XNYS:LM Legg Mason, Inc. Annual Report 10-K Filing - 3/31/2012

Effective Date 3/31/2012

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UNITED STATES
 
 
 
 
 
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FORM 10-K
 
 
 
(Mark One)
 
 
 
S
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE
 
 
 
 
ACT OF 1934
 
 
 
 
For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2012
 
 
 
 
or
 
 
 
£
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES
 
 
 
 
EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
 
 
 
For the transition period from
 
 
to
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Commission File Number 1-8529
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
LEGG MASON, INC.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Maryland
 
 
 
 
 
 
52-1200960
 
 
 
 
 
(State or other jurisdiction of
 
 
 
 
 
 
(I.R.S. Employer
 
 
 
 
 
 incorporation or organization)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Identification No.)
 
 
 
 
 
100 International Drive
 
 
 
 
 
 
21202
 
 
 
 
 
Baltimore, MD
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Zip Code)
 
 
 
 
 
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Registrant's telephone number, including area code:
(410) 539-0000
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Name of each exchange on
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Title of each class
 
 
 
 
 
 
which registered
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common Stock, $.10 par value
 
 
 
 
 
New York Stock Exchange
 
 
 
 
 
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: NONE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
Yes
S
No
£
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act.
Yes
£
No
S
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of
1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such
 filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Yes
S
No
£
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File
required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months
(or such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). 
Yes
S
No
£
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein,
and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this
 Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.
£
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting
company.  See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
(Check one)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Large accelerated filer
S
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Accelerated filer
£
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-accelerated filer
£
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Smaller reporting company
£
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
Yes
£
No
S
 
 
As of September 30, 2011 the aggregate market value of the registrant's voting stock, consisting of the registrant's common stock, held by
non-affiliates was $3,172,320,648.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
As of May 22, 2012, the number of shares outstanding of the registrant's common stock was 141,188,221.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
 
 
 
 
Portions of the registrant's definitive proxy statement for its Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on July 24, 2012 are incorporated by
reference into Part III of this Report.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  




TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
Page

 
PART I
 
Item 1.
Business
1

Item 1A.
Risk Factors
9

Item 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
18

Item 2.
Properties
18

Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
19

Item 4.
Mine Safety Disclosures
19

Item 4A.
Executive Officers of the Registrant
19

 
PART II
 
Item 5.
Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
20

Item 6.
Selected Financial Data
22

Item 7.
Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
23

Item 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
54

Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
55

Item 9.
Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
99

Item 9A.
Controls and Procedures
99

Item 9B.
Other Information
99

 
PART III
 
Item 10.
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
100

Item 11.
Executive Compensation
100

Item 12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
100

Item 13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
101

Item 14.
Principal Accountant Fees and Services
101

 
PART IV
 
Item 15.
Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
102







PART I
ITEM 1. BUSINESS.
General
Legg Mason is a global asset management company. Acting through our subsidiaries, we provide investment management and related services to institutional and individual clients, company-sponsored mutual funds and other pooled investment vehicles. We offer these products and services directly and through various financial intermediaries. We provide our asset management services through a number of asset managers, each of which generally markets its products and services under its own brand name and, in many cases, distributes retail products and services through a centralized retail distribution network.
Legg Mason, Inc. was incorporated in Maryland in 1981 to serve as a holding company for its various subsidiaries. The predecessor companies to Legg Mason trace back to Legg & Co., a Maryland‑based broker‑dealer formed in 1899. Our subsequent growth has occurred primarily through internal expansion and the acquisition of asset management and broker‑dealer firms. In December 2005, Legg Mason completed a transaction in which it sold its primary broker‑dealer businesses to concentrate on the asset management industry.
Additional information about Legg Mason is available on our website at http://www.leggmason.com. We make available, free of charge, our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and our proxy statements. Investors can find this information under the “Investor Relations” section of our website. These reports are available through our website as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file the material with, or furnish it to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). In addition, the Legg Mason, Inc. Corporate Governance Principles, our Code of Conduct for all employees and directors and the charters for the committees of our Board of Directors are also available on our corporate website at http://www.leggmason.com under the “About Us - Corporate Governance” section. A copy of any of these materials may also be obtained, free of charge, by sending a written request to Corporate Secretary, Legg Mason, Inc., 100 International Drive, Baltimore, MD 21202. As required, and within the time frames required, by the SEC or the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”), we will post on our website any amendments to the Code of Conduct and any waiver of the Code of Conduct applicable to any executive officer, director, chief financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller. The information on our website is not incorporated by reference into this Report.
Unless the context otherwise requires, all references in this Report to “we,” “us,” “our” and “Legg Mason” include Legg Mason, Inc. and its predecessors and subsidiaries, and the term “asset managers” refers to the asset management businesses operated by our subsidiaries. References to “fiscal year 2012” or other fiscal years refer to the 12-month period ended March 31st of the year specified.
Business Developments During the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2012
During fiscal year 2012, in addition to the normal course operation of our business, we completed our business model streamlining initiative, managed our balance sheet to return capital to shareholders and had strong overall investment performance which, when combined with other actions we took during the fiscal year, we believe will help us to grow our business in the future. In May 2010, we announced a business model streamlining initiative in order to drive increased profitability and growth. During fiscal year 2012, we completed the initiative, which primarily involved transitioning certain shared services to our asset managers which are closer to the actual client relationship. The initiative resulted in the elimination of over $140 million in costs.

During the fiscal year we also managed our balance sheet to return capital to shareholders while maintaining a conservative cash and cash equivalents balance. During fiscal year 2012, we returned $444 million to our shareholders in the form of $400 million in stock buybacks and $44 million in dividends. In addition, in April 2012 our Board of Directors increased the quarterly dividend paid on Legg Mason common stock by 38% to $0.11 per share. Notwithstanding this return of capital to shareholders, we continued to maintain a strong balance sheet with $1.4 billion in cash and cash equivalents as of March 31, 2012.

We believe that our overall investment performance during the fiscal year, together with a number of actions that we took during the year, will help us grow our business in the future. As of March 31, 2012, our overall investment performance, as shown by the percentage of our marketed composite assets that outperformed their benchmarks for the 1-, 3-, 5- and 10- year periods was strong, as over 60% of our marketed composite assets exceeded their benchmarks for each of these periods. We believe that strong investment performance is an important factor to growing an investment management business. We also took a number of actions during the year that we believe help improve our growth prospects. These actions included reorganizing our global distribution operations to include a greater number of client-facing and selling employees, further integrating our U.S. and international sales

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activities, launching a number of new products and expanding our geographic distribution coverage through opening an office in Geneva, Switzerland.

See “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” for the revenues, net income and assets of the company, which operates in a single reportable business segment. See Note 17 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report for our revenues generated in, and our long-lived assets (consisting of intangible assets and goodwill) located in, each of the principal geographic areas in which we conduct business. See Note 8 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report for our deferred tax assets in the U.S. and in all other countries, in aggregate.
Business Overview
Acting through our subsidiaries, we provide investment management and related services to institutional and individual clients, company‑sponsored investment funds and retail separately managed account programs. Operating from asset management offices located in the United States, the United Kingdom and a number of other countries worldwide, our businesses provide a broad array of investment management products and services. We offer these products and services directly and through various financial intermediaries. Our investment advisory services include discretionary and non-discretionary management of separate investment accounts in numerous investment styles for institutional and individual investors. Our investment products include proprietary mutual funds ranging from money market and other liquidity products to fixed income and equity funds managed in a wide variety of investment styles, other domestic and offshore funds offered to both retail and institutional investors and funds-of-hedge funds.
Our subsidiary asset managers primarily earn revenues by charging fees for managing the investment assets of clients. Fees are typically calculated as a percentage of the value of assets under management and vary with the type of account managed, the amount of assets in the account, the asset manager and the type of client. Accordingly, the fee income of each of our asset managers will typically increase or decrease as its average assets under management increases or decreases. We may also earn performance fees from certain accounts if the investment performance of the assets in the account meets or exceeds a specified benchmark during a measurement period. For the fiscal years ended March 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, $49.5 million, $96.7 million and $71.5 million, respectively, of our $2.3 billion, $2.4 billion and $2.3 billion in total investment advisory revenues represented performance fee revenues. Increases in assets under management generally result from inflows of additional assets from new and existing clients and from appreciation in the value of client assets (including investment income earned on client assets). Conversely, decreases in assets under management generally result from client redemptions and withdrawals and from depreciation in the value of client assets. Our assets under management may also increase as a result of business acquisitions, or decrease as a result of dispositions.
As of March 31 of each of the last three fiscal years, we had the following aggregate assets under management (in billions, except percents):
 
 
Assets
Under
Management
 
Equity
Assets
 
% of Total in
Equity Assets
 
Fixed
Income
Assets
 
% of Total in
Fixed Income
Assets
 
Liquidity
Assets
 
% of Total
in Liquidity
Assets
2012
 
$
643.3

 
$
163.4

 
26
%
 
$
356.1

 
55
%
 
$
123.8

 
19
%
2011
 
677.6

 
189.6

 
28

 
356.6

 
53

 
131.4

 
19

2010
 
684.5

 
173.8

 
25

 
364.3

 
53

 
146.4

 
22

From time to time, our reported equity or fixed income assets under management may exclude assets that we are retained to manage on a short-term, temporary basis.
We believe that market conditions and our investment performance are critical elements in our attempts to grow our assets under management and business. When securities markets are increasing, our assets under management will tend to increase because of market growth, resulting in additional asset management revenues. Similarly, if we can produce positive investment results when securities markets are increasing, our assets under management will tend to increase as a result of the investment performance. In addition, favorable market conditions or strong relative investment performance can result in increased inflows in assets from existing and new clients. Conversely, in periods when securities markets are weak or declining, or when we have produced poor investment performance, absolute or relative to benchmarks or peers, it is likely to be more difficult to grow our assets under management and business and, in such periods, our assets under management and business are likely to decline.
We generally manage the accounts of our clients pursuant to written investment management or sub-advisory contracts between one of our asset managers and the client (or a financial intermediary acting on behalf of the client). These contracts usually

2



specify, among other things, the management fees to be paid to the asset manager and the investment strategy for the account, and are generally terminable by either party on relatively short notice. Typically, investment management contracts may not be assigned (including as a result of transactions, such as a direct or indirect change of control of the asset manager, that would constitute an assignment under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 or other applicable regulatory requirements) without the prior consent of the client. When the asset management client is a U.S. registered mutual fund or closed-end fund (whether or not one of our asset managers has sponsored the fund), the fund's board of directors generally must annually approve the investment management contract, and any material changes to the contract, and the board and fund shareholders must approve any assignment of the contract (including as a result of transactions that would constitute an assignment under the Investment Company Act of 1940).
We conduct our business primarily through 12 asset managers. Our asset managers are individual businesses, each of which generally focuses on a portion of the asset management industry in terms of the types of assets managed (primarily equity or fixed income), the types of products and services offered, the investment styles utilized, the distribution channels used, and the types and geographic locations of its clients. Each asset manager is housed in one or more different subsidiaries, all of the voting equity of which is directly or indirectly owned by Legg Mason. Each of our asset managers is generally operated as a separate business, in many cases with certain distribution functions being provided by the parent company and other affiliates, that typically markets its products and services under its own brand name. Consistent with this approach, we have in place revenue sharing agreements with certain of our asset managers: Batterymarch Financial Management, Brandywine Global Asset Management, Legg Mason Capital Management, Permal Group, Private Capital Management, Royce & Associates and Western Asset Management Company, and/or certain of their key officers. Pursuant to these revenue sharing agreements, a specified percentage of the asset manager's revenues (or, in certain cases, revenues net of certain third party distribution expenses) is required to be distributed to us and the balance of the revenues (or net revenues) is retained to pay operating expenses, including salaries and bonuses, with specific compensation allocations being determined by the asset manager's management, subject to corporate management approval in certain cases, but excluding certain expenses such as amortization of acquired intangible assets and excluding income taxes. Although, without renegotiation, the revenue sharing agreements impede our ability to increase our profit margins of these businesses, we believe the agreements are important because they help us retain and attract talented employees and provide management of the businesses with incentives to (i) grow the asset managers' revenues, since management is able to participate in the revenue growth through the portion that is retained; and (ii) control operating expenses, which will increase the portion of the revenues retained that is available to fund growth initiatives and for incentive compensation.
Asset Managers
Our asset managers provide a wide range of separate account investment management services to institutional clients, including pension and other retirement plans, corporations, insurance companies, endowments and foundations and governments, and to high net worth individuals and families. In addition, our asset managers also sponsor and manage various groups of U.S. mutual funds, including the Legg Mason Funds, The Royce Funds and the Western Asset Funds, funds-of-hedge funds and numerous proprietary equity, fixed income, liquidity and balanced funds that are domiciled and distributed in countries around the globe, and provide investment advisory services to a number of retail separately managed account programs.
Western Asset Management Company is a leading global fixed income asset manager for institutional clients. Headquartered in Pasadena, California, Western Asset's operations include investment operations in New York City, the United Kingdom, Japan, Brazil, Australia and Singapore. Western Asset offers a broad range of products spanning the yield curve and encompassing the world's major bond markets, including a suite of limited duration and core products, emerging market and high yield portfolios, municipal portfolios and a variety of sector-oriented and global products. Among the services Western Asset provides are management of separate accounts and management of mutual funds, closed-end funds, international funds and other structured investment products. As of March 31, 2012, Western Asset managed assets with a value of $446.2 billion.
ClearBridge Advisors is an equity asset management firm based in New York City that also has an office in San Francisco, California. ClearBridge Advisors provides asset management services to 29 of the equity funds (including balanced funds and closed‑end funds) in the Legg Mason Funds, to retail separately managed account programs, to certain of our international funds and, primarily through separate accounts, to institutional clients. ClearBridge also sub-advises domestic mutual funds that are sponsored by third parties. ClearBridge offers a diverse array of investment styles and disciplines, designed to address a range of investment objectives. Significant ClearBridge investment styles include large-cap growth and core equity management. In managing assets, ClearBridge generally utilizes a bottom-up, research intensive, fundamental approach to security selection that seeks to identify companies with the potential to provide solid economic returns relative to their risk-adjusted valuations. As of March 31, 2012, ClearBridge managed assets with a value of $55.8 billion.
Royce & Associates is investment advisor to all of The Royce Funds and to certain of our international funds. In addition, Royce & Associates manages other pooled and separate accounts, primarily institutional. Headquartered in New York City, Royce & Associates generally invests in smaller company stocks, using a value approach. Royce & Associates' stock selection process

