XNAS:PSUN Pacific Sunwear Annual Report 10-K/A Filing - 1/28/2012

Effective Date 1/28/2012

XNAS:PSUN (Pacific Sunwear): Fair Value Estimate
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XNAS:PSUN (Pacific Sunwear): Consider Buying
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XNAS:PSUN (Pacific Sunwear): Consider Selling
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XNAS:PSUN (Pacific Sunwear): Fair Value Uncertainty
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XNAS:PSUN (Pacific Sunwear): Economic Moat
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United States

Securities and Exchange Commission

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K/A

(Amendment No. 1)

(Mark One)

[ x ] Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the fiscal year ended: January 28, 2012

or

[    ] Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the transition period from              to             

Commission file number 001-21296

 

LOGO

PACIFIC SUNWEAR OF CALIFORNIA, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

California   95-3759463
(State of incorporation)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
3450 E. Miraloma Ave., Anaheim, CA   92806
(Principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:

(714) 414-4000

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class

  

Name of Exchange on Which Registered

Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share

   The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (Nasdaq Global Select Market)
Convertible Series B Preferred Stock, par value $0.01 per share    The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (Nasdaq Global Select Market)

Share Purchase Rights

   The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC (Nasdaq Global Select Market)

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None.

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [ ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. Yes [ ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No [ ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [X ] No [ ]

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer [ ]

  Accelerated filer [X]   Non-accelerated filer [ ]   Smaller reporting company [ ]
  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes [ ] No [X]

The aggregate market value of Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of July 30, 2011, the last business day of the most recently completed second quarter, was approximately $191 million. All outstanding shares of voting stock, except for shares held by executive officers and members of the Board of Directors and their affiliates, are deemed to be held by non-affiliates.

On April 2, 2012, the registrant had 67,553,504 shares of Common Stock outstanding.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

None


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Explanatory Note

This Amendment No. 1 to the Annual Report on Form 10-K (this “Amendment”) for the fiscal year ended January 28, 2012, originally filed on April 4, 2012 (the “Original Form 10-K”), of Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. (the “Company”) is being filed solely to correct merchandise calculations included in the “Merchandising” section included in Item 1 and in the Risk Factor captioned “Our customers may not prefer our proprietary brand merchandise, which may negatively impact our profitability” in Item 1A.

No other changes have been made to the Original Form 10-K other than those described above. This Amendment does not reflect subsequent events that may have occurred after the filing date of the Original Form 10-K or modify or update the disclosures made in the Original Form 10-K, except as set forth in this Form 10-K/A, and should be read in conjunction with the Original Form 10-K.

PACIFIC SUNWEAR OF CALIFORNIA, INC.

FORM 10-K/A

For the Fiscal Year Ended January 28, 2012

Index

 

         Page #  

PART I

  

Item 1.

  Business      2   

Item 1A.

  Risk Factors      7   

PART IV

  

Signatures

     14   


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PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

General

Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. (together with its wholly-owned subsidiaries, the “Company,” “Registrant,” “PacSun,” “we,” “us,” or “our”) is a leading specialty retailer rooted in the action sports, fashion and music influences of the California lifestyle. We sell a combination of branded and proprietary casual apparel, accessories and footwear designed to appeal to teens and young adults. We operate a nationwide, primarily mall-based chain of retail stores under the names “Pacific Sunwear” and “PacSun.” The Company, a California corporation, was incorporated in August 1982. As of January 28, 2012, we leased and operated 733 stores in each of the 50 states and Puerto Rico, comprised of 2.9 million total square feet.

Our executive offices are located at 3450 East Miraloma Avenue, Anaheim, California, 92806; our telephone number is (714) 414-4000; and our Internet address is www.pacsun.com. Through our website, we make available free of charge, as soon as reasonably practicable after such information has been filed or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission”), our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”).

The Company’s fiscal year is the 52- or 53-week period ending on the Saturday closest to January 31. Fiscal year-end dates for all periods presented or discussed herein are as follows:

 

Fiscal Year    Year-End Date    # of Weeks  

2012

   February 2, 2013      53   

2011

   January 28, 2012      52   

2010

   January 29, 2011      52   

2009

   January 30, 2010      52   

2008

   January 31, 2009      52   

2007

   February 2, 2008      52   

Our Mission and Strategies

Our mission is to be the favorite place for teens and young adults to shop in the mall. Our objective is to provide our customers with a compelling merchandise assortment and great shopping experience that together highlight a great mix of heritage brands, proprietary brands and emerging brands that speak to the action sports, fashion and music influences of the California lifestyle. We offer an assortment of apparel, accessories and footwear for young men and women designed to meet the fashion needs of our customers.

PacSun’s foundation has traditionally been built upon a great collection of powerful brands. Today, that mix of brands includes heritage brands, our own proprietary brands and a mix of up-and-coming, emerging brands. Our heritage brands have been partnered with us for many years and include some of the most well-known names in the action sports industry, including Fox Racing, DC Shoes, Roxy, Quiksilver, Hurley, Billabong, Element, O’Neill, Vans and Volcom, among others. In recent years, we have also built our own proprietary brands, including Bullhead®, Kirra®, On the Byas®, Black Poppy® and Nollie®, to complement our heritage brands and give us added flexibility within certain categories. In fiscal 2010, we licensed the Modern Amusement® brand from Dirty Bird Productions, Inc., a company owned by Mossimo Giannulli, the founder of the Mossimo® brand. Additionally, we continually seek to introduce emerging brands that bring newness to our stores and speak to the ever-changing tastes of our customers such as RVCA, Young and Reckless and Diamond, among others. Taken together, we believe that this mix of brands gives us the capability to offer our customers an unmatched selection of fashionable and authentic products.

