PINX:SIBE Sibling Group Holdings Inc Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 3/31/2012

Effective Date 3/31/2012

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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

ý

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the Quarterly Period Ended March 31, 2012

 

 £

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD FROM ______ TO _______

 

 

Commission File No.: 0-28311

 

SIBLING ENTERTAINMENT GROUP HOLDINGS, INC.

(Name of small business issuer specified in its charter)

 

 

 

                   TEXAS                  

 

     76-027334     

(State or other jurisdiction of

 

(I.R.S. Employer

incorporation or organization)

 

Identification No.)

 

 

 

1355 Peachtree Street, Suite 1150

 

 

                      Atlanta, GA                     

 

       30309       

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

                             (404) 551-5274                          

 (Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days:   Yes   T     No   £

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted in its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this Chapter) during the preceding 12 months or such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

Yes  T      No  £

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated file­­r, a non –accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See definitions of large accelerated filer, accelerated filer and smaller reporting company in Section 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer ____                                             

 

Accelerated filer ____

Non-accelerated filer ___ ( Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Smaller reporting company      X    

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).   Yes     No  T 

 

The number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock as of May 15, 2012 was 73,684,306 shares of Common stock and 9,879,854 shares of series common stock.

1



 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

 

 

PART I.

 

 

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

 

 

Balance Sheets as of  March 31, 2012 (unaudited) and December 31, 2011

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statements of Operations for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, and the period from June 10, 2010 (inception) to March 31, 2012 (unaudited)

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statements of Cash Flows for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011, and the period June 10, 2010 (inception) to March  31, 2012 (unaudited)

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statements of Stockholder’s Equity (Deficit) for the period June 10, 2010 (inception) to March 31, 2012 (unaudited)

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes to Financial Statements (unaudited)

7-15

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT'S PLAN OF OPERATION

15

 

 

 

 

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

17

 

 

 

 

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

17

 

 

 

 

PART II

18

 

ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

24

 

 

 

 

ITEM 6. EXHIBITS

25

 

 

 

 

SIGNATURES

26

PART I

 

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

As used herein the terms “Company,” “we,” “our”, and “us” refer to Sibling Entertainment Group Holdings, Inc., formerly, Sona Development Corp., a Texas corporation, unless otherwise indicated. In the opinion of management, the accompanying unaudited financial statements included in this Form 10-Q reflect all adjustments (consisting only of normal recurring accruals) necessary for a fair presentation of the results of operations for the periods presented. The results of operations for the periods presented are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year.

 

2


 

SIBLING ENTERTAINMENT GROUP HOLDINGS, INC.

(A Development Stage Company)

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

March 31, 2012

December 31, 2011

(Unaudited)

ASSETS

Current assets:

Cash in Bank

   $                         0 

   $                      63 

Total current assets

   $                         0 

   $                      63 

Total assets

   $                         0 

   $                      63 

                                 LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT

 

Current liabilities:

Accounts payable

   $              728,314 

   $             575,822 

Accrued liabilities

                     25,380 

                    23,122 

Derivative liability

                     34,137 

                    34,137 

Note payable related party

                       5,000 

                      5,000 

Amounts due to related parties

                     24,374 

                    71,298 

Short-term notes payable

                     62,500 

                    62,500 

Total current liabilities

   $              879,705 

   $             771,880 

Stockholders' deficit

Convertible series common stock, $.0001 par value, 10,000,000 shares authorized, 9,879,854 shares issued and outstanding

   $                     988 

   $                    988 

Common stock, $.0001 par value, 90,000,000 shares authorized,  73,684,306 and 71,593,931 shares issued and outstanding

                       7,369 

                      7,160 

Additional paid-in capital

                3,867,042 

               1,965,632 

Accumulated deficit

              (4,755,104)

             (2,745,595)

Total stockholders' deficit

                 (879,705)

                (771,815)

Total liabilities and stockholders' deficit

   $                         0 

   $                      63 

 

3



 

SIBLING ENTERTAINMENT GROUP HOLDINGS, INC.

