

 

 
Empire Resources, Inc. and Subsidiaries.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)
(In thousands, except per share amounts)

1. The Company

The condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Empire Resources, Inc. (the “Company”) and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, Empire Resources Pacific Ltd., the Company’s sales agent in Australia, 6900 Quad Avenue LLC, the owner of a warehouse facility in Baltimore, Maryland and Imbali Metals BVBA (“Imbali”), the Company’s operating subsidiary in Europe.  All significant inter-company transactions and accounts have been eliminated on consolidation.  We purchase and sell semi-finished aluminum and steel products to a diverse customer base located in the Americas, Australia, Europe and New Zealand.

2. Interim Financial Statements

The consolidated interim financial statements included herein have been prepared pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) for interim reporting.  The information and note disclosures normally included in complete financial statements prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (“GAAP”) have been condensed or omitted pursuant to such rules and regulations.  The interim financial statements should be read in conjunction with the Company’s audited financial statements and notes thereto for the year ended December 31, 2011, which are included in the Company’s prospectus filed pursuant to Rule 424(b) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, with the SEC on May 3, 2012.

The Company’s management is responsible for interim financial information.  In the opinion of management, the accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements contain all adjustments which are of a normal and recurring nature, necessary to present fairly the Company’s financial position as of June 30, 2012 and the results of its operations and cash flows for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011.   Interim results may not be indicative of the results that may be expected for the year.

3. Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of income and expenses during the reporting period.  Actual results could differ from these estimates.

4. Newly Effective Accounting Pronouncements

In May 2011, the Financial Accounting Standard Board (the “FASB”) issued new guidance which amends fair value disclosures for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011. Such amendments include a consistent definition of fair value, enhanced disclosure requirements for Level 3 fair value adjustments and other changes to required disclosures.  The Company adopted the new disclosure guidance effective January 1, 2012.

In June 2011, the FASB issued authoritative guidance that amends the presentation of comprehensive income in the financial statements by requiring an entity to present the total comprehensive income, the components of net income and the components of other comprehensive income either in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. The update also eliminates the option to present the components of other comprehensive income as part of the statement of changes in stockholders’ equity. The guidance is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2011, with early adoption permitted. The Company adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2012.
 
 
-8-

 
 
 
5. Concentrations

Two customers accounted for approximately 11% and 10% of our consolidated net sales for the six month period ended June 30, 2012 and 12% and 9% respectively, for the six month period ended June 30, 2011.

The Company’s purchase of metal products is from a limited number of suppliers located throughout the world.  Two suppliers, PT Alumindo Light Metal Industry and Hulamin Ltd. accounted for 63% of total purchases during the six month period ended June 30, 2012 as compared to 38% during the same period ended June 30, 2011.

The loss of any one of our largest suppliers or a material default by any such supplier in its obligations to us could have a material adverse effect on our business.

6. Stock Options

Stock-based compensation for an award of equity instruments, including stock options,  is recognized as an expense over the vesting period based on the fair value of the award at the grant date.  As of June 30, 2012, there were outstanding employee stock options to acquire 414 common shares, which had vested in prior years, and during the six month periods ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, we did not grant any stock options or any other stock-based awards. During the 3 months ended June 30, 2012, options to acquire 2 shares of common stock expired.

7. Treasury Stock

On July 22, 2008, the Board of Directors authorized the Company to repurchase up to 2,000 shares of its common stock.  As of December 31, 2011 the Company repurchased a total of 598 shares under its repurchase program for an aggregate cost of $1,281.  On June 4, 2012 the Company filed a tender offer statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission to repurchase up to 1,000 shares at price of $3.00 per share.  The Company acquired 600 common shares at a cost of $1,801 pursuant to the tender offer which expired on June 29, 2012.  In addition, the Company acquired 43 additional common shares at a cost of $131 during the six month period ended June 30, 2012.

8. Inventories

Inventories, which consist of purchased semi-finished metal products, are stated at the lower of cost or market value.  Cost is determined by the specific-identification method. Inventory is purchased for specific customer orders and our own inventory.  The carrying amount of inventory which is hedged by futures contracts designated as fair value hedges is adjusted to fair value.

9. Notes Payable—Banks

On April 28, 2011, the Company entered into a working capital credit agreement with Rabobank International, for itself and as Lead Arranger and Agent, JPMorgan Chase, for itself and as Syndication Agent, and ABN AMRO, BNP Paribas, RBS Citizens, Société Générale, and Brown Brothers Harriman. The $200 million secured, asset-based credit facility matures on June 30, 2014 and refinanced the Company’s previous $175 million credit agreement which would have matured on June 30, 2011. The new credit agreement also allows additional increases in the line of credit of up to $50 million, subject to certain restrictions. Amounts borrowed bear interest (.27% at June 30, 2012) at Eurodollar, money market or base rates, at our option, plus an applicable margin.   Our borrowings under this line of credit are secured by substantially all of our assets. The credit agreement contains financial and other covenants including but not limited to, covenants requiring maintenance of minimum tangible net worth and compliance with leverage ratios, as well as an ownership minimum and limitations on other indebtedness, liens, and investments and dispositions of assets.   As of June 30, 2012, the Company was in compliance with the covenants.

The credit agreement provides that amounts under the facility may be borrowed and repaid, and re-borrowed, subject to a borrowing base test, until the maturity date of June 30, 2014.  As of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, the credit utilized amounted to, respectively, $185,769 and $179,791 (including approximately $34,269 and $33,791 of outstanding letters of credit).
 
 
-9-

 
 
 
Our wholly owned Belgian subsidiary, Imbali, maintains a line of credit with ING Belgium S.A./N.V., for a EUR 8 million commitment for loans and documentary letters of credit.  Loan advances are limited to a percentage of Imbali’s pledged accounts receivables and inventory. This secured credit arrangement is unconditionally guaranteed by the Company. As of June 30, 2012 the outstanding loan amounted to EUR 4,880 (US $6,179), as compared to EUR 6,500 (US $8,424) on December 31, 2011 bearing interest at EURIBOR plus 1.75% and Imbali was in compliance with all financial covenants.

10. Mortgage Payable

In connection with the purchase of its Baltimore warehouse, the Company entered into a mortgage loan, which had outstanding balances of $1.5 million at June 30, 2012 and $1.6 million at December 31, 2011. The loan requires monthly payments of approximately $21.6, including interest at LIBOR plus 1.75%, and matures in December 2014.  Under a related interest rate swap, which has been designated as a cash flow hedge and remains effective through the maturity of the mortgage loan, we pay a monthly fixed interest rate of 6.37% to the counterparty bank on a notional principal equal to the outstanding principal balance of the mortgage.  In return, the bank pays us a floating rate, namely, LIBOR, which resets monthly, plus 1.75% on the same notional principal amount.

11. Convertible Subordinated Debt

On June 3, 2011, the Company sold $12,000 principal amount of 10% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes Due June 1, 2016 in a private placement to selected accredited investors.  As of June 30, 2012, the notes are convertible at the option of the holders into shares of common stock at a conversion rate of 224.51 shares of common stock per $1,000 principal amount of notes (equivalent to a conversion price of $4.45 per share of common stock), subject to dilutive adjustment for cash and stock dividends, stock splits and similar transactions, at any time before maturity.  The current conversion price reflects five adjustments for dividends declared on common stock since the issuance of the notes.  In addition, if the last reported sale price of the Company’s common stock for 30 consecutive trading days is equal to or greater than $7.00, and a registration statement is effective covering the resale of the shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of the notes, the Company has the right, in its sole discretion, to require the holders to convert all or part of their notes at the then applicable conversion rate.  Interest on the notes is payable in arrears on the first day of June and December every year the notes are outstanding. The purchase agreement pursuant to which the notes were issued contains covenants, including restrictions on the Company’s ability to incur certain indebtedness and create certain liens. As of June 30, 2012, the Company was in compliance with all covenants. Officers and directors of the Company and certain affiliated entities purchased $4,000 principal amount of the notes.

As a result of transactions which cause adjustments to the conversion rate, the embedded conversion option has been bifurcated and recorded as a separate derivative liability at a fair value at issuance of the notes of $2,829, with a corresponding discount recorded on the notes. The derivative liability is carried at fair value with changes therein recorded in income. The quarterly mark to market of the derivative liability will result in non-operating, non-cash gains or losses based on decreases or increases in the Company’s stock price, respectively, among other factors. The non-cash discount is being amortized as additional interest expense over the term of the notes. During the three month and six month periods ended June 30, 2012, the change in the fair value of the derivative liability resulted in a gain of $195 and a loss of $49, respectively and amortization of the discount amounted to $142 and $283, respectively.