Our in-store merchandise presentations feature heritage brands throughout our store via fixtures dedicated to particular brands along with their own brand signage. We have also partnered with key brands to allow them to create “brand shops” that offer them the opportunity to create their own selling space within our stores and display their product in a unique manner.

 

  2      Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. Form 10-K/A 2011 (Amendment No. 1)


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During fiscal 2011, we launched our “Dress Irresponsibly” marketing campaign which was realized in a variety of media, including television, internet, print advertising, mobile marketing and in-store visual elements. Recently, we launched our “Golden State of Mind” marketing initiative which embodies the culture that our brands, customers and employees live every day. The concept is inspired by the amazing diversity, overall optimism and unique sense of adventure that California offers and is being realized through print advertising, online social media, in-store elements and events such as the “Golden State of Mind Event Series.”

We believe that there continues to be a significant opportunity to improve both our sales and merchandise margin performance through more refined merchandise assortment planning strategies. We historically took a “one size fits all” approach to merchandise assortments in our stores in terms of the timing of product flows and brand or category presentation. This approach generally resulted in all stores receiving seasonal categories (i.e., swim in spring or fleece in autumn) at the same time and in the same magnitude. We are now grouping our stores into a number of store clusters based on customer segmentations, brand performance, differences in weather and demographics, among other characteristics. In conjunction with this clustering, we have changed our allocation strategies to distribute what we believe to be the right products to the right stores for the right customers. The majority of our assortments are consistent across all stores but our clustering results in subtle penetration changes by brand and category for the last 20% to 40% of a given store’s assortment.

Merchandising

Merchandise

Our stores offer an assortment of casual apparel, related accessories and footwear for young men and women, with the goal of being viewed by our customers as the most desired retailer for their lifestyle. The following tables set forth our merchandise assortment as a percentage of net sales for the most recent three fiscal years:

 

     Fiscal Years  
     2011     2010     2009  

Men’s Apparel

     49     49     45

Women’s Apparel

     37     38     43

Accessories and Footwear

     14     13     12
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

     100     100     100
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Denim represents a significant percentage of our total sales, accounting for 19%, 18% and 22% of total sales in fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. During fiscal 2010, denim became a very price-competitive business with very little newness or uniqueness in the marketplace in terms of fit or trend, and sales of denim were adversely affected as a result. In fiscal 2011, denim and casual pants had positive comparable sales. Men’s denim capitalized on a new trend in “twill and chino” pants while Women’s denim invested heavily in leggings, and continued to perform well in our foundational “skinny” fit line.

Another significant trend in our business over the past three years was the decline in sales of accessories and footwear (“non-apparel”). Prior to fiscal 2007, non-apparel accounted for more than 30% of net sales versus only 12% in fiscal 2009, resulting from a de-emphasis on non-apparel categories. In retrospect, we believe we lost significant sales opportunities as a result of our previous decisions to de-emphasize non-apparel categories during fiscal 2008 and 2009. During fiscal 2010 and into fiscal 2011, we began working toward reclaiming non-apparel sales by reintroducing footwear to approximately 425 stores as of January 28, 2012. While non-apparel still only represented 14% of net sales for the 2011 fiscal year, footwear sales for men’s non-apparel increased 38% and women’s non-apparel increased 42% as compared to fiscal 2010.

Heritage Brands

We offer a wide selection of well-known action-sports inspired heritage brands, such as Fox Racing, Billabong, Element, DC Shoes, Roxy, Quiksilver, Hurley, O’Neill, Vans and Volcom, among others. In addition, we continually cultivate relationships to add and support up-and-coming brands, even if they are not of sufficient size to deliver to our stores on a nationwide basis. During fiscal 2011 and 2009 no vendor accounted for more than 10% of net sales. During fiscal 2010, Fox Racing accounted for 10% of our net sales. Branded merchandise accounted for approximately 52%, 55% and 53% of total net sales in fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. Excluding Men’s denim and knit sales, branded merchandise accounted for approximately 88%, 86% and 81% of Men’s sales in fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

 

Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. Form 10-K/A 2011 (Amendment No. 1)     3   


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Proprietary Brands

We complement our name-brand offerings with our proprietary brands, including Bullhead®, Kirra®, On the Byas®, Black Poppy® and Nollie®. Proprietary brands provide us with an opportunity to broaden our customer base by offering merchandise of comparable quality to brand name merchandise, capitalize on emerging fashion trends when branded merchandise is not available in sufficient quantities and exercise a greater degree of control over the flow of our merchandise. Our own product design group, in collaboration with our buying staff, designs our proprietary brand merchandise. Our sourcing organization oversees the manufacture and delivery of our proprietary brand merchandise, with manufacturing sourced both domestically and internationally. Our proprietary brand merchandise accounted for approximately 48%, 45% and 47% of total net sales in fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

Vendor and Contract Manufacturer Relationships

We generally purchase merchandise from vendors that target distribution through specialty retailers, small boutiques and, in some cases, particular department stores, rather than distribution through mass-market channels. To encourage the design and development of new merchandise, we frequently share ideas regarding fashion trends and merchandise sell-through information with our vendors. We also suggest merchandise design and fabrication to certain vendors.

We have cultivated our proprietary brand sources with a view toward high-quality merchandise, production reliability and consistency of fit. We source our proprietary brand merchandise both domestically and internationally in order to benefit from the shorter lead times associated with domestic manufacturing and the lower costs associated with international manufacturing.

Merchandising, Planning, Allocation and Distribution

Our merchants are responsible for reviewing branded merchandise lines from new and existing vendors, identifying emerging fashion trends, and selecting branded and proprietary brand merchandise styles in quantities, colors and sizes to meet inventory levels established by Company management. Our planning and allocation team is responsible for management of inventory levels by store and by class, allocation of merchandise to stores and inventory replenishment based upon information generated by our merchandise management information systems. These systems provide the planning department with current inventory levels at each store and for the Company as a whole, as well as current selling history within each store by merchandise classification and by style. See “Information Technology.”

