XNAS:NVSL Naugatuck Valley Financial Corp Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 6/30/2012

Effective Date 6/30/2012

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UNITED STATES 

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION 

WASHINGTON, DC 20549

 


 

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

 

xQUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2012

 

OR

 

¨TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ______________ to _____________

 

Commission file number: 0-54447

 

NAUGATUCK VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION

 

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

MARYLAND   01-0969655
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
organization)    

 

333 CHURCH STREET, NAUGATUCK, CONNECTICUT   06770
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

(203) 720-5000

 

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

N/A

 

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes x No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act (Check one):

 

Large Accelerated Filer  ¨ Accelerated Filer  ¨
Non-accelerated Filer  ¨ Smaller Reporting Company  x
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

Yes ¨ No x

 

As of August 6, 2012, there were 7,002,208 shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding.

 

 
 

 

NAUGATUCK VALLEY FINANCIAL CORPORATION

 

Table of Contents

 

    Page No.
Part I.  Financial Information  
       
  Item 1. Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)  
       
    Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011 3
       
    Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011 4
       
    Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholder’s Equity for the six months ended June 30, 2012 5
       
    Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011 6
       
    Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements 7
       
  Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 25
       
    Liquidity and Capital Resources 31
       
  Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 33
       
  Item 4. Controls and Procedures 33
       
Part II.  Other Information  
       
  Item 1. Legal Proceedings 34
       
  Item 1A.  Risk Factors 34
       
  Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 34
       
  Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities 34
       
  Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 34
       
  Item 5. Other Information 34
       
  Item 6. Exhibits 35
       
Signatures   36
     
Exhibits    

 

2
 

 

Part I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition

(In thousands, except share data)

   June 30,   December 31, 
   2012   2011 
   (Unaudited)     
ASSETS          
Cash and due from depository institutions  $21,910   $15,436 
Investment in federal funds   868    2,633 
Investment securities available-for-sale, at fair value   26,512    25,051 
Investment securities held-to-maturity, at amortized cost   29,379    25,292 
Loans held for sale   1,358    2,993 
Loans receivable, net   444,426    466,965 
Accrued income receivable   1,773    1,932 
Foreclosed real estate and repossessed assets, net   403    873 
Premises and equipment, net   9,535    9,654 
Bank owned life insurance   9,707    9,556 
Federal Home Loan Bank stock, at cost   5,917    6,252 
Deferred income taxes   2,480    2,439 
Other assets   3,694    3,144 
           
Total assets  $557,962   $572,220 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY          
Liabilities          
Deposits  $411,346   $410,887 
Borrowed funds   57,252    70,817 
Mortgagors' escrow accounts   4,621    4,755 
Other liabilities   4,088    3,447 
           
Total liabilities   477,307    489,906 
           
Commitments and contingencies          
           
Stockholders' equity          
Preferred stock, $.01 par value; 1,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued or outstanding   -    - 
Common stock, $.01 par value; 25,000,000 shares authorized; 7,002,366 shares issued; 7,002,208 shares outstanding at June 30, 2012  and 7,002,292 outstanding at December 31, 2011.   70    70 
Paid-in capital   58,909    58,908 
Retained earnings   24,922    27,014 
Unearned ESOP shares (391,479 shares at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011)   (3,442)   (3,442)
Unearned stock awards (997 shares at June 30, 2012 and 1,395 shares at December 31, 2011)   (9)   (14)
Treasury stock, at cost (158 shares at June 30, 2012 and 74 shares at December 31, 2011)   (1)   (1)
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)   206    (221)
           
Total stockholders' equity   80,655    82,314 
           
Total liabilities and stockholders' equity  $557,962   $572,220 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

3
 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income

(In thousands, except per share data)

   Three Months Ended   Six Months Ended 
   June 30,   June 30, 
   2012   2011   2012   2011 
   (Unaudited) 
Interest income                    
Interest on loans  $5,652   $6,452   $11,699   $12,784 
Interest and dividends on investments and deposits   398    411    817    841 
Total interest income   6,050    6,863    12,516    13,625 
                     
Interest expense                    
Interest on deposits   975    1,718    2,069    3,464 
Interest on borrowed funds   432    564    890    1,176 
Total interest expense   1,407    2,282    2,959    4,640 
                     
Net interest income   4,643    4,581    9,557    8,985 
                     
Provision for loan losses   2,147    1,040    4,119    1,478 
                     
Net interest income after provision for loan losses   2,496    3,541    5,438    7,507 
                     
Noninterest income                    
Mortgage banking income   625    355    1,016    483 
Fees for other services   263    233    525    406 
Fees for services related to deposit accounts   204    213    406    426 
Income from bank owned life insurance   76    78    151    155 
Income from investment advisory services, net   51    65    107    139 
Net gain on investments   -    86    -    86 
Recovery from legal settlement   -    -    -    147 
Other income   30    32    54    56 
Total noninterest income   1,249    1,062    2,259    1,898 
                     
Noninterest expense                    
Compensation, taxes and benefits   2,705    2,326    5,314    4,669 
Office occupancy   575    565    1,150    1,172 
Professional fees   244    122    537    259 
Loss on foreclosed real estate, net   204    49    341    88 
Computer processing   194    64    368    326 
FDIC insurance premiums   187    172    321    376 
Advertising   160    106    286    205 
Directors compensation   130    110    335    286 
Office supplies   53    50    107    97 
Public company expenses   38    30    57    48 
Deposit related charge (reduction)   (88)   -    712    - 
Other expenses   468    292    812    610 
Total noninterest expense   4,870    3,886    10,340    8,136 
                     
Income (loss) before provision for income taxes   (1,125)   717    (2,643)   1,269 
Provision (benefit) for income taxes   (410)   212    (951)   368 
                     
Net income (loss)  $(715)  $505   $(1,692)  $901 
Other Comprehensive income (loss)                    
Changes in unrealized gain (loss) on securities available-for-sale, net   (68)   121    427    18 
Total other comprehensive income   (68)   121    427    18 
Comprehensive income (loss)  $(783)  $626   $(1,265)  $919 
Earnings (loss) per common share - basic and diluted  $(0.11)  $0.07   $(0.26)  $0.13 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

4
 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholder’s Equity

Six months ended June 30, 2012

 

(Unaudited, in thousands, except share data)

   Common   Paid-in   Retained   Unearned
ESOP
   Unearned
Stock
   Treasury   Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
     
   Stock   Capital   Earnings   Shares   Awards   Stock   Income (Loss)   Total 
                                 
Balance at December 31, 2011  $70   $58,908   $27,014   $(3,442)  $(14)  $(1)  $(221)  $82,314 
Dividends declared ($0.06 per common share)   -    -    (397)   -    -    -    -    (397)
Stock based compensation (199 shares vested and  199 shares forfeited)   -    -    (3)   -    5    -    -    2 
Stock based compensation options   -    1    -    -    -    -    -    1 
Treasury stock acquired (84 shares)   -    -    -    -    -    -    -    - 
Comprehensive income (loss)   -    -    (1,692)   -    -    -    427    (1,265)
                                         
Balance at June 30, 2012  $70   $58,909   $24,922   $(3,442)   (9)  $(1)  $206   $80,655 

 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

5
 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (In thousands)

   Six Months Ended 
   June 30, 
   2012   2011 
Cash flows from operating activities  (Unaudited) 
Net income (loss)  $(1,692)  $901 
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to cash provided (used) by operating activities:          
Provision for loan losses   4,119    1,478 
Depreciation and amortization expense   351    393 
Net loss on foreclosed assets   172    11 
Gain on sale of loans   (810)   (350)
Loans originated for sale   (35,179)   (18,664)
Proceeds from sale of loans held for sale   37,623    16,429 
Net amortization from investments   177    73 
Amortization of intangible assets   17    17 
Provision for deferred taxes   -    124 
Net gain on investments   -    (233)
Stock-based compensation   123    92 
Net change in:          
Accrued income receivable   159    (5)
Deferred loan fees   (54)   (44)
Cash surrender value of life insurance   (151)   (155)
Other assets   550    1,111 
Other liabilities   (577)   432 
Net cash provided by operating activities   4,828    1,610 
Cash flows from investing activities          
Proceeds from maturities and repayments of available-for-sale securities   2,786    2,468 
Proceeds from sale of available-for-sale securities   300    1,522 
Proceeds from maturities of held-to-maturity securities   3,178    624 
Redemption of Federal Home Loan Bank stock   335    - 
Purchase of available-for-sale securities   (4,216)   - 
Purchase of held-to-maturity securities   (7,386)   - 
Loan originations net of principal payments   18,217    (12,187)
Purchase of premises and equipment   (248)   (532)
Proceeds from the sale of foreclosed assets   556    109 
Net cash provided (used) by investing activities   13,522    (7,996)
Cash flows from financing activities          
Net change in time deposits   (13,790)   (12,867)
Net change in other deposit accounts   14,248    22,169 
Advances in borrowed funds   -    5,300 
Repayment of borrowed funds   (11,387)   (15,935)
Net change in mortgagors' escrow accounts   (134)   23 
Change in short term borrowings   (2,178)   (1,466)
Proceeds from common stock offering, net of offering costs   -    31,322 
Purchase of shares by ESOP pursuant to reorganization   -    (2,003)
Forfeited restricted shares   (2)   - 
Common stock repurchased   (1)   (1)
Cash dividends to common stockholders   (397)   (220)
Net cash (used) provided by financing activities   (13,641)   26,322 
Net change in cash and cash equivalents   4,709    19,936 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period   18,069    14,263 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period  $22,778   $34,199 
Non-cash investing activities:          
Transfer of loans to foreclosed assets  $258   $488 
Cash paid during the period for:          
Interest  $2,989   $4,657 
Income taxes   151    76 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

6
 

 

Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF OPERATIONS

 

Effective June 29, 2011, Naugatuck Valley Financial Corporation (the “Company”) completed its public stock offering in connection with the conversion of Naugatuck Valley Mutual Holding Company (the “MHC”) from the mutual holding company to the stock holding company form of organization (the “Conversion”). As a result of the Conversion, the Company succeeded Naugatuck Valley Financial Corporation, a Federal corporation (the “Federal Corporation”), as the holding company for Naugatuck Valley Savings and Loan (the “Bank”) and the MHC ceased to exist. A total of 4,173,008 shares of Company common stock were sold in a subscription and community offering at $8.00 per share, including 250,380 shares purchased by the Naugatuck Valley Savings and Loan Employee Stock Ownership Plan (the “ESOP”). Additionally, shares totaling 2,829,358 were issued to the stockholders of the Federal Corporation (other than the MHC) in exchange for their shares of Federal Corporation common stock at an exchange ratio of 0.9978 share of Company common stock for each share of Federal Corporation common stock. Shares outstanding after the stock offering and the exchange totaled 7,002,366. Net proceeds from the reorganization and stock offering totaled $31.3 million, after deducting offering costs of $2.1 million.

 

Originally organized in 1922, the Bank is a federally chartered stock savings bank which is headquartered in Naugatuck, Connecticut. The Bank provides a full range of personal banking services to individual and small business customers located primarily in the Naugatuck Valley and the immediate surrounding vicinity. It is subject to competition from other financial institutions throughout the region. The Bank is also subject to the regulations of various federal agencies and undergoes periodic examinations by those regulatory authorities.

 

The Bank owns Naugatuck Valley Mortgage Servicing Corporation, which qualifies and operates as a Connecticut passive investment company pursuant to legislation.