3



generally seeks to identify companies with strong balance sheets and the ability to generate free cash flow. Royce & Associates pursues securities that are priced below its estimate of the company's current worth. As of March 31, 2012, Royce & Associates managed assets with a value of $39.7 billion.
Brandywine Global Investment Management manages fixed income, including global and international fixed income, and equity portfolios for institutional and, through wrap accounts, high net worth individual clients. Brandywine, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, pursues a value investing approach in its management of both equity and fixed income assets. As of March 31, 2012, Brandywine managed assets with a value of $37.2 billion.
Batterymarch Financial Management manages U.S., international and emerging markets equity portfolios for institutional clients. Based in Boston, Massachusetts, Batterymarch primarily uses a quantitative approach to asset management. The firm's investment process for U.S. and international portfolios, other than emerging market portfolios, is designed to enhance the fundamental investment disciplines by using quantitative tools to process fundamental data. As of March 31, 2012, Batterymarch managed assets with a value of $18.4 billion.
Permal Group Ltd. is a leading global funds-of-hedge funds management firm. With a headquarters in London and other offices in New York City, Boston, Dubai, Paris, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore and Nassau, Permal manages products which include both directional and absolute return strategies, and are available through multi‑manager and single manager funds, separately managed accounts and structured products sponsored by several large financial institutions. Permal selects from among thousands of investment managers and investment firms in designing portfolios that are intended to meet a wide variety of specific investment objectives, including global, regional, class and sector specific offerings. In managing its directional offerings, Permal's objective is to participate significantly in strong markets, preserve capital in down or volatile markets and outperform market indices over a full market cycle with reduced risk and volatility. In managing its absolute return strategies, Permal seeks to achieve positive investment returns in all market conditions with low correlation to the overall equity markets. As of March 31, 2012, Permal managed assets with a value of $18.3 billion.
Legg Mason Capital Management is an equity asset management business based in Baltimore, Maryland that manages both institutional separate accounts and mutual funds. Legg Mason Capital Management manages 12 Legg Mason Funds, and also sub-advises the mutual fund managed by the joint venture described below and investment products sponsored by our other subsidiaries, including certain of our international funds. Applying the principles of value investing, Legg Mason Capital Management's investment process uses a variety of techniques to develop an estimate of the worth of a business over the long term. The objective is to identify companies where the intrinsic value of the business is significantly higher than the current market value. As of March 31, 2012, Legg Mason Capital Management managed assets with a value of $8.5 billion.
We and one of our employees each own 50% of a consolidated joint venture subsidiary that serves as investment manager of one equity fund, Legg Mason Opportunity Trust, within the Legg Mason Funds family. We include all of the assets managed by this joint venture, $1.0 billion at March 31, 2012, in our assets under management.
Legg Mason Investment Counsel & Trust Company, National Association is a national banking association with authority to exercise trust powers. Headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland, Legg Mason Investment Counsel & Trust Company provides services as a trustee for trusts established by our individual and employee benefit plan clients and manages fixed income and equity assets. Legg Mason Investment Counsel, LLC, a subsidiary of Legg Mason Investment Counsel & Trust, manages equity, fixed income and balanced portfolios for high net worth individual and institutional clients and several of our proprietary mutual funds. Legg Mason Investment Counsel is headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland and operates out of offices in New York City, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Easton, Maryland, and Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. As of March 31, 2012, Legg Mason Investment Counsel & Trust Company, including its subsidiary, managed assets with a value of $8.1 billion.
Esemplia Emerging Markets is an emerging markets equities investment manager. Headquartered in London and with an office in Hong Kong, Esemplia offers a range of portfolio management strategies, including core long-only and alpha-extension portfolios, to institutional investors around the world, including pension funds and sovereign wealth funds. Esemplia has a disciplined, systematic and fundamental‑based investment process with an integrated, top-down (via country strategy) and bottom-up (via stock and sector) equity security selection process. As of March 31, 2012, Esemplia managed assets with a value of $3.8 billion.
Private Capital Management manages equity assets for high net worth individuals and families, institutions, endowments and foundations in separate accounts and through limited partnerships. Based in Naples, Florida, Private Capital Management's value‑focused investment philosophy leads to an effort to build an all-cap portfolio consisting primarily of securities of mid-cap companies that possess several basic elements, including significant free cash flow, a substantial resource base and a management team with the ability to correct problems. As of March 31, 2012, Private Capital Management managed assets with a value of

4



$1.6 billion.
Legg Mason's business in Poland engages in portfolio management, servicing and distribution of both separate account management services and local funds in Poland. Based in Warsaw, the firm provides portfolio management services primarily for equity assets to institutions, including corporate pension plans and insurance companies, and, through funds distributed through banks and insurance companies, individual investors. As of March 31, 2012, Legg Mason's Poland business managed assets with a value of $1.0 billion.
Legg Mason Australian Equities is an Australian asset management business that offers Australian equity products, Australian property trusts and asset allocation products. Based in Melbourne, the firm follows a fundamental, intrinsic value approach to portfolio management and its guiding philosophy is a belief that in-depth research can generate superior long-term investment performance. As of March 31, 2012, Legg Mason Australian Equities managed assets with a value of $1.0 billion.
During fiscal year 2012, we sold Bartlett & Co., a Cincinnati-based wealth manager.
United States Mutual Funds
Our U.S. mutual funds business primarily consists of three groups of proprietary mutual and closed-end funds, the Legg Mason Funds, The Royce Funds and the Western Asset Funds. The Legg Mason Funds invest in a wide range of domestic and international equity and fixed income securities utilizing a number of different investment styles, and also include several money market funds. The Royce Funds invest primarily in smaller-cap company stocks using a value investment approach. The Western Asset Funds invest primarily in fixed income securities.
The Legg Mason Funds consist of 113 mutual funds and 27 closed-end funds in the United States, almost all of which are sub-advised by our subsidiary asset managers. The mutual funds and closed-end funds within the Legg Mason Funds include 63 equity funds (including balanced funds) that invest in a wide spectrum of equity securities utilizing numerous investment styles, including large- and mid-cap growth funds and international funds. The fixed income and liquidity mutual funds and closed‑end funds within the Legg Mason Funds include 77 funds that offer a similarly wide variety of investment strategies and objectives, including income funds, investment grade funds and municipal securities funds. Many of our asset managers provide investment advisory services to the Legg Mason Funds. As of March 31, 2012 and 2011, the Legg Mason Funds included $114.7 billion and $142.7 billion in assets, respectively, in their mutual funds and closed-end funds, of which approximately 30% and 27%, respectively, were equity assets, approximately 24% and 18%, respectively, were fixed income assets and approximately 46% and 55%, respectively, were liquidity assets.
The Royce Funds consist of 32 mutual funds and three closed-end funds, most of which invest primarily in smaller‑cap company stocks using a value approach. The funds differ in their approach to investing in smaller or micro-cap companies and the universe of securities from which they can select. As of March 31, 2012 and 2011, The Royce Funds included $37.3 billion and $41.7 billion in assets, respectively, substantially all of which were equity assets. The Royce Funds are distributed through non-affiliated fund supermarkets, our centralized funds distribution operations, non-affiliated wrap programs, and direct distribution. In addition, two of the portfolios in The Royce Funds are distributed only through insurance companies.
Our mutual funds business also includes the Western Asset Funds, a proprietary family of nine mutual funds and two closed-end funds. The mutual funds are marketed primarily to institutional investors and retirement plans through our institutional funds marketing group. Western Asset Management Company manages these funds using a team approach under the supervision of Western Asset's investment committee. The funds primarily invest in fixed income securities. As of March 31, 2012 and 2011, the Western Asset Funds included $15.5 billion and $14.1 billion in assets, respectively.
International Funds
Outside the United States, we manage, support and distribute numerous proprietary funds across a wide array of global fixed income, liquidity and equity investment strategies. Our international funds include a broad range of cross border funds that are domiciled in Ireland and Luxembourg and are sold in a number of countries across Asia, Europe and Latin America. Our international funds also include local fund ranges that are available for distribution in the United Kingdom, Australia, Japan, Singapore, Poland, Hong Kong and Canada. All of our international funds are distributed and serviced by Legg Mason's global distribution group, as discussed below. Our international funds include equity, fixed income, liquidity and balanced funds that are primarily managed or sub-advised by Batterymarch Financial Management, Brandywine Global, ClearBridge, Esemplia, Legg Mason Capital Management, Private Capital Management, Royce & Associates, Western Asset Management and our global asset allocation team. In aggregate, we sponsor and manage more than 220 of these international funds, which as of March 31, 2012 and 2011, had an aggregate of approximately $104.5 billion and $103.6 billion in assets, respectively. The information in this

5



paragraph does not include the funds-of-hedge funds managed by Permal.
Retail Separately Managed Account Programs
We are a leading provider of asset management services to retail separately managed account programs, commonly known as managed account or wrap programs. These programs typically allow securities brokers or other financial intermediaries to offer their clients the opportunity to choose from a number of asset management services pursuing different investment strategies provided by one or more asset managers, and generally charge an all-inclusive fee that covers asset management, trade execution, asset allocation and custodial and administrative services. We provide investment management services to a number of retail separately managed account programs sponsored by several financial institutions.
Distribution
Our centralized global distribution group distributes and supports our U.S. and international funds and retail separately managed account program business. In general, our fund distributors are housed in separate subsidiaries from our asset managers. In addition, each of our asset managers has its own distribution operations that distribute its products and services, primarily, in most cases, to institutional investors.
U.S. Distribution
The U.S.-based operations of our global distribution group support and distribute the Legg Mason Funds, The Royce Funds and the Western Asset Funds, and include our mutual fund wholesalers and our institutional funds marketing group. Our mutual fund wholesalers distribute the Legg Mason Funds through a number of third‑party distributors. Historically, many of the Legg Mason Funds were principally sold through the retail brokerage business of Citigroup. While we have worked to diversify our distribution network, the retail business created by the combination of Morgan Stanley's brokerage unit and Citigroup's Smith Barney unit into a joint venture known as Morgan Stanley Smith Barney remains the primary intermediary selling the Legg Mason Funds. We are not able to predict the long-term effect of the Morgan Stanley Smith Barney joint venture on our ability to continue to successfully distribute our funds through it, or the costs of doing so. We have, however, experienced a reduction in our liquidity assets under management as a result of Morgan Stanley Smith Barney amending certain historic brokerage programs that had provided assets under management to liquidity funds our asset managers manage. Our institutional funds marketing group distributes institutional share classes of the Legg Mason Funds and the Western Asset Funds to institutional clients and also distributes variable annuity sub-advisory services provided by our asset managers to insurance companies. Our institutional liquidity funds are primarily distributed by Western Asset's distributors. In addition to our centralized funds distribution group, Royce & Associates' distributors also distribute The Royce Funds.
In addition to distributing funds, the wholesalers in our global distribution operations also support our retail separately managed account program services. These services are provided through programs sponsored by Morgan Stanley Smith Barney's retail business, as well as other financial institutions.
Outside of our global distribution group, each of our United States asset managers has its own marketing groups that distribute its separate account management services to institutions or high net worth individuals and families. The institutional marketing groups distribute asset management services to potential clients, both directly and through consultants. Consultants play a large role in the institutional asset management business by helping clients select and retain asset managers. Institutional asset management clients and their consultants tend to be highly sophisticated and investment performance‑driven. The high net worth individual marketing groups distribute asset management services for high net worth families and individuals both directly to clients and indirectly through financial intermediaries.
International Distribution
The international distributors within our global distribution group offer our investment management services to individual and institutional investors across Asia, Europe and the Americas. These distributors operate out of distribution offices in 18 cities in 14 countries and are the sole distributors of our cross border funds globally and our international local funds in their respective countries. The goal of our international distributors is to be a global partner for firms that utilize or distribute asset management products around the world, but also to be viewed as a local partner through an understanding of the nuances and needs of each local market that they cover. These distributors seek to develop deep distribution relationships with retail banks, private banks, asset managers, fund platforms, pension plans and insurance plans. Our international distribution offices also work with our asset managers on a case-by-case basis to take advantage of preferences for local distributors or to meet regulatory requirements in distributing products and services into their local markets.

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Legg Mason Investments is the largest business component within our international distribution group. It is responsible for the distribution and servicing of cross border and local fund ranges across Europe, the Americas and Asia. Legg Mason Investments has offices in locations including London, Paris, Milan, Geneva, Frankfurt, Madrid, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taipei, Miami, Santiago and New York. Our distribution efforts are not limited to the locations where we have offices, as Legg Mason Investments distributes cross border funds in more than 25 countries around the world. This global presence provides Legg Mason Investments with the capabilities to provide a platform of sales, service, marketing and products that can cater to the different distribution dynamics in each of the three regions that it covers. Client coverage is local, coordinated across regions, and encompasses multiple distribution channels including fund-of-funds buyers, private banks, fund platforms, insurance companies, intermediaries and distribution partners. The extent to which each channel takes precedence in any one market is governed by local market dynamics.
In addition to Legg Mason Investments, our global distribution group includes separate distribution operations in Australia, Canada and Japan. In Australia, our distribution operations distribute local and cross border pooled investment vehicles sub-advised by our asset managers primarily to retail investors, pension plans, fund-of-funds managers, insurance companies and government funds/agencies. In Canada, our distribution operations distribute Legg Mason-managed products primarily to pension plans, endowments, foundations, banks and mutual fund companies and separately managed account programs. In Japan, our distribution operations distribute domestic investment funds, cross border funds and institutional separate accounts primarily to the retail market, which includes retail banks, private banks, asset managers, funds platforms and insurance companies.
Esemplia, Legg Mason Australian Equities and Legg Mason's Poland business cooperate from time to time on certain marketing and other similar activities as the Legg Mason Global Equities Group.
Permal's products and services are sold primarily outside the United States to non-U.S. high net worth investors through a network of financial intermediaries by Permal's distribution operations. Permal's relationships with its financial intermediaries have resulted in wide international distribution of Permal's products and services. In addition, Permal has successfully distributed its products and services to U.S. institutions over the last few years.
Employees
At March 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, we had 2,979, 3,395 and 3,550 employees, respectively. None of our employees are covered by a collective bargaining agreement. We consider our relations with our employees to be satisfactory. However, competition for experienced asset management personnel is intense and from time to time we may experience a loss of valuable personnel. We recognize the importance to our business of hiring, training and retaining skilled professionals.
Competition
We are engaged in an extremely competitive business and are subject to substantial competition in all aspects of our business. Our competition includes, with respect to one or more aspects of our business, numerous international and domestic asset management firms and broker‑dealers, mutual fund complexes, hedge funds, commercial banks, insurance companies, other investment companies and other financial institutions. Many of these organizations offer products and services that are similar to, or compete with, those we offer, and many of these organizations have substantially more personnel and greater financial resources than we have. Some of these competitors have proprietary products and distribution channels that make it more difficult for us to compete with them. In addition, many of our competitors have long-standing and established relationships with distributors and clients. The principal competitive factors relating to our business are the quality of advice and services provided to investors, the performance records of that advice and service, the reputation of the company providing the services, the price of the services, the products and services offered and distribution relationships and compensation offered to distributors.
Competition in our business periodically has been affected by significant developments in the asset management industry. See “Item 1A. Risk Factors - Risks Related to our Asset Management Business - Competition in the Asset Management Industry Could Reduce our Revenues and Net Income.”
Regulation
The asset management industry in the United States is subject to extensive regulation under both federal and state securities and other laws. The SEC is the federal agency charged with administration of the federal securities laws. Our distribution activities also may be subject to regulation by federal agencies, self-regulatory organizations and state securities commissions in those states in which we conduct business. In addition, asset management firms are subject to regulation by various foreign governments, securities exchanges, central banks and regulatory bodies, particularly in those countries where they have established offices. Due to the extensive laws and regulations to which we are subject, we must devote substantial time, expense and effort to remaining