The derivative liability was valued using a lattice model using Level 3 inputs. This technique was selected because it embodies all of the types of inputs that the Company expects market participants would consider in determining the fair value of equity linked derivatives embedded in hybrid debt agreements.
 
 
-10-

 

 
The following table summarizes the significant inputs resulting from the calculations as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011:

   
June 30, 2012
   
December 31, 2011
 
             
Equity value
  $ 25,698     $ 25,897  
Volatility
    70 %     70 %
Risk free return
    0.57 %     0.83 %
Dividend Yield
    3.34 %     3.57 %
Strike Price
  $ 4.45     $ 4.57  

The majority of the proceeds from the convertible subordinated debt was earmarked for a long term advance in connection with a supply agreement with the Indonesian company PT. Alumindo Light Metal Industry Tbk (“PT. Alumindo”), a leading producer of high quality semi-finished aluminum products, and its affiliates, as described below.  The Company provided a $10 million non-interest bearing loan to an affiliate of PT. Alumindo to enable the expansion of capacity within that group of companies’ production network.  Agreements entered into in connection with this loan also provide for a long term, multi-year substantial and preferential supply position from PT. Alumindo's premier aluminum rolling mill located in Surabaya, Indonesia.   The loan is to be repaid to the Company beginning on January 1, 2013 in monthly installments of $278. If the Company and PT. Alumindo are unable to agree on a product price under the supply agreement for any given quarter, the monthly re-payment obligation will increase to $556 and the outstanding balance will accrue interest, at the one month U.S. dollar LIBOR rate plus 3.5% per annum, per month. The entire remaining balance, if any, must be repaid on January 1, 2016.  The specific parties to the agreement, PT. Alumindo, Southern Aluminum Industry and Fung Lam Trading Company, are related parties controlled by the Maspion Group - Indonesia.  The Fung Lam Trading Company Ltd, which is wholly owned by the Maspion Group, is a holding company for the group’s investments in China, including 70% ownership of Southern Aluminum Industry. The loan was made to Fung Lam Trading Company Ltd at the request of Maspion Group – Indonesia.  The purpose of the loan was to allow the Maspion Group - Indonesia to increase its overall production capacity, specifically for regional markets and for distribution in China. As consideration for this loan the Maspion Group - Indonesia agreed to make available a committed and significant tonnage of production to the Company on a guaranteed and long-term basis, which will help the Company lessen the risk of an interruption in the sources of its metal supply from PT. Alumindo’s mill in Surabaya, Indonesia, with which the Company has had substantial experience.  The supply agreement calls for increased supply and minimum tonnages.

Interest at the rate of 3.74%, based on the interest rate chargeable in the agreement in the event the supplier does not meet its supply commitments, has been imputed on the non-interest bearing advance and the resulting discount which amounted to $962 has been ascribed to the preferential supply agreement.  Imputed interest is recorded in income over the term of the advance by use of the interest method. The preferential supply agreement will be amortized by the straight line method over three years starting from January 1, 2013, the date that the increased supply is due to begin.
 
 
-11-

 

 
12. Earnings per Share

Basic earnings per share are based upon weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during each period. Diluted earnings per share are based upon the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during each period, plus potential dilutive shares of common stock from assumed exercise of the outstanding stock options using the treasury stock method and assumed conversion of subordinated debt, weighted for the period the debt was outstanding.

The following table sets forth the computation of basic and diluted earnings per share.

   
Three Months Ended June 30,
   
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2012
   
2011
 
Numerator:
                       
Net income
  $ 1,168     $ 1,055     $ 1,999     $ 2,633  
Add back of interest on convertible subordinated debt, net of taxes
    185       56       371       56  
Add back of amortization of discount on convertible subordinated debt, net of taxes
    87       27       175       27  
Adjustment for change in value of convertible note derivative, net of taxes
    (121 )     (5 )     30       (5 )
Numerator for diluted earnings per share
  $ 1,319     $ 1,133     $ 2,575     $ 2,711  
                                 
Denominator:
                               
Weighted average shares outstanding-basic
    9,230       9,259       9,205       9,259  
Dilutive effect of stock options
    193       260       197       276  
Dilutive effect of convertible subordinated debt
    2,694       766       2,694       385  
Weighted average shares outstanding-diluted
    12,117       10,285       12,096       9,920  
Basic Earnings per Share
  $ 0.13     $ 0.11     $ 0.22     $ 0.28  
Diluted Earnings per Share
  $ 0.11     $ 0.11     $ 0.21     $ 0.27  

13. Dividends

On March 22, 2012, our Board of Directors declared a cash dividend of $0.025 per share to stockholders of record at the close of business on April 6, 2012. The dividend, totaling $230, was paid on April 20, 2012. On June 21, 2012, our Board of Directors declared a cash dividend of $0.025 per share to stockholders of record at the close of business on July 6, 2012 except for those shares tendered under the stock repurchase plan.  The dividend, totaling $215, is reflected in dividends payable on the accompanying balance sheet at June 30, 2012 and was paid on July 20, 2012.  The Board of Directors will review its dividend policy on a quarterly basis, and make a determination subject to the profitability and free cash flow and the other requirements of its business.
 
 
-12-

 

 
14. Derivative Financial Instruments and Risk Management

The Company uses derivative financial instruments designated as fair value hedges to manage its exposure to commodity price risk and foreign currency exchange risk inherent in its operations.  It is the Company’s policy to hedge such risks to the extent practicable.  The Company enters into high-grade aluminum futures contracts to limit its gross margin exposure by hedging the metal content element of firmly committed purchase and sales commitments. The Company also enters into foreign exchange forward contracts to hedge its exposure related to commitments to buy and sell metals denominated in international currencies.

The Company’s unrealized assets and liabilities in respect of its fair value hedges measured at fair value are as follows:

Derivatives designated
   
June 30,
   
December 31,
 
as fair value hedges
Balance Sheet Location
 
2012
   
2011
 
Asset derivatives:
             
Aluminum futures
    contracts
Other current  assets
    6,804     $ 4,915  
  Total
  $ 6,804     $ 4,915  
                   
Liability derivatives:
                 
Foreign currency futures
    contracts
Accrued expenses and derivative
   liabilities
  $ 125     $ 315  
  Total
  $ 125     $ 315  

For the periods ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, hedge ineffectiveness associated with derivatives designated as fair value hedges was insignificant, and no fair value hedges were derecognized.

The Company has entered into interest rate swaps to convert the mortgage for its Baltimore warehouse from a variable rate to a fixed rate obligation.  The swap has been designated as a cash flow hedge and the Company’s unrealized liabilities relating to it measured at fair value is as follows:

Derivatives designated
   
June 30,
   
December 31,
 
as cash flow hedges
Balance Sheet Location
 
2012
   
2011
 
Liability derivatives:
             
Interest rate swap
    contracts
Accrued expenses and derivative
   liabilities
  $ 138     $ 161  

A corresponding debit, net of deferred taxes, is reflected in accumulated other comprehensive loss in the accompanying balance sheet.
 
 
-13-

 

 
The table below summarizes the realized gains or (losses) of the Company’s derivative instruments and their location in the income statement:

       
Three Months Ended
   
Six Months Ended
 
Derivatives in hedging
 
Location of Gain or
 
June 30,
   
June 30
 
relationships
 
(Loss) Recognized
 
2012
   
2011
   
2012
   
2011
 
Foreign currency futures
(a)  
Cost of Goods Sold
  $ (252 )   $ (291 )   $ (609 )   $ 483  
Interest rate swaps
(b)  
Interest Expense
    (17 )     (19 )     (34 )     (38 )
Aluminum futures
(c)  
Cost of Goods Sold
    2,604       (3,299 )     5,491       (5,380 )
Total
      $ 2,335     $ (3,609 )   $ 4,848     $ (4,935 )
 
(a)
Fair value hedge: the related hedged item is accounts receivable and an offsetting gain in 2012 and gain/(loss) in 2011 is included in cost of goods sold in the same respective amounts.

(b)
Cash flow hedge: recognized loss reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss.

(c)
Fair value hedge: the related hedged item is inventory and offsetting losses in 2012 and gains in 2011 are included in cost of goods sold in the same respective amounts.