All merchandise is delivered to our distribution facility in Olathe, Kansas where it is inspected, received, allocated to stores, ticketed when necessary and boxed for distribution to our stores or packaged for delivery to our Internet customers. Each store is typically shipped merchandise three to five times a week, providing it with a steady flow of new merchandise. We use both national and regional carriers to ship merchandise to our stores and Internet customers. We may occasionally use air freight to ship merchandise to stores when necessary.

E-commerce

Our Internet sales represented approximately 6% of our sales for fiscal 2011 and 5% of our sales for each of fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009. We sell a combination of the same selection of merchandise carried in our stores along with online exclusives at www.pacsun.com. We also advertise our website as a shopping destination on certain Internet portals and search engines and market our website in our stores. Additionally, we have recently equipped a substantial portion of our retail stores with technology that enables our customers to access our e-commerce website in-store and have our products shipped directly to them. Our Internet strategy benefits from the nationwide retail presence of our stores, brand recognition of PacSun, an Internet-savvy customer base, and the availability of our key brands.

Stores

Locations

We operate stores in each of the 50 states and Puerto Rico. For a geographical breakdown of stores by state, see Item 2, “Properties.”

 

  4      Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. Form 10-K/A 2011 (Amendment No. 1)


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Real Estate Strategy

Prior to fiscal 2007, we grew rapidly, with approximately 50 to 100 new store openings per year, leading to a peak of approximately 950 PacSun stores. Given the economic environment and our sales performance over the past four years, our focus shifted from continuing to open new stores to optimizing our existing fleet of stores. In order to improve the overall productivity of our store fleet, beginning in fiscal 2008 we began to close a significant number of PacSun stores each fiscal year. We closed 38 stores in fiscal 2008, 40 in fiscal 2009 and 44 in fiscal 2010. In fiscal 2011, we accelerated the pace of store closures, resulting in the closing of 119 stores.

During fiscal 2012, we anticipate closing approximately 100 to 120 additional underperforming stores resulting in a cumulative net cash savings of approximately $9 million, excluding one-time buyout payments of approximately $13 million. Further, by the end of fiscal 2013, we expect a $10 million to $15 million improvement in cash on our balance sheet due to a corresponding reduction in inventory associated with such store closings. The affected stores generate on average annual sales revenue of approximately $0.6 million as compared to our remaining stores, which generate approximately $1.1 million in average annual net sales.

Except in connection with lease buyout transactions, we typically do not incur any significant termination costs, exit or disposal charges, such as significant inventory write-down costs or charges, or one-time termination benefits as a result of store closures. A kick-out clause relieves us of any future obligation under a lease if specified sales levels for our stores (typically $1 million) or certain mall occupancy targets are not achieved by a specified date.

Store Operations

Our stores are open for business during mall shopping hours. Each store has a manager, one or more assistant managers and approximately six to twelve part-time sales associates. District managers supervise approximately a dozen stores and approximately a dozen district managers report to a regional director. District and store managers participate in a bonus program based on achieving predetermined metrics. We have store operating policies and procedures and in-store training for new managers. We place an emphasis on loss prevention programs in order to control inventory shrinkage. These programs include the installation of electronic article surveillance systems in all stores, education of store personnel on loss prevention and monitoring of returns, voids and employee sales. As a result of these programs, our historical inventory shrinkage rates have been below 2% of net sales at retail (1% at cost).

Competition

The retail apparel, accessory and footwear business is highly competitive. Our stores compete on a national level with certain leading specialty retail chains as well as certain department stores that offer the same or similar brands and styles of merchandise including: Abercrombie & Fitch, Aéropostale, American Eagle Outfitters, The Buckle, Forever 21, H&M, Hollister, J.C. Penney, Kohl’s, Macy’s, Nordstrom, Old Navy, Target, Tilly’s, Urban Outfitters and Zumiez, as well as a wide variety of regional and local specialty stores. Many of our competitors are larger than we are and have significantly greater resources available to them than we do. We believe the principal competitive factors in our industry are fashion, merchandise assortment, quality, price, store location, environment and customer service.

Trademarks and Service Marks

We are the owner in the United States of the marks “Pacific Sunwear of California®,” “PacSun®,” and “Pacific Sunwear®.” We also use and have registered, or have a pending registration on, a number of other marks, including those attributable to our proprietary brands such as Bullhead®, Kirra®, Nollie®, Black Poppy® and On the Byas®. We have registered many of our marks outside of the United States. We believe our rights in our marks are important to our business and intend to maintain our marks and the related registrations.

Information Technology

Our information systems provide our management, our merchandising group and our planners with data that helps us identify emerging trends and manage inventories. These systems include purchase order management, open order reporting, open-to-buy, receiving, distribution, merchandise allocation, basic stock replenishment, inter-store transfers and inventory and price management. We use daily and weekly item sales reports to make purchasing and markdown decisions. Merchandise

 

Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. Form 10-K/A 2011 (Amendment No. 1)     5   


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purchases are generally based on planned sales and inventory levels. All of our stores have a point-of-sale system featuring bar-coded ticket scanning, price look-up capability, electronic check and credit/debit authorization and automated nightly transmittal of data between each store and our corporate office.

Seasonality

For details concerning the seasonality of our business, see Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, “Seasonality and Quarterly Results.”