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current on, and addressing, legal and regulatory compliance matters. Moreover, increasingly regulatory changes in one jurisdiction will affect our business operations in other jurisdictions.
Our U.S. asset managers are registered as investment advisors with the SEC, as are several of our international asset managers, and are also required to make notice filings in certain states. Virtually all aspects of the asset management business, including related sales and distribution activities, are subject to various federal and state laws and regulations and self-regulatory organization rules. These laws, rules and regulations are primarily intended to protect the asset management clients and generally grant supervisory agencies and bodies broad administrative powers, including the power to limit or restrict an investment advisor from conducting its asset management business in the event that it fails to comply with such laws and regulations. Possible sanctions that may be imposed include the suspension of individual employees, the imposition of limitations on engaging in the asset management business for specified periods of time, the requirement to hire independent compliance consultants, the revocation of licenses or registrations, and imposition of censures and fines. A regulatory proceeding, regardless of whether it results in a sanction, can require substantial expenditures and can have an adverse effect on our reputation or business. Regulators also have a variety of informal enforcement mechanisms available that could have a significant impact on our business.
Our asset managers also may be subject to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (“ERISA”), and related regulations, particularly insofar as they act as a “fiduciary” under ERISA with respect to benefit plan clients. ERISA and related provisions of the Internal Revenue Code impose duties on persons who are fiduciaries under ERISA, and prohibit certain transactions involving the assets of ERISA plan clients and certain transactions by the fiduciaries (and several other related parties) to the plans. The Department of Labor, which administers ERISA, has been increasingly active in proposing and adopting regulations affecting the asset management industry. In addition, Legg Mason Investment Counsel & Trust Company is regulated by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.
In our international business, we have fund management, asset management and distribution subsidiaries domiciled in a number of jurisdictions, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Japan, Hong Kong, Ireland, Luxembourg, Poland, Singapore, Taiwan and the United Kingdom that are subject to extensive regulation under the laws of, and to supervision by, governmental authorities in each of these jurisdictions. Our international subsidiaries are also authorized or licensed to offer their products and services in several other countries around the world, and thus are subject to the laws of, and to supervision by, governmental authorities in these additional countries. In addition, a subsidiary of Permal is a Bahamas bank regulated by the Central Bank of the Bahamas. Our offshore proprietary funds are subject to the laws and regulatory bodies of the jurisdictions in which they are domiciled and, for funds listed on exchanges, to the rules of the applicable exchanges. Certain of our funds domiciled in Ireland and Luxembourg are also registered for public sale in several countries around the world and are subject to the laws of, and supervision by, the governmental authorities of those countries. All of these non-U.S. governmental authorities generally have broad supervisory and disciplinary powers, including, among others, the power to set minimum capital requirements, to temporarily or permanently revoke the authorization to carry on regulated business, to suspend registered employees, and to invoke censures and fines for both the regulated business and its registered employees.
Our broker‑dealer subsidiaries are subject to regulations that cover all aspects of the securities business. Much of the regulation of broker‑dealers has been delegated to self-regulatory organizations, principally the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority. These self-regulatory organizations have adopted extensive regulatory requirements relating to matters such as sales practices, compensation and disclosure, and conduct periodic examinations of member broker‑dealers in accordance with rules they have adopted and amended from time to time, subject to approval by the SEC. The SEC, self-regulatory organizations and state securities commissions may conduct administrative proceedings that can result in censure, fine, suspension or expulsion of a broker‑dealer, its officers or registered employees. These administrative proceedings, whether or not resulting in adverse findings, can require substantial expenditures and can have an adverse impact on the reputation or business of a broker‑dealer. The principal purpose of regulation and discipline of broker‑dealers is the protection of clients and the securities markets, rather than protection of creditors and stockholders of the regulated entity.
Net Capital Requirements
We have three small, non-clearing broker-dealer subsidiaries that primarily distribute our funds and other asset management products. These broker‑dealer subsidiaries are subject to net capital rules that mandate that they maintain certain levels of capital. In addition, certain of our subsidiaries that operate outside the United States are subject to net capital or liquidity requirements in the jurisdictions in which they operate. For example, in addition to requirements in other jurisdictions, our United Kingdom‑based subsidiaries and our Singapore‑based subsidiaries are subject to the net capital requirements of the Financial Services Authority and the Monetary Authority of Singapore, respectively.

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS.
Our business, and the asset management industry in general, is subject to numerous risks, uncertainties and other factors that could negatively affect our business or results of operations. These risks, uncertainties and other factors, including the ones discussed below and those discussed elsewhere herein and in our other filings with the SEC, could cause actual results to differ materially from any forward‑looking statements that we or any of our employees may make.
Risks Related to our Asset Management Business
Poor Investment Performance Could Lead to a Loss of Assets Under Management and a Decline in Revenues
We believe that investment performance is one of the most important factors for the maintenance and growth of our assets under management. Poor investment performance, either on an absolute or relative basis, could impair our revenues and growth because:
existing clients might withdraw funds in favor of better performing products, which would result in lower investment advisory and other fees;
our ability to attract funds from existing and new clients might diminish; and
negative absolute investment performance will directly reduce our managed assets.
In addition, in the ordinary course of our business we may reduce or waive investment management fees, or limit total expenses, on certain products or services for particular time periods to manage fund expenses, or for other reasons, and to help retain or increase managed assets. If our revenues decline without a commensurate reduction in our expenses, our net income will be reduced. During certain times over the last five fiscal years, several of our key equity and fixed income asset managers generated poor investment performance, on a relative basis or an absolute basis, in certain products or accounts that they managed. These investment performance issues contributed to a significant reduction in their assets under management and revenues and a reduction in performance fees. Although our overall investment performance has improved over the last two fiscal years, we still face performance issues with a number of our products, and there is typically a lag before improvements in investment performance produce a positive effect on asset flows. There can be no assurances as to when investment performance issues will cease to influence our assets under management and revenues.
Assets Under Management May Be Withdrawn, Which May Reduce our Revenues and Net Income
Our investment advisory and administrative contracts are generally terminable at will or upon relatively short notice, and investors in the mutual funds that we manage may redeem their investments in the funds at any time without prior notice. Institutional and individual clients can terminate their relationships with us, reduce the aggregate amount of assets under management, or shift their funds to other types of accounts with different rate structures for any number of reasons, including investment performance, changes in prevailing interest rates, changes in investment preferences of clients, changes in our reputation in the marketplace, changes in management or control of clients or third‑party distributors with whom we have relationships, loss of key investment management or other personnel and financial market performance. This risk is underscored by the fact that we have one international client that represents approximately 4% of our total assets under management (although it generates less than 1% of our operating revenues). In addition, in a declining securities market, the pace of mutual fund redemptions and withdrawal of assets from other accounts could accelerate. Poor investment performance generally or relative to other investment management firms tends to result in decreased purchases of fund shares, increased redemptions of fund shares, and the loss of institutional or individual accounts. Due in part to investment performance issues, we have experienced net outflows of equity and fixed income assets under management for the last six and five fiscal years, respectively. While the rate of outflows decreased in fiscal year 2012, there can be no assurances as to when, or if, the flows will reverse. During fiscal years 2012 and 2011 we had $27.5 billion and $61.1 billion, respectively, in aggregate net client outflows. The fiscal year 2012 outflows included $21.3 billion in equity asset outflows and $18.6 in fixed income asset outflows, which were partially offset by $12.4 billion in liquidity asset inflows.
We May Support Money Market Funds to Maintain Their Stable Net Asset Values, or Other Products we Manage, Which Could Affect our Revenues or Operating Results
Approximately 19% of our assets under management as of March 31, 2012 consisted of assets in money market funds. Money market funds seek to preserve a stable net asset value. The money market funds our asset managers manage have always maintained this stable net asset value. However, there is no guarantee that this stable net asset value will be achieved in the future. Market conditions could lead to severe liquidity or security pricing issues, which could impact their net asset values. If the net

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asset value of a money market fund managed by our asset managers were to fall below its stable net asset value, we would likely experience significant redemptions in assets under management and reputational harm, which could have a material adverse effect on our revenues or net income.
If a money market fund's stable net asset value comes under pressure, we may elect, as we have done in the past, to provide credit, liquidity, or other support to the fund. We may also elect to provide similar or other support, including by providing liquidity to a fund, to other products we manage for any number of reasons. We are not legally required to support any money market fund or other product and there can be no assurance that any support would be sufficient to avoid an adverse impact on any product or investors in any product. A decision to provide support may arise from factors specific to our products or from industry‑wide factors. If we elect to provide support, we could incur losses from the support we provide and incur additional costs, including financing costs, in connection with the support. These losses and additional costs could be material, and could adversely affect our earnings. If we were to take such actions we may also restrict our corporate assets, limiting our flexibility to use these assets for other purposes, and may be required to raise additional capital.
If we Are Unable to Maintain our Fee Levels or If our Asset Mix Changes, our Revenues and Margins Could Be Reduced
Our profit margins and net income are dependent in significant part on our ability to maintain current fee levels for the products and services that our asset managers offer. There has been a trend toward lower fees in some segments of the asset management industry, and no assurances can be given that we will be able to maintain our current fee structure. Competition could lead to our asset managers reducing the fees that they charge their clients for products and services. See “ - Competition in the Asset Management Industry Could Reduce our Revenues and Net Income.” In addition, our asset managers may be required to reduce their fee levels, or restructure the fees they charge, because of, among other things, regulatory initiatives or proceedings that are either industry-wide or specifically targeted, or court decisions. A reduction in the fees that our asset managers charge for their products and services will reduce our revenues and could reduce our net income. These factors also could inhibit our ability to increase fees for certain products.
Our assets under management can generate very different revenues per dollar of managed assets based on factors such as the type of asset managed (equity assets generally produce greater revenues than fixed income assets), the type of client (institutional clients generally pay lower fees than other clients), the type of asset management product or service provided and the fee schedule of the asset manager providing the service. A shift in the mix of our assets under management from higher revenue‑generating assets to lower revenue‑generating assets may result in a decrease in our revenues even if our aggregate level of assets under management remains unchanged or increases. A decrease in our revenues, without a commensurate reduction in expenses, will reduce our net income. We experienced such a shift in the mix of our assets under management during fiscal year 2012, during which our equity assets under management decreased from $189.6 billion (28% of our total assets under management) on March 31, 2011 to $163.4 billion (26% of our total assets under management) on March 31, 2012. There can be no assurances that this shift will not continue or reverse.
Our Mutual Fund Management Contracts May Not Be Renewed, Which May Reduce our Revenues and Net Income
A substantial portion of our revenue comes from managing U.S. mutual funds. We generally manage these funds pursuant to management contracts with the funds that must be renewed and approved by the funds' boards of directors annually. A majority of the directors of each mutual fund are independent from us. Although the funds' boards of directors have historically approved each of our management contracts, there can be no assurance that the board of directors of each fund that we manage will continue to approve the fund's management contract each year, or will not condition its approval on the terms of the management contract being revised in a way that is adverse to us. If a mutual fund management contract is not renewed, or is revised in a way that is adverse to us, it could result in a reduction in our revenues and, if our revenues decline without a commensurate reduction in our expenses, our net income will be reduced.
Unavailability of Appropriate Investment Opportunities Could Hamper our Investment Performance or Growth
An important component of investment performance is the availability of appropriate investment opportunities for new client funds. If any of our asset managers is not able to find sufficient investments for new client assets in a timely manner, the asset manager's investment performance could be adversely affected. Alternatively, if one of our asset managers does not have sufficient investment opportunities for new funds, it may elect to limit its growth by reducing the rate at which it receives new funds. Depending on, among other factors, prevailing market conditions, the asset manager's investment style, regulatory and other limits and the market sectors and types of opportunities in which the asset manager typically invests (such as less capitalized companies and other more thinly traded securities in which relatively smaller investments are typically made), the risks of not having sufficient investment opportunities may increase when an asset manager increases its assets under management, particularly

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when the increase occurs very quickly. If our asset managers are not able to identify sufficient investment opportunities for new client funds, their investment performance or ability to grow may be reduced.
Changes in Securities Markets and Prices May Affect our Revenues and Net Income
A large portion of our revenue is derived from investment advisory contracts with clients. Under these contracts, the investment advisory fees we receive are typically based on the market value of assets under management. Accordingly, a decline in the prices of securities generally may cause our revenues and income to decline by:
causing the value of our assets under management to decrease, which would result in lower investment advisory and other fees;
causing our clients to withdraw funds in favor of investments they perceive offer greater opportunity or lower risk, which would also result in lower investment advisory and other fees; or
decreasing the performance fees earned by our asset managers.
There are substantial fluctuations in price levels in the securities markets. These fluctuations can occur on a daily basis and over longer periods as a result of a variety of factors, including national and international economic and political events, broad trends in business and finance, and interest rate movements. Reduced securities market prices generally may result in reduced revenues from lower levels of assets under management and loss or reduction in incentive and performance fees. Periods of reduced market prices may adversely affect our profitability because fixed costs remain relatively unchanged. Because we operate in one industry, the business cycles of our asset managers may occur contemporaneously. Consequently, the effect of an economic downturn may have a magnified negative effect on our business.
In addition, as of March 31, 2011, a substantial portion of our assets was invested in securities and other seed capital investments. A decline in the value of equity, fixed income or other alternative securities could lower the value of these investments and result in declines in our non-operating income and net income. Increases or decreases in the value of these investments could increase the volatility of our earnings.
Changes in Interest Rates Could Have Adverse Effects on our Assets Under Management
Increases in interest rates from their historically low present levels may adversely affect the net asset values of our assets under management. In addition, in a rising interest rate environment institutional investors may shift liquidity assets that we manage in pooled investment vehicles to direct investments in the types of assets in which the pooled vehicles invest in order to realize higher yields. Furthermore, increases in interest rates may result in reduced prices in equity markets. Conversely, decreases in interest rates could lead to outflows in fixed income or liquidity assets that we manage as investors seek higher yields. Any of these effects could lower our assets under management and revenues and, if our revenues decline without a commensurate reduction in our expenses, our net income will be reduced.
The current historically low interest rate environment affects the yields of money market funds, which are based on the income from the underlying securities less the operating costs of the funds. With short-term interest rates at or near zero, the operating expenses of money market funds may become greater than the income from the underlying securities. During the past three fiscal years, we voluntarily waived certain fees or assumed expenses of money market funds for competitive reasons, such as to maintain positive yields. These fee waivers resulted in $120 million in reduced investment advisory revenues in fiscal year 2012, and have continued into the present fiscal year.
Competition in the Asset Management Industry Could Reduce our Revenues and Net Income
The asset management industry in which we are engaged is extremely competitive and we face substantial competition in all aspects of our business. We compete with numerous international and domestic asset management firms and broker‑dealers, mutual fund complexes, hedge funds, commercial banks, insurance companies, other investment companies and other financial institutions. Many of these organizations offer products and services that are similar to, or compete with, those offered by our asset managers and have substantially more personnel and greater financial resources than we do. Some of these competitors have proprietary products and distribution channels that make it more difficult for us to compete with them. In addition, many of our competitors have long-standing and established relationships with distributors and clients. From time to time, our asset managers also compete with each other for clients and assets under management. Our ability to compete may be adversely affected if, among other things, our asset managers lose key employees or, as has been the case for certain of the products managed by our asset managers, under‑perform in comparison to relevant performance benchmarks or peer groups.