15. Fair Value

Authoritative guidance defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date.  The fair value hierarchy consists of three broad levels, as described below:

 
·
Level 1 - Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets that are accessible at the measurement date for identical, unrestricted assets or liabilities.
 
·
Level 2 - Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.
 
·
Level 3 - Inputs that are both significant to the fair value measurement and unobservable.

Derivative contracts consisting of aluminum contracts, foreign currency contracts, and interest rates swaps are valued using quoted market prices and significant other observable inputs.  These financial instruments are typically exchange-traded and are generally classified within Level 1 or Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy depending on whether the exchange is deemed to be an active market or not.

Major categories of assets and liabilities measured at fair value at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011 are classified as follows:

   
June 30, 2012
   
December 31, 2011
 
   
Level 1
   
Level 2
   
Level 3
   
Level 1
   
Level 2
   
Level 3
 
Assets:
                                   
Inventories
  $ 149,190                     $ 172,068                  
Aluminum futures contracts
    6,804                       4,915                  
Liabilities:
                                               
Foreign currency futures
   contracts
    125                       315                  
Interest rate swap contracts
          $ 138                     $ 161          
Embedded conversion option
                  $ 1,983                     $ 1,934  
 
 
-14-

 

 
16. Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The carrying amounts of variable rate notes payable to the banks and the variable rate mortgage payable approximate fair value (level 2) as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, because these notes reflect market changes to interest rates.  The fair value (level 2) of the subordinated convertible debt approximates its principal amount of $12 million at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011 which exceeds its carrying amount as a result of the unamortized discount related to the bifurcation of the embedded conversion option. The fair value (level 2) of the advance to supplier approximates its carrying value. Derivative financial instruments are carried at fair value (see Note 14).

17. Business Segment and Geographic Area Information

The Company’s only business segment is the sale and distribution of metals.  Sales are attributed to countries based on location of customers.  Sales to domestic and foreign customers were as follows:

   
Three Months Ended June 30,
   
Six Months Ended June 30,
 
   
2012
   
2011
   
2012
   
2011
 
United States
  $ 105,607     $ 87,799     $ 205,325     $ 167,440  
Canada
    12,809       16,259       28,655       30,938  
Europe
    4,571       8,248       9,376       17,237  
Brazil
    13,181       4,050       25,460       5,791  
Australia & New Zealand
    9,524       10,250       22,485       18,727  
    $ 145,692     $ 126,606     $ 291,301     $ 240,133  

18. Commitments and Contingencies

We have $34,269 in outstanding letters of credit to certain of our suppliers at June 30, 2012.

On October 31, 2011, MF Global UK Limited (“MFG”), one of the Company’s London Metal Exchange (“LME”) clearing brokers, went into special administration under The Investment Bank Special Administration Regulations 2011 in the UK.  The Company had no cash balances with MFG on October 31, 2011. The majority of the positions traded through MFG were transferred to another LME broker. However, for the contracts not transferred, the Company has a claim of approximately $800 against MFG, representing the fair value of the contracts on such date which has been written off to cost of goods sold based on the uncertainty of recoverability from MFG. The Company has been in discussions to explore the sale of its claim against MFG.
 
 
-15-

 

 
Item 2.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

You should read the following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and our Prospectus filed pursuant to Rule 424(b) under the Securities Act with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 3, 2012.

Forward-Looking Statements

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains “forward-looking statements,” which include information relating to future events, future financial performance, strategies, expectations, competitive environment and regulation. Words such as “may,” “should,” “could,” “would,” “predict,” “potential,” “continue,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “future,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “estimate,” and similar expressions, as well as statements in future tense, identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements should not be read as a guarantee of future performance or results and may not be accurate indications of when such performance or results will be achieved. Forward-looking statements are based on information we have when those statements are made or our management’s good faith belief as of that time with respect to future events, and are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual performance or results to differ materially from those expressed in or suggested by the forward-looking statements.  Important factors that could cause such differences include, but are not limited to:

 
·
loss or default of one or more suppliers;

 
·
loss or default of one or more significant customers;

 
·
default by the counterparties to our derivative financial instruments;

 
·
changes in general, national or regional economic conditions;

 
·
an act of war or terrorism that disrupts international shipping;

 
·
changes in laws, regulations and tariffs;

 
·
the imposition of anti-dumping duties on the products we import;

 
·
changes in the size and nature of our competition;

 
·
changes in interest rates, foreign currencies or spot prices of aluminum;

 
·
loss of one or more key executives;

 
·
increased credit risk from customers;

 
·
our failure to grow internally or by acquisition; and

 
·
failure to improve operating margins and efficiencies.

For a discussion of these and other risks that relate to our business and investing in shares of our common stock, you should carefully review the risks and uncertainties set forth under the section entitled “Risk Factors” included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and our Prospectus filed pursuant to Rule 424(b) under the Securities Act with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 3, 2012, and those described from time to time in our future reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The forward-looking statements contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement. We do not undertake any obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which any such statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.
 
 
-16-

 

 
Our Business

We are engaged in the purchase, sale and distribution of semi-finished aluminum and steel products to a diverse customer base located in the Americas, Europe, Australia and New Zealand. We sell our products through our own marketing and sales personnel as well as through commission based independent sales agents located in North America and Europe. We purchase products from suppliers located throughout the world. Our two largest suppliers furnished approximately 63% of our products during the first six months of 2012 as compared to 38% of our products during the same period in 2011. While we generally place orders with our suppliers based upon orders that we receive from our customers, we also purchase material for our own stock, which we typically use for shorter term deliveries to our customers.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the U.S. The preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the U.S. requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in our financial statements. The financial statements include estimates based on currently available information and our judgment as to the outcome of future conditions and circumstances. Significant estimates in these financial statements include allowance for doubtful accounts and accruals for inventory claims. Changes in the status of certain facts or circumstances could result in material changes to the estimates used in the preparation of the financial statements and actual results could differ from the estimates and assumptions.

Among the significant judgments made by management in the preparation of our financial statements are the following:

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts (in thousands)

As of June 30, 2012, we had $68,566 in trade receivables, after an allowance for doubtful accounts of $519. We report accounts receivable, net of an allowance for doubtful accounts, to represent our estimate of the amount that ultimately will be realized in cash. We review the adequacy of our allowance for doubtful accounts on an ongoing basis, using historical collection trends, aging of receivables, as well as review of specific accounts, and make adjustments in the allowance as we believe necessary. We maintain a credit insurance policy on the majority of our customers. In general, this policy has a 10% deductible; however there are some instances where the co-insurance may vary and instances where we may exceed the insured values. Changes in economic conditions could have an impact on the collection of existing receivable balances or future allowance considerations. In addition, changes in the credit insurance environment could affect the availability of credit insurance and our ability to secure it.

Accruals for Inventory Claims

Generally, our exposure on claims for defective material is relatively immaterial, as we usually refer all claims on defects back to our suppliers. If we do not believe that a supplier will honor a material claim for a defective product, we will record an allowance for inventory adjustments.

Results of Operations

We are engaged in the purchase, sale and distribution of semi-finished aluminum and steel products which we purchase from producing mills around the world.  The market prices of materials we purchase, as well as the market price of materials we sell, fluctuate constantly in world markets.  Our cost of sales is composed of metal content, which is determined on world metal exchanges, plus a unique fabrication premium charged by each producer to convert the raw metal to a semi-finished product.  In turn, we typically sell to our customers based on metal content plus a premium which includes supplier fabrication margin, and costs of importation, warehousing, and delivery of material to customers.  Since metal content costs are the largest component of cost of sales and selling price, our sales pricing trends and cost of sales trends generally track consistently.
 
 
-17-

 

 
Comparison of Three Months Ended June 30, 2012 and 2011 (in thousands)

During the three months ended June 30, 2012, net sales increased by $19,086, from $126,606 to $145,692, or an increase of 15% from the same period in 2011.  This increase was due to increased unit volume shipments in our North and South American markets and was somewhat offset by a decline in European sales, resulting from weaker economic conditions on the continent.

 Gross profit increased by $1,127, from $5,294 during the three months ended June 30, 2011 to $6,421 in the same period of 2012, representing a 21% increase.  This increase resulted primarily from higher unit sales volume during the period and slightly improved margins on our spot depot business.

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased 16% or $444, from $2,863 during the first three months ended June 30, 2011, to $3,307 in the same period 2012.  Sales commissions resulting from our higher sales volume is the largest component of this increase for the quarter. Additionally, legal and accounting costs from our tender offer filings during the quarter, as well as higher bank fees, made up the balance of the increase in our selling, general and administrative expenses.