 

NOTE 2 - BASIS OF PRESENTATION

 

The accompanying consolidated interim financial statements are unaudited and include the accounts of the Company, the Bank, and the Bank’s wholly owned subsidiary, Naugatuck Valley Mortgage Servicing Corporation. The consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) for interim financial information and with the instructions to Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) Form 10-Q. Accordingly, they do not include all the information and footnotes required by GAAP for complete financial statements. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. These consolidated financial statements reflect, in the opinion of management, all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of the Company’s financial position and the results of its operations and its cash flows at the dates and for the periods presented.

 

In preparing the consolidated financial statements, management is required to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities as of the date of the statement of condition, and income and expenses for the interim period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Material estimates that are particularly susceptible to significant change in the near-term relate to the determination of the allowance for losses on loans, the valuation of real estate acquired in connection with foreclosure or in satisfaction of loans, deferred income taxes and the valuation of certain investment securities. While management uses available information to recognize losses and properly value these assets, future adjustments may be necessary based on changes in economic conditions both in Connecticut and nationally.

 

Management has evaluated subsequent events for potential recognition or disclosure in the financial statements. No subsequent events were identified that would have required a change to the financial statements or disclosure in the notes to the financial statements.

 

Operating results for the six months ended June 30, 2012 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2012.

 

7
 

 

These consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K/A for the year ended December 31, 2011.

 

Certain reclassifications have been made to prior period consolidated financial statements to conform to the June 30, 2012 consolidated financial statement presentation. These reclassifications only changed the reporting categories and did not affect the Company’s results of operations or financial position.

 

NOTE 3 - CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The accounting policies related to loans and the allowance for loan losses are presented below. For a summary of all other significant accounting policies, please refer to Note 4, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies”, contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K/A for the year ended December 31, 2011.

 

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of the allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Although the Company believes that it uses the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future additions to the allowance may be necessary based on estimates that are susceptible to change as a result of changes in economic conditions and other factors. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a quarterly basis, at a minimum, and establishes the provision for loan losses based on the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, economic conditions, and other factors related to the collectability of the loan portfolio.

 

The Company engages an independent review of its commercial loan portfolio on a quarterly basis and considers adjustments to its loan ratings based upon this review. In addition, the Company’s regulatory authorities, as an integral part of their examination process, periodically review the Company’s allowance for loan losses and may require the Company to recognize adjustments to the allowance based on their judgments about information available to them at the time of their examination.

 

Impaired Loans - Impaired loans consist of non-accrual loans and troubled debt restructurings (“TDRs”) in accordance with applicable authoritative accounting guidance. With the exception of loans that were restructured and still accruing interest, a loan is considered impaired when, based on current information and events, it is probable that the Company will be unable to collect all contractual principal and interest due according to the terms of the loan agreement. Loans deemed to be impaired are classified as non-accrual.

 

Impairment is measured by estimating the value of the loan based on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s initial effective interest rate or the fair value of the underlying collateral less costs to sell, if repayment of the loan is considered collateral-dependent. All impaired loans are included in non-performing assets.

 

Non-accrual loans. Loans are automatically placed on non-accrual status when payment of principal or interest is more than 90 days delinquent. Loans are also placed on non-accrual status if collection of principal or interest in full is in doubt or if the loan has been restructured. When loans are placed on non-accrual status, unpaid accrued interest is fully reversed, and further income is recognized only to the extent received. The loan may be returned to accrual status if unpaid principal and interest are repaid so that the loan is less than 90 days delinquent.

 

Troubled Debt Restructurings. TDRs are loans for which the original contractual terms of the loans have been modified and both of the following conditions exist: (i) the restructuring constitutes a concession (including reduction of interest rates or extension of maturity dates) and (ii) the borrower is experiencing financial difficulties. Loans are not classified as TDRs when the modification is short-term or results in only an insignificant delay or shortfall in the payments to be received. The Company’s TDRs are determined on a case-by-case basis in connection with ongoing loan collection processes.

 

The Company does not accrue interest on any TDRs unless it believes collection of all principal and interest under the modified terms is reasonably assured. Generally, six consecutive months of payment performance by the borrower under the restructured terms is required before a TDR is returned to accrual status assuming the loan is restructured at market rates. However, the period could vary depending upon the individual facts and circumstances of the loan.

 

8
 

 

For a TDR to begin accruing interest, the borrower must demonstrate both some level of performance and the capacity to perform under the modified terms. A history of timely payments and adherence to financial covenants generally serve as sufficient evidence of the borrower’s performance. An evaluation of the borrower’s current creditworthiness is used to assess whether the borrower has the capacity to repay the loan under the modified terms. This evaluation includes an estimate of expected cash flows, evidence of strong financial position, and estimates of the value of collateral, if applicable.

 

NOTE 4 — Accounting Standards Updates

 

Recently Adopted Accounting Guidance

 

Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”): In April 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued guidance that clarifies the wording used to describe many of the requirements in GAAP for measuring fair value and for disclosing information about fair value measurements. The guidance does not extend the use of fair value accounting, but clarifies the wording on how it should be applied to be consistent with IFRS and expands certain disclosure requirements relating to Level 3 fair value measurements. For many of the requirements, the FASB does not intend for the amendments in this update to result in a change in application from current guidance. This guidance is to be applied prospectively for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011. Since the guidance only relates to disclosure, the adoption of this guidance did not impact the Company’s financial condition, results of operations, or liquidity.

 

Statement of Comprehensive Income: In April 2011, the FASB issued accounting guidance requiring companies to include a statement of comprehensive income as part of its interim and annual financial statements. The new guidance gives companies the option to present net income and comprehensive income either in one continuous statement or in two separate, but consecutive statements. This approach represents a change from current GAAP, which allows companies to report Other Comprehensive Income (“OCI”) and its components in the statement of shareholder’s equity. The guidance also allows companies to present OCI either net of tax with details in the notes or shown gross of tax (with tax effects shown parenthetically). This guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011, but early adoption is permitted. Since the guidance only relates to disclosure, the adoption of this guidance did not impact the Company’s financial condition, results of operations, or liquidity.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Guidance

 

There were no additional accounting standards updates applicable to the Company issued by FASB during the second quarter ended June 30, 2012. Other accounting standards that have been issued or proposed by the FASB or other standards-setting bodies are not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

9
 

 

NOTE 5 – INVESTMENT SECURITIES

 

At June 30, 2012, the composition of the investment portfolio was:

 

   Amortized   Gross Unrealized   Fair 
(In thousands)    Cost Basis   Gains   Losses   Value 
Available-for-sale securities:                    
U.S. government and agency obligations  $1,010   $40   $-   $1,050 
Government guaranteed mortgage-backed securities   15,698    728    (28)   16,398 
Government guaranteed collateralized mortgage obligations   1,328    18    -    1,346 
Private label collateralized mortgage obligations   334    -    (67)   267 
Total debt securities   18,370    786    (95)   19,061 
Auction-rate trust preferred securities   7,700    -    (249)   7,451 
                     
Total available-for-sale securities    $26,070   $786   $(344)  $26,512 

 

   Amortized   Gross Unrealized   Fair 
(In thousands)    Cost Basis   Gains   Losses   Value 
Held-to-maturity securities:                    
Government guaranteed mortgage-backed securities  $29,379   $818   $-   $30,197 
                     
Total held-to-maturity securities    $29,379   $818   $-   $30,197 

 

At December 31, 2011, the composition of the investment portfolio was:

 

   Amortized   Gross Unrealized   Fair 
(In thousands)  Cost Basis   Gains   Losses   Value 
Available-for-sale securities:                    
U.S. government and agency obligations  $1,014   $54   $-   $1,068 
Government guaranteed mortgage-backed securities   13,919    844    -    14,763 
Government guaranteed collateralized mortgage obligations   1,711    10    -    1,721 
Private label collateralized mortgage obligations   352    -    (97)   255 
Total debt securities   16,996    908    (97)   17,807 
Auction-rate trust preferred securities   8,000    -    (756)   7,244 
                     
Total available-for-sale securities  $24,996   $908   $(853)  $25,051 

 

   Amortized   Gross Unrealized   Fair 
(In thousands)  Cost Basis   Gains   Losses   Value 
Held-to-maturity securities:                    
Government guaranteed mortgage-backed securities  $25,292   $387   $(9)  $25,670 
                     
Total held-to-maturity securities  $25,292   $387   $(9)  $25,670 

 

The Company has identified certain investment securities in which the fair value of the security is less than the cost of the security. This can be from an increase in interest rates since the time of purchase or from deterioration in the credit quality of the issuer. All investment securities which have unrealized losses undergo an internal impairment review.

 

Management’s review for impairment generally entails identification and analysis of individual investments that have fair values less than amortized cost, including consideration of the length of time the investment has been in an

unrealized loss position and the expected recovery period; discussion of evidential matter, including an evaluation of factors or triggers that could cause individual investments to qualify as having other-than-temporary impairment and those that would not support other-than-temporary impairment; and documentation of the results of these analyses. As a result of the reviews, management has determined that there are no other investment securities which have deteriorated in credit quality subsequent to purchase, and believes that these unrealized losses are temporary and are the result of changes in market interest rates and market conditions over the past several years.

10
 

 

The following is a summary of the fair values and related unrealized losses aggregated by investment category and length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position at June 30, 2012, and December 31, 2011.

 

   At June 30, 2012 
   Securities in Continuous Unrealized 
   Loss Position Less Than 12 Months 
   Number of   Market   Unrealized 
(Dollars in thousands)  Securities   Value   Loss 
             
Government guaranteed mortgage backed securities  2   $4,005   $(28)
                
Total securities in unrealized loss position  2   $4,005   $(28)

 

   Securities in Continuous Unrealized 
   Loss Position 12 or More Consecutive Months 
   Number of   Market   Unrealized 
(Dollars in thousands)  Securities   Value   Loss 
             
Private label collateralized mortgage obligations  1   $267   $(67)
Auction-rate trust preferred securities  2    2,150    (249)
                
Total securities in unrealized loss position  3   $2,417   $(316)

 

   At December 31, 2011 
   Securities in Continuous Unrealized 
   Loss Position Less Than 12 Months 
   Number of   Market   Unrealized 
(Dollars in thousands)  Securities   Value   Loss 
             
Government guaranteed mortgage backed securities  2   $4,244   $(9)
                
Total securities in unrealized loss position  2   $4,244   $(9)

 

   Securities in Continuous Unrealized 
   Loss Position 12 or More Consecutive Months 
   Number of   Market   Unrealized 
(Dollars in thousands)  Securities   Value   Loss 
             
Private label collateralized mortgage obligations  1   $256   $(97)
Auction-rate trust preferred securities  2    1,644    (756)
                
Total securities in unrealized loss position  3   $1,900   $(853)

 

11
 

 

NOTE 6 – LOANS RECEIVABLE

 

A summary of loans receivable at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011 is as follows:

 

   June 30,   December 31, 
(Dollars in thousands)  2012   2011 
         
Real estate loans:          
One-to four-family  $208,653   $217,893 
Commercial real estate and multi-family   150,083    160,858 
Construction   33,399    29,734 
Total real estate loans   392,135    408,485 
           
Commercial business loans   32,869    36,645 
Consumer loans:          
Home equity   29,277    32,157 
Savings accounts   749    847 
Automobile   487    509 
Personal   162    197 
Total consumer loans   30,675    33,710 
Totals loans   455,679    478,840 
           
Less:          
Allowance for loan losses   8,399    8,053 
Undisbursed construction loans   2,574    3,489 
Deferred loan origination fees, net   280    333 
Loans receivable, net  $444,426   $466,965 
           
Weighted average yield   5.16%   5.29%

 

Credit Quality of Financing Receivables and the Allowance for Loan Losses

 

Management segregates the loan portfolio into portfolio segments, which are defined as the levels at which the Company develops and documents a systematic method for determining its allowance for loan losses. The portfolio segments are segregated based on loan types and the underlying risk factors present in each loan type. Such risk factors are periodically reviewed by management and revised as deemed appropriate.