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The asset management industry has experienced from time to time the entry of many new firms, as well as significant consolidation as numerous asset management firms have either been acquired by other financial services firms or ceased operations. In many cases, this has resulted in firms with greater financial resources than we have. In addition, a number of heavily capitalized companies, including commercial banks and foreign entities have made investments in and acquired asset management firms. Access to mutual fund distribution channels has also become increasingly competitive. All of these factors could make it more difficult for us to compete, and no assurance can be given that we will be successful in competing and growing our assets under management and business. If clients and potential clients decide to use the services of competitors, it could reduce our revenues and growth rate, and if our revenues decrease without a commensurate reduction in our expenses, our net income will be reduced. In this regard, there are a number of asset classes that are not well covered by our current products and services. When these asset classes are in favor with investors, we will miss the opportunity to gain the assets under management that are being invested in these assets and face the risk of our managed assets being withdrawn in favor of competitors who provide services covering these classes. For example, to the extent there is a trend in the asset management business in favor of passive products such as index and exchange- traded funds, it favors our competitors who provide those products over active managers like our asset managers. In addition, our asset managers are not typically the lowest cost provider of asset management services. To the extent that we compete on the basis of price in any of our businesses, we may not be able to maintain our current fee structure in that business, which could adversely affect our revenues and net income. In the retail separately managed account program business, there has been a trend toward more open programs that involve more asset managers who provide only investment models which the financial institution sponsor's employees use to allocate assets. A number of the programs for which we provide services have followed this trend, and additional programs could do so in the future. This trend could result in assets under management retention issues due to additional competition within the programs, particularly for products with performance issues, and reduced management fees, which are typical results of providing investment models rather than advisory services.
Our sole business is asset management. As a result, we may be more affected by trends and issues affecting the asset management industry, such as industry-wide regulatory issues and inquiries, publicity about, and public perceptions of the industry and asset management industry market cycles, than other financial services companies that have more diversified businesses.
Failure to Comply With Contractual Requirements or Guidelines Could Result in Liability and Loss of Assets Under Management, Both of Which Could Cause our Net Income to Decline
The asset management contracts under which we manage client assets, including contracts with investment funds, often specify guidelines or contractual requirements that we are obligated to observe in providing asset management services. A failure to comply with these guidelines or requirements could result in damage to our reputation, liability to the client or the client reducing its assets under our management, any of which could cause our revenues and net income to decline. This risk is increased by the trend toward customized, specialized mandates seen by many of our asset managers, which tends to result in more complex mandates that are more difficult to administer.
The Soundness of Other Financial Institutions Could Adversely Affect our Business
Volatility in the markets in the recent past has highlighted the interconnection of the global markets and demonstrated how the deteriorating financial condition of one institution may materially and adversely impact the performance of other institutions. Legg Mason, and the funds and accounts that we manage, has exposure to many different industries and counterparties, and routinely executes transactions with counterparties in the financial industry. We, and the funds and accounts we manage, may be exposed to credit, operational or other risk in the event of a default by a counterparty or client, or in the event of other unrelated systemic failures in the markets.
Performance‑Based Fee Arrangements May Increase the Volatility of our Revenues
A portion of our investment advisory and related fee revenues is derived from performance fees. Our asset managers earn performance fees under certain client agreements if the investment performance in the portfolio meets or exceeds a specified benchmark. If the investment performance does not meet or exceed the investment return benchmark for a particular period, the asset manager will not generate a performance fee for that period and, if the benchmark is based on cumulative returns, the asset manager's ability to earn performance fees in future periods may be impaired. We earned $49.5 million, $96.7 million and $71.5 million in performance fees during fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. An increase in performance fees, or in performance‑based fee arrangements with our clients, could create greater fluctuations in our revenues.
We Rely Significantly on Third Parties to Distribute Mutual Funds and Certain Other Products
Our ability to market and distribute mutual funds and certain other investment products that we manage is significantly dependent on access to third‑party financial intermediaries that distribute these products. These distributors are generally not

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contractually required to distribute our products, and typically offer their clients various investment products and services, including proprietary products and services, in addition to and in competition with our products and services. Relying on third‑party distributors also exposes us to the risk of increasing costs of distribution, as we compensate them for selling our products and services in amounts that are agreed between them and us but which, in many cases, are largely determined by the distributor. Many of the funds we manage were historically primarily distributed through Citigroup's retail brokerage business. While we have strived to diversify our distribution network, the retail business created by the combination of Morgan Stanley's brokerage unit and Citigroup's Smith Barney brokerage unit into a joint venture known as Morgan Stanley Smith Barney remains the primary intermediary selling our funds. While the third‑party distributors are compensated for distributing our products and services, there can be no assurances that we will be successful in distributing our products and services through them. In addition, mergers and other corporate transactions among distributors may affect our distribution relationships. For example, we are not able to predict the long-term effect of the Morgan Stanley Smith Barney joint venture on our ability to continue to successfully distribute our funds and other products through it, or the costs of doing so. During the quarter ended June 30, 2011, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney amended certain historic Smith Barney brokerage programs to transfer to Morgan Stanley Smith Barney managers certain arrangements that had previously provided for investments in liquidity funds that our asset managers manage. This resulted in a $19.9 billion reduction in our liquidity assets under management. In addition, we expect further amendments to result in an additional $6 billion in liquidity assets under management being transferred over the next four months. If we are unable to distribute our products and services successfully, it will adversely affect our revenues and net income, and any increase in distribution‑related expenses could adversely affect our net income.
Our Funds-of-Hedge Funds Business Entails a Number of Additional Risks
Permal operates in the international funds-of-hedge funds business. The funds-of-hedge funds business typically involves clients being charged fees on two levels - at the funds-of-funds level and at the underlying funds level. These fees may include management fees and performance fees. While we are not currently aware of any issues in this area, there is no assurance that Permal will not be forced to change its fee structures by competitive or other pressures or that Permal's fee structures will not hamper its growth. In addition, Permal may generate significant performance fees from time to time, which could increase the volatility of our revenues. See “ - Performance‑Based Fee Arrangements May Increase the Volatility of our Revenues.” Because Permal operates in the funds-of-hedge funds business globally, it is exposed to a number of regulatory authorities and requirements in different jurisdictions.
Risks Related to our Company
Our Leverage May Affect our Business and May Restrict our Operating Results
At March 31, 2012, on a consolidated basis, we had approximately $1.4 billion in total indebtedness, excluding debt of consolidated investment vehicles for which we are not responsible, and total stockholders' equity of $5.7 billion, and our goodwill and other intangible assets were $1.3 billion and $3.9 billion, respectively. As of March 31, 2012, we had $265 million of additional borrowing capacity available under our various credit agreements, subject to certain conditions and compliance with the covenants in our outstanding indebtedness. As a result of this substantial indebtedness, we are required to use a significant portion of our cash flow to service principal and interest on our debt, which will limit the cash flow available for other business opportunities. In addition, these servicing obligations would increase in the future if we incur additional indebtedness.
Our ability to make scheduled payments of principal, to pay interest, or to refinance our indebtedness and to satisfy our other debt obligations will depend upon our future operating performance, which may be affected by general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory, business and other factors beyond our control and by a variety of factors specific to our business.
The level of our indebtedness could:
limit our ability to obtain additional debt financing in the future or to borrow under our existing credit facilities (our principal bank debt facility requires that (i) our ratio of net debt (total debt less unrestricted cash in excess of working capital) to Consolidated EBITDA (as defined therein) not exceed 2.5 to 1, and (ii) our ratio of Consolidated EBITDA to total cash interest payments on certain Indebtedness (as defined therein) exceeds 4 to 1);
limit cash flow available for general corporate purposes due to the ongoing cash flow requirements for debt service;
limit our flexibility, including our ability to react to competitive and other changes in the industry and economic conditions; and
place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that have less debt.

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As of March 31, 2012, under the terms of our bank credit agreement our ratio of net debt to Consolidated EBITDA was 1.1 to 1 and our ratio of Consolidated EBITDA to interest expense was 13.8 to 1, and, therefore, Legg Mason was in compliance with its bank financial covenants. If our net income significantly declines for any reason, it may be difficult to remain in compliance with these covenants. Similarly, to the extent that we spend our available cash for purposes other than repaying debt or acquiring businesses that increase our EBITDA, we will increase our net debt to Consolidated EBITDA ratio. Although there are actions that we may take if our financial covenant compliance becomes an issue, there can be no assurance that Legg Mason will remain in compliance with its bank debt covenants.
Our access to credit on reasonable terms is also partially dependent on our credit ratings. If our credit ratings are downgraded, it will likely become more difficult and costly for us to access the credit markets or otherwise incur new debt.
Upon the occurrence of various events, such as a change of control, some or all of our outstanding debt obligations may come due prior to their maturity dates and may require payments in excess of their outstanding amounts, which in certain circumstances may be significant.
We May Engage in Strategic Transactions That Could Create Risks
As part of our business strategy, we regularly review, are currently reviewing, and from time to time have discussions with respect to potential strategic transactions, including potential acquisitions, dispositions, consolidations, joint ventures or similar transactions and “lift-outs” of portfolio management teams, some of which may be material. There can be no assurance that we will find suitable candidates for strategic transactions at acceptable prices, have sufficient capital resources to accomplish our strategy, or be successful in entering into agreements for desired transactions. In addition, these transactions typically involve a number of risks and present financial, managerial and operational challenges, including:
adverse effects on our reported earnings per share in the event acquired intangible assets or goodwill become impaired;
existence of unknown liabilities or contingencies that arise after closing; and
potential disputes with counterparties.
Acquisitions, including completed acquisitions, also pose the risk that any business we acquire may lose customers or employees or could underperform relative to expectations. We could also experience financial or other setbacks if transactions encounter unanticipated problems, including problems related to execution or integration. Following the completion of an acquisition, we may have to rely on the seller to provide administrative and other support, including financial reporting and internal controls, to the acquired business for a period of time. There can be no assurance that the seller will do so in a manner that is acceptable to us.
Strategic transactions typically are announced publicly even though they may remain subject to numerous closing conditions, contingencies and approvals and there is no assurance that any announced transaction will actually be consummated. The failure to consummate an announced transaction could have an adverse effect on us. Future transactions may also further increase our leverage or, if we issue equity securities to pay for acquisitions, dilute the holdings of our existing stockholders.
If our Reputation is Harmed, we Could Suffer Losses in our Business, Revenues and Net Income
Our business depends on earning and maintaining the trust and confidence of clients and other market participants, and the resulting good reputation is critical to our business. Our reputation is vulnerable to many threats that can be difficult or impossible to control, and costly or impossible to remediate. Regulatory inquiries, employee misconduct and rumors, among other things, can substantially damage our reputation, even if they are baseless or satisfactorily addressed. Any damage to our reputation could impede our ability to attract and retain clients and key personnel, and lead to a reduction in the amount of our assets under management, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our revenues and net income.
Failure to Properly Address Conflicts of Interest Could Harm our Reputation, Business and Results of Operations
As we have expanded the scope of our businesses and our client base, we must continue to address conflicts between our interests and those of our clients. In addition, the SEC and other regulators have increased their scrutiny of potential conflicts of interest. We have procedures and controls that are reasonably designed to address these issues. However, appropriately dealing with conflicts of interest is complex and difficult and if we fail, or appear to fail, to deal appropriately with conflicts of interest, we could face reputational damage, litigation or regulatory proceedings or penalties, any of which may adversely affect our revenues or net income.

14



Loss of Key Personnel Could Harm our Business
We are dependent on the continued services of a number of our key asset management personnel and our management team, including our Chief Executive Officer. The loss of any of such personnel without adequate replacement could have a material adverse effect on us. Moreover, since certain of our asset managers contribute significantly to our revenues and net income, the loss of even a small number of key personnel at these businesses could have a disproportionate impact on our overall business. Additionally, we need qualified managers and skilled employees with asset management experience in order to operate our business successfully. The market for experienced asset management professionals is extremely competitive and is increasingly characterized by the movement of employees among different firms. Due to the competitive market for asset management professionals and the success of some of our employees, our costs to attract and retain key employees are significant and will likely increase over time. From time to time, we may work with key employees to revise revenue sharing agreements and other employment‑related terms to reflect current circumstances, including in situations where a revenue sharing agreement may result in insufficient revenues being retained by the subsidiary. In addition, since the investment track record of many of our products and services is often attributed to a small number of individual employees, and sometimes one person, the departure of one or more of these employees could cause the business to lose client accounts or managed assets, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. If we are unable to attract and retain qualified individuals or our costs to do so increase significantly, our operations and financial results would be materially adversely affected.
Our Business is Subject to Numerous Operational Risks and Risks that we May Incur Charges Related to Leased Facilities
We face numerous operational risks related to our business on a day-to-day basis. Among other things, we must be able to consistently and reliably obtain securities pricing information, process trading activity, process client and investor transactions and provide reports and other customer service to our clients, investors and distributors. Failure to keep current and accurate books and records can render us subject to disciplinary action by governmental and self-regulatory authorities, as well as to claims by our clients. If any of our financial, portfolio accounting or other data processing systems, or the systems of third parties on whom we rely, do not operate properly or are disabled or if there are other shortcomings or failures in our internal processes, people or systems, or those of third parties on whom we rely, we could suffer an impairment to our liquidity, a financial loss, a disruption of our businesses, liability to clients, regulatory problems or damage to our reputation. These systems may fail to operate properly or become disabled as a result of events that are wholly or partially beyond our control, including a disruption of electrical or communications services or our inability to occupy one or more buildings. In addition, our operations are dependent upon information from, and communications with, third parties, and operational problems at third parties may adversely affect our ability to carry on our business.
Our operations rely on the secure processing, storage and transmission of confidential and other information in our computer systems, networks and mobile devices. Although we take protective measures and endeavor to modify them as circumstances warrant, our computer systems, software, networks and mobile devices, may be vulnerable to unauthorized access, computer viruses or other malicious code, and other events that have a security impact. If one or more of such events occur, it potentially could jeopardize our or our clients' or counterparties' confidential and other information processed and stored in, and transmitted through, our computer systems, networks and mobile devices, or otherwise cause interruptions or malfunctions in our, our clients', our counterparties' or third parties' operations. We may be required to spend significant additional resources to modify our protective measures or to investigate and remediate vulnerabilities or other exposures, and we may be subject to litigation and financial losses that are either not insured against fully or not fully covered through any insurance that we maintain.
We depend on our headquarters, the offices of our subsidiaries and our operations centers for the continued operation of our business. A disaster or a disruption in the infrastructure that supports our asset managers, or an event disrupting the ability of our employees to perform their job functions, including terrorist attacks or a disruption involving electrical communications, transportation or other services used by us or third parties with whom we conduct business, directly affecting our headquarters, the offices of our subsidiaries, our operations centers or the travel of our sales, client service and other personnel, may have a material adverse impact on our ability to continue to operate our business without interruption. Although we have disaster recovery programs in place, there can be no assurance that these will be sufficient to mitigate the harm that may result from such a disaster or disruption. In addition, insurance and other safeguards might only partially reimburse us for our losses.
We continue to be exposed to the risk of incurring charges related to subleases or vacant space for several of our leased offices. As of March 31, 2012, our future commitments from third parties under non-cancellable subleases were approximately $149 million, which in total, net of reserves, effectively offsets obligations under our leases for the properties. As of March 31, 2012, our total future lease commitments for office space that we have vacated and are seeking to sublease was approximately $38 million, of which we have previously reserved $17 million through lease charges to our earnings. Under generally accepted accounting principles, at the time a sublease is entered into or space is deemed permanently abandoned, we must incur a charge