During the three months ended June 30, 2012, interest expense increased by $719, from $694 to $1,413 for the same period in 2011.  Under our new credit agreement, which we entered into in April 2011, the premium (over the Eurodollar, money market or base rate) charged by our banks increased to 2.5% from 1.5% under our former credit agreement, resulting in the additional interest costs during the three months ended June 30, 2012.  Additionally, during the three months ended June 30, 2012 the cost of servicing interest on our 10% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes Due June 1, 2016 and amortization of the debt discount in connection with these notes totaled $441.

Net income increased from $1,055 during the three months ended June 30, 2011 to $1,168 during the three months ended June 30, 2012, which was attributable to the increased sales volumes and slightly improved margins.  Net income for the three months ended June 30, 2012 included a non-cash, non-operating after tax gain of $121 resulting from the mark to market of the derivative element of our 10% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes Due June 1, 2016.

Comparison of Six Months Ended June 30, 2012 and 2011 (in thousands)

During the six months ended June 30, 2012, net sales increased by $51,168, from $240,133 to $291,301, or an increase of 21% from the same period in 2011.  This increase was due to increased unit volume shipments in our North and South American markets and was somewhat offset by a decline in European sales, resulting from weaker economic conditions on the continent.

Gross profit increased by $1,758, from $11,017 during the six months ended June 30, 2011 to $12,775 in the same period of 2012, representing a 16% increase.  This increase resulted primarily from higher unit sales volume during the period and slightly improved margins on our spot depot business.

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased 20% or $1,124, from $5,635 during the six months ended June 30, 2011, to $6,759 in the same period 2012.  Sales commissions resulting from our higher sales volume is the largest component of this increase for the period. Additionally, legal and accounting costs from our S-1 registration statements and tender offer filings during the period, as well as higher bank fees made up the balance of the increase in our selling, general and administrative expenses.

During the six months ended June 30, 2012, interest expense increased by $1,640, from $1,101 to $2,741 for the same period in 2011.  Under our new credit agreement, which we entered into in April 2011, the premium (over the Eurodollar, money market or base rate) charged by our banks increased to 2.5% from 1.5% under our former credit agreement, resulting in the additional interest costs during the six months ended June 30, 2012.  Additionally, during the six months ended June 30, 2012 the cost of servicing interest on our 10% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes Due June 1, 2016 and amortization of the debt discount in connection with these notes totaled $883.

Net income decreased from $2,633 during the six months ended June 30, 2011 to $1,999 during the six months ended June 30, 2012, which was attributable to the increased selling, general and administrative expenses and higher interest expense.  Net income for the six months ended June 30, 2012 included a non-cash, non-operating after tax loss of $30 resulting from the mark to market of the derivative element of our 10% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes Due June 1, 2016.
 
 
-18-

 

 
Liquidity and Capital Resources (in thousands)

Overview

At June 30, 2012, we had cash of $4,159, accounts receivable of $68,566, total senior secured debt of $159,222 and subordinated debt of $12,000.  Management believes that cash from operations, together with funds available under our credit facility will be sufficient to fund the cash requirements relating to our existing operations for the next twelve months. However, we will require additional debt or equity financing in connection with the future expansion of our operations.

Comparison of Periods Ended June 30, 2012 and 2011

Net cash provided by operating activities was $3,996 during the period ended June 30, 2012 as compared to cash used in operating activities of $19,207 during the same period in 2011.  During 2012, we focused on decreasing inventory and improving inventory turns while maintaining our current sales volume, which led to positive operating cash flows.  Cash provided by operating activities during the six months ended June 30, 2012 was primarily due to net income, decreased inventory, offset by increases in accounts receivable and decreased trade accounts payable. Accounts receivable increased by $12,148 in the first six months of 2012 as a result of increased sales.  Inventory levels decreased by $27,423 from December 31, 2011 as a result of increased focus on increasing inventory turns and improving cash flows.  The days payable outstanding decreased from 34 days at December 31, 2011 to 25 days at June 30, 2012, as a consequence of reducing inventory purchases.

We focus on our days’ sales outstanding and our inventory turnover rate to manage working capital, because accounts receivable and inventory are the two most significant elements of our working capital. As of June 30, 2012, our days’ sales outstanding rate was approximately 42 days, as compared to 40 days as of December 31, 2011.

During the first six months of 2012, our inventory turn rate was about 3.7 times (or 3.2 months on hand), compared to our 2011 annual rate of about 2.8 times (or 4.3 months on hand). Our turns improved as sales during the first six months of 2012 increased reducing outstanding inventories.  In addition, we reduced our inventory purchases during the period.  During 2012, we intend to stay focused on decreasing inventory and improving inventory turns while maintaining our current sales volume, which we believe will lead to positive operating cash flows.

Cash flows used in investing activities during the six months ended June 30, 2012 was primarily the $5,000 advance related to our supply agreement with PT. Alumindo Light Metal Industry and its affiliates.

Cash flows provided by financing activities during the six months ended June 30, 2012 amounted to $924, as compared to $26,823 during the same period in 2011. We acquired 600 common shares at a cost of $1,801 pursuant to the tender offer which expired on June 29, 2012.  In addition, we acquired 43 additional common shares at a cost of $131 during the six month period ended June 30, 2012. We paid dividends to our stockholders of $461 in the first six months of 2012.

As of June 30, 2012, our committed line of credit totaled $200,000.  The agreement also allows additional increases in the line of credit of up to $50,000, subject to certain restrictions.  Our direct borrowings amounted to $151,500 and letters of credit amounted to $34,269, leaving an availability of approximately $14,231 on our line of credit, or approximately 7%.  The letters of credit will expire on or before October 15, 2012.

Our wholly owned Belgian subsidiary, Imbali Metals BVBA (“Imbali”), operates under a line of credit with ING Belgium S.A./N.V., with a EUR 8 million ($10,368) commitment for loans and documentary letters of credit.
 
 
-19-

 

 
Credit Agreements and Other Debt (in thousands)

We were a party to an amended and restated credit agreement with JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. for itself and as the agent for Rabobank International, New York branch, Citicorp USA, Inc., Brown Brothers Harriman & Co., and Fortis Capital Corp., which provided for a $175,000 revolving line of credit, including a commitment to issue letters of credit and a swing-line loan sub facility, with a maturity date of June 30, 2011. The credit agreement provided that amounts under the facility could be borrowed and repaid, and re-borrowed, subject to a borrowing base test, until the maturity date of June 30, 2011.  Amounts borrowed by us bore interest of LIBOR, Eurodollar, money market, or base rates, at our option, plus an applicable margin. The applicable margin was determined by our leverage ratios. Borrowings under the credit agreement were collateralized by security interests in substantially all of our assets. The credit agreement contained financial and other covenants including but not limited to, covenants requiring maintenance of minimum tangible net worth and compliance with leverage ratios, as well as an ownership minimum and limitations on other indebtedness, liens, and investments and dispositions of assets.

On April 28, 2011 we entered into a new working capital credit agreement with Rabobank International, for itself and as lead arranger and agent, JPMorgan Chase, for itself and as syndication agent, and ABN AMRO, BNP Paribas, RBS Citizens, Société Générale, and Brown Brothers Harriman. The $200,000 secured, asset-based credit facility matures on June 30, 2014 and refinanced our $175,000 credit agreement. The agreement also allows additional increases in the line of credit of up to $50,000, subject to certain restrictions. Amounts borrowed bear interest of Eurodollar, money market or base rates, at our option, plus an applicable margin. Our borrowings under this line of credit are secured by substantially all of our assets. The credit agreement contains financial and other covenants including but not limited to, covenants requiring maintenance of minimum tangible net worth of $25,000 plus an aggregate amount equal to 25% of our positive net earnings and compliance with a leverage ratio of not more than 6.00 to 1, as well as an ownership minimum and limitations on other indebtedness, liens, and investments and dispositions of assets. The credit agreement provides that amounts under the facility may be borrowed and repaid, and re-borrowed, subject to a borrowing base test, until the maturity date of June 30, 2014.  As of June 30, 2012, we had borrowings of $151,500 outstanding under the credit agreement, bearing interest at 2.7% and we were in compliance with all financial covenants.