(A Development Stage Company)

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

Cumulative amounts

For the period from

June 10, 2010

For The Three Months Ended March 31,

(Inception) to

2012

2011

March 31, 2012

Operating expenses:

General and administrative costs

  $           1,971,897

$              181,090 

   $               4,300,325

Professional fees

                   35,354 

                   27,270 

                      285,775 

Loss from operations

            (2,007,251)

               (208,360)

                  (4,586,100)

Non-operating income (expense):

Interest expense

                   (2,258)

                   (3,327)

                       (13,142)

  loss on extinguishment of debt

                            0 

                 (79,445)

                     (108,050)

Net loss

  $         (2,009,509)

$            (291,132)

   $             (4,707,292)

Loss per common share:

Basic loss per share:

  Common stock

                   ($0.03)

                   ($0.01)

Weighted average number of common shares

outstanding:

  Common stock

            72,639,119 

            54,933,069 

4



 

SIBLING ENTERTAINMENT GROUP HOLDINGS, INC.

(A Development Stage Company)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

Cumulative amounts

For the period from

June 10, 2010

For The Three Months Ended March 31,

(Inception) to

2012

2011

March 31, 2012

OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

Net loss

 $

                                 (2,009,509)

              (291,132)

         (4,707,292)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net  cash

  provided by / (used in) operating activities:

 Equity issued to consultants

                                   1,858,007 

                          200 

           2,298,007 

Common stock issued for directors fees

                                                         - 

               470,000 

Common stock issued for services

                                                         - 

                  30,000 

Loss on extinguishment of debt

                                                         - 

                  79,445 

               108,050 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

Accounts payable

                                       173,801 

               119,010 

               738,205 

Accrued Liabilities

                                             2,258 

                     3,327 

                 (24,551)

Liabilities settled in stock

                                                         - 

                                 - 

               155,930 

Derivative liability

                                                         - 

                                 - 

                  34,137 

Pre-paid expenses

                                                         - 

                  18,863 

               314,704 

Due to related parties

                                                         - 

                  70,342 

               569,830 

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities

                                          24,557 

                             55 

                 (12,980)

   FINANCING ACTIVITIES:

Common stock issued for cash

                                                         - 

                                 - 

                  10,000 

Proceeds from short-term notes payable

                                                         - 

                                 - 

                     2,500 

Repayments of notes payable related party'

                                         (24,620)

                                 - 

                 (29,620)

Proceeds from notes payable

                                                         - 

                                 - 

                  30,000 

Capital contribution

                                 - 

                          100 

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities

                                         (24,620)

                                 - 

                  12,980 

NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH

                                                   (63)

                             55 

                                 - 

CASH, BEGINNING OF PERIOD

                                                     63 

                                 - 

                                 - 

CASH, END OF PERIOD

 $

                                                        0 

                             55 

                                 - 

 

5



SIBLING ENTERTAINMENT GROUP HOLDINGS, INC.

(A Development Stage Company)

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT

FOR THE PERIODS ENDED JUNE 10, 2010 (Inception) To March 31, 2012

(Unaudited)

Deficit

Accumulated

Additional

During

Convertible Series

Common

Paid-in

Development

Treasury

 

Common Shares

Amount

Shares

Amount

   Capital   

     Stage     

    Stock    

    Total    

Balance at June 10, 2010 (Date of Inception)

                                    -- 

     $                  --

     $                       --

     $                  100 

                          100 

Reverse merger recapitalization

               9,879,854 

                    988

    46,635,816

                    4,664

                        (100)

                (47,812)

   $                          -- 

                 (42,260)

Net loss

                                    -- 

                          --

                            --

                               --

                                -- 

             (334,430)

                

               334,430 

Balance at December 31, 2010

               9,879,854 

                    988

    46,635,816

                    4,664

                                -- 

             (382,242)

              (376,590)

Common shares issued for cash at $0.02 per share

                                    -- 

                          --

           571,429

                            57

                     9,943 

                               -- 

                  10,000 

Common shares issued for fees accrued during merger

                                    -- 

                          --

       2,000,000

                         200

                  39,800 

                               -- 

                  40,000 

Common shares issued for prepaid expenses at $0.09 per share

                                    -- 

                          --

       2,500,000

                         250

               224,750 

                               -- 

               225,000 

Common shares issued for liabilities to be settled in stock at $0.02 per share, and  $.05 per share

                                    -- 

                          --

       8,346,500

                         835

               190,095 

                               -- 

               190,930 

Common shares issued for settlement of accrued expenses at $0.05 per share (loss on

 extinguishment of $16,666)