15



equal to the present value of the amount by which the commitments under the lease exceeds the amount due, or amount expected to be received, under a sublease. As a result, in a period of declining commercial lease markets, we are exposed to the risk of incurring charges relating to any premises we are seeking to sublease resulting from longer periods to identify sub-tenants and reduced market rent rates leading to new sub-tenants paying less in rent than we are paying under our lease. Also, if a sub-tenant defaults on its sublease, we would likely incur a charge for the rent that we will incur during the period that we expect would be required to sublease the premises and any reduction in rent that current market rent rates lead us to expect a new sub-tenant will pay. This risk is underscored by the fact that one sub-tenant represents approximately 51% of the future sublease rent commitments described above. There can be no assurance that we will not recognize additional lease‑related charges, which may be material to our results of operations.
Potential Impairment of Goodwill and Intangible Assets Could Increase our Expenses and Reduce our Assets
Determining goodwill and intangible assets, and evaluating them for impairment, requires significant management estimates and judgment, including estimating value and assessing life in connection with the allocation of purchase price in the acquisition creating them. Our goodwill and intangible assets may become impaired as a result of any number of factors, including losses of investment management contracts or declines in the value of managed assets. Any impairment of goodwill or intangibles could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. Our $33 million in net amortizable intangible assets represent asset management contracts purchased in several transactions. These assets could become impaired if we experience client attrition at a rate faster than projected or fees charged under the contracts are reduced. The domestic mutual fund contracts acquired in the 2005 acquisition of the Citigroup Asset Management business (“CAM”) of $2,502 million and the Permal funds-of-hedge funds contracts of $947 million account for approximately 65% and 25%, respectively, of our indefinite-life intangible assets, while the goodwill in our asset management business aggregates $1.3 billion. Changes in the assumptions underlying projected cash flows from the assets or reporting unit, resulting from market conditions, reduced assets under management or other factors, could result in an impairment of any of these assets. As of December 31, 2011, the date of our most recent annual testing, assuming all other factors remain the same, actual results and changes in assumptions for the domestic mutual fund and Permal funds-of-hedge fund contracts would have to cause our cash flow projections over the long term to deviate more than 5% and 35%, respectively, from projections or the discount rate would have to increase from 13.0 to 13.5% and from 14.5 to 19.5%, respectively, for the asset to be deemed impaired. Similarly, assuming all other factors remain the same, actual results and changes in assumptions for goodwill would have to cause our cash flow projections over the long term to deviate approximately 51% from previous projections or the discount rate would have to increase by approximately eight percentage points, for the goodwill to be deemed impaired. There can be no assurances that market turmoil or asset outflows, or other factors, will not produce an impairment. See “Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates - Intangible Assets and Goodwill.”
Our Deferred Tax Assets May Not Be Fully Realizable
As of March 31, 2012, we had approximately $718 million in U.S. federal deferred tax assets, which represent tax benefits that we expect to realize in future periods. Under accounting rules, we are required to recognize a charge to earnings to reduce our deferred tax assets if it is determined that any future tax benefits are not likely to be realized before they expire. Deferred tax assets generated in U.S. jurisdictions resulting from net operating losses generally expire 20 years after they are generated. Those resulting from foreign tax credits generally expire 10 years after they are generated. In order to realize these future tax benefits, we estimate that we must generate approximately $4.1 billion in future U.S. earnings, approximately $169 million of which must be in the form of foreign source income, before the benefits expire. There can be no assurances that we will achieve this level of earnings before some portion of these tax benefits expires. In addition, our belief that we will likely be able to realize these future tax benefits is based in part upon our estimates of the timing of other differences in revenue and expense recognition between tax returns and financial statements and our understanding of the application of tax regulations, which may prove to be incorrect for any number of reasons, including future changes in tax or accounting regulations. If we are required to recognize a charge to earnings to reduce our deferred tax assets, the charge may be material to our earnings or financial condition.

16



We Are Exposed to a Number of Risks Arising From our International Operations
Our asset managers operate in a number of jurisdictions outside of the United States on behalf of international clients. We have offices in numerous countries and many cross border and local proprietary funds that are domiciled outside the United States. Our international operations require us to comply with the legal requirements of various foreign jurisdictions, expose us to the political consequences of operating in foreign jurisdictions and subject us to expropriation risks, expatriation controls and potential adverse tax consequences which, among other things, make it more difficult to repatriate to the United States the cash that we generate outside the U.S. At March 31, 2012, our total cash and cash equivalents of $1.4 billion included approximately $600 million held by our foreign subsidiaries, some of which, if repatriated, may be subject to material tax effects. Our foreign business operations are also subject to the following risks:
difficulty in managing, operating and marketing our international operations;
fluctuations in currency exchange rates which may result in substantial negative effects on assets under management and revenues in our U.S. dollar-based financial statements; and
significant adverse changes in foreign legal and regulatory environments.
Legal and Regulatory Risks
Regulatory Matters May Negatively Affect our Business and Results of Operations
Our business is subject to regulation by various regulatory authorities that are charged with protecting the interests of our clients. We could be subject to civil liability, criminal liability, or sanction, including revocation of our subsidiaries' registrations as investment advisers, revocation of the licenses of our employees, censures, fines, or temporary suspension or permanent bar from conducting business, if we violate such laws or regulations. Any such liability or sanction could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, reputation, and business prospects. In addition, the regulatory environment in which we operate frequently changes and has seen significant increased regulation in recent years. In particular, we have incurred, and will continue to incur, significant additional costs as a result of regulatory changes affecting U.S. mutual funds and changes to European mutual fund regulation, including the EU Directive on Undertakings for Collective Investments in Transferable Securities Directives (UCITs) and the Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive. Furthermore, the SEC has proposed replacing Rule 12b-1 under the Investment Company Act of 1940, which regulates certain fees that may be paid to mutual fund distributors, with a new regulation that would significantly change fund distribution practices in the industry. This proposal, if adopted, could increase our operational and compliance costs and may affect our ability to compensate distributors for selling our products. We also expect to spend time and money to comply with the requirements of the U.S. Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act. Our business and results of operations can also be adversely affected by federal, state and foreign regulatory issues and proceedings.
We may be adversely affected as a result of new or revised legislation or regulations or by changes in the interpretation or enforcement of existing laws and regulations. For example, we note that the federal government has made, and has proposed further, significant changes to the regulatory structure of the financial services industry, and we expect to spend time and resources to comply with these regulatory changes. We also note that recommendations for regulatory reform in the liquidity asset management business include the possible imposition of banking and banking-like regulations on liquidity funds and their managers. Currently, SEC officials have stated publicly that the agency is considering proposing additional regulations for money market funds that are designed to address certain concerns arising from the 2007-2008 financial crisis. Among the changes the SEC says it is considering are a possible requirement that money market funds have a capital buffer, the imposition of redemption holdbacks, and a requirement that money market funds convert to a floating net asset value. If adopted, these proposals, which also have been publicly supported by a number of Federal banking officials, could significantly impact the money market fund industry. Depending on the nature of any changes adopted, the new regulations could, among other things, reduce the attractiveness of money market funds to retail and institutional investors and raise the costs of being in this business. Although the SEC has not proposed any specific regulations to date, we continue to monitor this area carefully and, if new regulations are adopted, we will consider how they affect our liquidity management business and take action, as appropriate. Any of these revisions could adversely affect our liquidity asset management business and our results of operations.
Instances of criminal activity and fraud by participants in the asset management industry, disclosures of trading and other abuses by participants in the financial services industry and significant governmental intervention and investment in the financial markets and financial firms have led the U.S. government and regulators to increase the rules and regulations governing, and oversight of, the U.S. financial system. This activity has resulted in changes to the laws and regulations governing the asset management industry and more aggressive enforcement of the existing laws and regulations. For example, the 2010 Dodd-Frank

17



Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in the U.S. provides for a comprehensive overhaul of the financial services regulatory environment and requires the adoption of extensive regulations and many regulatory decisions to be implemented. These revisions to the laws and regulations are an ongoing process. The cumulative effect of these actions may result in increased expenses, or lower management or other fees, and therefore adversely affect the revenues or profitability of our business.
Our Business Involves Risks of Being Engaged in Litigation and Liability That Could Increase our Expenses and Reduce our Net Income
Many aspects of our business involve substantial risks of liability. In the normal course of business, our asset managers are from time to time named as defendants or co-defendants in lawsuits, or are involved in disputes that involve the threat of lawsuits, seeking substantial damages. For example, one of our asset managers was named as the defendant in a lawsuit filed by a former institutional client seeking damages in excess of $90 million. Although we believe the claims are without merit, no assurances can be given that this lawsuit will not adversely impact our expenses or net income. We are also involved from time to time in governmental and self-regulatory organization investigations and proceedings. Similarly, the investment funds that our asset managers manage are subject to actual and threatened lawsuits and governmental and self-regulatory organization investigations and proceedings, any of which could harm the investment returns or reputation of the applicable fund or result in our asset managers being liable to the funds for any resulting damages. There has been an increased incidence of litigation and regulatory investigations in the asset management industry in recent years, including customer claims as well as class action suits seeking substantial damages. Any litigation can increase our expenses and reduce our net income.
Insurance May Not Be Available on a Cost Effective Basis to Protect us From Liability
We face the inherent risk of liability related to litigation from clients, third‑party vendors or others and actions taken by regulatory agencies. To help protect against these potential liabilities, we purchase insurance in amounts, and against risks, that we consider appropriate, where such insurance is available at prices we deem acceptable. There can be no assurance, however, that a claim or claims will be covered by insurance or, if covered, will not exceed the limits of available insurance coverage, that any insurer will remain solvent and will meet its obligations to provide us with coverage or that insurance coverage will continue to be available with sufficient limits at a reasonable cost. Insurance costs are impacted by market conditions and the risk profile of the insured, and may increase significantly over relatively short periods. In addition, certain insurance coverage may not be available or may only be available at prohibitive costs. Renewals of insurance policies may expose us to additional costs through higher premiums or the assumption of higher deductibles or co-insurance liability.
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.
None.
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES.
We lease all of our office space. Our headquarters and certain other functions are located in an office building in Baltimore, Maryland, in which we currently hold under lease approximately 372,000 square feet, of which approximately 82,000 square feet has been subleased to third parties.
Our asset managers and other subsidiaries are housed in office buildings in 32 cities in 19 countries around the world. The largest of the leases include:
ClearBridge Advisors, Western Asset Management Company and our distribution and administrative services subsidiaries currently occupy approximately 130,000 square feet in an office building located in New York, New York in which we hold under lease approximately 193,000 square feet. The remaining 63,000 square feet has been subleased to a third party;
Western Asset Management Company's headquarters is housed in an office building in Pasadena, California in which we occupy approximately 190,000 square feet; and
    
our distribution and administrative services subsidiaries occupy approximately 150,000 square feet in an office building located in Stamford, Connecticut.
See Note 9 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report for a discussion of our lease obligations.

18



ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.
Our current and former subsidiaries have been the subject of customer complaints and have also been named as defendants in various legal actions arising primarily from securities brokerage, asset management and investment banking activities, including certain class actions, which primarily allege violations of securities laws and seek unspecified damages, which could be substantial. For example, we are aware of litigation against certain underwriters of offerings in which one or more of our former subsidiaries was a participant, but where the former subsidiary is not now a defendant. In these latter cases, it is possible that we may be called upon to contribute to settlements or judgments. In the normal course of our business, our current and former subsidiaries have also received subpoenas and are currently involved in governmental and self-regulatory agency inquiries, investigations and, from time to time, proceedings involving asset management activities. In the 2005 transaction with Citigroup, we transferred to Citigroup the subsidiaries that constituted our private client brokerage and capital markets businesses, thus transferring the entities that would have primary liability for most of the customer complaint, litigation and regulatory liabilities and proceedings arising from those businesses. However, as part of that transaction, we agreed to indemnify Citigroup for most customer complaint, litigation and regulatory liabilities of our former private client brokerage and capital markets businesses that result from pre-closing events. In addition, the asset management business we acquired from Citigroup is a defendant in a number of legal actions, including class action litigation, arising from pre-closing asset management activities, some of which seek substantial damages. Under the terms of the transaction agreement with Citigroup, Citigroup has agreed to indemnify us for certain legal matters, including all currently known pre-closing legal matters, of the former CAM business. While the ultimate resolution of any pre-closing matters threatened or pending from our prior brokerage and capital markets businesses or the former CAM business cannot be determined at this time, based on current information and after consultation with legal counsel, management believes that any accrual or range of reasonably possible losses as of March 31, 2012 is not material. While the ultimate resolution of any other threatened or pending litigation and other matters cannot be currently determined, in the opinion of our management, after consultation with legal counsel, due in part to the preliminary nature of certain of these matters, we are currently unable to estimate the amount or range of potential losses from these matters, and our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be materially affected during a period in which a matter is ultimately resolved. See Note 9 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 of this Report.
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES.

Not Applicable.

ITEM 4A. EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT.

Information (not included in our definitive proxy statement for the 2012 Annual Meeting of Stockholders) regarding certain of our executive officers is as follows:
Peter H. Nachtwey, age 56, was elected Chief Financial Officer and Senior Executive Vice President of Legg Mason in January 2011 when he joined the firm. From July 2007 through December 2010, Mr. Nachtwey served as Chief Financial Officer of The Carlyle Group, an alternative investment management firm, where he had responsibility for all of the financial and a number of the operational functions at the firm. Prior to The Carlyle Group, Mr. Nachtwey spent more than 25 years at Deloitte and Touche, LLP, an accounting firm, most recently as Managing Partner of the Investment Management practice.
Ronald R. Dewhurst, age 59, was elected Senior Executive Vice President and Senior Managing Director of Legg Mason in January 2008, was the head of our International division from January 2008 until January 2011 and currently oversees our global investment managers. Mr. Dewhurst served as the Chief Executive Officer of I00F, an investment management company in Australia, from 2004 to 2007. From 1993 to 2002, he held various positions at J.P. Morgan Investment Management and J.P. Morgan Fleming Asset Management, including Head of Asian Equities, Hong Kong; Head of European Equities, London and Head of the Americas, New York. He was also a member of the J.P. Morgan Global Committee for Private Banking and Asset Management.
Thomas P. Lemke, age 57, was elected General Counsel and Senior Vice President of Legg Mason in 2005 and Executive Vice President in July 2011. Until December 2010, Mr. Lemke was responsible for overseeing our Legal, Compliance and Internal Audit functions. Since December 2010, Mr. Lemke has been responsible for overseeing our Governance Group, which consists of Legal, Compliance, Internal Audit, Risk Management, Global Fiduciary Platform and U.S. Fund Boards. Prior to joining Legg Mason, Mr. Lemke was a partner at Morgan Lewis, a law firm where he held a senior role in the firm's asset management practice.
Jeffrey A. Nattans, age 45, was elected Senior Vice President of Legg Mason in March 2009 and Executive Vice President in July 2009, previously was responsible for overseeing our Specialized Asset Managers and currently oversees our acquisition and business development activities. Mr. Nattans has been involved in corporate strategy, strategic initiatives, including acquisitions and financings, and the development of Legg Mason's international equity asset management businesses since joining us in 2006.