Our wholly owned Belgian subsidiary, Imbali Metals BVBA (“Imbali”), operates under a line of credit with ING Belgium S.A./N.V., with a EUR 8,000 commitment for loans and documentary letters of credit. Loan advances are limited to a percentage of Imbali’s pledged accounts receivables and inventory. This secured credit arrangement is unconditionally guaranteed by us. As of June 30, 2012, we had borrowings of EUR 4,880 ($6,179) under this line of credit, bearing interest at EURIBOR plus 1.75%, and we were in compliance with all financial covenants.

In addition, we are a party to a mortgage and an interest rate swap that we entered into in 2004 in connection with the purchase of our Baltimore warehouse. The mortgage loan, which had an outstanding balance of $1,500 at June 30, 2012, requires monthly payments of approximately $21.6, including interest at LIBOR plus 1.75%, and matures in December 2014. Under the related interest rate swap, which has been designated as a cash flow hedge and remains effective through the maturity of the mortgage loan, we will pay a monthly fixed interest rate of 6.37% to the counterparty bank on a notional principal equal to the outstanding principal balance of the mortgage. In return, the bank will pay us a floating rate, namely, LIBOR, to reset monthly, plus 1.75% on the same notional principal amount.

We have commitments in the form of letters of credit to some of our suppliers.

On June 3, 2011, we sold $12,000 principal amount of 10% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes Due June 1, 2016 in a private placement to selected accredited investors.  The notes are currently convertible at the option of the holders into shares of common stock at a conversion rate of 224.51shares of common stock per $1 thousand principal amount of notes, subject to adjustment for cash and stock dividends, stock splits and similar transactions, at any time before maturity.  The current conversion price reflects five adjustments for dividends.  In addition, if the last reported sale price of the common stock for 30 consecutive trading days is equal to or greater than $7.00, and a registration statement is effective covering the resale of the shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of the notes, we have the right, in our sole discretion, to require the holders to convert all or part of their notes at the then applicable conversion rate.  Interest on the notes is payable in arrears on the first day of June and December every year the notes are outstanding.

Derivative Financial Instruments

Inherent in our business is the risk of matching the timing of our purchase and sales contracts. The prices of the aluminum products we buy and sell are based on a constantly moving terminal market price determined by the London Metal Exchange. Were we not to hedge such exposures, we could be exposed to significant losses due to the continually changing aluminum prices.
 
 
-20-

 

 
We use aluminum futures contracts to manage our exposure to this commodity price risk. It is generally our policy to hedge such risks to the extent practicable. We enter into hedges to limit our exposure to volatile price fluctuations that we believe would impact our gross margins on firm purchase and sales commitments. As an example, if we enter into fixed price contracts with our suppliers and variable priced sales contracts with our customers, we will generally enter into a futures contract to sell the aluminum for future delivery in the month when the aluminum is to be priced and delivered to the customer and repurchase this position once the pricing has been fixed with our customer.  If the underlying metal price increases, we suffer a hedging loss and have a derivative liability, but the sales price to the customer is based on a higher market price and offsets the loss. Conversely, if the metal price decreases, we have a hedging gain and recognize a derivative asset, but the sales price to the customer is based on the lower market price and offsets the gain.

We also enter into foreign exchange forward contracts to hedge our exposure related to commitments to purchase or sell metals denominated in some international currencies. In such cases, we will purchase or sell the foreign currency through a bank for an approximate date when we anticipate making a payment to a supplier or receiving payment from the foreign customer.

In accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the U.S., we designate these derivative contracts as fair value hedges and recognize them on our balance sheet at fair value.  We also recognize offsetting changes in the fair value of the related firm purchase and sales commitment to which the hedge is attributable in earnings upon revenue recognition, which occurs at the time of delivery to our customers.

As further described under “Risk Factors,” the potential for losses related to our hedging activities, given our hedging methodology, arises from counterparty defaults with banks for our foreign exchange hedging, the London Metal Exchange for our aluminum hedges, or customer defaults. In the event of a customer default, we might be forced to sell the material in the open market and absorb losses for metal or foreign exchange hedges that were applied to the defaulting customers’ transactions. Our results of operations could be materially impacted by any counterparty or customer default, as we might not be able to collect money owed to us and/or our hedge might effectively be cancelled.

We use hedges for no purpose other than to avoid exposure to changes in aluminum prices and foreign currency rates between when we buy a shipment of aluminum from a supplier and when we deliver it to a customer.  Our derivatives are not for purposes of trading in the futures market. We earn our gross profit margin through our business operations and not from the movement of aluminum prices.

As part of our business we also engage in the purchase, sale and distribution of steel products. If we do not have a matching sales contract related to such products, (for example, any steel products that are unsold in our inventory), we have price risk that we currently do not or are unable to hedge. As such, any decline in pricing for such products may adversely impact our profitability.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Management’s Conclusions Regarding Effectiveness of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

As of June 30, 2012, we conducted an evaluation, under the supervision and participation of management including our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) and Rule 15d-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended). There are inherent limitations to the effectiveness of any system of disclosure controls and procedures. Accordingly, even effective disclosure controls and procedures can only provide reasonable assurance of achieving their control objectives.

Based upon this evaluation, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective at the reasonable assurance level as of June 30, 2012.
 
 
-21-

 

 
Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the second quarter that materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

From time to time, we may be involved in litigation relating to claims arising out of our operations. We are not currently a party to any material litigation or other material legal proceedings. We may, however, be involved in material legal proceedings in the future. Such matters are subject to uncertainty and there can be no assurance that such legal proceedings will not have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

Item 1A. Risk Factors

RISK FACTORS

Our operations and financial results are subject to various risks and uncertainties, including those described below, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, and the trading price of our common stock.

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

We are highly dependent on a few suppliers.

Our two largest suppliers year to date in 2012 were PT. Alumindo Light Metal Industry and Hulamin Ltd., from whom we purchased approximately 63% of our products.  Accordingly, the termination or limitation by one or more of our largest suppliers of their relationships with us could limit our ability to fulfill customer orders or cause us to purchase products at a loss, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. In addition, our loss of any one of our other suppliers (or material default by any supplier in its obligations to us) for any reason, including but not limited to bankruptcy, financial difficulties, expropriation, social unrest, destruction, sabotage, strikes, acquisition by a person or entity unwilling to provide products to us, or for any other reason, could limit our ability to fulfill customer orders or cause us to purchase products at a loss, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

An interruption in the sources of our metal supply could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

We rely on our suppliers to fulfill contractual obligations.  The failure of any one of our suppliers to fulfill their obligations to us may expose us to serious losses by requiring us to purchase material at a loss in the open market and/or absorb losses for hedges applied to the defaulting supplier’s transaction.  Our primary suppliers could curtail or discontinue their delivery of metals to us in the quantities we need with little or no notice.  If our suppliers experience production problems, lack of capacity or transportation disruptions, we may be unable to obtain sufficient amounts of metal on a timely basis, or we may not be able to obtain metal from alternate sources at competitive prices to meet our delivery schedules.

In addition, in recent years, the metal producing supply base has experienced significant consolidation, with a few domestic producers accounting for a majority of the domestic metal market.  The number of available suppliers could be reduced in the future by factors such as further industry consolidation or bankruptcies affecting metal suppliers. Although we have in the past successfully replaced suppliers lost as a result of industry consolidations, there can be no assurance that we would be able to replace the volume of production or the type of products supplied by any of our current vendors if they were acquired or their operations terminated or were interrupted.

The occurrence of any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
 
 
-22-

 

 
We are highly dependent on a few significant customers.

Our sales are highly concentrated among a few customers. During the period ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, 49% and 43%, respectively, of our revenues were derived from sales to ten customers. Two major customers, Ryerson Inc. and Samuel Son & Co., Ltd., Two major customers, Ryerson Inc. and Samuel Son & Co., Ltd., accounted for approximately 11% and 10% of our consolidated net sales respectively for the six month period ended June 30, 2012 and 12% and 13%  of our consolidated net sales respectively for the comparable period in 2011. Over the last several years, there have been consolidations in the industries we serve that may increase our sales concentration and the related risks. Any material reduction in sales to any of these customers could have a material adverse effect on our business. Our sales contracts tend to be short term in nature. We typically sell our products on monthly or quarterly customer commitments.  As a result, the relationship, as well as particular orders, can generally be terminated with relatively little advance notice. The loss of any one of our major customers or decrease in demand by those customers or credit constraints placed on them could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The counterparties to our commodity derivative instruments may not be able to perform their obligations to us, which could materially affect our cash flows and results of operations.