Working Capital Concentration

A significant portion of our working capital is related to merchandise inventories available for sale to customers as well as in our distribution center. For details concerning working capital and the merchandising risk associated with our inventories, see “Risk Factors” in Item 1A and “Working Capital” within Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

Employees

At the end of fiscal 2011, we had approximately 9,100 employees, of whom approximately 6,400 were part-time. Of the total employees, approximately 530 were employed at our corporate headquarters and distribution center. A significant number of seasonal employees are hired during peak selling periods. None of our employees are represented by a labor union, and we believe that our relationships with our employees are good.

Executive Officers

Set forth below are the names, ages, titles, and certain background information of persons serving as executive officers of the Company as of March 31, 2012:

 

Executive Officer

   Age     

Title

Gary H. Schoenfeld

     49       President, Chief Executive Officer and Director

Michael W. Kaplan

     48       Sr. Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

Charles Mescher

     38       Sr. Vice President, Men’s Merchandising

Christine Lee

     41       Sr. Vice President, Women’s Merchandising

Paula M. Lentini

     48       Sr. Vice President, Retail

Jonathan Brewer

     57       Sr. Vice President, Product Development and Supply Chain

Craig E. Gosselin

     52       Sr. Vice President, General Counsel, Human Resources and Secretary

Gary H. Schoenfeld was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer in June 2009. Prior to joining us, he was President of Aritzia Inc., a Canadian fashion retailer, and Chief Executive Officer of Aritzia USA from August 2008 to February 2009, and was a director of Aritzia Inc. from May 2006 to June 2009. From 2006 until 2008 he was Vice Chairman and President and then Co-CEO of Global Brands Group, a brand management and licensing company based in London and Singapore which is the world-wide master licensee for The FIFA World CupTM. From September 1995 to July 2004, Mr. Schoenfeld was an executive officer of Vans, Inc., a publicly traded designer, distributor and retailer of footwear. He joined Vans as Chief Operating Officer, then became President and a member of the Board of Directors in 1996 and Chief Executive Officer in 1997. He is a former director of CamelBak Products, LLC, 24 Hour Fitness, Inc. and Global Brands Group.

Michael W. Kaplan was appointed Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer in May 2011. In this position, he has responsibility for all aspects of the Company’s financial planning and reporting, treasury, tax, insurance, investor relations, real estate, inventory management and information technology. Mr. Kaplan joined us from Harbor Freight Tools, a privately held retailer of proprietary branded tools, where he served as Chief Financial Officer. Prior to joining Harbor Freight Tools in 2010, he was a senior executive of Gap, Inc. from 2005 to 2010. From 1989 to 2005, Mr. Kaplan held various financial positions with the Walt Disney Company including Vice President of Financial Planning and Control for the Disneyland resort division from 2001 to 2005. Mr. Kaplan is a certified public accountant.

Charles Mescher was appointed Senior Vice President, Men’s Merchandising in January 2008. He is responsible for all merchandising, buying and design related to Men’s merchandise, including all apparel, accessories and footwear. Prior to that, he served the Company as Vice President/General Merchandise Manager of Young Men’s merchandise and accessories from

 

  6      Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. Form 10-K/A 2011 (Amendment No. 1)


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March 2006 to January 2008. Mr. Mescher joined the Company in January 2005 as Division Merchandise Manager of Young Men’s. Prior to joining the Company, he served in various merchandising positions for Nike, The Gap and Abercrombie & Fitch.

Christine Lee was appointed Senior Vice President, Women’s Merchandising in February 2010. She leads all aspects of merchandising, buying and design for our Women’s apparel, accessories and footwear business. Prior to joining us, Ms. Lee spent 18 years with specialty retailer Urban Outfitters working her way from Sales Associate to General Merchandise Manager of Women’s Apparel and Accessories, as well as Urban Renewal and Design.

Paula M. Lentini was appointed Senior Vice President, Retail in April 2010. Ms. Lentini is responsible for managing all aspects of our retail stores, store operations, loss prevention, construction and store design. Prior to joining us, she was Vice President of Retail Sales and Operations at T-Mobile USA, a wireless provider, from September 2007 to March 2010. From 2005 until 2007 she was a Zone Vice President at The Gap, Inc., leading stores in Canada and the Central United States. From 2004 to 2005 Ms. Lentini was the Senior Vice President of Retail Sales and Operations for Giorgio Armani and Emporio Armani, USA. From 2000 to 2004 she was a Regional Director/Zone Vice President for Victoria’s Secret Stores in the Central United States. Prior to Joining Victoria’s Secret Stores, Ms. Lentini was employed in a variety of positions at The Gap, Inc., domestically and internationally, from 1990 to 2000.

Jonathan Brewer was appointed Senior Vice President, Product Development and Supply Chain in June of 2010. Mr. Brewer is responsible for managing all aspects of Product Development, Sourcing, Quality Assurance, Product Integrity, and Supply Chain Operations including inbound and outbound logistics and the Olathe Distribution Center. Prior to this, Mr. Brewer was Vice President of Product Development and Sourcing for the Company. Before joining PacSun, Mr. Brewer held various executive positions between 1996 and 2006 at Warner Bros. Inc., including Vice President International Sourcing for Warner Bros. Consumer Products and Vice President of Sourcing and Quality Assurance for Warner Bros. Studio Stores. From 1994 until 1996 he was Director of Sourcing at a division of Kellwood Inc. Between 1983 to 1994 Mr. Brewer was the Vice President of Production at Segue Ltd., a private label import company. Mr. Brewer began his career at May Department Stores in its executive training program and held various merchandising positions.