19



From 1996 to 2006, he served as an investment banker at Goldman, Sachs & Co., a large broker‑dealer and investment banking firm.
Joseph A. Sullivan, age 54, was elected Senior Executive Vice President of Legg Mason in September 2008 and until January 2011 was responsible for overseeing our administrative functions as Chief Administrative Officer. Mr. Sullivan currently oversees our global distribution operations. From December 2005 to September 2008 he was responsible for overseeing the fixed income capital markets operations of Stifel Nicolaus, a broker‑dealer. From 1993 to December 2005 he oversaw the fixed income capital markets operations of Legg Mason Wood Walker, Legg Mason's broker‑dealer subsidiary that was sold in December 2005.
PART II
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.
Shares of Legg Mason, Inc. common stock are listed and traded on the New York Stock Exchange (symbol LM). As of March 31, 2012, there were approximately 1,500 holders of record of Legg Mason common stock. Information with respect to our dividends and stock prices is as follows:
 
 
Quarter ended
 
 
Mar. 31
 
Dec. 31
 
Sept. 30
 
June 30
Fiscal 2012
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash dividend declared per share
 
$
0.08

 
$
0.08

 
$
0.08

 
$
0.08

Stock price range:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
High
 
29.49

 
29.56

 
34.32

 
37.82

Low
 
23.75

 
22.61

 
24.11

 
30.86

Fiscal 2011
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash dividend declared per share
 
$
0.06

 
$
0.06

 
$
0.04

 
$
0.04

Stock price range:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
High
 
37.29

 
37.72

 
31.04

 
34.83

Low
 
32.21

 
29.68

 
24.94

 
27.36

We expect to continue paying cash dividends. However, the declaration of dividends is subject to the discretion of our Board of Directors. In determining whether to declare dividends, or how much to declare in dividends, our Board will consider factors it deems relevant, which may include our results of operations and financial condition, our financial requirements, general business conditions and the availability of funds from our subsidiaries, including all restrictions on the ability of our subsidiaries to provide funds to us. On April 30, 2012, our Board of Directors declared a regular, quarterly dividend of $0.11 per share, increasing the regular, quarterly dividend rate paid on shares of our common stock during the prior fiscal quarter.

20



Purchases of our Common Stock
The following table sets out information regarding our purchases of Legg Mason common stock during the quarter ended March 31, 2012:
Period
 
(a)
Total number
of shares
purchased
 
(b)
Average price
paid per share
 
(c)
Total number of
shares purchased
as part of
publicly announced
plans or programs(1)
 
(d)
Approximate dollar value that may
yet be purchased
under the plans
or programs(1)
January 1, 2012 Through January 31, 2012
 
63,319

(2) 
$
24.19

 

 
$
154,938,375

February 1, 2012 Through February 29, 2012
 

 

 

 
154,938,375

March 1, 2012 Through March 31, 2012
 

 

 

 
154,938,375

Total
 
63,319

 
$
24.19

 

 
$
154,938,375

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

(1)
On May 10, 2010, we announced that our Board of Directors replaced a prior stock purchase authorization with a new authorization to purchase up to $1 billion worth of our common stock. There is no expiration date attached to this authorization.
(2)
Consists of shares of vesting restricted stock and restricted stock units surrendered to Legg Mason to satisfy related income tax withholding obligations of employees via net share transactions.



21



ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA.

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts or unless otherwise noted)
 
 
Years ended March 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
OPERATING RESULTS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating revenues
 
$
2,662,574

 
$
2,784,317

 
$
2,634,879

 
$
3,357,367

 
$
4,634,086

Operating expenses, excluding impairment
 
2,323,821

 
2,397,509

 
2,313,696

 
2,718,577

 
3,432,910

Impairment of goodwill and intangible assets
 

 

 

 
1,307,970

 
151,000

Operating income (loss)
 
338,753

 
386,808

 
321,183

 
(669,180
)
 
1,050,176

Other non-operating expense
 
(54,006
)
 
(23,315
)
 
(32,027
)
 
(243,577
)
 
(5,573
)
Other non-operating income of consolidated investment vehicles, net
 
18,336

 
1,704

 
17,329

 
7,796

 

Fund support
 

 

 
23,171

 
(2,283,236
)
 
(607,276
)
Income (loss) before income tax provision (benefit)
 
303,083

 
365,197

 
329,656

 
(3,188,197
)
 
437,327

Income tax provision (benefit)
 
72,052

 
119,434

 
118,676

 
(1,223,203
)
 
173,496

Net income (loss)
 
231,031

 
245,763

 
210,980

 
(1,964,994
)
 
263,831

Less: Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests
 
10,214

 
(8,160
)
 
6,623

 
2,924

 
266

Net income (loss) attributable to Legg Mason, Inc.
 
$
220,817

 
$
253,923

 
$
204,357

 
$
(1,967,918
)
 
$
263,565

PER SHARE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss) per share attributable to
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Legg Mason, Inc. common shareholders:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
$
1.54

 
$
1.63

 
$
1.33

 
$
(13.99
)
 
$
1.86

Diluted
 
$
1.54

 
$
1.63

 
$
1.32

 
$
(13.99
)
 
$
1.83

Weighted‑average shares outstanding:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
143,292

 
155,321

 
153,715

 
140,669

 
142,018

Diluted (1)
 
143,349

 
155,484

 
155,362

 
140,669

 
143,976

Dividends declared
 
$
0.32

 
$
0.20

 
$
0.12

 
$
0.96

 
$
0.96

BALANCE SHEET
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
 
$
8,555,747

 
$
8,707,756

 
$
8,622,632

 
$
9,232,299

 
$
11,830,352

Long-term debt
 
1,136,892

 
1,201,868

 
1,170,334

 
2,740,190

 
1,992,231

Total stockholders' equity
 
5,677,291

 
5,770,384

 
5,841,724

 
4,598,625

 
6,784,641

FINANCIAL RATIOS AND OTHER DATA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adjusted income (loss) (2)
 
$
397,030

 
$
439,248

 
$
381,258

 
$
(1,191,389
)
 
$
879,519

Adjusted income (loss) per diluted share (2)
 
$
2.77

 
$
2.83

 
$
2.45

 
$
(8.47
)
 
$
6.11

Operating margin
 
12.7
%
 
13.9
%
 
12.2
%
 
(19.9
)%
 
22.7
%
Operating margin, as adjusted (3)
 
21.3
%
 
23.2
%
 
20.7
%
 
23.9
 %
 
35.5
%
Total debt to total capital (4)
 
19.6
%
 
20.1
%
 
19.6
%
 
39.4
 %
 
26.9
%
Assets under management (in millions)
 
$
643,318

 
$
677,646

 
$
684,549

 
$
632,404

 
$
950,122

Full-time employees
 
2,979

 
3,395

 
3,550

 
3,890

 
4,220

(1)
Basic shares and diluted shares are the same for periods with a net loss.
(2)
Adjusted income (loss) is a non-GAAP performance measure. We define Adjusted income (loss) as Net income (loss) attributable to Legg Mason, Inc., plus amortization and deferred taxes related to intangible assets and goodwill, and imputed interest and tax benefits on contingent convertible debt less deferred income taxes on goodwill and indefinite-life intangible asset impairment, if any. We also adjust for non-core items that are not reflective of our economic performance, such as impairment charges and the impact of tax rate adjustments on certain deferred tax liabilities related to indefinite-life intangible assets and goodwill, and net money market fund support losses (gains). See Supplemental Non-GAAP Information in Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
(3)
Operating margin, as adjusted, is a non-GAAP performance measure we calculate by dividing (i) Operating income (loss), adjusted to exclude the impact on compensation expense of gains or losses on investments made to fund deferred compensation plans, the impact on compensation expense of gains or losses on seed capital investments by our affiliates under revenue sharing agreements, transition-related costs of streamlining our business model, income (loss) of consolidated investment vehicles, and impairment charges by (ii) our operating revenues, adjusted to add back net investment advisory fees eliminated upon consolidation of investment vehicles, less distribution and servicing expenses which we use as an approximate measure of revenues that are passed through to third-parties, which we refer to as “Operating revenues, as adjusted.” See Supplemental Non-GAAP Information in Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
(4)
Calculated based on total debt as a percentage of total capital (total stockholders' equity plus total debt) as of March 31.




22



ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW

Legg Mason, Inc., a holding company, with its subsidiaries (which collectively comprise "Legg Mason") is a global asset management firm. Acting through our subsidiaries, we provide investment management and related services to institutional and individual clients, company-sponsored mutual funds and other investment vehicles. We offer these products and services directly and through various financial intermediaries. We have operations principally in the United States of America ("U.S.") and the United Kingdom ("U.K.") and also have offices in Australia, Bahamas, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Dubai, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Poland, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland and Taiwan. All references to fiscal 2012, 2011 or 2010, refer to our fiscal year ended March 31 of that year. Terms such as "we," "us," "our," and "Company" refer to Legg Mason.

In connection with a realignment of our executive management team during fiscal 2011, we no longer manage our business in two divisions and, during fiscal 2012, eliminated the previous separation of the Americas and International divisions and combined them into one operating segment, Global Asset Management. We believe this structure allows us to function as a global organization with a single purpose. As a result of this change, we no longer present assets under management ("AUM") or revenues by division.

Our operating revenues primarily consist of investment advisory fees, from separate accounts and funds, and distribution and service fees. Investment advisory fees are generally calculated as a percentage of the assets of the investment portfolios that we manage. In addition, performance fees may be earned under certain investment advisory contracts for exceeding performance benchmarks. Distribution and service fees are fees received for distributing investment products and services or for providing other support services to investment portfolios, and are generally calculated as a percentage of the assets in an investment portfolio or as a percentage of new assets added to an investment portfolio. Our revenues, therefore, are dependent upon the level of our AUM and fee rates, and thus are affected by factors such as securities market conditions, our ability to attract and maintain AUM and key investment personnel, and investment performance. Our AUM primarily vary from period to period due to inflows and outflows of client assets as well as market performance. Client decisions to increase or decrease their assets under our management, and decisions by potential clients to utilize our services, may be based on one or more of a number of factors. These factors include our reputation in the marketplace, the investment performance, both absolute and relative to benchmarks or competitive products, of our products and services, the fees we charge for our investment services, the client or potential client's situation, including investment objectives, liquidity needs, investment horizon and amount of assets managed, our relationships with distributors and the external economic environment, including market conditions.

The fees that we charge for our investment services vary based upon factors such as the type of underlying investment product, the amount of assets under management, the asset management affiliate that provides the services, and the type of services (and investment objectives) that are provided. Fees charged for equity asset management services are generally higher than fees charged for fixed income and liquidity asset management services. Accordingly, our revenues will be affected by the composition of our AUM. In addition, in the ordinary course of our business, we may reduce or waive investment management fees, or limit total expenses, on certain products or services for particular time periods to manage fund expenses, or for other reasons, and to help retain or increase managed assets. Under revenue sharing agreements, certain of our asset management affiliates retain different percentages of revenues to cover their costs, including compensation. As such, our Net income attributable to Legg Mason, Inc., operating margin and compensation as a percentage of operating revenues are impacted based on which affiliates generate our revenues, and a change in AUM at one affiliate can have a dramatically different effect on our revenues and earnings than an equal change at another affiliate. In addition, from time to time we may agree to changes in revenue sharing agreements and other arrangements with our asset management personnel, which may impact our compensation expenses and profitability.

The most significant component of our cost structure is employee compensation and benefits, of which a majority is variable in nature and includes incentive compensation that is primarily based upon revenue levels, non-compensation related operating expense levels at revenue share-based affiliates, and profits. The next largest component of our cost structure is distribution and servicing expense, which are primarily fees paid to third-party distributors for selling our asset management products and services and are largely variable in nature. Certain other operating costs are fixed in nature, such as occupancy, depreciation and amortization, and fixed contract commitments for market data, communication and technology services, and usually do not decline with reduced levels of business activity or, conversely, usually do not rise proportionately with increased business activity.

Our financial position and results of operations are materially affected by the overall trends and conditions of the financial markets, particularly in the United States, but also in the other countries in which we operate. Results of any individual period should not be considered representative of future results. Our profitability is sensitive to a variety of factors, including the amount and composition of our AUM, and the volatility and general level of securities prices and interest rates, among other things. Periods of unfavorable market conditions are likely to affect our profitability adversely. In addition, the diversification of services and products offered, investment performance, access to distribution channels, reputation in the market, attracting and retaining key

23



employees and client relations are significant factors in determining whether we are successful in attracting and retaining clients. In the last few years, the industry has seen flows into products for which we do not currently garner significant market share. In addition, the economic downturn of fiscal years 2008 and 2009 contributed to a significant contraction in our business and we have not recovered to pre-downturn levels.

The financial services business in which we are engaged is extremely competitive. Our competition includes numerous global, national, regional and local asset management firms, broker-dealers and commercial banks. The industry has been impacted by continued economic uncertainty, and in prior years, by the consolidation of financial services firms through mergers and acquisitions.

The industry in which we operate is also subject to extensive regulation under federal, state, and foreign laws. Like most firms, we have been impacted by regulatory and legislative changes. Responding to these changes has required, and will continue to require, us to incur costs that continue to impact our profitability.

Our strategy is focused on three primary areas listed below.  Management keeps these strategic priorities in mind when it evaluates our operating performance and financial condition.  Consistent with this approach, we have also listed below the most important matters on which management currently focuses in evaluating our performance and financial condition.
Outstanding independent investment managers:
The investment performance of our asset management products and services compared to their benchmarks and to the performance of competitive products for the trailing 1-year, 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year periods.
Our AUM, the components of the changes in our AUM amid continued market uncertainty, the long-term trend of outflows in AUM, and the resulting impact of changes in AUM on our revenues.
A corporate center that delivers strategic value:
Promote revenue growth through strategic marketing of products to institutional clients, supported by retail and instividual (e.g., 401(k) plans) distribution globally.
Management of expenses.
Allocating capital for diversified growth and returning capital to shareholders as appropriate:
The amount of excess capital we generate, and deployment of that capital through share repurchases, investments in proprietary fund products, dividends and targeted acquisitions.

The following discussion and analysis provides additional information regarding our financial condition and results of operations.

BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Although the financial environment, both globally and in the U.S., continued to rebound during fiscal 2012, challenging and volatile conditions persisted throughout a portion of our fiscal year. Economic uncertainties related to the European debt crisis slowed the global economy, and the unprecedented downgrade to the U.S. credit rating in August 2011 contributed to a sharp decline in the equity markets during the first half of fiscal 2012.

In spite of the challenging conditions during the first half of our fiscal year, economic interventions which eased the European debt crisis, and continuing improvement in U.S. employment rates and consumer confidence, resulted in equity market increases during the second half of the fiscal year which more than offset earlier market declines. During fiscal 2012, the Federal Reserve Board held the federal funds rate at 0.25%, the lowest in history. While the economic outlook has been more positive than in recent years, the financial environment in which we operate continues to be challenging, as we move into fiscal 2013.

All three major U.S. equity market indices, as well as the Barclays Capital U.S. Aggregate Bond Index and Barclays Capital Global Aggregate Bond Index, increased significantly during the past two fiscal years as illustrated in the table below:
 
 
% Change as of and for the year ended March 31:
Indices(1)
 
2012
 
2011
Dow Jones Industrial Average
 
7.24
%
 
13.48
%
S&P 500
 
6.23
%
 
13.37
%
NASDAQ Composite Index
 
11.16
%
 
15.98
%
Barclays Capital U.S. Aggregate Bond Index
 
7.71
%
 
5.12
%
Barclays Capital Global Aggregate Bond Index
 
5.26
%
 
7.15
%
(1)
Indices are trademarks of Dow Jones & Company, McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., NASDAQ Stock Market, Inc., and Barclays Capital, respectively, which are not affiliated with Legg Mason.