In order to minimize risk associated with fluctuations in commodity prices and foreign currency, we use derivative instruments to hedge metal pricing and foreign currency risk as we deem appropriate for a majority of our purchase and sales contracts. We are exposed to the risk of a counterparty default in fulfilling these derivative instruments. Should there be a counterparty default, we could be exposed to losses on the original derivative instrument or be unable to recover anticipated gains from the transactions, which could result in decreased gross margins, profitability and/or outright losses.

In particular, on October 31, 2011 MF Global UK Limited, one of our London Metal Exchange clearing brokers, went into special administration under The Investment Bank Special Administration Regulations 2011 in the UK.  On October 31, 2011 we had no cash balances with MF Global UK Limited. The majority of the positions cleared through MF Global UK Limited were transferred to another London Metal Exchange broker. There were some unsettled contracts that were not transferred at that time.  For the contracts not transferred, we have a claim of approximately $800,000 against MF Global UK Limited, representing the fair value of the contracts on October 31, 2011. Of such amount, unsettled contracts valued at $800,000, which hedged inventory  sold prior to June 30, 2012, have been written off to cost of goods sold based on the uncertainty of recoverability from October 31, 2011.  We are in discussions to explore the sale of our claim against MF Global UK Limited.

Although we expect to finance our future and in-process growth initiatives through borrowings under our credit facility, we may have to find additional sources of funding, which could be difficult. Additionally, increased leverage could adversely impact our business and results of operations.

We expect to finance our future and in-process growth initiatives through borrowings under our $200 million secured, asset-based credit facility, which matures on June 30, 2014. However, our credit facility may not be sufficient or available to finance our growth initiatives, and we may have to find additional sources of financing. It may be difficult for us in the future to obtain the necessary funds and liquidity to run and expand our business.

Additionally, if we incur substantial additional debt, including under our credit facility, to finance future growth, our leverage could increase as could the risks associated with such leverage. A high degree of leverage could have important consequences to us. For example, it could:

 
·
increase our vulnerability to adverse economic and industry conditions;

 
·
require us to dedicate a substantial portion of cash from operations to the payment of debt service, thereby reducing the availability of cash to fund working capital, capital expenditures, dividends and other general corporate purposes;

 
·
limit our ability to obtain additional financing for working capital, capital expenditures, general corporate purposes or acquisitions;

 
·
place us at a disadvantage compared to our competitors that are less leveraged; and

 
·
limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business.
 
 
-23-

 

 
We may not be able to generate sufficient cash flow to meet our existing debt service obligations.

Our annual debt service obligations until June 30, 2014, when our senior credit facility is scheduled to mature, will be primarily limited to interest and principal payments on our 10% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes Due June 1, 2016, with an aggregate principal amount of $12 million, and borrowings under our $200 million credit facility with outstanding borrowings of $185,769 million as of June 30, 2012. Our ability to generate sufficient cash flow from operations to make scheduled payments on our debt obligations will depend on our future financial performance, which will be affected by a range of economic, competitive and business factors, many of which are outside of our control.  If we do not generate sufficient cash flow from operations to satisfy our debt obligations, we may be required to undertake alternative financing plans, such as refinancing or restructuring our debt, selling assets, reducing or delaying capital investments or seeking to raise additional capital. We may not be able to consummate any such transaction at all or on a timely basis or on terms, and for proceeds, that are acceptable to us, and these transactions may not be permitted under the terms of our various debt instruments then in effect.  Our inability to generate sufficient cash flow to satisfy our debt obligations or to timely refinance our obligations on acceptable terms could adversely affect our ability to serve our customers and could cause us to reduce or discontinue our planned operations.

We service industries that are highly cyclical, and any downturn in our customers’ demand could reduce our sales, margins and profitability.

Many of our products are sold to customers in industries that experience significant fluctuations in demand based on economic conditions, energy prices, consumer demand, availability of adequate credit and financing, customer inventory levels, changes in governmental policies (including those that would limit or reduce defense spending) and other factors beyond our control. When one or more of our customers’ industries experiences a decline, we may have difficulty increasing or maintaining our level of sales or profitability if we are not able to divert sales of our products to customers in other industries.

We are vulnerable to interest rate fluctuations on our indebtedness, which could hurt our operating results.

We are exposed to various interest rate risks as a result of our indebtedness under our credit facility. Market risk arises from changes in variable interest rates of our borrowings, which are primarily short-term LIBOR or money market based loans, which are subject to change. If interest rates significantly increase, we could be unable to service our debt which could have a material adverse effect on our operating results.

We are dependent on our executive officers and key employees.

We are highly dependent on the management and leadership skills of our executive officers and other key employees, including Nathan Kahn, our chief executive officer, president and a director, Sandra Kahn, our vice president, chief financial officer and a director, and Harvey Wrubel, our vice president of sales/director of marketing and a director.  There can be no assurance that these individuals will continue to provide services to us.  The loss of any of our executive officers or other key employees or the failure to attract and retain additional qualified personnel could prevent us from implementing our business strategy and continuing to grow our business at a rate necessary to maintain future profitability.

Failure of the supplier to honor the terms of our supply and pre-payment advance agreements could have a material adverse effect on us.

We are a party to a supply agreement and a pre-payment advance agreement with one of our largest suppliers, which provide for the sale to us of certain aluminum products and our advance of $10 million to finance the expansion of the supplier’s production capacity.  We are exposed to the risk of failure of our supplier to honor its obligations under these agreements.  The supplier’s failure to provide the supply of materials as contemplated could negatively impact our results of operations.  The supplier’s failure to repay any or all of the advance could result in a material loss to us.

Many of our suppliers and customers are located in international markets, which expose us to a number of risks.

We generally purchase metal products from foreign suppliers, and our customers are principally located throughout the Americas, Australia, New Zealand and Europe.  Thus, our operations could be materially and adversely affected by changes in economic, political and social conditions in the countries where we currently purchase or sell or may in the future purchase or sell such products, including the potential for adverse change in the local political or social climate or in government policies, laws and regulations, restrictions on imports and exports or sources of supply, and change in duties and taxes.
 
 
-24-

 

 
In addition, an act of war or terrorism or major pandemic event could disrupt international shipping schedules, cause additional delays in importing our products into the U.S. or increase the costs required to do so. Acts of crime or violence in these international markets could also adversely affect our operating results. Fluctuations in the value of the U.S. dollar versus foreign currencies could reduce the value of these assets as reported in our financial statements, which could reduce our stockholders’ equity. Our failure to adequately anticipate and respond to these risks and the other risks inherent in international operations could have a material adverse effect on our operating results.

Our future operating results could be impacted by the volatility of the prices of metals, which could cause our results to be adversely affected.

The metal industry is highly cyclical and pricing can be volatile. The prices we pay for metals and the prices we charge our customers may fluctuate depending on many factors, including general economic conditions (both domestic and international), competition, production levels, import duties and other trade restrictions and currency fluctuations. We rely on long-term relationships with our suppliers but generally have no long-term, fixed-price purchase contracts. Instead we purchase at prevailing market prices at the time orders are placed, typically with discounts for quantity purchases. To the extent metals prices decline, we would generally expect lower sales and possibly lower net income, depending on the timing of the price changes and the ability to pass price changes on to our customers. To the extent we are not able to pass on to our customers any increases in our raw materials prices, our operating results may be adversely affected. In addition, because we maintain substantial inventories of metals in order to meet short lead-times and the just-in-time delivery requirements of our customers, a reduction in our selling prices could result in lower profitability or, in some cases, losses, either of which could adversely impact our ability to remain in compliance with certain financial covenants in our loan facilities, as well as result in us incurring impairment charges.

If suppliers fail to provide products of sufficient quality, customer relationships and prices could be negatively affected.

Our relationships with our customers depend, in part, on our ability to deliver products of the quality specified by those customers. We rely on certifications from our suppliers that attest to the quality of the metals received from those suppliers for resale and generally, consistent with industry practice, do not undertake independent testing of such metals.  In the event that metal purchased from suppliers is deemed defective material or deemed to not meet quality specifications as set forth in the certifications or customer specifications, we may be forced to buy products of the specified quality from another source to fulfill the customer’s order.  While we would then be left with a claim against the supplier for any loss sustained by us, we may not be able to bring these claims successfully, particularly in foreign jurisdictions.  In addition, we could suffer damage to our reputation that may arise from sub-standard products and possible losses of customers.

We are exposed to credit risk from our customers.