Craig E. Gosselin was appointed Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Human Resources in December 2009. He was appointed Secretary of the Company in June 2010. Mr. Gosselin oversees our legal, human resources, procurement, office services and facility functions. Mr. Gosselin joined the Company from Connolly, Finkel and Gosselin LLP (“CF&G”) and was a partner of that firm, and its predecessor Zimmermann, Koomer, Connolly and Finkel LLP, since 2005. While with the firm, Mr. Gosselin represented leading brands, including Vans, CamelBak, Ariat, Von Dutch, The North Face, JanSport, Reef and 7 For All Mankind. Prior to joining CF&G, Mr. Gosselin spent nearly 13 years with Vans, Inc., serving as Senior Vice President and General Counsel. Prior to Vans, Mr. Gosselin practiced corporate mergers and acquisitions and securities law at several large law firms, including Shea & Gould and Pacht, Ross, Warne, Bernhard & Sears.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This report on Form 10-K contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Exchange Act, and we intend that such forward-looking statements be subject to the safe harbors created thereby. We are providing cautionary statements identifying important factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements contained herein. Any statements that express, or involve discussions as to, expectations, beliefs, plans, objectives, assumptions, future events or performance (often, but not always identifiable by the use of words or phrases such as “will result,” “expects to,” “will continue,” “anticipates,” “plans,” “intends,” “estimated,” “projects” and “outlook”) are not historical facts and may be forward-looking and, accordingly, such statements involve estimates, assumptions and uncertainties which could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements. Examples of forward-looking statements in this report include, but are not limited to, the following categories of expectations about:

 

Ÿ  

the sufficiency of operating cash flows, working capital and available credit to meet our operating and capital expenditure requirements;

 

Ÿ  

our capital expenditure plans for fiscal 2012;

 

Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. Form 10-K/A 2011 (Amendment No. 1)     7   


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Ÿ  

potential recording of noncash impairment charges for underperforming stores in future quarters;

 

Ÿ  

increases in product sourcing costs;

 

Ÿ  

forecasted net cash savings as a result of the amendment or termination of certain leases;

 

Ÿ  

forecasts of future store closures, expansions, relocations and store refreshes during fiscal 2012; and

 

Ÿ  

future increases in occupancy costs.

All forward-looking statements included in this report are based on information available to us as of the date hereof, and are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements. We assume no obligation to update or revise any such forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances that occur after such statements are made.

We face significant competition from both vertically-integrated and brand-based competitors which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

The retail apparel business is highly competitive. We compete on a national level with a diverse group of retailers, including vertically-integrated and brand-based national, regional and local specialty retail stores, and certain leading department stores and off-price retailers that offer the same or similar brands and styles of merchandise as we do. Many of our competitors are larger and have significantly greater resources than we do. We believe the principal competitive factors in our industry are fashion, merchandise assortment, quality, price, store location, environment and customer service. Current and increased competition could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our failure to identify and respond appropriately to changing consumer preferences and fashion trends in a timely manner could have a material adverse impact on our business and profitability.

Our success is largely dependent upon our ability to gauge the fashion tastes of our customers and to provide merchandise at competitive prices and in adequate quantities that satisfies customer demand in a timely manner. Our failure to anticipate, identify or react appropriately in a timely manner to changes in fashion trends could have a material adverse effect on our same store sales results, gross margins, operating margins, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, misjudgments or unanticipated fashion changes may result in excess or slow-moving inventory, which may need to be heavily discounted to be disposed of. Such discounts and increased inventory costs could have a material adverse effect on our business. Misjudgments or unanticipated fashion changes could also have a material adverse effect on our image with our customers. Some of our vendors have limited resources, production capacities and operating histories and some have intentionally limited the distribution of their merchandise. The inability or unwillingness on the part of key vendors to expand their operations to accommodate our merchandising requirements, or the loss of one or more key vendors or proprietary brand sources for any reason, could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our failure to improve our comparable store net sales would have a material adverse impact on our business, profitability and liquidity.

In fiscal 2011, fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009, we experienced declines of 1%, 8%, and 20%, respectively, in comparable store net sales. If negative comparable store net sales continue to occur, we believe that our working capital and cash flows from operating activities might not be sufficient to meet our operating requirements and we may be required to access some, if not all, of our new credit facility with Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. (the “New Credit Facility”) and potentially require other sources of financing to fund our operations, which might not be available. Our current level of debt could adversely affect our ability to raise additional capital to fund our operations, limit our ability to react to changes in the economy or our industry, expose us to interest rate risk to the extent of our variable rate debt and prevent us from meeting our debt repayment obligations. We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs. Based on current forecasts and plans for fiscal 2012, we believe that the proceeds from the senior secured term loan we obtained from an affiliate of Golden Gate Private Equity, Inc. (“Golden Gate Capital”) in December 2011 (the “Term Loan”) and availability under our New Credit Facility will be sufficient to meet our operating and capital expenditure needs for the next twelve months.

 

  8      Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. Form 10-K/A 2011 (Amendment No. 1)


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Our net sales, operating income and inventory levels fluctuate on a seasonal basis.

We experience major seasonal fluctuations in our net sales and operating income, with a significant portion of our operating income typically realized during the six to seven week selling periods for each of the back-to-school and holiday seasons. Any decrease in sales or margins during these periods could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. Additionally, extended periods of unseasonably warm temperatures during the fall/winter season or cold weather during the spring/summer season could render a portion of our inventory incompatible with those unseasonable conditions. Seasonal fluctuations also affect our inventory levels, since we usually order merchandise in advance of peak selling periods and sometimes before new fashion trends are confirmed by customer purchases. We generally carry a significant amount of inventory, especially before the six to seven week back-to-school and holiday season selling periods. If we are not successful in selling inventory during these periods, we may have to sell the inventory at significantly reduced prices, which would adversely affect our profitability.

Our comparable store net sales results fluctuate significantly, which can cause volatility in our operating performance and stock price.