                                    -- 

                          --

           833,334

                            83

                  41,583 

                               -- 

                  41,666 

Common shares issued to settle amounts  due to related parties at $0.05 per share,

  and $.20 per share (loss on extinguishment of $62,779)

                                    -- 

                          --

       4,796,852

                         480

               488,052 

                               -- 

               488,532 

Common shares issued for consulting fees at $0.20 per share

                                    -- 

                          --

       2,000,000

                         200

               399,800 

                               -- 

               400,000 

Common shares issued for settlement of accounts payable at $0.13 per share

                                    -- 

                          --

           360,000

                            36

                  71,964 

                               -- 

                  72,000 

Common shares issued for Director's fees at $0.13 per share

                                    -- 

                          --

       3,400,000

                         340

               469,660 

                               -- 

               470,000 

Common shares issued for services at $0.20 per share

                                    -- 

                          --

           150,000

                            15

                  29,985 

                               -- 

                  30,000 

Net loss, year ended December 31, 2011

                                    -- 

                          --

                            --

                               --

                                -- 

         (2,363,353)

                 

         (2,363,353)

Balance at December 31, 2011

               9,879,854 

                    988

    71,593,931

                    7,160

           1,965,632 

         (2,745,595)

              (771,815)

Common shares issued for settlement of notes payable - related party at $.04 per share

                                    -- 

                          --

           557,600

                            56

                  22,248 

                               -- 

                  22,304 

Common shares issued for settlement of amounts owed  $.04 per share

                                    -- 

                          --

           532,775

                            53

                  21,255 

                               -- 

                  21,308 

Common shares issued for consulting fees at $0.03 per share

                                    -- 

                          --

       1,000,000

                         100

                  29,900 

                               -- 

                  30,000 

Series common shares reacquired at $4.13 per share

                  (430,010)

                            --

                               --

           1,828,007 

                               -- 

         (1,828,007)

                                -- 

Series common shares for compensation at $4.13 per share

                    430,010 

                            --

                               --

                                -- 

                               -- 

          1,828,007 

           1,828,007 

Net loss, for period ended March 31, 2012

                                    -- 

                          --

                            --

                               --

                                -- 

         (2,009,509)

                               -- 

         (2,009,509)

Balance at March 31, 2012

               9,879,854 

     $            988

    73,684,306

     $             7,369

     $   3,867,042 

   $   (4,775,104)

   $                          -- 

              (879,705)

 

6



 

SIBLING ENTERTAINMENT GROUP HOLDINGS, INC.

(A Development Stage Company)

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2012 AND 2011

(Unaudited)

 

Note 1 - Nature of Operations and Basis of Presentation

 

(a) Organization

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in The United States of America and the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission for interim financial information.  Accordingly, they do not include all of the information necessary for a comprehensive presentation of financial position and results of operations. The interim results for the period ended March 31, 2012 are not necessarily indicative of results for the full fiscal year. It is management’s opinion, however that all material adjustments (consisting of normal recurring adjustments) have been made which are necessary for a fair financial statements presentation.

 

 

Sibling Entertainment Group Holdings, Inc., referenced as the “SIBE,” “Company,” “we,” “our,” and “us” was incorporated under the laws of the State of Texas on December 28, 1988, as “Houston Produce Corporation”. On June 24, 1997, the Company changed its name to “Net Masters Consultants, Inc.” On November 27, 2002, the Company changed its name to “Sona Development Corporation” in an effort to restructure the business image to attract prospective business opportunities. Our name changed on May 14, 2007 to “Sibling Entertainment Group Holdings, Inc.”,  in New York City. Our business plan then called for focusing on large group sales of tickets to New York based entertainment shows, mostly Broadway plays. We intended to create a full-featured Internet website and registered the domain name Stageseats.com on May 14, 2009. We hired an existing industry expert to head the entity and to execute the business plan. We started booking tickets in April 2009 and continued until November 27, 2009 when we closed the business due to our manager abruptly resigning and lack of funding to continue the business. In September 2009, the executives of SIBE discussed several different methods of obtaining intellectual property from which to launch the next Broadway play. In the fourth quarter of 2009, the Company continued to engage in additional capital efforts. During 2010, the Company continued to pursue additional opportunities in the entertainment industry as well as synergistic opportunities in other industries.