We do not require collateral for customer receivables. We have significant balances owing from customers that operate in cyclical industries and under leveraged conditions, which may impair our collection of these receivables. We carry credit insurance with a 10% deductible covering the majority of our customers, and we have set specific limits on each customer’s receivables. However, we sometimes elect to exceed these specific credit limits, and in selected instances the co-pay may be increased.  Our failure to collect a significant portion of the amount due on our receivables directly from customers or through insurance claims (or other material default by customers) could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

We are subject to the risk of default by our customers.

We rely on our customers to fulfill contractual obligations. The failure of our customers to do so may expose us to serious losses and may force us to sell material at a loss in the open market and/or absorb losses for metal hedges applied to the defaulting customer’s transaction.  A default by a single customer or multiple customers could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
-25-

 

 
We could be held liable for any product failures related to the products we manufactured at our extrusion facility or for products manufactured by our suppliers.

As a result of the production that took place at our extrusion facility prior to September 2009, when we ceased production at the facility, we may be exposed to potentially serious risks such as product failure following distribution in the market.  While we are not aware of any defects in our aluminum extrusion products, defects in the products that we manufactured may result in serious and potentially fatal accidents which may in turn result in substantial losses to us.  Additionally, we may be exposed to risks as a result of product failures by the products we import.

Significant changes to international trade regulations could adversely affect our results of operations.

During 2011 and 2010, approximately 54% and 42%, respectively, of our purchases of aluminum products were from countries that were considered developing countries whose exports were eligible for preferential tariff treatment for import into the U.S. under the generalized system of preferences (“GSP”) or duty free. There can be no assurance that any of our suppliers will continue to be eligible for such preferential tariff treatment or that the GSP will be renewed after its expiration on June 30, 2013.  If the preferential tariff treatment of any of our suppliers that are currently eligible for such treatment becomes unavailable, then imports from such supplier may be subjected to a tariff, instead of the duty-free treatment those imports now enjoy. In fact, one of our suppliers, PT. Alumindo Light Metal Industry, exceeded the quota of imports permitted under the GSP statute during 2011, and triggered the Competitive Needs Limit of the GSP program.  As a result, imports from PT. Alumindo Light Metal Industry are subject to a 3% duty as of July 1, 2012.  This increase in duty rate, along with other duty increases imposed on our other suppliers, could adversely affect our profit margins to the extent these increased costs cannot be passed on to our customers. This could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Antidumping and other duties could be imposed on us, our suppliers and our products.

The imposition of an antidumping or other increased duty on any products that we import could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition. For example, under U.S. law, an antidumping duty may be imposed on any imports if two conditions are met. First, the Department of Commerce must decide that the imports are being sold in the U.S. at less than fair value. Second, the International Trade Commission must determine that the U.S. industry is materially injured or threatened with material injury by reason of the imports. The International Trade Commission’s determination of injury involves a two-prong inquiry: first, whether the industry is materially injured, and second, whether the dumping, not other factors, caused the injury.  The International Trade Commission is required to analyze the volume of imports, the effect of imports on U.S. prices for like merchandise, and the effects the imports have on U.S. producers of like products, taking into account many factors, including lost sales, market share, profits, productivity, return on investment, and utilization of production capacity.

General global economic, credit and capital market conditions have had and could continue to have an adverse impact on our business, operating results and financial condition.

We are susceptible to macroeconomic downturns in the U.S. and abroad which have had, and in the future may continue to have, an adverse effect on demand for our products and consequently our operating results, financial condition and cash flows. Future negative economic conditions, as well as a slow recovery period from the current economic downturn, could lead to reduced demand for our products, increased price competition, reduced gross margins, increased risk of obsolete inventories and higher operating costs as a percentage of revenue.

Disruption of the capital and credit markets may negatively impact our business, including our ability to access additional financing at a time when we would like, or need, to access those markets to run or expand our business. These events may also make it more costly for us to raise capital through the issuance of our equity securities and could reduce our net income by increasing our interest expense and other costs of capital. The diminished availability of credit and other capital could also affect the industries we serve and could result in reduction in sales volumes and increased credit and collection risks.

Our industry is highly competitive, which may force us to lower our prices and may have an adverse effect on our operating results.

The principal markets that we serve are highly competitive.  Competition is based principally on price, service, quality, processing capabilities, inventory availability and timely delivery.  Many of our competitors are significantly larger than us, and many have captive sources of supply and significantly greater access to capital and other resources. Increased competition could lower our margins or reduce our market share and have a material adverse effect on our financial performance. Additionally, if our sources of supply were interrupted, our competitors could be in a position to capture our customers.
 
 
-26-

 

 
Increases in energy prices would increase our operating costs, and we may be unable to pass all these increases on to our customers in the form of higher prices.

If our energy costs increase disproportionately to our revenues, our earnings could be reduced. We use energy to process and transport our products. Our operating costs increase if energy costs, including electricity, diesel fuel and natural gas, rise. During periods of higher energy costs, we may not be able to recover our operating cost increases through price increases without reducing demand for our products. In addition, we generally do not hedge our exposure to higher energy prices. Increases in energy prices will increase our operating costs and may reduce our profitability if we are unable to pass all of the increases on to our customers.

Rising freight rate costs and lack of adequate cargo space may affect our operations.

Substantially all of the products we distribute require transportation, either via ocean vessels, rail or trucks. Increasing freight rates may materially adversely affect our profit margin and lack of cargo space may affect our ability to deliver products in a timely manner.

The failure of our key computer-based systems could have a material adverse effect on our business.

We currently maintain computer-based systems in the operation of our business and we depend on these systems to a significant degree for all areas of business operations. These systems are vulnerable to, among other things, damage or interruption from fire, flood, tornado, and other natural disasters, power loss, computer system and network failures, operator negligence, physical and electronic loss of data or security breaches and computer viruses. The destruction or failure of any one of our computer-based systems for any significant period of time could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We may face risks associated with current or future litigation and claims.

Although we do not believe that we currently face any material litigation or claims, there can be no guarantee that we will not, in the future, be involved in one or more lawsuits, claims or other proceedings. These suits could concern issues including contract disputes, employment actions, employee benefits, taxes, environmental, health and safety, personal injury and product liability matters. Due to the uncertainties of litigation, we can give no assurance that we will prevail on any claims made against us in any such lawsuit. While it is not feasible to predict the outcome of any pending lawsuits and claims, we do not believe that the disposition of any such pending matters is likely to have an adverse effect on our financial condition or liquidity, although the resolution in any reporting period of one of more of these matters could have an adverse effect on our operating results for that period. Also, we can give no assurance that any other lawsuits or claims brought in the future will not have an adverse effect on our financial condition, liquidity or operating results.

Risks Related our Common Stock

The interests of our controlling stockholders may not coincide with yours and such controlling stockholder may make decisions with which you may disagree.

As of August 8, 2012, Nathan Kahn, our chief executive officer, president and a director, and Sandra Kahn, our vice president, chief financial officer and a director, beneficially owned approximately 45% of our outstanding common stock (43% excluding the 10% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes Due June 1, 2016, which only have voting rights once they are converted to common stock) and Harvey Wrubel, our vice president of sales/director of marketing and a director, beneficially owns approximately 6% (5% excluding the 10% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes Due June 1, 2016). In addition, through ownership of our 10% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes Due June 1, 2016, Leon G. Cooperman and his affiliates beneficially own (i.e., have the right acquire) 17% of our outstanding common stock. As a result, our controlling stockholders control substantially all matters requiring stockholder approval, including the election of directors and approval of significant corporate transactions. In addition, this concentration of ownership may delay or prevent a change in control of our company and make some future transactions more difficult or impossible without the support of our controlling stockholders. The interests of our controlling stockholders may not coincide with our interests or the interests of other stockholders.
 
 
-27-

 

 
Our common stock may be affected by limited trading volume and price fluctuations, each of which could adversely impact the value of our common stock.

There is relatively limited trading in our common stock and there can be no assurance that an active trading market in our common stock will either develop or be maintained. In addition, our common stock currently trades on the OTCQX, which generally lacks the liquidity, research coverage and institutional investor following of a national stock exchange like the NYSE MKT, the New York Stock Exchange or the Nasdaq Stock Market. Our common stock has experienced, and is likely to experience in the future, significant price and volume fluctuations, which could adversely affect the market price of our common stock without regard to our operating performance. In addition, we believe that factors such as quarterly fluctuations in our financial results and changes in the overall economy or the condition of the financial markets could cause the price of our common stock to fluctuate substantially. These fluctuations may also cause short sellers to enter the market from time to time in the belief that we will have poor results in the future. We cannot predict the actions of market participants and, therefore, can offer no assurances that the market for our stock will be stable or appreciate over time.