Our comparable store net sales results have fluctuated significantly over time, and are expected to continue to fluctuate in the future. For example, over the past five years, quarterly comparable store net sales results for our stores have varied from a low of minus 24% to a high of plus 8%. A variety of factors affect our comparable store net sales results, including unfavorable economic conditions and decreases in consumer spending, changes in fashion trends and customer preferences, changes in our merchandise mix, calendar shifts of holiday periods, actions by competitors, and weather conditions. Our comparable store net sales results for any fiscal period may decrease. As a result of these or other factors, our comparable store net sales results, both past and future, are likely to have a significant effect on the market price of our common stock and our operating performance, including our use of markdowns and our ability to leverage operating and other expenses that are somewhat fixed.

Our customers may not prefer our proprietary brand merchandise, which may negatively impact our profitability.

Sales from proprietary brand merchandise accounted for approximately 48%, 45% and 47% of total net sales in fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. There can be no assurance that any change in the sales penetration of proprietary brand merchandise will improve our operating results. Additionally, there can be no assurance that attempts to balance our proprietary brand merchandise and other merchandise will improve our operating results. Because our proprietary brand merchandise generally carries higher merchandise margins than our other merchandise, our failure to anticipate, identify and react in a timely manner to fashion trends with our proprietary brand merchandise, particularly if the percentage of net sales derived from proprietary brand merchandise changes significantly (up or down), may have a material adverse effect on our same store sales results, operating margins, results of operations and financial condition.

Our inability to reduce occupancy costs or close underperforming stores in the future may have a material adverse effect on our business and financial results.

Occupancy costs represent a significant percentage of the total cost of operating our stores. Occupancy costs as a percentage of net sales was 20% in fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2011. If we are unsuccessful in lowering our occupancy costs as a percent of sales in the future it would be difficult to operate our stores profitably, which in turn would have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We anticipate closing an additional 100 to 120 underperforming stores in fiscal 2012 and additional stores as other leases come up for renegotiation, expire or we have an earlier lease kick-out opportunity. Except for certain lease termination payments, we typically do not incur any significant termination costs, exit or disposal charges, such as significant inventory write-down costs or charges, or one-time termination benefits as a result of store closures. Based on our review of certain underperforming stores, we recorded $15 million, $16 million and $27 million in impairment charges during fiscal 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. In addition, of the $15 million and $16 million of impairment charges recorded in fiscal 2011 and 2010, approximately $6 million and $3 million related to projected store closures. If we are unable to achieve acceptable levels of store profitability or successfully negotiate the closing of underperforming stores, we may be required to record additional impairment charges in the future which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

 

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Product costs from our manufacturing partners may increase, which could result in significant margin erosion.

Commodity prices, including fuel costs, have fluctuated in recent years, affecting the costs of many of our vendors. If these product costs increase, this could result in margin erosion for us. Additionally, a significant percentage of our private label apparel products, and the products sold to us by our branded partners, are manufactured in China. Manufacturers in that country have experienced increased costs in recent years due to shortages of labor and the fluctuation of the Chinese Yuan in relation to the U.S. dollar. If we were unable to successfully mitigate a significant portion of such product costs, our results of operations could be adversely effected.

Our foreign sources of production may not always be reliable, which may result in a disruption in the flow of new merchandise to our stores.

We do not own or operate any manufacturing facilities and therefore depend upon independent third-party vendors for the manufacture of our merchandise. We purchase merchandise directly in foreign markets for our proprietary brands. In addition, we purchase merchandise from domestic vendors, some of which is manufactured overseas. We do not have any long-term merchandise supply contracts and our imports are subject to existing or potential duties, tariffs and quotas. Additionally, some of our vendors are relatively unsophisticated or underdeveloped and may have difficulty providing adequate quantities of quality merchandise to us in a timely manner. We face competition from other companies for production facilities and capacity. We also face a variety of other risks generally associated with doing business in foreign markets and importing merchandise from abroad, such as: (i) political instability; (ii) enhanced security measures at United States ports, which could delay delivery of imports; (iii) imposition of new legislation relating to import quotas that may limit the quantity of goods which may be imported into the United States from countries in a region within which our vendors do business, and competition with other companies for import quota capacities; (iv) imposition of duties, taxes, and other charges on imports; (v) delayed receipt or non-delivery of goods due to the failure of foreign-source suppliers to comply with applicable import regulations; (vi) delayed receipt or non-delivery of goods due to organized labor strikes or unexpected or significant port congestion at United States ports; (vii) local business practice and political issues; and (viii) acts of terrorism. New initiatives may be proposed that may have an impact on the trading status of certain countries and may include retaliatory duties or other trade sanctions that, if enacted, would increase the cost of products purchased from suppliers in countries that we do business with. Any inability on our part to rely on our foreign sources of production due to any of the factors listed above could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Our business could suffer if a manufacturer fails to conform to applicable domestic or international labor standards.

We do not control our vendors or their labor practices. The violation of labor or other laws by any of our vendors, or the divergence of the labor practices followed by any of our vendors from those generally accepted as ethical in the United States, could interrupt, or otherwise disrupt, the shipment of finished products to us or damage our reputation. Any of these, in turn, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

The loss of key personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business at any time.

Our future success is dependent to a significant degree upon the services of our key personnel, particularly our executive officers. The loss of the services of any member of our senior management team could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. In this regard, we have historically used equity awards as a component of our executive compensation program in order to align management’s interests with the interests of our shareholders, encourage retention and provide competitive compensation and benefit packages. As a result of the decline in our stock price in recent years, the ability to retain present, or attract prospective executives through equity awards has been adversely affected.