24



The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, amounts in the Consolidated Statements of Income as a percentage of operating revenues and the increase (decrease) by item as a percentage of the amount for the previous period:
 
 
Percentage of Operating Revenues
 
Period to Period Change(1)
 
 
Years Ended
March 31,
 
2012
Compared
 
2011
Compared
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
to 2011
 
to 2010
Operating Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Investment advisory fees
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Separate accounts
 
29.1
%
 
29.3
%
 
30.9
%
 
(4.9
)%
 
0.1
%
Funds
 
56.0

 
53.4

 
51.9

 
0.3

 
8.7

Performance fees
 
1.9

 
3.5

 
2.7

 
(48.8
)
 
35.3

Distribution and service fees
 
12.8

 
13.6

 
14.3

 
(10.1
)
 
1.0

Other
 
0.2

 
0.2

 
0.2

 
(16.0
)
 
4.6

Total operating revenues
 
100.0

 
100.0

 
100.0

 
(4.4
)
 
5.7

Operating Expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Compensation and benefits
 
41.7

 
41.0

 
42.2

 
(2.7
)
 
2.6

Transition-related compensation
 
1.3

 
1.6

 

 
(23.1
)
 
            n/m
   Total compensation and benefits
 
43.0

 
42.6

 
42.2

 
(3.5
)
 
6.7

Distribution and servicing
 
24.4

 
25.6

 
26.3

 
(8.9
)
 
3.0

Communications and technology
 
6.2

 
5.8

 
6.2

 
1.7

 
(0.7
)
Occupancy
 
5.8

 
5.0

 
6.0

 
12.3

 
(12.2
)
Amortization of intangible assets
 
0.7

 
0.8

 
0.8

 
(14.6
)
 
0.6

Other
 
7.2

 
6.3

 
6.3

 
8.0

 
5.3

Total operating expenses
 
87.3

 
86.1

 
87.8

 
(3.1
)
 
3.6

Operating Income
 
12.7

 
13.9

 
12.2

 
(12.4
)
 
20.4

Other Income (Expense)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
Interest income
 
0.4

 
0.3

 
0.3

 
24.2

 
25.7

Interest expense
 
(3.3
)
 
(3.3
)
 
(4.8
)
 
(5.0
)
 
(27.0
)
Fund support
 

 

 
0.9

 
   n/m
 
            n/m
Other
 
0.8

 
2.1

 
3.2

 
(62.9
)
 
(31.4
)
Other non-operating income of consolidated investment vehicles
 
0.8

 
0.1

 
0.7

 
(65.1
)
 
(90.2
)
Total other income (expense)
 
(1.3
)
 
(0.8
)
 
0.3

 
          n/m
 
            n/m
Income before Income Tax Provision
 
11.4

 
13.1

 
12.5

 
(17.0
)
 
10.8

Income tax provision
 
2.7

 
4.3

 
4.5

 
(39.7
)
 
0.6

Net Income
 
8.7

 
8.8

 
8.0

 
(6.0
)
 
16.5

Less: Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests
 
0.4

 
(0.3
)
 
0.2

 
          n/m
 
            n/m
Net Income Attributable to Legg Mason, Inc.
 
8.3
%
 
9.1
%
 
7.8
%
 
(13.0
)%
 
24.3
%
n/m-not meaningful
(1)    Calculated based on the change in actual amounts between fiscal years as a percentage of the prior year amount.


25



FISCAL 2012 COMPARED WITH FISCAL 2011

Financial Overview
Net Income Attributable to Legg Mason, Inc. for the year ended March 31, 2012, totaled $220.8 million, or $1.54 per diluted share, compared to $253.9 million, or $1.63 per diluted share, in the prior year.  The decrease in Net Income was primarily due to an increase in incentive compensation from changes in an expense reimbursement arrangement with Western Asset Management Company ("Western Asset"), the impact of net market losses on proprietary fund products and assets invested for deferred compensation plans which are not offset in compensation and benefits, and the net impact of decreased operating revenues. These decreases were offset in part by the impact of cost savings due to our business streamlining initiative, and the impact of tax benefits associated with the restructuring of a foreign subsidiary and U.K. tax rate changes. These items are further discussed in "Results of Operations" below. Adjusted Income (see Supplemental Non-GAAP Financial Information) decreased to $397.0 million, or $2.77 per diluted share, for the year ended March 31, 2012, from $439.2 million, or $2.83 per diluted share, in the prior year primarily due to the decrease in Net Income, previously discussed, excluding the impact of U.K. tax rate adjustments. Operating margin decreased to 12.7% from 13.9% in the prior year. Operating Margin, as Adjusted (see Supplemental Non-GAAP Financial Information), for the years ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, was 21.3% and 23.2%, respectively.

Assets Under Management
The components of the changes in our AUM (in billions) for the years ended March 31, were as follows:
 
 
2012
 
2011
Beginning of period
 
$
677.6

 
$
684.5

Investment funds, excluding liquidity funds(1)
 
 

 
 

Subscriptions
 
46.9

 
49.5

Redemptions
 
(51.1
)
 
(44.3
)
Separate account flows, net
 
(35.9
)
 
(52.1
)
Liquidity fund flows, net
 
12.6

 
(14.2
)
Net client cash flows
 
(27.5
)
 
(61.1
)
Market performance and other (2)
 
17.1

 
56.3

Dispositions
 
(23.9
)
 
(2.1
)
End of period
 
$
643.3

 
$
677.6

(1)    Subscriptions and redemptions reflect the gross activity in the funds and include assets transferred between funds and between share classes.
(2)    Includes impact of foreign exchange, reinvestment of dividends, and other.

AUM at March 31, 2012, was $643.3 billion, a decrease of $34.3 billion, or 5%, from March 31, 2011. The decrease in AUM was attributable to net client outflows of $27.5 billion and dispositions of $23.9 billion, which were partially offset by market performance and other of $17.1 billion, including the negative impact of foreign currency exchange fluctuations. The majority of dispositions were in liquidity assets, $19.9 billion, which resulted from the amendment of historical Smith Barney brokerage programs discussed below. There were also $4.0 billion in dispositions from the divestiture of two small affiliates. Long-term asset classes accounted for the net client outflows, with $21.3 billion and $18.6 billion in equity and fixed income outflows, respectively, partially offset by liquidity inflows of $12.4 billion.  Equity outflows were primarily experienced by products managed at Legg Mason Capital Management, Inc. ("LMCM"), ClearBridge Advisors LLC ("ClearBridge"), Batterymarch Financial Management, Inc. (“Batterymarch”) and Royce & Associates (“Royce”). Due in part to investment performance issues, we have experienced net annual outflows in our equity asset class since fiscal 2007. The majority of fixed income outflows were in products managed by Western Asset, including $12.7 billion in outflows from a single, low fee global sovereign mandate. We expect to continue to experience outflows from this mandate of approximately $1 billion per month during fiscal 2013. With the exception of the June 2011 quarter, we have experienced outflows in our fixed income asset class since fiscal 2008. We generally earn higher fees and profits on equity AUM, and outflows in this asset class will more negatively impact our revenues and Net Income than would outflows in other asset classes.

During the first quarter of fiscal 2012, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney ("MSSB") amended certain historical Smith Barney brokerage programs providing for investment in liquidity funds that our asset managers manage that resulted in a reduction of $19.9 billion in liquidity AUM during the year ended March 31, 2012. As a significant portion of the management fees generated by these assets were being waived prior to the disposition, the disposition of this liquidity AUM resulted in a reduction in operating revenue of $52.3 million, net of related fee waivers, in the year ended March 31, 2012, as compared to the year ended March 31, 2011. The disposition of this AUM also resulted in reductions in distribution and servicing expenses of $41.4 million in the year ended March 31, 2012, as compared to the year ended March 31, 2011. We expect the amendments to result in an additional $6 billion in liquidity assets being transferred over the next four months.

26



Our investment advisory and administrative contracts are generally terminable at will or upon relatively short notice, and investors in the mutual funds that we manage may redeem their investments in the funds at any time without prior notice. Institutional and individual clients can terminate their relationships with us, reduce the aggregate amount of assets under management, or shift their funds to other types of accounts with different rate structures for any number of reasons, including investment performance, changes in prevailing interest rates, changes in our reputation in the marketplace, changes in management or control of clients or third-party distributors with whom we have relationships, loss of key investment management personnel or financial market performance.

AUM by Asset Class
AUM by asset class (in billions) as of March 31 was as follows:
 
 
2012
 
% of
Total
 
2011
 
% of
Total
 
%
Change
 Equity
 
$
163.4

 
26
%
 
$
189.6

 
28
%
 
(14
)%
Fixed Income
 
356.1

 
55

 
356.6

 
53

 

Liquidity
 
123.8

 
19

 
131.4

 
19

 
(6
)
Total
 
$
643.3

 
100
%
 
$
677.6

 
100
%
 
(5
)%

The component changes in our AUM by asset class (in billions) for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2012, were as follows:
 
 
Equity
 
Fixed
Income
 
Liquidity
 
Total
March 31, 2011
 
$
189.6

 
$
356.6

 
$
131.4

 
$
677.6

Investment funds, excluding liquidity funds
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Subscriptions
 
21.7

 
25.2

 

 
46.9

Redemptions
 
(30.4
)
 
(20.7
)
 

 
(51.1
)
Separate account flows, net
 
(12.6
)
 
(23.1
)
 
(0.2
)
 
(35.9
)
Liquidity fund flows, net
 

 

 
12.6

 
12.6

Net client cash flows
 
(21.3
)
 
(18.6
)
 
12.4

 
(27.5
)
Market performance and other
 
(2.1
)
 
19.3

 
(0.1
)
 
17.1

Dispositions
 
(2.8
)
 
(1.2
)
 
(19.9
)
 
(23.9
)
March 31, 2012
 
$
163.4

 
$
356.1

 
$
123.8

 
$
643.3


Average AUM by asset class (in billions) for the year ended March 31 were as follows:
 
 
2012
 
% of
Total
 
2011
 
% of
Total
 
%
Change
Equity
 
$
168.4

 
26
%
 
$
173.8

 
26
%
 
(3
)%
Fixed Income
 
359.8

 
56

 
361.6

 
54

 

Liquidity
 
116.6

 
18

 
133.8

 
20

 
(13
)
Total
 
$
644.8

 
100
%
 
$
669.2

 
100
%
 
(4
)%

Investment Performance(1) 
Overall investment performance of our assets under management in the year ended March 31, 2012, was generally positive compared to relevant benchmarks.

The equity markets ended a difficult year on a positive note, responding favorably to improving unemployment figures, the conclusion of bank stress tests resulting in certain banks increasing dividends, and reduced fears of a European debt fallout. As a result, most U.S. indices produced positive returns for our full fiscal year. The most notable was the NASDAQ Composite returning 11.2% for the year ended March 31, 2012.

In the fixed income markets, improved economic data suggested that the recovery was strengthening. Flights-to-safety ebbed as the European debt crisis eased allowing U.S. Treasury rates to climb from historically low levels. The yield curve steepened over the year as economic releases from the Federal Reserve Board painted an increasingly optimistic picture and talk of a third round of quantitative easing diminished.


27



The worst performing fixed income sector for the year was high yield bonds, as measured by the Barclays High Yield Index returning 6.5%. The best performing fixed income sector for the year was Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS), as measured by the Barclays U.S. TIPS Index returning 12.2% as of March 31, 2012.

The following table presents a summary of the percentage of our marketed composite assets(2) that outpaced their benchmarks as of March 31, 2012 and 2011, for the trailing 1-year, 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year periods:
 
 
As of March 31, 2012
 
As of March 31, 2011
 
 
1-year

 
3-year

 
5-year

 
10-year

 
1-year

 
3-year

 
5-year

 
10-year

Total (includes liquidity)
 
60
%
 
80
%
 
69
%
 
86
%
 
75
%
 
78
%
 
74
%
 
84
%
Equity
 
48
%
 
47
%
 
66
%
 
80
%
 
42
%
 
57
%
 
61
%
 
77
%
Fixed income
 
49
%
 
87
%
 
58
%
 
83
%
 
82
%
 
80
%
 
70
%
 
81
%

The following table presents a summary of the percentage of our U.S. mutual fund assets(3) that outpaced their Lipper category averages as of March 31, 2012 and 2011, for the trailing 1-year, 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year periods:
 
 
As of March 31, 2012
 
As of March 31, 2011
 
 
1-year

 
3-year

 
5-year

 
10-year

 
1-year

 
3-year

 
5-year

 
10-year

Total long-term (excludes liquidity)
 
67
%
 
66
%
 
78
%
 
74
%
 
56
%
 
74
%
 
70
%
 
67
%
Equity
 
57
%
 
56
%
 
73
%
 
71
%
 
58
%
 
70
%
 
68
%
 
60
%
Fixed income
 
84
%
 
81
%
 
87
%
 
83
%
 
52
%
 
83
%
 
78
%
 
85
%
(1)
Index performance in this section includes reinvestment of dividends and capital gains.
(2)
A composite is an aggregation of discretionary portfolios (separate accounts and investment funds) into a single group that represents a particular investment objective or strategy. Each of our asset managers has its own specific guidelines for including portfolios in their marketed composites. Assets under management that are not managed in accordance with the guidelines are not included in a composite. As of March 31, 2012 and 2011, 91% and 89% of our equity assets under management and 88% and 89% of our fixed income assets under management, respectively, were in marketed composites.
(3)
Source: Lipper Inc. includes open-end, closed-end, and variable annuity funds. As of March 31, 2012 and 2011, the U.S. long-term mutual fund assets represented in the data accounted for 18% and 17%, respectively, of our total assets under management. The performance of our U.S. long-term mutual fund assets is included in the marketed composites.

Business Model Streamlining Initiative
In May 2010, we announced an initiative to streamline our business model to drive increased profitability and growth that primarily
involved transitioning certain shared services to our investment affiliates which are closer to the actual client relationships. The initiative resulted in over $140 million in cost savings, which will be fully realized on an annual basis, beginning in fiscal 2013. These cost savings consist of (i) over $80 million in compensation and benefits cost reductions from eliminating positions in certain corporate shared services functions as a result of transitioning such functions to the affiliates, and charging affiliates for other centralized services that will continue to be provided to them without any corresponding adjustment in revenue sharing or other compensation arrangements; (ii) approximately $50 million in non-compensation costs from eliminating and streamlining activities in our corporate and distribution business units, including savings associated with consolidating office space; and (iii) approximately $10 million from our global distribution group sharing in affiliate revenues from retail assets under management without any corresponding adjustment in revenue sharing or other compensation arrangements.

The initiative involved $127.5 million in transition-related costs that primarily included charges for employee termination benefits and incentives to retain employees during the transition period.  The transition-related costs also included charges for consolidating leased office space, early contract terminations, accelerated depreciation of fixed assets, asset disposals and professional fees. During the years ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, transition-related costs totaled $73.1 million and $54.4 million, respectively. All transition-related costs have been accrued as of March 31, 2012. Significant events of fiscal 2012 related to the initiative included the transition of shared services to our affiliates, as well as reductions-in-force made over three phases. For the year ended March 31, 2012, we have achieved total estimated transition-related savings of approximately $97 million, and we expect total annual savings of approximately $140 million beginning in fiscal 2013, when compared to similar expenses prior to the commencement of the streamlining initiative. A majority of the estimated transition-related savings were first achieved in fiscal 2012, and are noted, where applicable, in the results of operations discussion to follow. See Note 16 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on our business streamlining initiative.



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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

In accordance with financial accounting standards on consolidation, we consolidate and separately identify certain sponsored investment vehicles, the most significant of which is a collateralized loan obligation entity ("CLO"). The consolidation of these investment vehicles has no impact on Net Income Attributable to Legg Mason, Inc. and does not have a material impact on our consolidated operating results. We also hold investments in certain consolidated sponsored investment funds and the change in the value of these investments, which is recorded in Other non-operating income (expense), is reflected in our Net Income, net of amounts allocated to noncontrolling interests. The impact of the consolidation of investment vehicles is presented below in our "Consolidated Statements of Income, Excluding Consolidated Investment Vehicles" (See Supplemental Non-GAAP Financial Information). Also, see Notes 1 and 18 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information regarding the consolidation of investment vehicles.