Our stock price may be volatile, which could result in substantial losses for investors.

The market price of our common stock is highly volatile and could fluctuate widely in response to various factors, many of which are beyond our control, including the following:

 
·
additions or departures of key personnel;

 
·
sales of our common stock, including management shares;

 
·
our ability to execute our business plan;

 
·
operating results that fall below expectations;

 
·
loss of any strategic relationship;

 
·
industry developments; and

 
·
general domestic or international economic, market and political conditions.

In addition, the securities markets have from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. These market fluctuations may also significantly affect the market price of our common stock.

A significant number of our shares will be eligible for sale and their sale or potential sale may depress the market price of our common stock.

Sales of a significant number of shares of our common stock in the public market could harm the market price of our common stock. In particular, all of our currently outstanding shares of common stock are freely tradeable unless they are purchased by our “affiliates,” as defined in Rule 144 under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and 2,694,120 shares of common stock issuable at June 30, 2012 upon the conversion of our 10% Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes Due June 1, 2016 are currently freely tradable pursuant to an effective registration statement.

In addition, 414,000 shares are issuable upon exercise of options. If any options are exercised, the shares issued upon exercise will also be restricted, but may be sold under Rule 144 after the applicable holding period has been satisfied. Sales under Rule 144 may be subject to volume limitations and other conditions.
 
 
-28-

 

 
In addition to the possibility that actual sales of significant amounts of our common stock in the public market could harm our common stock price, the fact that our stockholders have the ability to make such sales could create a circumstance commonly referred to as an “overhang,” in anticipation of which the market price of our common stock could fall. The existence of an overhang, whether or not sales have occurred or are occurring, could also make it more difficult for us to raise additional financing through the sale of equity or equity-related securities in the future at a time and price that we deem reasonable or appropriate.

Although we have paid dividends in prior periods, there can be no assurance that we will pay dividends in the future. As a result, any return on investment may be limited to the value of our common stock.

Although we have paid dividends in prior periods, there can be no assurance that we will pay dividends in the future. The payment of dividends on our common stock will depend on our earnings, financial condition and other business and economic factors as our board of directors may consider relevant. If we do not pay dividends, our common stock may be less valuable because a return on your investment will only occur if our stock price appreciates.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our common stock will depend in part on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. We do not currently have research coverage by securities and industry analysts and you should not invest in our common stock in anticipation that we will obtain such coverage. If we obtain securities or industry analyst coverage and if one or more of the analysts who covers us downgrades our stock or publishes inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts ceases coverage of us or fails to publish reports on us regularly, demand for our stock could decrease, which could cause our stock price and trading volume to decline.

The requirements of being a public company may strain our resources, divert management’s attention and affect our ability to attract and retain qualified board members.

We are subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the Dodd-Frank Act, and other applicable securities rules and regulations. Compliance with these rules and regulations has increased and will continue to increase our legal and financial compliance costs, make some activities more difficult, time-consuming or costly, and increase demand on our systems and resources. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. In order to maintain and, if required, improve our disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting to meet this standard, significant resources and management oversight may be required. As a result, management’s attention may be diverted from other business concerns, which could harm our business and operating results. Although we have hired additional employees to comply with these requirements, we may need to hire more employees in the future, which will increase our costs and expenses.

In addition, changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure are creating uncertainty for public companies, increasing legal and financial compliance costs and making some activities more time consuming. These laws, regulations and standards are subject to varying interpretations, in many cases due to their lack of specificity, and, as a result, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance is provided by regulatory and governing bodies. This could result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and higher costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to disclosure and governance practices. We intend to invest resources to comply with evolving laws, regulations and standards, and this investment may result in increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of management’s time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities. If our efforts to comply with new laws, regulations and standards differ from the activities intended by regulatory or governing bodies due to ambiguities related to practice, regulatory authorities may initiate legal proceedings against us and our business may be harmed.

We also expect that being a public company that is subject to these new rules and regulations will make it more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain coverage. These factors could also make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified members of our board of directors and qualified executive officers.
 
 
-29-

 

 
We are obligated to develop and maintain proper and effective internal controls over financial reporting. We may not complete our analysis of our internal controls over financial reporting in a timely manner, or these internal controls may not be determined to be effective, which may adversely affect investor confidence in our company and, as a result, the value of our common stock.

We will be required, pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, to furnish a report by management on, among other things, the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting for fiscal 2013. This assessment will need to include disclosure of any material weaknesses identified by our management in our internal control over financial reporting.

We are in the early stages of the costly and challenging process of compiling the system and processing documentation necessary to perform the evaluation needed to comply with Section 404. We may not be able to complete our evaluation, testing and any required remediation in a timely fashion. During the evaluation and testing process, if we identify one or more material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, we will be unable to assert that our internal controls are effective.

If we are unable to assert that our internal control over financial reporting is effective, we could lose investor confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, which would cause the price of our common stock to decline.

Item 6. Exhibits

 
(a)
Exhibits

See Index to Exhibits.
 
 
-30-

 

 
SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 
 
EMPIRE RESOURCES, INC.
 
       
       
Date: August 14, 2012
By: 
/s/ Nathan Kahn
 
   
Name: 
Nathan Kahn
 
   
Title:
President and Chief Executive Officer
 
     
(Principal Executive Officer)
 
         
         
 
By: 
/s/Sandra Kahn
 
   
Name: 
Sandra Kahn
 
   
Title:
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
 
     
(Principal Financial Officer)
 

 
 
-31-

 

 
EXHIBIT INDEX

Exhibit No.
Description
3.1
Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1, No. 333- 179245, filed January 30, 2012)
   
3.2
Certificate of Amendment of Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation (Amendment No. 1) (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1, No. 333-179245, filed January 30, 2012)
   
3.3
Certificate of Amendment of the Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation (Amendment No. 2) (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.3 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1, No. 333-179245, filed January 30, 2012)
   
3.4
Amended and Restated By-Laws (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.4 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1, No. 333-179245, filed January 30, 2012)
   
3.5
Amendment No. 1 to Amended and Restated By-Laws (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.5 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1, No. 333-179245, filed January 30, 2012)
   
3.6
Amendment No. 2 to Amended and Restated By-Laws (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.6 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1, No. 333-179245, filed January 30, 2012)
   
31.1*
Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
   
31.2*
Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
   
32.1*
Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
   
32.2*
Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
   
101**
The following materials from the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2012, formatted in XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language), (i)Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets, (ii)Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income, (iii) Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows, (iv) Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity, and (v) the Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
_______________________
*           Filed herewith.

** Pursuant to Rule 406T of Regulation S-T, the Interactive Data Files on Exhibit 101 hereto are deemed not filed or part of a registration statement or prospectus for purposes of Sections 11 or 12 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, are deemed not filed for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and otherwise are not subject to liability under those sections.
 
 

PINX:ERSO Quarterly Report 10-Q Filling

PINX:ERSO Stock - Get Quarterly Report SEC Filing of PINX:ERSO stocks, including company profile, shares outstanding, strategy, business segments, operations, officers, consolidated financial statements, financial notes and ownership information.

PINX:ERSO Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 6/30/2012
Name |  Ticker |  Star Rating |  Market Cap |  Stock Type |  Sector |  Industry Star Rating |  Investment Style |  Total Assets |  Category |  Top Holdings |  Top Sectors |  Symbol |  Title Star Rating |  Category |  Total Assets |  Top Holdings |  Top Sectors |  Symbol |  Name Title |  Date |  Author |  Collection |  Interest |  Popularity Topic |  Sector |  Key Indicators |  User Interest |  Market Cap |  Industry Name |  Ticker |  Star Rating |  Market Cap |  Stock Type |  Sector |  Industry Star Rating |  Investment Style |  Total Assets |  Category |  Top Holdings |  Top Sectors |  Symbol / Ticker |  Title Star Rating |  Category |  Total Assets |  Symbol / Ticker |  Name Title |  Date |  Author |  Collection |  Popularity |  Interest Title |  Date |  Company |  Symbol |  Interest |  Popularity Topic |  Sector |  Key Indicators |  User Interest |  Market Cap |  Industry Title |  Date |  Company |  Symbol |  Interest |  Popularity

Previous: PINX:ERSO Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 3/31/2012  |  Next: PINX:ERSO Quarterly Report 10-Q/A Filing - 3/31/2012