 

On December 30, 2010, Sibling Entertainment Group Holdings, Inc. (SIBE), entered into a Securities Exchange Agreement with NEWCO4EDUCATION, LLC (“N4E”), a newly formed entity on June 10, 2010, and the members of N4E. Pursuant to the Securities Exchange Agreement, SIBE has acquired N4E in exchange for 8,839,869 shares of SIBE’s newly authorized convertible series common stock. For accounting purposes, the acquisition has been treated as an acquisition of SIBE by N4E and as a recapitalization of N4E’s equity. N4E is the surviving and continuing entity and the historical financials following the reverse merger transaction will be those of N4E. As part of the recapitalization of N4E, the equity transactions since its inception have been retroactively restated to include the equivalent shares of the Company’s common stock received in the merger. Accordingly, the statement of changes in shareholders’ deficit reflects the restatement of these transactions. The consolidated financial statements are based on the historical consolidated financial statements of N4E after giving effect to the reverse merger. In conjunction with the acquisition of N4E, the company issued 1,039,985 shares of our series common stock pursuant to debt conversion agreements with the holders of the Company's Series AA Debentures and related warrants.

 

The Company, through its wholly-owned subsidiary, N4E, focuses on providing services and technology aimed at increasing the performance in educational settings and operates through two (2) divisions, its Educational Management Organization (EMO) and its Technology and Services Group (TSG). The EMO intends to provide school management services, primarily within the charter school arena. The TSG division is focused on the development and deployment of software, systems and procedures to enhance the rate of learning in both primary and secondary education. It is based in Atlanta, Georgia. The Company is considered a development stage company in accordance with ASC 915, “Development Stage Entities”.

 

(b) Going Concern

 

The financial statements have been prepared on the basis of a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has not generated any revenues or completed development of any commercially acceptable products or services to date, and has incurred losses of $4,707,292 since inception, and further significant losses are expected to be incurred during the Company’s development stage. The Company will depend almost exclusively on outside capital through the issuance of common shares, debentures, and other loans, and advances from related parties to finance ongoing operating losses.

7



The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent on raising additional capital and ultimately on generating future profitable operations. There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to raise the necessary funds when needed to finance its ongoing costs. The accompanying financial statements do not include any adjustments relative to the recoverability and classification of asset carrying amounts or the amount and classification of liabilities that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Note 2 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

(a) Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with United States Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“U.S. GAAP”) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

(b) Income Taxes

 

The Company utilizes Financial Accounting Standards Board Codification (‘ASC”), ASC 740, “Accounting for Income Taxes”, which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements or tax returns. Under this method, deferred income taxes are recognized for the estimated tax consequences in future years of differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities, and their financial reporting amounts at each period end based on enacted tax laws and statutory tax rates applicable to the period in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income.

 

(c) Financial Instruments

 

In accordance with the requirements of ASC 825, “Financial Instruments, Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments,” the Company has determined the estimated fair value of financial instruments using available market information and appropriate valuation methodologies. The carrying values of cash, accounts payable, and amounts due to related parties approximate fair values due to the short-term maturity of the instruments.

 

(d) Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation in accordance ASC 718, “Compensation – Stock Compensation”. Under the provisions of ASC 718, stock-based compensation cost is estimated at the grant date based on the award’s fair value as calculated by the Black-Scholes-Merton (BSM) option-pricing model and/or market price of conversion shares, and is recognized as expense over the requisite service period. The BSM model requires various highly judgmental assumptions including volatility and expected option life. If any of the assumptions used in the BSM model change significantly, stock-based compensation expense may differ materially in the future from that recorded in the current period. In addition, the Company is required to estimate the expected forfeiture rate and only recognize expense for those shares expected to vest. The Company estimates the forfeiture rate based on historical experience. Further, if the extent of the Company’s actual forfeiture rate is different from the estimate, then the stock-based compensation expense is adjusted accordingly.

 

The Company accounts for equity instruments issued in exchange for the receipt of goods or services from other than employees in accordance with ASC 505-50 “Equity Based Payments to Non-Employees. Costs are measured at the estimated fair market value of the consideration received, or the estimated fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The value of equity instruments issued for consideration other than employee services is determined on the earliest of a performance commitment or completion of performance by the provider of goods or services as defined by ASC 505-50.