 

The Company’s loan portfolio is segregated into the following portfolio segments:

 

One-to Four-Family Owner Occupied Loans. This portfolio segment consists of the origination of first mortgage loans secured by one-to four-family owner occupied residential properties and residential construction loans to individuals to finance the construction of residential dwellings for personal use located in our market area. Although the Company has experienced an increase in foreclosures on its owner occupied loan portfolio over the past year, foreclosures are still at relatively low levels and believe this is due mainly to its conservative underwriting and lending policies which do not allow for risky loans such as “Option ARM,” “sub-prime” or “Alt-A” loans.

 

Commercial Real Estate and Multi-family Loans. This portfolio segment includes loans secured by commercial real estate, non-owner occupied one-to four-family and multi-family dwellings for property owners and businesses in our market area. Loans secured by commercial real estate generally have larger loan balances and more credit risk than owner occupied one-to four-family mortgage loans. The increased risk is the result of several factors, including the concentration of principal in a limited number of loans and borrowers, the impact of local and general economic conditions on the borrower’s ability to repay the loan, and the increased difficulty of evaluating and monitoring these types of loans.

 

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Construction and Land Development Loans. This portfolio segment includes commercial construction loans for commercial development projects, including condominiums, apartment buildings, and single family subdivisions as well as office buildings, retail and other income producing properties and land loans, which are loans made with land as security. Construction and land development financing generally involves greater credit risk than long-term financing on improved, owner-occupied real estate. Risk of loss on a construction loan depends largely upon the accuracy of the initial estimate of the value of the property at completion of construction compared to the estimated cost (including interest) of construction and other assumptions. If the estimate of construction cost proves to be inaccurate, the Company may be required to advance additional funds beyond the amount originally committed in order to protect the value of the property. Moreover, if the estimated value of the completed project proves to be inaccurate, the borrower may hold a property with a value that is insufficient to assure full repayment. Construction loans also expose the Company to the risks that improvements will not be completed on time in accordance with specifications and projected costs and that repayment will depend on the successful operation or sale of the properties, which may cause some borrowers to be unable to continue with debt service which exposes the Company to greater risk of non-payment and loss. Additionally, economic factors such as the decline of property values may have an adverse effect on the ability of the borrower to sell the property.

 

Commercial Business Loans. This portfolio segment includes commercial business loans secured by real estate, assignments of corporate assets, and personal guarantees of the business owners. Commercial business loans generally have higher interest rates and shorter terms than other loans, but they also may involve higher average balances, increased difficulty of loan monitoring and a higher risk of default since their repayment generally depends on the successful operation of the borrower’s business.

 

Real Estate Secured Loans. This portfolio segment includes home equity loans and home equity lines of credit secured by owner occupied one-to four-family residential properties. Loans of this type are generally written at a maximum of 75% of the appraised value of the property and require that the Company has a second lien position on the property. These loans are written at a higher interest rate and a shorter term than mortgage loans. The Company has experienced a low level of foreclosure in this type of loan during recent periods. These loans can be affected by economic conditions and the values of the underlying properties.

 

Consumer Loans. This portfolio segment includes loans secured by passbook or certificate accounts, or automobiles, as well as unsecured personal loans and overdraft lines of credit. This type of loan may entail greater risk than do residential mortgage loans, particularly in the case of loans that are unsecured or secured by assets that depreciate rapidly.

 

Loans are generally carried at the amount of unpaid principal, less the allowance for loan losses and adjusted for deferred loan fees, which are amortized over the term of the loan using the interest method. Interest on loans is accrued based on the principal amounts outstanding. It is the Company’s policy to discontinue the accrual of interest when a loan is specifically determined to be impaired or when the principal or interest is delinquent for more than 90 days. When a loan is placed on nonaccrual status, all interest previously accrued but not collected is reversed against current period interest income.

 

The allowance for loan losses is established through a provision for loan losses. The Company maintains the allowance at a level believed, to the best of management’s knowledge, adequate to cover all known and inherent losses in the loan portfolio that are both probable and reasonable to estimate at each reporting date.

 

Management reviews the allowance for loan losses on at least a quarterly basis in order to identify those inherent losses and to assess the overall collection probability for the loan portfolio. The evaluation process by portfolio segment includes, among other things, an analysis of delinquency trends, non-performing loan trends, the level of charge-offs and recoveries, prior loss experience, total loans outstanding, the volume of loan originations, the type, size and geographic concentration of the loans, the value of collateral securing the loan, the borrower’s ability to repay and repayment performance, the number of loans requiring heightened management oversight, local economic conditions and industry experience.

 

The establishment of the allowance for loan losses is significantly affected by management’s judgment and uncertainties, and there is a likelihood that different amounts would be reported under different conditions or assumptions. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”), as an integral part of its examination process, periodically reviews the allowance for loan losses and may require the Company to make additional provisions for estimated loan losses based upon judgments different from those of management.

 

13
 

 

The allowance generally consists of specific and general components. The specific component relates to loans that have been evaluated and determined to be impaired under ASC 310-10-35. For such impaired loans, when the discounted cash flows (or collateral value or observable market price if the loan is collateral dependent) of the impaired loan is lower than the carrying value of that loan, the Company will charge the difference to loss or establish a specific allowance if the loss is not confirmed. The general component covers non-classified loans and is based on historical loss experience adjusted for qualitative factors. Additional allowances are placed on loans classified as either doubtful, substandard or special mention. Although for analytical purposes, certain allowances are attributed to loans that are impaired and general components are attributed to loans evaluated collectively. The allowance is available to cover all charge offs that arise from the loan portfolio.

 

The Company will continue to monitor and modify its allowance for loan losses as conditions dictate. No assurances can be given that the level of allowance for loan losses will cover all of the inherent losses in the loan portfolio or that future adjustments to the allowance for loan losses will not be necessary if economic and other conditions differ substantially from the economic and other conditions used by management to determine the current level of the allowance for loan losses.

 

The following tables set forth the balance of the allowance for loan losses at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, by portfolio segment, disaggregated by impairment methodology, which is then further segregated by amounts evaluated for impairment collectively and individually. Also included is a summary of transactions in the allowance for loan losses for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and the year ended December 31, 2011. The allowance for loan losses allocated to each portfolio segment is not necessarily indicative of future losses in any particular portfolio segment and does not restrict the use of the allowance to absorb losses in other portfolio segments.

 

   One-to Four-
Family
   Construction   Commercial
Real Estate
   Commercial   Consumer   Total 
As of and for the Six Months
Ended June 30, 2012
                              
(In thousands)                              
Allowance for loan losses:                              
Beginning balance  $1,745   $1,327   $3,745   $754   $482   $8,053 
Provision for loan losses   611    374    901    2,081    152    4,119 
Charge-offs   (347)   (629)   (1,245)   (1,416)   (146)   (3,783)
Recoveries   4    -    -    5    1    10 
Ending balance  $2,013   $1,072   $3,401   $1,424   $489   $8,399 
Ending loan balance individually evaluated for impairment  $4,636   $13,209   $8,892   $801   $175   $27,713 
Ending loan balance collectively evaluated for impairment  $204,017   $20,190   $141,191   $32,068   $30,500   $427,966 
                               
As of and for the Year Ended
December 31, 2011
                              
(In thousands)                              
Allowance for loan losses:                              
Beginning balance  $1,585   $600   $2,714   $884   $610   $6,393 
Provision for loan losses   377    1,449    1,942    383    142    4,293 
Charge-offs   (217)   (722)   (911)   (516)   (271)   (2,637)
Recoveries   -    -    -    3    1    4 
Ending balance  $1,745   $1,327   $3,745   $754   $482   $8,053 
Ending loan balance individually evaluated for impairment  $2,721   $8,474   $4,422   $3,585   $225   $19,427 
Ending loan balance collectively evaluated for impairment  $215,172   $21,260   $156,436   $33,060   $33,485   $459,413 

 

The Company’s policies provide for the classification of loans and other assets into the following categories: pass (1 - 4), bankable with care (5), special mention (6), substandard (7), doubtful (8) and loss (9). Consistent with regulatory guidelines, loans and other assets that are considered to be of lesser quality are classified as substandard, doubtful, or loss assets. An asset is considered substandard if it is inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or of the collateral pledged, if any. Substandard assets include those assets characterized by the distinct possibility that we will sustain some loss if the deficiencies are not corrected. Assets classified as doubtful have all of the weaknesses inherent in those classified substandard with the added characteristic that the weaknesses present make collection or liquidation in full, on the basis of currently existing facts, conditions and values, highly questionable and improbable. Assets (or portions of assets) classified as loss are those considered uncollectible and of such little value that their continuance as assets without establishment of a specific valuation allowance or charge-off is not warranted. Assets that do not expose us to risk sufficient to warrant classification in one of the aforementioned categories, but which possess potential weaknesses that deserve close attention, are required to be designated as special mention.

 

14
 

 

When assets are classified as special mention, substandard or doubtful, the Company disaggregates these assets and allocates a portion of the related general loss allowances to such assets as the Company deems prudent. Determinations as to the classification of assets and the amount of loss allowances are subject to review by our principal federal regulator, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, which can require that we establish additional loss allowances. The Company regularly reviews its asset portfolio to determine whether any assets require classification in accordance with applicable regulations.

 

The following tables are a summary of the loan portfolio quality indicators by loan class as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011:

 

Commercial Loans  - Credit Risk Profile by Internally Assigned Grade: 
    At June 30, 2012   At December 31, 2011 
(In thousands)   Commercial
Loans
   Commercial
Real Estate
Construction
   Commercial
Real Estate
   Commercial
Loans
   Commercial
Real Estate
Construction
   Commercial
Real Estate
 
Grade:                               
4   $6,284   $-   $35,141   $6,659   $216   $40,769 
5    19,103    10,308    81,890    21,941    7,463    88,089 
6    4,524    4,268    19,099    2,072    5,948    15,383 
7    2,750    12,539    13,953    5,235    8,595    16,004 
8    208    -    -    738    -    613 
Total   $32,869   $27,115   $150,083   $36,645   $22,222   $160,858 
                                  

Consumer Loans - Credit Risk Profile by Internally Assigned Grade:
   At June 30, 2012   At December 31, 2011 
(In thousands)  Residential -
Prime
   Residential -
Construction
   Residential -
Prime
   Residential -
Construction
 
                 
Grade:                    
Pass  $202,420   $6,284   $213,049   $7,512 
Special Mention   308    -    746    - 
Substandard   5,925    -    4,098    - 
Doubtful   -    -    -    - 
Total  $208,653   $6,284   $217,893   $7,512 

 

Consumer Loans - Credit Risk Profile Based on Payment Activity:
       At June 30, 2012       At December 31, 2011 
(In thousands)      Consumer - Other       Consumer - Other 
Grade:                    
Performing      $30,286       $33,323 
Nonperforming        389         387 
Total       $30,675        $33,710 

 

When a loan is 15 days past due, the Company sends the borrower a late notice. The Company also contacts the borrower by phone if the delinquency is not corrected promptly after the notice has been sent. When the loan is 30 days past due, the Company mails the borrower a letter reminding the borrower of the delinquency, and attempt to contact the borrower personally to determine the reason for the delinquency in order to ensure that the borrower understands the terms of the loan and the importance of making payments on or before the due date. If necessary, subsequent delinquency notices are issued and the account will be monitored on a regular basis thereafter. By the 90th day of delinquency, the Company will send the borrower a final demand for payment and may recommend foreclosure. A summary report of all loans 30 days or more past due is provided to the board of directors of the Company each month, and more frequently to the Asset Quality Committee of the Board of Directors.