Our success also depends in part upon our ability to attract, motivate and retain a sufficient number of qualified employees, including, merchants, designers, buyers, regional directors, district managers, store managers and store associates, who understand and appreciate our corporate culture and product and are able to adequately represent the California lifestyle to our customers. Qualified individuals of the requisite caliber and skills needed to fill these positions may be in short supply in some areas, and the employee turnover rate in the retail industry is high. Competition for qualified employees could require us to pay higher wages to attract a sufficient number of suitable employees. Our inability to attract and retain qualified personnel in the future could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

  10      Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. Form 10-K/A 2011 (Amendment No. 1)


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We operate our business from one corporate headquarters facility and one distribution facility which exposes us to significant operational risks.

All of our corporate headquarters functions reside within a single facility in Anaheim, California. Our distribution function resides within a single facility in Olathe, Kansas. Any significant interruption in the availability or operation of our corporate headquarters or distribution facility due to natural disasters, accidents, system failures or other unforeseen causes would have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Any material failure, interruption or security breach of our computer systems or information technology may adversely affect the operation of our business and our financial results.

We are dependent on our computer systems and information technology to properly conduct business. A failure or interruption of our computer systems or information technology could result in the loss of data, business interruptions or delays in our operations. Also, despite our considerable efforts and technological resources to secure our computer systems and information technology, security breaches, such as an intentional cyber attack, unauthorized access, computer viruses and similar disruptions may occur resulting in system disruptions, shutdowns, lost data or unauthorized disclosure of confidential information. Any security breach of our computer systems or information technology may result in adverse publicity, litigation, loss of sales and profits, damages, fines or other loss resulting from misappropriation of information.

In addition, while we regularly evaluate our information systems capabilities and requirements, there can be no assurance that our existing information systems will be adequate to support the existing or future needs of our business. We may have to undertake significant information system implementations, modifications and/or upgrades in the future at significant cost to us. Such projects involve inherent risks associated with replacing and/or changing existing systems, such as system disruptions and the failure to accurately capture data, among others. Information system disruptions, if not anticipated and appropriately mitigated, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

The continued volatility in the U.S. economy and potential inflationary economic conditions may adversely affect consumer spending in the future, which could negatively impact our business, operating results and stock price.

Our business operations and financial performance depend significantly on general economic conditions and their impact on levels of consumer spending. Consumer spending is impacted by a number of factors, including consumer confidence in the strength of the general economy, fears of economic recession or depression, the availability and cost of consumer credit, the cost of basic necessities such as food, fuel and housing, inflation, salary and wage levels, levels of taxation and unemployment levels. Additionally, inflationary economic conditions would likely increase the costs of manufacturing the goods we sell in our stores which could increase the prices charged by us for our products or reduce gross margins. Inflationary pressure could also have a negative impact on the ability of our customer to buy our products in previous volumes. Any increase in product cost or decrease in customer purchasing power due to inflationary economic conditions could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

A significant decrease in mall traffic would negatively impact our business and operating results.

We are primarily a mall-based retailer and are dependent upon the continued popularity of malls as a shopping destination and the ability of shopping mall anchor tenants and other attractions within the vicinity of our stores to generate customer traffic. Unfavorable economic conditions, particularly in certain regions, have adversely affected mall traffic and resulted in the closing of certain anchor tenants. Volatility in the U.S. economy or an uncertain economic outlook could continue to lower consumer spending levels and cause a decrease in shopping mall traffic, each of which would adversely affect our sales and financial performance.

Any reinvestment in our existing store base may not result in improved operating performance. Conversely, the lack of any reinvestment may cause many of our stores to appear less attractive to customers.

We believe that store design is an important element in the customer shopping experience. Many of our stores have been in operation for many years and have not been updated or renovated since opening. Some of our competitors are in the process of updating, or have updated, their store designs, which may make our stores appear less attractive in comparison. Due to the current economic environment and our financial performance, we have significantly scaled back our store refresh program. Any inability on our part to successfully implement new store designs in a timely manner could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. Form 10-K/A 2011 (Amendment No. 1)     11   


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The effects of terrorism or war could significantly impact consumer spending and our operational performance.

The majority of our stores are located in regional shopping malls. Any threat or actual act of terrorism, particularly in public areas, could lead to lower customer traffic in regional shopping malls. In addition, local authorities or mall management could close regional shopping malls in response to any immediate security concern. Mall closures, as well as lower customer traffic due to security concerns, could result in decreased sales. Additionally, war or the threat of war could significantly diminish consumer spending, resulting in decreased sales. Decreased sales would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. As we source our product globally, any threat or actual act of terrorism or war could cause a disruption to our inventory supply which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Adverse outcomes of litigation matters or failure to comply with federal or state regulations could adversely affect us.

We are involved from time to time in litigation incidental to our business, including several cases involving allegations that we have violated provisions of California wage and hour laws. See Item 3. “Legal Proceedings.” We believe that the outcome of such litigation will not have a material adverse effect upon our results of operations or financial condition. However, our assessment of current litigation could change in light of the discovery of facts with respect to legal actions pending against us not presently known to us or determinations by judges, juries or other finders of fact which do not accord with our evaluation of the possible liability or outcome of such litigation. Additionally, we are subject to SEC rules and regulations, state laws, Sarbanes-Oxley requirements, new rules and regulations issued pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, other U.S. public company regulations, and various other requirements mandated for the textiles and apparel industries such as the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008, California’s Proposition 65 and similar state laws. Failure to comply with these laws could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and stock price. Also, changes in such laws could make operating our business more expensive or require us to change the way we do business. For example, changes in laws related to employee healthcare, hours, wages, job classification and benefits could significantly increase operating costs. In addition, changes in product safety or other consumer protection laws could lead to increased costs for certain merchandise, or additional labor costs associated with readying merchandise for sale. It may be difficult for us to oversee regulatory changes impacting our business and our responses to changes in the law could be costly and may negatively impact our operations.