Operating Revenues
Total operating revenues for the year ended March 31, 2012, were $2.7 billion, a decrease of 4.4% from $2.8 billion in the prior year, primarily due to a 4% decrease in average AUM and a $47.2 million decrease in performance fees. This decrease was offset in part by an increase in average AUM revenue yields, from 34.4 basis points in the year ended March 31, 2011, to 35.2 basis points in the year ended March 31, 2012, resulting from a more favorable average asset mix. The previously discussed disposition of liquidity AUM related to the MSSB relationship resulted in a reduction in operating revenues of $52.3 million, net of related fee waivers, in fiscal 2012, as compared to fiscal 2011, as a significant portion of the management fees generated by these assets were being waived prior to the disposition.

Investment advisory fees from separate accounts decreased $40.1 million, or 4.9%, to $775.5 million. Of this decrease, $25.9 million was primarily the result of lower average equity assets managed by LMCM, Batterymarch, ClearBridge and Legg Mason Investment Counsel & Trust Company ("LMIC"), and $8.0 million was primarily due to the divestiture of a Singapore-based asset manager in fiscal 2011.  These decreases were offset in part by an increase of $6.7 million due to higher average fixed income assets managed by Brandywine Global Management, LLC ("Brandywine").

Investment advisory fees from funds remained essentially flat at $1.5 billion for both periods. Higher average equity assets managed by Royce and ClearBridge, and higher average fixed income assets, primarily managed at Western Asset, resulted in an increase of $41.3 million and $41.1 million, respectively. These increases were offset by a decrease of $51.3 million, net of related fee waivers, due to lower average liquidity assets managed at Western Asset, primarily as a result of the previously discussed disposition of liquidity AUM related to our MSSB relationship, as well as a $31.5 million decrease as a result of lower average equity assets managed by LMCM and Permal Group, Ltd. ("Permal").

Performance fees decreased 48.8%, or $47.2 million, to $49.5 million during the year ended March 31, 2012, primarily as a result of lower fees earned on assets managed at Permal and Western Asset, offset slightly by an increase in performance fees earned on assets managed at Brandywine.

Distribution and service fees decreased $38.2 million, or 10.1%, to $341.0 million, primarily due to the disposition of the liquidity AUM related to the MSSB relationship, as well as a decline in average mutual fund AUM subject to distribution and service fees.

Operating Expenses
Total compensation and benefits decreased $41.0 million to $1.1 billion. Transition-related compensation decreased $10.4 million to $34.6 million, and represents accruals for severance and retention costs related to our business streamlining initiative. Compensation and benefits, excluding transition-related compensation, decreased $30.6 million, or 2.7%, to $1.1 billion, primarily driven by a $49.8 million decrease in corporate compensation, primarily due to headcount reductions resulting from our business streamlining initiative, as well as a $43.2 million net decrease in compensation at revenue share-based affiliates. Additionally, there was a decrease in deferred compensation and revenue share-based incentive obligations of $22.5 million, primarily resulting from reduced gains on assets invested for deferred compensation plans and seed capital investments, which are offset by corresponding decreases in Other non-operating income (expense). These decreases were offset in part by an increase in incentives from changes in an expense reimbursement arrangement with Western Asset, including an increase in non-cash amortization expense associated with certain related deferred compensation awards, totaling $71.8 million, as well as additional costs of approximately $20.5 million associated with market-based compensation increases among retained staff and new employees, primarily in our global distribution group, to support on-going growth initiatives.

Compensation as a percentage of operating revenues increased to 43.0% from 42.6% in the prior fiscal year, primarily due to the impact of the change in the expense reimbursement arrangement with Western Asset and market-based compensation increases among retained staff and new employees, discussed above. These increases were offset in part by the impact of lower corporate compensation costs, primarily attributable to our business streamlining initiative, the impact of compensation decreases related

29



to reduced market gains on assets invested for deferred compensation plans and seed capital investments, and the decrease in transition-related compensation.

Distribution and servicing expenses decreased 8.9% to $649.7 million, principally driven by a $41.4 million decrease due to the previously discussed disposition of liquidity AUM related to the MSSB relationship, as well as a $6.9 million decrease in servicing expenses as a result of our business streamlining initiative. A $5.8 million decline in structuring fees related to closed-end fund launches also contributed to the decrease.

Communications and technology expense increased 1.7% to $164.7 million, driven by increases, principally in data processing costs, market data costs, and consulting fees, totaling $12.2 million, primarily due to transition-related costs incurred as a result of our business streamlining initiative. These increases were offset in part by $9.3 million in cost savings as a result of our streamlining changes, including reduced depreciation of technology hardware and software and consulting fees.

Occupancy expense increased 12.3% to $154.8 million, primarily due to a $14.7 million net increase in lease reserves recorded in fiscal 2012, primarily related to permanently abandoning certain office space as part of our business streamlining initiative. In addition, there was a $10.3 million increase as a result of the acceleration of depreciation related to space permanently abandoned in fiscal 2012, also related to our business streamlining initiative. These increases were offset in part by the impact of the write-off of a $4.1 million real estate escrow deposit in the prior year and a $3.3 million reduction in depreciation on furniture and leasehold improvements, both resulting from our business streamlining initiative.

Amortization of intangibles decreased 14.6% to $19.6 million, primarily due to the full amortization of certain management contracts during fiscal 2012.

Other expenses increased $14.1 million, or 8.0%, to $190.7 million, primarily as a result of an increase in expense reimbursements paid to certain mutual funds during the current year under expense cap arrangements.

Non-Operating Income (Expense)
Interest income increased 24.2% to $11.5 million, driven by higher yields earned on investment balances.

Interest expense decreased 5.0% to $87.6 million, primarily as a result of the retirement of our Equity Units during fiscal 2012, which reduced interest expense by $4.1 million.

Other non-operating income decreased $37.5 million to $22.1 million, primarily as a result of $56.0 million in net market losses on investments in proprietary fund products, which were partially offset by corresponding compensation decreases discussed above, and $11.8 million due to reduced gains on assets invested for deferred compensation plans, which were substantially offset by corresponding compensation decreases described above. These decreases were offset in part by an $11.3 million increase in dividend income, which was partially offset by a corresponding compensation increase under revenue-sharing agreements, a gain of $8.6 million related to an assigned bankruptcy claim, and a gain of $7.5 million on the sale of a small affiliate.

Other non-operating income of consolidated investment vehicles ("CIVs") increased $16.6 million to $18.3 million, due to net market gains on investments of certain CIVs.

Income Tax Provision
The provision for income taxes was $72.1 million compared to $119.4 million in the prior year. During fiscal 2012, The U.K. Finance Act 2011 (the "Act") was enacted. The Act reduced the main U.K. corporate income tax rate from 27% to 26% effective April 1, 2011, and to 25% effective April 1, 2012. The impact of the tax rate changes on the revaluation of certain existing deferred tax liabilities resulted in a tax benefit of $18.3 million in the current year. The prior year also included a similar tax benefit of $8.9 million on the revaluation of deferred tax liabilities. In addition, the restructuring of our Australian business, partially offset by adjustments to the net value of certain deferred tax assets, resulted in a net tax benefit of $10.1 million in the current year. The effective tax rate was 23.8% compared to 32.7% in the prior year. Changes in the U.K. tax rate impacted the effective tax rate by 6.0 and 2.5 percentage points in the years ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively. In addition, the restructuring of our Australian business, partially offset by adjustments to the net value of certain deferred tax assets, impacted the effective tax rate by 3.3 percentage points in the current year.

Supplemental Non-GAAP Financial Information
As supplemental information, we are providing performance measures that are based on methodologies other than generally accepted accounting principles (“non-GAAP”) for “Consolidated Statements of Income, Excluding Consolidated Investment Vehicles”, "Adjusted Income", and "Operating Margin, As Adjusted" that management uses as benchmarks in evaluating and comparing our period-to-period operating performance.

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Consolidated Statements of Income, Excluding Consolidated Investment Vehicles
In accordance with financial accounting standards on consolidation, we consolidate and separately identify certain sponsored investment vehicles, the most significant of which is a CLO. In presenting our "Consolidated Statements of Income, Excluding Consolidated Investment Vehicles," we add back the investment advisory and distribution and servicing fees that are eliminated upon the consolidation of investment vehicles and exclude the operating expenses and the impact on non-operating income (expense) and noncontrolling interests of CIVs.

We believe it is important to provide the Consolidated Statements of Income, Excluding Consolidated Investment Vehicles to present the underlying economic performance of our core asset management operations, which does not include the results of the investment funds that we manage but may not own all of the equity invested. By deconsolidating the CIVs from the Consolidated Statements of Income, the investment advisory and distribution fees we earn from CIVs are added back to reflect our actual revenues. Similarly, the operating expenses and the impact on non-operating income (expense) and noncontrolling interests of CIVs are removed from the GAAP basis Consolidated Statements of Income since this activity does not actually belong to us. The deconsolidation of the investment vehicles does not have any impact on Net Income Attributable to Legg Mason, Inc. in any period presented. The Consolidated Statements of Income, Excluding Consolidated Investment Vehicles are presented in addition to our GAAP basis Consolidated Statements of Income, but are not substitutes for the GAAP basis Consolidated Statements of Income and may not be comparable to Consolidated Statements of Income presented on a non-GAAP basis of other companies.

The following table presents a reconciliation of our Consolidated Statements of Income presented on a GAAP basis to our Consolidated Statements of Income, Excluding Consolidated Investment Vehicles for the years ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 (in thousands):
 
 
For the Years Ended March 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
 
GAAP Basis
 
CIVs
 
Non-GAAP Basis - Excluding CIVs
 
GAAP Basis
 
CIVs
 
Non-GAAP Basis - Excluding CIVs
Total operating revenues
 
$
2,662,574

 
$
3,094

 
$
2,665,668

 
$
2,784,317


$
4,133


$
2,788,450

Total operating expenses
 
2,323,821

 
(608
)
 
2,323,213

 
2,397,509


(571
)

2,396,938

Operating Income
 
338,753

 
3,702

 
342,455

 
386,808


4,704


391,512

Other non-operating income (expense)
 
(35,670
)
 
(13,566
)
 
(49,236
)
 
(21,611
)

3,680


(17,931
)
Income (Loss) before Income Tax Provision
 
303,083

 
(9,864
)
 
293,219

 
365,197


8,384


373,581

Income tax provision
 
72,052

 

 
72,052

 
119,434




119,434

Net Income (Loss)
 
231,031

 
(9,864
)
 
221,167

 
245,763


8,384


254,147

Less:  Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests
 
10,214

 
(9,864
)
 
350

 
(8,160
)

8,384


224

Net Income Attributable to Legg Mason, Inc.
 
$
220,817

 
$

 
$
220,817

 
$
253,923


$


$
253,923


Adjusted Income
We define "Adjusted Income" as Net Income Attributable to Legg Mason, Inc., plus amortization and deferred taxes related to intangible assets and goodwill, and imputed interest and tax benefits on contingent convertible debt less deferred income taxes on goodwill and indefinite-life intangible asset impairment, if any. We also adjust for non-core items that are not reflective of our economic performance, such as the impact of tax rate adjustments on certain deferred tax liabilities related to indefinite-life intangible assets, and net money market fund support losses (gains).

We believe that Adjusted Income provides a useful representation of our operating performance adjusted for non-cash acquisition related items and other items that facilitate comparison of our results to the results of other asset management firms that have not issued contingent convertible debt, made significant acquisitions, or engaged in money market fund support transactions. We also believe that Adjusted Income is an important metric in estimating the value of an asset management business.

Adjusted Income only considers adjustments for certain items that relate to operating performance and comparability, and therefore,

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is most readily reconcilable to Net Income Attributable to Legg Mason, Inc. determined under GAAP. This measure is provided in addition to Net Income Attributable to Legg Mason, Inc., but is not a substitute for Net Income Attributable to Legg Mason, Inc. and may not be comparable to non-GAAP performance measures, including measures of adjusted earnings or adjusted income, of other companies. Further, Adjusted Income is not a liquidity measure and should not be used in place of cash flow measures determined under GAAP. We consider Adjusted Income to be useful to investors because it is an important metric in measuring the economic performance of asset management companies, as an indicator of value, and because it facilitates comparison of our operating results with the results of other asset management firms that have not issued contingent convertible debt, engaged in significant acquisitions, or engaged in money market fund support transactions.

In calculating Adjusted Income, we add the impact of the amortization of intangible assets from acquisitions, such as management contracts, to Net Income Attributable to Legg Mason, Inc. to reflect the fact that these non-cash expenses distort comparisons of our operating results with the results of other asset management firms that have not engaged in significant acquisitions. Deferred taxes on indefinite-life intangible assets and goodwill include actual tax benefits from amortization deductions that are not realized under GAAP absent an impairment charge or the disposition of the related business. Because we fully expect to realize the economic benefit of the current period tax amortization, we add this benefit to Net Income Attributable to Legg Mason, Inc. in the calculation of Adjusted Income. However, because of our net operating loss carryforward, we will receive the benefit of the current tax amortization over time. Conversely, we subtract the non-cash income tax benefits on goodwill and indefinite-life intangible asset impairment charges and United Kingdom tax rate adjustments on excess book basis on certain acquired indefinite-life intangible assets, if applicable, that have been recognized under GAAP. We also add back imputed interest on contingent convertible debt, which is a non-cash expense, as well as the actual tax benefits on the related contingent convertible debt that are not realized under GAAP. We also add (subtract) other non-core items, such as net money market fund support losses (gains) (net of losses on the sale of the underlying structured investment vehicle ("SIV") securities, if applicable). These adjustments reflect that these items distort comparisons of our operating results to prior periods and the results of other asset management firms that have not engaged in money market fund support transactions or significant acquisitions, including any related impairments.

Should a disposition, impairment charge or other non-core item occur, its impact on Adjusted Income may distort actual changes in the operating performance or value of our firm. Also, realized losses on money market fund support transactions are reflective of changes in the operating performance and value of our firm. Accordingly, we monitor these items and their related impact, including taxes, on Adjusted Income to ensure that appropriate adjustments and explanations accompany such disclosures.

Although depreciation and amortization of fixed assets are non-cash expenses, we do not add these charges in calculating Adjusted Income because these charges are related to assets that will ultimately require replacement.

A reconciliation of Net Income Attributable to Legg Mason, Inc. to Adjusted Income (in thousands except per share amounts) is as follows:
 
 
For the Years Ended March 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
Net Income Attributable to Legg Mason, Inc.
 
$
220,817

 
$
253,923

Plus (less):
 
 
 
 
Amortization of intangible assets
 
19,574

 
22,913

Deferred income taxes on intangible assets:
 
 
 
 
Tax amortization benefit
 
135,830

 
134,602

U.K. tax rate adjustment
 
(18,268
)
 
(8,878
)
Imputed interest on convertible debt
 
39,077

 
36,688

Adjusted Income
 
$
397,030

 
$
439,248

Net Income per diluted share attributable to Legg Mason, Inc. common shareholders
 
$
1.54

 
$
1.63

Plus (less):
 
 
 


Amortization of intangible assets
 
0.14

 
0.15

Deferred income taxes on intangible assets:
 
 
 
 
Tax amortization benefit
 
0.95

 
0.87