 

15
 

 

Loans are automatically placed on non-accrual status when payment of principal or interest is more than 90 days delinquent. Loans are also placed on non-accrual status if collection of principal or interest in full is in doubt or if the loan has been restructured. When loans are placed on non-accrual status, unpaid accrued interest is fully reversed, and further income is recognized only to the extent received. The loan may be returned to accrual status if unpaid principal and interest are repaid so that the loan is less than 90 days delinquent. Management works closely with the Asset Quality Committee of the Board of Directors in an effort to resolve nonperforming assets in a manner most advantageous to the Company.

 

The following tables set forth certain information with respect to our loan portfolio delinquencies by loan class and amount as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011:

 

   Credit Quality Information 
           Greater               Carrying 
           Than               Amount > 90 
   31-60 Days   61-90 Days   90 Days   Total Past           Days and 
   Past Due   Past Due   (Nonaccrual)   Due   Current   Total Loans   Accruing 
As of June 30, 2012                            
(In thousands)                                   
Real estate loans                                   
One-to four-family  $1,539   $-   $4,715   $6,254    208,683   $214,937   $- 
Construction   -    480    11,525    12,005    15,110    27,115    - 
Commercial real estate and multi-family   750    40    10,828    11,618    138,465    150,083    - 
Commercial business loans   347    695    1,680    2,722    30,147    32,869      
Consumer - other   390    -    389    779    29,896    30,675    - 
Total  $3,026   $1,215   $29,137   $33,378   $422,301   $455,679   $- 
                                    
As of December 31, 2011                                   
(In thousands)                                   
Real estate loans                                   
One-to four-family  $1,379   $214   $4,140   $5,733    212,160   $217,893   $- 
Construction   270    -    9,005    9,275    20,459    29,734    - 
Commercial real estate and multi-family   654    249    9,182    10,085    150,773    160,858    - 
Commercial business loans   396    -    1,967    2,363    34,282    36,645      
Consumer - other   467    37    387    891    32,819    33,710    - 
Total  $3,166   $500   $24,681   $28,347   $450,493   $478,840   $- 

 

Nonperforming loans (defined as nonaccrual loans and TDRs) totaled $29.1 million at June 30, 2012 compared to $24.7 million at December 31, 2011 ($1.3 million of which at both dates is fully guaranteed by the U.S. Small Business Administration). The amount of income that was contractually due but not recognized on nonperforming loans totaled $329,000 and $1.3 million for the quarter and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively, compared with $365,000 for the year ended December 31, 2011.

 

At June 30 2012, there were no loans 90 or more days past due and still accruing interest. At June 30, 2012, the Company had 106 loans on non-accrual status with foregone interest for the period since the loans were placed on non-accrual status in the amount of approximately $1.3 million. Included in these loans were 46 loans which were not 90 days past due, but were placed on non-accrual status as a result of a recent modification or the identification of a weakness on the loan.

 

The Company accounts for impaired loans in accordance with GAAP. An impaired loan generally is one for which it is probable, based on current information, that the lender will not collect all the amounts due under the contractual terms of the loan. Loans are individually evaluated for impairment. When the Company classifies a problem asset as impaired, it makes a specific allowance for that portion of the asset that is deemed uncollectible.

 

At June 30, 2012, the Company had $27.8 million of loans which were considered to be impaired, with a valuation allowance of $305,000, compared to $19.4 million of such loans at December 31, 2011 with a valuation allowance of $1.1 million. The increase is primarily due to the classification of the following as impaired during the period: three residential development loans, fourteen commercial real estate loans, ten commercial loans secured by business assets, fifteen residential mortgage loans and four home equity loans. The increases were partially offset by removing from impaired status: one residential mortgage loan, three home equity loans and six commercial business loans. Additionally, $1.1 million of specific allowances that were allowed under previous regulatory supervision, were charged off against the loan balances as required under current regulatory supervision.

 

16
 

 

The following tables are a summary of impaired loans by class of loans as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011:

 

       Unpaid       Average   Interest 
   Carrying   Principal   Related   Carrying   Income 
As of June 30, 2012  Amount   Balance   Allowance   Amount   Recognized 
   (In thousands) 
Impaired loans without valuation allowance:                         
Real estate loans                         
One-to four-family  $4,621   $5,002   $-   $4,784   $84 
Construction   10,339    12,205    -    10,485    80 
Commercial real estate and multi-family   9,109    10,390    -    9,195    85 
Commercial business loans   763    1,811    -    937    7 
Consumer - other   221    397    -    259    6 
Total impaired loans without valuation allowance   25,053    29,805    -    25,660    262 
Impaired loans with valuation allowance:                         
Real estate loans                         
Construction   2,717    3,439    305    2,958    59 
Total impaired loans with valuation allowance   2,717    3,439    305    2,958    59 
Total impaired loans  $27,770   $33,244   $305   $28,618   $321 

 

       Unpaid       Average   Interest 
   Carrying   Principal   Related   Carrying   Income 
As of December 31, 2011  Amount   Balance   Allowance   Amount   Recognized 
   (In thousands) 
Impaired loans without valuation allowance:                         
Real estate loans                         
One-to four-family  $1,360   $1,375   $-   $1,368   $42 
Construction   959    959    -    944    5 
Commercial real estate and multi-family   3,334    3,352    -    3,370    201 
Commercial business loans   2,870    3,094    -    239    80 
Consumer - other   101    353    -    206    1 
Total impaired loans without valuation allowance   8,624    9,133    -    6,127    329 
Impaired loans with valuation allowance:                         
Real estate loans                         
One-to four-family   1,361    1,361    109    1,362    42 
Construction   7,515    8,980    510    4,173    279 
Commercial real estate and multi-family   1,088    1,088    336    1,097    24 
Commercial business loans   715    715    46    662    35 
Consumer - other   124    124    71    125    6 
Total impaired loans with valuation allowance   10,803    12,268    1,072    7,419    386 
Total impaired loans  $19,427   $21,401   $1,072   $13,546   $715 

 

Loan modifications are generally performed at the request of the individual borrower and may include reduction in interest rates, changes in payments, and maturity date extensions. TDRs are loans for which the original contractual terms of the loans have been modified and both of the following conditions exist: (i) the restructuring constitutes a concession (including reduction of interest rates or extension of maturity dates) and (ii) the borrower is experiencing financial difficulties. Loans are not classified as TDRs when the modification is short-term or results in only an insignificant delay or shortfall in the payments to be received. The Company’s loan modifications are determined on a case-by-case basis in connection with ongoing loan collection processes.

 

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The following table displays information for impaired loans modified through a TDR at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011:

 

   As of   As of 
   June 30,   December 31, 
(In thousands)  2012   2011 
         
Aggregate recorded investment of impaired loans with terms modified through a troubled debt restructuring:          
Accruing interest  $656   $416 
Nonaccrual   10,565    12,235 
Total  $11,221   $12,651 

 

The following table presents a summary of loans that were restructured during the six months ended June 30, 2012 and for the year ended December 31, 2011:

 

   For the Six Months Ended June 30, 2012 
(Dollars in thousands)  Number
of Loans
   Pre-
Modification
Recorded
Investment
   Funds
Disbursed
   Interest and
Escrow
Capitalized
   Post-
Modification
Recorded
Investment
 
                     
Real estate loans:                         
One-to four-family   4   $989   $-   $3   $992 
Multi-family and commercial real estate   1    426    -    -    426 
Consumer loans:                         
Home equity   3    123    -    -    123 
Total TDRs restructured during the period   8   $1,538   $-   $3   $1,541 
                          
TDRs, still accruing interest   3   $567   $-   $-   $567 
TDRs, included in nonaccrual   5    971    -    3    974 
Total   8   $1,538   $-   $3   $1,541 

 

   For the Year Ended December 31, 2011 
(Dollars in thousands)  Number
of Loans
   Pre-
Modification
Recorded
Investment
   Funds
Disbursed
   Interest and
Escrow
Capitalized
   Post-
Modification
Recorded
Investment
 
                     
Real estate loans:                         
One-to-four family   2   $310   $-   $-   $310 
Construction   1    48    30    -    78 
Commercial real estate and multi-family   5    3,736    19    59    3,814 
Commercial business loans   3    673    -    -    673 
Total TDRs restructured during the period   11   $4,767   $49   $59   $4,875 
                          
TDRs, still accruing interest   -   $-   $-   $-   $- 
TDRs, included in nonaccrual   11    4,767    49    59    4,875 
Total   11   $4,767   $49   $59   $4,875 

 

18
 

 

The specific allowances for loan losses on TDRs is determined by discounting the restructured cash flows at the original effective rate of the loan before modification or is based on the underlying collateral value less costs to sell, if repayment of the loan is considered collateral-dependent. If the resulting amount is less than the recorded book value, the Company either establishes a specific valuation allowance as a component of the allowance for loan losses, or charges off the impaired balance if it determines that such amount is a confirmed loss. This method is used consistently for all segments of the portfolio. The allowance for loan losses also includes an allowance based on a loss migration analysis for each loan category for loans that are not individually evaluated for specific impairment. All loans charged-off, including TDRs charged-off, are factored into this calculation by portfolio segment. During the six months ended June 30, 2012, the Company charged off $2.1 million of loans previously classified as TDRs, on which there were $743,000 of related specific allowances.

 

NOTE 7 - EARNINGS PER SHARE

 

Basic earnings per common share is calculated by dividing the net income available to common stockholders by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per common share is computed in a manner similar to basic earnings per common share except that the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding is increased to include the incremental common shares (as computed using the treasury stock method) that would have been outstanding if all potentially dilutive common stock equivalents were issued during the period. The Company's common stock equivalents are comprised of stock options and restricted stock awards. Anti-dilutive shares are common stock equivalents with weighted-average exercise prices in excess of the weighted-average market value for the periods presented. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, anti-dilutive options excluded from the calculations totaled 278,813 options (with an exercise price of $11.12) and 5,886 options (with an exercise price of $12.51). For the three and six months ended June 30, 2011, anti-dilutive options excluded from the calculations totaled 315,827 options (with an exercise price of $11.12) and 7,483 options (with an exercise price of $12.51). Unallocated common shares held by the ESOP are not included in the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for purposes of calculating either basic or diluted net income per common share.

 

   Three Months Ended   Six Months Ended 
   June 30,   June 30, 
   2012   2011   2012   2011 
             
Net income (loss)  $(715,000)  $505,000   $(1,692,000)  $901,000 
                     
Weighted-average common shares outstanding:                    
Basic   6,610,729    6,826,963    6,610,766    6,827,055 
Effect of dilutive stock options and restrictive stock awards   -    -    -    - 
Diluted   6,610,729    6,826,963    6,610,766    6,827,055 
                     
Earnings (loss) per common share:                    
Basic  $(0.11)  $0.07   $(0.26)  $0.13 
Diluted  $(0.11)  $0.07   $(0.26)  $0.13 

 

NOTE 8 - COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

 

Comprehensive income is net income adjusted for any changes in equity from non-owner sources that are not recorded in the income statement (such as changes in the net unrealized gain/loss on available-for-sale securities). The purpose of reporting comprehensive income is to provide a measure of all changes in equity that result from recognized transactions and other economic events of the period other than transactions with owners in their capacity as owners. The Company’s sole source of other comprehensive income is the net unrealized gain on its available-for-sale securities.