Our inability or failure to protect our intellectual property or our infringement of other’s intellectual property could adversely affect us.

We believe that our trademarks and domain names are valuable assets that are critical to our success. The unauthorized use or other misappropriation of our trademarks or domain names could diminish the value of our brands and cause a decline in our net sales. Although we have secured or are in the process of securing protection for our trademarks and domain names in the United States and a number of other countries, there are certain countries where we do not currently have or where we do not currently intend to apply for protection for certain trademarks or at all. Also, the efforts we have taken to protect our trademarks may not be sufficient or effective. Therefore, we may not be able to prevent other persons from using our trademarks or domain names, which also could adversely affect our business. We are also subject to the risk that we or the third-party brands we carry may infringe on the intellectual property rights of other parties. Any infringement or other intellectual property claim made against us or the third-party brands we carry, whether or not it has merit, could be time-consuming, result in costly litigation, cause product delays or require us to pay additional royalties or license fees. As a result, any such claim could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and stock price.

Selling merchandise over the Internet carries particular risks that can have a negative impact on our business.

Our Internet operations are subject to numerous risks that could have a material adverse effect on our operational results, including unanticipated operating problems, reliance on third party computer hardware and software providers, system failures and the need to invest in additional computer systems. Specific risks include but are not limited to: (i) diversion of traffic and sales from our stores; (ii) liability for online content; and (iii) risks related to the failure of the computer systems that operate our website and its related support systems, including computer viruses, credit card fraud, telecommunication failures and electronic break-ins and similar disruptions. While we have installed privacy protection systems, devices and activity monitoring on our network, if unauthorized parties gain access to our networks or databases, they may be able to steal, publish, delete or modify our private and sensitive third-party information. In such circumstances, we could be held liable to our customers or other parties or be subject to regulatory or other actions for breaching privacy rules. This could

 

  12      Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. Form 10-K/A 2011 (Amendment No. 1)


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result in costly investigations and litigation, civil or criminal penalties and adverse publicity that could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and reputation. Further, if we are unable to comply with security standards established by banks and the credit card industry, we may be subject to fines, restrictions and expulsion from card acceptance programs, which could adversely affect us.

We may be subject to unionization, work stoppages, slowdowns or increased labor costs.

Currently, none of our employees are represented by a union. However, our employees have the right under the National Labor Relations Act to form or affiliate with a union. If some or all of our workforce were to become unionized and the terms of the collective bargaining agreement were significantly different from our current compensation agreements, it could increase our costs and adversely impact our profitability. Moreover, participation is labor unions could put us at increased risk of labor strikes and disruption of our service.

Our stock price can fluctuate significantly due to a variety of factors, which can negatively impact our total market value.

The market price of our common stock has fluctuated substantially and there can be no assurance that the market price of the common stock will not continue to fluctuate significantly. Future announcements or management discussions concerning us or our competitors, net sales and profitability results, quarterly variations in operating results or comparable store net sales, changes in earnings estimates made by management or analysts, our failure to meet analysts’ estimates, changes in accounting policies, or unfavorable economic conditions, among other factors, could cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate substantially. Changes in the market price of our stock could considerably affect the valuation of our derivative instrument and could cause significant non-cash fluctuations in earnings.

Failure to maintain adequate financial and management processes and controls could lead to errors in our financial reporting and could harm our ability to manage our expenses.

We are required to document and test our internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 so that our management can certify as to the effectiveness of our internal controls and our independent registered public accounting firm can render an opinion on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting on an annual basis. This process requires us to document our internal controls over financial reporting and to potentially make significant changes thereto, if applicable. As a result, we have incurred and expect to continue to incur substantial expenses to test our financial controls and systems, and we have been and in the future may be required to improve our financial and managerial controls, reporting systems and procedures, to incur substantial expenses to make such improvements and to hire additional personnel. If our management is ever unable to certify the effectiveness of our internal controls or if our independent registered public accounting firm cannot render an opinion on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, or if material weaknesses in our internal controls are ever identified, we could be subject to regulatory scrutiny and a loss of public confidence, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and our stock price. In addition, if we do not maintain adequate financial and management personnel, processes and controls, we may not be able to accurately report our financial performance on a timely basis, which could cause a decline in our stock price and adversely affect our ability to raise capital.

Changes to accounting rules or regulations could significantly affect our financial results.

Our financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”). New accounting rules or regulations and changes to existing accounting rules or regulations have occurred and may occur in the future. Future changes to accounting rules or regulations, such as changes to lease accounting guidance or a requirement to convert to international financial reporting standards, could negatively affect our results of operations and financial condition through increased cost of compliance.

*************

We caution that the risk factors described above, some of which are beyond our control, could cause actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements made by us or on behalf of the Company. Further, we cannot assess the impact of each such factor on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.

 

Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. Form 10-K/A 2011 (Amendment No. 1)     13   


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SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed, on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

PACIFIC SUNWEAR OF CALIFORNIA, INC.
By:   /s/ CRAIG E. GOSSELIN
  Craig E. Gosselin
  Sr. Vice President, General Counsel, Human Resources and Secretary
  Date: April 10, 2012

 

  14      Pacific Sunwear of California, Inc. Form 10-K/A 2011 (Amendment No. 1)


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PART IV

INDEX TO EXHIBITS

 

         

Incorporated by

Reference

Exhibit #    Exhibit Description    Form    Filing Date  

31.1+

   Written statements of Gary H. Schoenfeld and Michael W. Kaplan pursuant to section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002      

32.1+

   Written statement of Gary H. Schoenfeld and Michael W. Kaplan pursuant to section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002      

+ Filed herewith

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