 

19
 

 

   Three Months Ended   Six Months Ended 
   June 30,   June 30, 
   2012   2011   2012   2011 
   (In thousands) 
                 
Net income (loss)  $(715)  $505   $(1,692)  $901 
                     
Other comprehensive income:                    
Unrealized gain (loss) on securities available-for-sale   (76)   226    386    101 
Reclassification adjustment for (gain) loss realized in net income   -    (86)   -    (86)
                     
Other comprehensive income (loss) before tax effect   (76)   140    386    15 
                     
Income tax effect related to items of other comprehensive income (loss)   (8)   19    (41)   (3)
                     
Other comprehensive income (loss) net of tax effect   (68)   121    427    18 
                     
Total comprehensive income (loss)  $(783)  $626   $(1,265)  $919 

 

The Company has not recognized deferred taxes related to unrealized capital losses in other comprehensive income due to its current inability to use them.

 

NOTE 9 - EQUITY INCENTIVE PLAN

 

Under the Naugatuck Valley Financial Corporation 2005 Equity Incentive Plan (the “Incentive Plan”), the Company may grant up to 371,794 stock options and 148,717 shares of restricted stock to its employees, officers and directors for an aggregate amount of up to 520,511 shares of the Company’s common stock for issuance upon the grant or exercise of awards. Both incentive stock options and non-statutory stock options may be granted under the Incentive Plan.

 

The amounts and terms of the awards granted under the Incentive Plan are summarized in the following table.

 

   Grant date 
   July 26,   December 18,   March 20,   March 21, 
   2008   2007   2007   2006 
                 
Option awards                    
Awarded   997    1,995    7,483    6,485 
Exercise price  $11.12   $11.12   $12.51   $11.12 
Maximum term in years   10    10    10    10 
Restricted stock awards                    
Awarded   997    2,993    1,995    1,496 

 

To date, stock option awards have been granted with an exercise price equal to the higher of the market price of the Company’s stock at the date of grant or $11.12, which was the market price of the Company’s stock at the date stock option awards were initially granted under the Incentive Plan. All granted stock options and restricted stock awards vest at 20% per year beginning on the first anniversary of the date of grant.

 

Stock options and restricted stock awards are considered common stock equivalents for the purpose of computing earnings per share on a diluted basis.

 

The Company records share-based compensation expense related to outstanding stock option and restricted stock awards based upon the fair value at the date of grant over the vesting period of such awards on a straight-line basis. The fair value of each restricted stock allocation, based on the market price at the date of grant, is recorded to unearned stock awards. Compensation expenses related to unearned restricted shares are amortized to compensation, taxes and benefits expense over the vesting period of the restricted stock awards. The fair value of each stock option award is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing method as described below. The Company recorded share-based compensation expense of $2,065 and $3,148 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively, compared to $4,550 and $10,301 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2011, respectively, in connection with the stock option and restricted stock awards.

 

20
 

 

The fair value of each stock option award is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing method which includes several assumptions such as volatility, expected dividends, expected term and risk-free rate for each stock option award. In determining the expected term of the option awards, the Company elected to follow the simplified method as permitted by the SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin 107. Under this method, the Company has estimated the expected term of the options as being equal to the average of the vesting term plus the original contractual term. The Company estimated its volatility using the historical volatility of other, similar companies during a period of time equal to the expected life of the options. The risk-free rate for the periods within the contractual life of the options is based upon the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant. Assumptions used to determine the weighted-average fair value of stock options granted were as follows:

 

   July 26,   December 18,   March 20,   March 21, 
Grant date  2008   2007   2007   2006 
                 
Dividend yield   2.74%   2.20%   1.60%   1.89%
Expected volatility   13.40%   11.00%   10.49%   11.20%
Risk-free rate   3.56%   3.63%   4.48%   4.61%
Expected life in years   6.5    6.5    6.5    6.5 
                     
Weighted average fair value of options at grant date  $1.51   $1.18   $2.55   $2.25 

 

NOTE 10 - DIVIDENDS

 

On May 16, 2012, the Company's Board of Directors declared a cash dividend of $0.03 per outstanding common share, which was paid on June 15, 2012, to stockholders of record as of the close of business on May 28, 2012.

 

NOTE 11 – FAIR VALUE

 

The Company uses fair value to record adjustments to certain assets and liabilities and to prepare required disclosures. Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Fair value is best determined using market quotes. However, in many instances, there are no quoted market prices available. In such instances, fair values are determined using various valuation techniques. Various assumptions and observable inputs must be relied upon in applying these techniques. Accordingly, the fair value estimates may not be realized in an immediate transfer of the respective asset or liability.

 

 

21
 

 

The following is a summary of the carrying value and estimated fair value of the Company’s significant financial instruments as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011: 

 

   June 30, 2012   December 31, 2011 
   Carrying   Estimated   Carrying   Estimated 
(In thousands)  Amount   Fair Value   Amount   Fair Value 
                 
Financial Assets                    
Cash and cash equivalents  $22,778   $22,778   $18,069   $18,069 
Investment securities   55,891    56,709    50,343    50,721 
Loans held for sale   1,358    1,358    2,993    2,993 
Loans receivable, net   444,426    461,179    466,965    492,446 
Accrued income receivable   1,773    1,773    1,932    1,932 
Mortgage servicing rights   685    720    700    742 
                     
Financial Liabilities                    
Deposits   411,346    414,865    410,887    409,357 
Borrowed funds   57,252    58,671    70,817    72,757 
Mortgagors' escrow accounts   4,621    4,621    4,755    4,755 

 

Fair Value Hierarchy

 

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Current accounting guidance establishes a fair value hierarchy based on the transparency of inputs participants use to price an asset or liability. The fair value hierarchy prioritizes these inputs into the following three levels:

 

Level 1: Valuation is based upon unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the reporting entity has the ability to access at the measurement date.

 

Level 2: Fair value is calculated using inputs other than quoted market prices that are directly or indirectly observable for the asset or liability. The valuation may rely on quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in inactive markets, inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability (such as interest rates, volatilities, prepayment speeds, credit ratings, etc.) or inputs that are derived principally or corroborated by market data by correlation or other means.

 

Level 3: Inputs for determining the fair value of the respective assets or liabilities are not observable. Level 3 valuations are reliant upon pricing models and techniques that require significant management judgment or estimation.

 

Categorization within the valuation hierarchy is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. A description of the valuation methodologies used by the Company is presented below:

 

Cash and cash equivalents - The carrying amount of cash, due from banks, and interest-bearing deposits is used to approximate fair value, given the short timeframe to maturity and as such assets do not present unanticipated credit concerns.

 

Investment Securities - When quoted prices are available in an active market, the Company classifies securities within Level 1 of the valuation hierarchy. If quoted market prices are not available, the Company employs an independent pricing service who utilizes matrix pricing to calculate fair value. Such fair value measurements consider observable data such as dealer quotes, market spreads, cash flows, yield curves, live trading levels, trade execution data, market consensus prepayments speeds, credit information, and the respective terms and conditions for debt instruments. Level 2 securities include CMOs, mortgage backed securities and corporate bonds issued by GSEs.

 

When a market is illiquid or there is a lack of transparency around the inputs to valuation, the respective securities are classified as Level 3 and reliance is placed upon internally developed models and management judgment and evaluation for valuation. Auction-rate trust preferred securities (“ARPs”) are currently classified as Level 3.

 

22
 

 

Management uses an internally developed model to value ARPs. The valuation model is based on a discounted cash flow using the expected value of the collateral preferred shares, either at call dates or the maturity date of the trust, the credit rating of the issuer of each of the ARPs, the expected yield during the holding period and current rates for U.S. Treasury securities matching the expected remaining term of the trust. The expected value of the collateral preferred shares (either when called or upon maturity of the trust) is assumed to range between current market prices and par. Discount rates are implied from observable market inputs. The resulting discounted cash flows for each of the ARPs indicated little to no impairment in the fair value of the securities. On a quarterly basis, management reviews the trust preferred securities pricing generated from our internal model.

 

Loans Receivable - Loans held for sale are accounted for at the lower of cost or market. The fair value of loans held for sale are based on quoted market prices of similar or identical loans sold in conjunction with securitization transactions, adjusted as required for changes in loan characteristics. The Company employs an independent third party to provide fair value estimates for loans held for investment. Such estimates are calculated using discounted cash flow analysis, using market interest rates for comparable loans. The associated cash flows are adjusted for credit and other potential losses. Fair value for impaired loans is estimated using the net present value of the expected cash flows or the fair value of the underlying collateral if repayment is collateral dependent.

 

Accrued income receivable – The carrying amounts reported in the statement of financial condition approximate these assets’ fair value.

 

Mortgage-servicing rights – The Company sells residential mortgage loans with servicing rights retained. At the time of the sale, the Company determines the value of the retained servicing rights, which represents the present value of the differential between the contractual servicing fee and adequate compensation, defined as the fee a sub-servicer would require to assume the role of servicer, after considering the estimated effects of prepayments. If material, a portion of the gain on the sale of the loan is recognized as due to the value of the servicing rights, and a servicing asset is recorded.

 

The Company has engaged an independent third party to perform the servicing rights analysis on a quarterly basis. The cost basis of loan servicing rights is amortized on a level yield basis over the period of estimated net servicing revenue and such amortization is included in the consolidated statement of income as a reduction of loan servicing fee income. Servicing rights are evaluated for impairment by comparing their aggregate carrying amount to their fair value. The fair value of loan servicing rights is estimated using a present value cash flow model. The most important assumptions used in the valuation model are the anticipated rate of loan prepayments and discount rates. All assumptions are based on standards used by market participants. Impairment is recognized as an adjustment to loan and servicing income.

 

Foreclosed Property and Repossessed Assets - Foreclosed property and repossessed assets are recorded as held for sale initially at the lower of the loan balance or fair value of the collateral less estimated selling costs. For the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, foreclosed properties and repossessed assets with a carrying value of $258,000 and $488,000, respectively, were transferred to foreclosed property and repossessed assets from loans. Prior to the transfer, the assets whose fair value less costs to sell was less than their carrying value, were written down to fair value through a charge to the allowance for loan losses. Subsequent to foreclosure, valuations are updated periodically, and the assets may be marked down further, reflecting a new cost basis. There were subsequent valuation adjustments to five foreclosed properties in the amount of $94,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2012. There were no subsequent valuation adjustments to foreclosed properties and repossessed assets for the six months ended June 30, 2011. Collateral dependent impaired loans and foreclosed real estate and repossessed assets are considered Level 3, as the fair value is based on an appraisal and the adjustment to comparable sales made by the appraiser are unobservable. Non collateral dependent loans are measured using a discounted cash flow technique and are also considered Level 3, as the inputs are the Bank’s own assumptions.

 

Deposit Liabilities - The fair values disclosed for demand deposits are by definition equal to the amount payable on demand at the reporting date which is also their carrying value. The carrying amounts of variable-rate, fixed term money market accounts and certificates of deposit approximate their fair values at the reporting date. Fair values for fixed rate certificates of deposit are estimated using a discounted cash flow calculation that applies market interest rates on comparable instruments to a schedule of aggregated expensed monthly maturities on time deposits.

 

Borrowed Funds - Carrying value is as an estimate of fair value for securities sold under agreements to repurchase and other short term debt that matures within 90 days. The fair values of other borrowings are estimated using discounted cash flow analyses based on current market rates adjusted, as appropriate, for associated credit and option risks.

 

23
 

 

Mortgagors’ escrow accounts – The carrying amounts reported in the statement of financial condition approximate the fair value of the mortgagors’ escrow accounts.

 

Under certain circumstances we make adjustment to fair value for our assets although they are not measured at fair value on an ongoing basis. These include assets that are measured at the lower of cost or market that were recognized at fair value (i.e., below cost) at the end of the period, as well as assets that are not measured at fair value on an ongoing basis but are subject to fair value adjustments in certain circumstances (e.g., when there is evidence of impairment).

 

Assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring and non-recurring basis at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011 are summarized below:

 

   June 30, 2012 
   Carrying Value 
(In thousands)  Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   Total 
Assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis:                    
Available-for-sale investment securities:                    
U.S. Government and agency obligations  $-   $1,050   $-   $1,050 
Government guaranteed mortgage-backed securities   -    16,398    -    16,398 
Government guaranteed collateralized mortgage obligations   -    1,346    -    1,346 
Private label collateralized mortgage obligations   -    267    -    267 
Auction-rate trust preferred securities   -    -    7,451    7,451 
Residential loans held for sale   -    1,358    -    1,358 
                     
Assets measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis:                    
                     
Impaired loans  $-   $-   $27,465   $27,465 
Foreclosed real estate and other repossessed assets   -    -    403    403 
Mortgage-servicing rights   -    -    803    803 

 

   December 31, 2011 
   Carrying Value 
(In thousands)  Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   Total 
Assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis:                
Available-for-sale investment securities:                    
U.S. Government and agency obligations  $-   $1,068   $-   $1,068 
Government guaranteed mortgage-backed securities   -    14,763    -    14,763 
Government guaranteed collateralized mortgage obligations   -    1,721    -    1,721 
Private label collateralized mortgage obligations   -    255    -    255 
Auction-rate trust preferred securities   -    -    7,244    7,244 
Residential loans held for sale   -    2,993    -    2,993 
                     
Assets measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis:                    
Impaired loans  $-   $-   $18,355   $18,355 
Foreclosed real estate and other repossessed assets   -    -    873    873 
Mortgage-servicing rights   -    -    726    726 

 

There were no significant transfers of assets between Levels 1, 2 or 3 of the fair value hierarchy during the three or six months ended June 30, 2012.

 

 

24
 

 

 

The following table shows a reconciliation of the beginning and ending balances for Level 3 assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis:

 

   For the Six   For the Year 
   Months Ended   Ended 
   June 30,   December 31, 
(In thousands)  2012   2011 
           
Balance at beginning of period  $7,244   $7,960 
Increase (decrease) in fair value of securities included in accumulated other comprehensive income   507    (516)
Redemptions at par   (300)   (200)
Balance at end of period  $7,451   $7,244 

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

This discussion should be read in conjunction with the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements for the year ended December 31, 2011 included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K/A.

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

This report contains forward-looking statements that are based on assumptions and may describe future plans, strategies and expectations of the Company. These forward-looking statements are generally identified by use of the words “believe”, “expect”, “intend”, “anticipate”, “estimate”, “project” or similar expressions. The Company’s ability to predict results or the actual effect of future plans or strategies is inherently uncertain. Factors which could have a material adverse effect on the operations of the Company and its subsidiaries include, but are not limited to, changes in interest rates, national and regional economic conditions, legislative and regulatory changes, monetary and fiscal policies of the U.S. government, including policies of the U.S. Treasury and the Federal Reserve Board, the size, quality and composition of the loan or investment portfolios, demand for loan products, deposit flows, competition, demand for financial services in the Company’s market area, changes in real estate market values in the Company’s market area, and changes in relevant accounting principles and guidelines. Additional factors are discussed below under “Item 1A – Risk Factors” and in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K/A for the year ended December 31, 2011. These risks and uncertainties should be considered in evaluating forward-looking statements and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements. Except as required by applicable law or regulation, the Company does not undertake, and specifically disclaims any obligation, to release publicly the result of any revisions that may be made to any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of the statements or to reflect the occurrence of anticipated or unanticipated events.

 

Comparison of Financial Condition at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011

 

Total assets contracted $14.3 million from $572.2 million at December 31, 2011 to $558.0 million at June 30, 2012. Net loans receivable decreased by $22.5 million, or 4.8%, partially offset by an increase in investments of $5.5 million and an increase in cash and cash equivalents of $4.7 million. Multi-family and commercial real estate loans decreased by $10.8 million, one-to four-family loans decreased by $9.2 million, commercial business loans decreased by $3.8 million and consumer loans decreased by $3.0 million. These decreases were partially offset by an increase in construction loans of $3.7 million, primarily due to a reclassification of one large loan from the commercial business loan portfolio. The decrease in one-to four-family loans is primarily related to the sale of new production fixed rate mortgages on the secondary market. Commercial real estate loans and commercial business loans decreased primarily due to normal amortization, repayments, charge offs, and decreased demand for these types of products. Consumer loans have decreased as customers have been paying off second mortgages as they refinance into first mortgages.

 

25
 

 

Total liabilities were $477.3 million at June 30, 2012 compared to $489.9 million at December 31, 2011. Deposits at June 30, 2012 were relatively flat with an increase of $459,000, or 0.1%, from December 31, 2011. Between December 31, 2011 and June 30, 2012, core deposits (defined as all deposits other than certificates of deposit) increased $14.2 million while certificates of deposit decreased $13.8 million. Management attributes the increase in core deposits to management’s strategy to offer competitive short term rates and products, as well as depositor preference to maintain funds in short term accounts given the expectation for higher market interest rates in future periods. Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston decreased by $11.4 million, from $64.3 million at December 31, 2011 to $52.9 million at June 30, 2012. Reverse repurchase agreements decreased $2.2 million, from $6.5 million to $4.3 million over the same period.

 

Total stockholders’ equity was $80.7 million at June 30, 2012 compared to $82.3 million at December 31, 2011. The decrease in stockholders’ equity was primarily due to the net loss of $1.7 million experienced for the six month period and dividends of $397,000 paid to shareholders, partially offset by a net decrease in the unrealized loss on available for sale securities of $427,000.

 

Comparison of Operating Results For the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2012 and 2011

 

General. For the three months ended June 30, 2012, the Company recorded a net loss of $715,000 compared to net income of $505,000 for the three months ended June 30, 2011, a decrease of $1.2 million or 241.6%. The Company recorded a net loss of $1.7 million for the six month period ended June 30, 2012, compared to net income of $901,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2011. The decrease was primarily due to increased loan loss provisions and a higher level of noninterest expense, including the previously reported deposit related charge relating to the underpayment of interest on certain certificate of deposit accounts. These increases were partially offset by higher levels of net interest income and noninterest income.

 

Net Interest Income. Net interest income for the quarter ended June 30, 2012 totaled $4.64 million compared to $4.58 million for the quarter ended June 30, 2011, an increase of $62,000 or 1.4%. For the six month period ended June 30, 2012, net interest income totaled $9.6 million, compared to $9.0 million for the six months ended June 30, 2011. The increase in net interest income was primarily due to a decrease in interest expense in both periods. Interest expense decreased by $875,000, or 38.3%, in the three month period and decreased by $1.7 million, or 36.2%, in the six month period. The decrease was primarily due to a decrease in the average rates paid on interest bearing liabilities. The average rates paid on deposits and borrowings decreased by 57 basis points in both the three and six month periods. The rate decrease is mainly due to certificates of deposit renewing at lower rates or being transferred to savings accounts during the period, combined with the payoff of higher rate borrowings from the Federal Home Loan Bank at maturity. The average balances of interest bearing liabilities decreased by 8.3% and 6.5% for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively. The decrease in interest bearing liabilities is attributed primarily to a decrease in the average balance of borrowings in both periods.

 

The decrease in interest expense was partially offset by a decrease in interest income. Interest income decreased by $813,000, or 11.8%, in the three month period and decreased by $1.1 million, or 8.1% in the six month period. The decrease was primarily due to a decrease in the average rates earned on loans and investments. The average rates earned on loans and investments decreased by 42 basis points and 30 basis points in the three and six month periods, respectively. Additionally, the average balances of interest earning assets decreased by 4.0% and 2.4% for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012. The decrease in interest earning assets is attributed to decreases of 6.6% and 4.5% in the average balance of the loan portfolio in the three and six month periods, respectively, partially offset by increases of 23.1% and 18.3% in the average balance of the investment portfolio over the same periods. The decreases in the loan portfolio are due primarily to the sale of new production of residential mortgages through the Bank’s secondary mortgage operation, combined with loan payoffs.

 

26
 

 

The following table summarizes changes in interest income and interest expense for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011:

 

   Three Months       Six Months     
   Ended June 30,       Ended June 30,     
   2012   2011   % Change   2012   2011   % Change  
   (Dollars in thousands) 
Interest income:                              
Loans  $5,652   $6,452    (12.40)%  $11,699   $12,784    (8.49)%
Investment securities   390    406    (3.94)   801    831    (3.61)
Federal Home Loan Bank stock   8    5    60.00    16    10    60.00 
Total interest income   6,050    6,863    (11.85)   12,516    13,625    (8.14)
Interest expense:                               
Certificate accounts   854    1,541    (44.58)   1,819    3,128    (41.85)
Regular savings accounts   88    119    (26.05)   179    223    (19.73)
Checking and NOW accounts   12    11    9.09    24    22    9.09 
Money market savings accounts   21    47    (55.32)   47    91    (48.35)
Total interest-bearing deposits   975    1,718    (43.25)   2,069    3,464    (40.27)
FHLB advances   425    547    (22.30)   870    1,136    (23.42)
Other borrowings   7    17    (58.82)   20    40    (50.00)
Total interest expense   1,407    2,282    (38.34)   2,959    4,640    (36.23)
Net interest income  $4,643   $4,581    1.35%  $9,557   $8,985    6.37%

 

The following table summarizes average balances and average yields and costs for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011:

 

   Three Months Ended June 30,   Six Months Ended June 30, 
   2012   2011   2012   2011 
   Average   Yield/   Average   Yield/   Average   Yield/   Average   Yield/ 
   Balance   Cost   Balance   Cost   Balance   Cost   Balance   Cost 
   (Dollars in thousands) 
                                 
Interest-earning assets                                        
Loans  $450,939    5.01%  $482,770    5.35%  $456,922    5.12%  $478,348    5.35%
Fed Funds sold   2,985    0.00    2,100    0.00    2,841    0.00    2,126    0.00 
Investment securities   53,609    2.91    43,539    3.73    52,705    3.04    44,535    3.73 
Federal Home Loan Bank stock   5,917    0.54    6,252    0.32    6,062    0.53    6,252    0.32 
                                         
Total interest-earning assets  $513,450    4.71   $534,661    5.13   $518,530    4.83   $531,261    5.13 
                                         
Interest-bearing liabilities                                        
Certificate accounts  $194,199    1.76   $233,623    2.64   $198,413    1.83   $235,935    2.65 
Regular savings accounts & escrow   116,007    0.30    93,987    0.51    113,297    0.32    89,631    0.50 
Checking and NOW accounts   73,494    0.07    69,871    0.06    70,805    0.07    64,669    0.07 
Money market savings accounts   27,628    0.30    28,080    0.67    27,893    0.34    27,443    0.66 
                                         
Total interest-bearing deposits   411,328    0.95    425,561    1.61    410,408    1.01    417,678    1.66 
FHLB advances   59,865    2.84    86,692    2.52    61,756    2.82    87,661    2.59 
Other borrowings   7,510    0.37    9,841    0.69    10,826    0.37    11,395    0.70 
                                         
Total interest-bearing liabilities  $478,703    1.18%  $522,094    1.75%  $482,990    1.23%  $516,734    1.80%

 

Allowance for Loan Losses and Asset Quality. The allowance for loan losses is a valuation allowance for the probable losses inherent in the loan portfolio. We evaluate the need to establish allowances against losses on loans on a quarterly basis, or more often if warranted. When additional allowances are needed a provision for loan losses is charged against earnings. The recommendations for increases or decreases to the allowance are presented by management to the Board of Directors on a quarterly basis, or more often if warranted. The methodology for assessing the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses consists of the following process:

 

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On a quarterly basis, or more often if warranted, management analyzes the loan portfolio. For individually evaluated loans that are considered impaired, a charge to the allowance will be made based on either the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, the loan’s observable market price, or for loans that are considered collateral dependant, the fair value of the collateral when a loss in not confirmed. A loan is considered impaired when, based on current information and events, it is probable that a creditor will be unable to collect all amounts due under the contractual term of the loan agreement.

 

All other loans, including loans that are individually evaluated but not considered impaired, are segregated into groups based on similar risk factors. Each of these groups is then evaluated based on several factors to estimate credit losses. Management will determine for each category of loans with similar risk characteristics the historical loss rate. Historical loss rates provide a reasonable starting point for the Bank’s analysis but analysis and trends in losses do not form a sufficient basis to determine the appropriate level of the loan loss allowance. Management also considers qualitative and environmental factors likely to cause losses. These factors include but are not limited to: changes in the amount and severity of past due, non-accrual and adversely classified loans; changes in local, regional, and national economic conditions that will affect the collectibility of the portfolio; changes in the nature and volume of loans in the portfolio; changes in concentrations of credit, lending area, industry concentrations, or types of borrowers; changes in lending policies, procedures, competition, management, portfolio mix, competition, pricing, loan to value trends, extension and modification requests; and loan quality trends. This analysis establishes factors that are applied to each of the segregated groups of loans to determine an acceptable level of loan loss allowance.

 

In addition, the Company engages an independent consultant to review the commercial loan portfolio and considers recommendations based on their review of specific credits in the portfolio for classifying and monitoring these loans.

 

Although the Company believes that it uses the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future adjustments to the allowance for loan losses may be necessary and results of operations could be adversely affected if circumstances differ substantially from the assumptions used in making the determinations. In addition, because further events affecting borrowers and collateral cannot be predicted with certainty, there can be no assurance that the existing allowance for loan losses is adequate or that increases will not be necessary should the quality of any loans deteriorate as a result of the factors discussed above.

 

Furthermore, while the Company believes it has established the allowance for loan losses in conformity with GAAP, there can be no assurance that regulators, in reviewing the Company’s loan portfolio during their examination process, will not request the Company to increase our allowance for loan losses based on information available to them at the time of their examination and their judgment, which may differ from ours.

 

Any material increase in the allowance for loan losses may adversely affect the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

 

The following table summarizes the activity in the allowance for loan losses and provision for loan losses for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011:

 

   Three Months   Six Months 
   Ended June 30,   Ended June 30, 
   2012   2011   2012   2011 
   (In thousands) 
Allowance at beginning of period  $7,220   $6,684   $8,053   $6,393 
Provision for loan losses   2,147    1,040    4,119    1,478 
                     
Charge-offs   (972)   (116)   (3,783)   (263)
Recoveries   4    1    10    1 
Net charge-offs   (968)   (115)   (3,773)   (262)
Allowance at end of period  $8,399   $7,609   $8,399   $7,609 

 

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The provision for loan losses was $2.1 million for the three months ended June 30, 2012, compared to $1.0 million for the same period in 2011. The increased provision in the 2012 period is due to management’s estimate of possible losses in the loan portfolio, primarily due to increased non-performing loans, charge offs and continuing recessionary economic conditions. Provisions of $4.1 million and $1.5 million were recorded for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively. The balances of non-performing assets increased $4.0 million between December 31, 2011 and June 30, 2012, primarily as a result of higher balances of nonaccrual loans. Classified assets increased $7.3 million over the same period as several large loans were downgraded. Classified assets consisted primarily of loans rated special mention, substandard or doubtful in accordance with regulatory guidance. Additionally, three investments totaling $2.5 million, which were performing at the end of the period, and real estate acquired through foreclosure in the amount of $403,000 are included in the substandard category. Charge-offs were $972,000 and $3.8 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively, compared to $116,000 and $263,000 during the three and six months ended June 30, 2011, respectively. The charge-offs in the 2012 period were due to the write-down of $347,000 on 17 one- to four-family loans, one of which was for a deed-in-lieu of foreclosure, the write-down of $145,000 on six home equity loans, one of which was to facilitate a short sale of the collateral property, the write down of 13 commercial real estate loans and seven construction loans in the amounts of $1.2 million and $629,000, respectively, and the charge-off of 21 commercial business loans totaling $1.4 million. Included in the charge-off amounts this period was the write off of $1.1 million of specific reserves that were allowed under previous regulatory supervision, but are now required to be charged directly against the loan balances.

 

The following table provides information with respect to the Company’s nonperforming assets at the dates indicated. The Company did not have any accruing loans past due 90 days or more at the dates presented:

 

   At June 30,   At December 31,     
   2012   2011   % Change 
   (Dollars in thousands)     
Nonaccrual loans  $25,262   $16,187    56.06%
Troubled debt restructurings   3,875    8,494    (54.38)
Real estate owned   403    783    (48.53)
Other repossessed assets   -    90    (100.00)
Total nonperforming assets  $29,540   $25,554    15.60%
                
Total nonperforming loans to total loans   6.43%   5.20%   23.65%
                
Total nonperforming loans to total assets   5.22%   4.31%   21.11%
                
Total nonperforming assets to total assets   5.29%   4.47%   18.34%

 

The following table shows the aggregate amounts of the Company’s classified assets at the dates indicated:

 

   At June 30,   At December 31, 
   2012   2011 
   (In thousands) 
         
Special mention assets  $26,425   $24,756 
Substandard assets   42,937    36,094 
Doubtful assets   218    1,429 
Loss assets   -    - 
Total classified assets  $69,580   $62,279 

 

The 11.7% increase in the level of classified assets from December 31, 2011 to June 30, 2012 was primarily in the commercial loan portfolio. Classified assets are primarily loans rated special mention or substandard in accordance with regulatory guidance. These assets warrant and receive increased management oversight and allowance for loan losses (both general allowances and, in certain cases, specific allowances) have been established to account for the increased credit risk of these assets.  At June 30, 2012, $29.5 million of classified assets were nonperforming assets, compared to $25.6 million at December 31, 2011.

 

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Noninterest Income. The following table summarizes noninterest income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011.

 

   Three Months       Six Months     
   Ended June 30,       Ended June 30,     
   2012   2011   % Change   2012   2011   % Change 
(Dollars in thousands)                        
Mortgage banking income  $625   $355    76.06%  $1,016   $483    110.35%
Fees for other services   263    233    12.88    525    406    29.31 
Fees for services related to deposit accounts   204    213    (4.23)   406    426    (4.69)
Income from bank owned life insurance   76    78    (2.56)   151    155    (2.58)
Income from investment advisory services, net   51    65    (21.54)   107    139    (23.02)
Net gain on investments   -    86    (100.00)   -    86    (100.00)
Recovery from legal settlement   -    -     N/A    -    147    (100.00)
Other income   30    32    (6.25)   54    56    (3.57)
Total  $1,249   $1,062    17.61%  $2,259   $1,898    19.02%

 

Noninterest income was $1.2 million for the quarter ended June 30, 2012 compared to $1.0 million for the quarter ended June 30, 2011, an increase of 17.6%. For the six months ended June 30, 2012 noninterest income was $2.3 million compared to $1.9 million for the period ended June 30, 2011, an increase of 19.0%. The increase in both periods is primarily due to an increase in income generated by increased sales of mortgage loans in the secondary mortgage market, combined with increases in fees for other services. These increases were partially offset by decreases in gains on investments, income from investment advisory services, fees for services related to deposit accounts and income from bank owned life insurance. Additionally, $147,000, representing a partial recovery with respect to Fannie Mae auction rate pass-through certificates on which an other-than-temporary impairment charge was recorded in the third quarter of 2008, is included in noninterest income for the six month period ended June 30, 2011.

 

Noninterest Expense. The following table summarizes noninterest expense for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and 2011.

 

   Three Months       Six Months     
   Ended June 30,       Ended June 30,     
   2012   2011   % Change   2012   2011   % Change 
(Dollars in thousands)                              
Compensation, taxes and benefits  $2,705   $2,326    16.29%  $5,314   $4,669    13.81%
Office occupancy   575    565    1.77    1,150    1,172    (1.88)
Professional fees   244    122    100.00    537    259    107.34 
Loss on foreclosed real estate, net   204    49    316.33    341    88    287.50 
Computer processing   194    64    203.13    368    326    12.88 
FDIC insurance premiums   187    172    8.72    321    376    (14.63)
Advertising   160    106    50.94    286    205    39.51 
Directors compensation   130    110    18.18    335    286    17.13 
Office supplies   53    50    6.00    107    97    10.31 
Public company expenses   38    30    26.67    57    48    18.75 
Deposit related charge (reduction)   (88)   -     N/A    712    -     N/A 
Other expenses   468    292    60.27    812    610    33.11 
Total  $4,870   $3,886    25.32%  $10,340   $8,136    27.09%

 

Noninterest expense was $4.9 million for the quarter ended June 30, 2012 compared to $3.9 million for the quarter ended June 30, 2011. For the six months ended June 30, 2012 noninterest expense was $10.3 million, compared to $8.1 million for the six months ended June 30, 2011. The increase was the result of increases in compensation costs, professional fees, net loss on foreclosed real estate, advertising, directors compensation and office supplies over the 2011 period. These increases were partially offset by decreases in office occupancy and FDIC insurance premiums in the six month period. The increases in compensation and professional fees are due to additional staff hired and additional work performed by legal and accounting professionals related to compliance with the previously announced regulatory order. Additionally, an $88,000 reduction in the estimate for the previously announced $800,000 accrual for a deposit-related charge is included in noninterest expense for the three month period. The net charge of $712,000 is included in noninterest expense for the six month period.

 

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Income Taxes. Provision (benefit) for income taxes was ($410,000) for the quarter ended June 30, 2012 compared to $212,000 for the quarter ended June 30, 2011, and ($951,000) for the six months ended June 30, 2012 compared to $368,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2011. The primary reason for the decrease was the net loss experienced before provision for income taxes.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Liquidity is the ability to meet current and future short-term financial obligations. The Bank’s primary sources of funds consist of deposit inflows, loan repayments, maturities and sales of investment securities and advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston. While maturities and scheduled amortization of loans and securities are predictable sources of funds, deposit flows and mortgage prepayments are greatly influenced by general interest rates, economic conditions and competition.

 

Each quarter the Bank projects liquidity availability and demands on this liquidity for the next 90 days. The Bank regularly adjusts its investments in liquid assets based upon its assessment of (1) expected loan demand, (2) expected deposit flows, (3) yields available on interest-earning deposits and securities, and (4) the objectives of our asset/liability management program. Excess liquid assets are invested generally in federal funds and short- and intermediate-term U.S. Government agency obligations.

 

The Bank’s most liquid assets are cash and cash equivalents. The levels of these assets depend on our operating, financing, lending and investing activities during any given period. At June 30, 2012, cash and cash equivalents totaled $22.8 million, including federal funds of $868,000. Securities classified as available-for-sale, which provide additional sources of liquidity, totaled $26.5 million at June 30, 2012. At June 30, 2012, the Bank had the ability to borrow a total of $136.2 million from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston, of which $52.9 million in borrowings was outstanding, along with $4.4 million in repurchase agreements. At June 30, 2012, the Bank had arranged overnight lines of credit of $2.5 million with the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston. The Bank had no overnight advances outstanding with the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston as of that date. In addition, at June 30, 2012, the Bank had the ability to borrow $15 million from the Federal Reserve Bank Discount Window. The Bank had no advances outstanding on this line at June 30, 2012.

 

The following table summarizes the commitments and contingent liabilities as of the dates indicated:

 

   June 30,   December 31, 
(In thousands)  2012   2011 
Commitments to extend credit:          
Loan commitments on one-to four-family loans  $8,655   $8,782 
Unused lines of credit   20,044    19,424 
Amounts due mortgagors on construction loans   15,250    15,476 
Amounts due on commercial loans   15,755    21,213 
Commercial letters of credit   4,015    5,683 

 

Certificates of deposit due within one year of June 30, 2012 totaled $94.7 million, or 23.0% of total deposits. If these deposits do not remain with the Bank, it will be required to seek other sources of funds, including other certificates of deposit and its available lines of credit. Depending on market conditions, the Bank may be required to pay higher rates on such deposits or other borrowings than are currently paid on the certificates of deposit due on or before June 30, 2013. Based on past experience, however, the Bank believes that a significant portion of our certificates of deposit will remain with us. The Bank has the ability to attract and retain deposits by adjusting the interest rates offered.

 

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Historically, the Company (on a consolidated basis) has remained highly liquid. The Company is not aware of any trends and/or demands, commitments, events or uncertainties that could result in a material decrease in liquidity. The Company expects that all of our liquidity needs, including the contractual commitments stated above and increases in loan demand, can be met by our currently available liquid assets and cash flows. In the event loan demand was to increase at a pace greater than expected, or any unforeseen demand or commitment were to occur, we could access our borrowing capacity with the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston or the Federal Reserve Bank Discount Window. The Company expects that our currently available liquid assets and our ability to borrow from both the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston and the Federal Reserve Bank would be sufficient to satisfy our liquidity needs without any material adverse effect on our liquidity.

 

The Bank’s primary investing activities are the origination of loans and the purchase of securities. For the six months ended June 30, 2012, the Bank originated $85.9 million of loans, including renewals, refinances and advances. These activities were funded primarily by the proceeds from sales and maturities of available-for-sale securities and held to maturity securities of $6.3 million, proceeds of from the sale of loans in the secondary market in the amount of $37.6 million, and loan payoffs combined with normal amortization.

 

Financing activities consist primarily of activity in deposit accounts and in Federal Home Loan Bank advances. The Bank experienced a net increase in total deposits of $458,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2012. Deposit flows are affected by the overall level of interest rates, the interest rates and products offered by us and its local competitors and other factors. The Bank generally manages the pricing of deposits to be competitive and to increase core deposit relationships. Occasionally, the Bank offers promotional rates on certain deposit products in order to attract deposits. The Bank experienced a net decrease in Federal Home Loan Bank advances of $11.4 million, and a decrease in repurchase agreements of $2.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2012.

 

The Company is a separate legal entity from the Bank and must provide for its own liquidity. In addition to its operating expenses, the Company, on a stand-alone basis, is responsible for paying any dividends declared to its shareholders. The Company’s primary source of income is dividends received from the Bank. The amount of dividends that the Bank may declare and pay to the Company in any calendar year, without the receipt of prior approval from the OCC but with prior notice to the OCC, cannot exceed net income for that year to date plus retained net income (as defined) for the preceding two calendar years. On a stand-alone basis, the Company had liquid assets of $11.5 million at June 30, 2012.

 

The Company is not subject to separate regulatory capital requirements. At June 30, 2012, the Bank was subject to the regulatory capital requirements of the OCC, including a risk-based capital measure. The risk-based capital guidelines include both a definition of capital and a framework for calculating risk-weighted assets by assigning balance sheet assets and off-balance sheet items to broad risk categories. At June 30, 2012, the Bank exceeded all of its regulatory capital requirements, and was considered “well capitalized” under regulatory guidelines.

 

The following table is a summary of the Bank’s actual capital as computed under the standards established by the OCC at June 30, 2012.

 

           Naugatuck Valley 
   OCC Regulation   Savings and Loan 
   Adequately   Well         
(Dollars in thousands)  Capitalized   Capitalized   Amount   Ratio 
                 
Total Risk-Based Capital (to Risk-Weighted Assets)   8.00%   10.00%  $70,875    18.23%
                     
Tier I Risk-Based Capital (to Risk-Weighted Assets)   4.00%   6.00%   65,978    16.97%
                     
Tier I Capital (to Adjusted Total Assets)   4.00%   5.00%   65,978    11.80%

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

In the normal course of operations, the Company engages in a variety of financial transactions that, in accordance with GAAP, are not recorded in our financial statements. These transactions involve, to varying degrees, elements of credit, interest rate, and liquidity risks. Such transactions are used primarily to manage customers’ requests for funding and take the form of loan commitments, unused lines of credit, amounts due on construction loans, amounts due on commercial loans, commercial letters of credit and commitments to sell loans.

 

For the six months ended June 30, 2012, the Company did not engage in any off-balance-sheet transactions reasonably likely to have a material effect on its financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

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Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

 

Qualitative Aspects of Market Risk. The Company’s most significant form of market risk is interest rate risk. The Company manages the interest rate sensitivity of our interest-bearing liabilities and interest-earning assets in an effort to minimize the adverse effects of changes in the interest rate environment. Deposit accounts typically react more quickly to changes in market interest rates than mortgage loans because of the shorter maturities of deposits. As a result, sharp increases in interest rates may adversely affect the Company’s earnings while decreases in interest rates may beneficially affect the Company’s earnings. To reduce the potential volatility of the Company’s earnings, the Company has sought to improve the match between assets and liability maturities (or rate adjustment periods), while maintaining an acceptable interest rate spread, by originating adjustable-rate mortgage loans for retention in our loan portfolio, variable-rate home equity lines and variable-rate commercial loans and by purchasing variable-rate investments and investments with expected maturities of less than 10 years. Generally, loans are sold without recourse and with servicing retained. The Company currently does not participate in hedging programs, interest rate swaps or other activities involving the use of off-balance sheet derivative financial instruments.

 

The Bank’s Asset/Liability Committee communicates, coordinates and controls all aspects of asset/liability management. The committee establishes and monitors the volume and mix of assets and funding sources with the objective of managing assets and funding sources.

 

Quantitative Aspects of Market Risk. The Company also uses a third party consultant to perform interest rate sensitivity and net interest income simulation analysis. The net interest income simulation measures the volatility of net interest income as a consequence of different interest rate conditions at a particular point in time. Using a range of assumptions, the simulations provide an estimate of the impact of changes in interest rates on net interest income. The various assumptions used in the model are reviewed on a quarterly basis by the asset/liability committee. Changes to these assumptions can significantly affect the results of the simulation.

 

The following table, which is based on information that we provided to our third party consultant as of June 30, 2012, presents an approximation of our exposure as a percentage of estimated net interest income for the next 12-month period using interest income simulation. The simulation uses projected repricing of assets and liabilities on the basis of contractual maturities, anticipated repayments and scheduled rate adjustments. Prepayment speeds can have a significant impact on the interest income simulation. When interest rates rise, prepayment speeds tend to slow down. When interest rates fall, prepayment speeds tend to increase. We believe that our assumptions included in the simulation are reasonable; however, there can be no guarantee that these prepayment rates will approximate actual future repayment activity.

 

   At June 30, 2012 
   Percentage Change in 
Basis Point (“bp”)  Estimated Net Interest Income 
Change in Rates  Over 12 months 
     
+300 bp   -0.04%
+200   0.54%
+100   0.60%
Flat   0.00%
-100   -2.12%

   

Our third party consultant also performs dynamic modeling. This type of modeling employs a further set of assumptions attempting to simulate scenarios that are more likely than an immediate and sustained shock of 100 to 300 basis points and include the business planning strategies. The changes in rates in the table below are assumed to occur immediately.

 

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Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

 

The Company’s management, including the Company’s principal executive officer and principal financial officer, have evaluated the effectiveness of the Company’s “disclosure controls and procedures”, as such term is defined in Rule 13a-15(e) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, (the “Exchange Act”). Based upon that evaluation, the principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that, as of the end of the period covered by this report, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective for the purpose of ensuring that the information required to be disclosed in the reports that the Company files or submits under the Exchange Act with the SEC (1) is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and (2) is accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

There were no changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting during the three months ended June 30, 2012 that have materially affected, or are reasonable likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Part II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. - Legal Proceedings.

 

The Company is not involved in any pending legal proceedings. The Bank is not involved in any pending legal proceedings other than routine legal proceedings occurring in the ordinary course of business. Such routine legal proceedings, in the aggregate, are believed by management to be immaterial to its financial condition and results of operations.

 

Item 1A. – Risk Factors.

 

In addition to the other information set forth in this report, you should carefully consider the factors discussed in Part I, “Item 1A. Risk Factors” in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K/A for the year ended December 31, 2011, which could materially affect the Company’s business, financial condition or future results. The risks described in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K/A are not the only risks that the Company faces. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to the Company or that the Company currently deems to be immaterial also may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and/or operating results.

  

Item 2. – Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.

 

(a)Not applicable.

 

(b)Not applicable.

 

(c)The Company did not repurchase any shares of its common stock during the quarter ended June 30, 2012.

 

Item 3. – Defaults Upon Senior Securities. Not applicable

 

Item 4. – Mine Safety Disclosures. Not applicable

 

Item 5. – Other Information. Not applicable

 

34
 

 

Item 6. – Exhibits.

 

Exhibits    
3.1   Articles of Incorporation of Naugatuck Valley Financial Corporation (1)
3.2   Bylaws of Naugatuck Valley Financial Corporation, as amended (2)
4.1   Specimen Stock Certificate of Naugatuck Valley Financial Corporation (3)
31.1   Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification.
31.2   Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification.
32   Section 1350 Certifications.
101*   The following materials from the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2012, formatted in XBRL (Extensible Business reporting Language): (i) the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, (ii) the Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income, (iii) the Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholder’s Equity, (iv) the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows, and (v) the Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

 

* Furnished, not filed.

 

(1)  Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1, as amended, initially filed on June 11, 2010.

 

(2)   Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1, as amended, initially filed on June 11, 2010.

 

(3)   Incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 4.0 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1, as amended, initially filed on June 11, 2010.

 

35
 

 

Signatures

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

    Naugatuck Valley Financial Corporation
     
Date: August 13, 2012 by: /s/ Lee R. Schlesinger
     
    Lee R. Schlesinger
    Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
    (principal executive and financial officer)

 

36

XNAS:NVSL Naugatuck Valley Financial Corp Quarterly Report 10-Q Filling

Naugatuck Valley Financial Corp XNAS:NVSL Stock - Get Quarterly Report SEC Filing of Naugatuck Valley Financial Corp XNAS:NVSL stocks, including company profile, shares outstanding, strategy, business segments, operations, officers, consolidated financial statements, financial notes and ownership information.

XNAS:NVSL Naugatuck Valley Financial Corp Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 6/30/2012
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