 

(e) Loss per Share

 

The Company computes loss per share in accordance with ASC 260, “Earnings Per Share”, which requires presentation of both basic and diluted earnings per share on the face of the statement of operations. This guidance requires companies that have multiple classes of equity securities to use the “two-class” of “if converted method” in computing earnings per share. We compute loss per share using the two-class method. The two-class method of computing earnings per share is an earnings allocation formula that determines earnings per share for common stock and any participating securities according to dividends declared (whether paid or unpaid) and participation rights in undistributed earnings.

 

8



Under the two-class method, earnings per common share are computed by dividing the sum of distributed earnings to common shareholders and undistributed earnings allocated to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. In applying the two-class method, undistributed earnings are allocated to both common shares and participating securities based on the weighted average shares outstanding during the period. The Company has excluded all common equivalent shares outstanding for warrants to purchase common stock from the calculation of diluted net loss per share because all such securities are antidilutive for the periods presented.

 

(f) Derivative Financial Instruments

 

 Our derivative financial instruments consist of embedded and free-standing derivatives related primarily to the $32,500 short term note. The embedded derivatives include the conversion features at 80% of market. In addition, under the accounting provisions, "Accounting for Derivative Financial Instruments Indexed to, and Potentially Settled in, a Company’s Own Stock ," the Company is required to classify certain other non-employee stock options and warrants (free-standing derivatives) as liabilities. The accounting treatment of derivative financial instruments requires that the Company record the derivatives at their fair values as of the inception date of the agreement and at fair value as of each subsequent balance sheet date. The fair value of all derivatives at March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 totaled $34,137 and $34,137, respectively. Any change in fair value of these instruments will be recorded as non-operating, non-cash income or expense at each reporting date. If the fair value of the derivatives is higher at the subsequent balance sheet date, the Company will record a non-operating, non-cash charge. If the fair value of the derivatives is lower at the subsequent balance sheet date, the Company will record non-operating, non-cash income. At  March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 the derivative was valued primarily using the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model with the following assumptions: dividend yield of 0%, annual volatility of 327% to 327%, risk free interest rate of 1.20% to 1.20%, and expected life of one year.

 

The accounting guidance establishes a fair value hierarchy based on whether the market participant assumptions used in determining fair value are obtained from independent sources (observable inputs) or reflect the Company's own assumptions of market participant valuation (unobservable inputs). A financial instrument's categorization within the fair value hierarchy is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. The accounting guidance establishes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value:

 

•              Level 1—Quoted prices in active markets that are unadjusted and accessible at the measurement date for identical, unrestricted assets or liabilities;

 

•              Level 2—Quoted prices for identical assets and liabilities in markets that are inactive; quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets or financial instruments for which significant inputs are observable, either directly or indirectly; or

 

•              Level 3—Prices or valuations that require inputs that are both unobservable and significant to the fair value measurement.

 

The Company considers an active market to be one in which transactions for the asset or liability occur with sufficient frequency and volume to provide pricing information on an ongoing basis, and views an inactive market as one in which there are few transactions for the asset or liability, the prices are not current, or price quotations vary substantially either over time or among market makers. Where appropriate the Company's or the counterparty's non-performance risk is considered in determining the fair values of liabilities and assets, respectively.

 

 

 

Fair Value Measurements at Reporting Date Using

 

 

 

 

Description

Quoted Prices in

Active Markets

for Identical

Assets

(Level 1)

Significant Other

Observable

Inputs

(Level 2)

Significant

Unobservable

Inputs

(Level 3)

 

 

 

 

Derivative securities – March 31, 2012

$                    --

$                    --

$           34,137

 

 

 

 

Derivative securities – December 31, 2011

$                    --

$                    --

$           34,137

 

 

 

 

 

9



 (g) Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-04, “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRSs,”  (“ASU 2011-04”). This standard results in a common requirement between the FASB and the International Accounting Standards Board for measuring fair value and disclosing information about fair value measurements. ASU 2011-04 is effective for fiscal years and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2011. The adoption of this accounting pronouncement did not have any effect on our financial position and results of operations.

 

All other new accounting pronouncements issued but not yet effective or adopted have been deemed not to be relevant to us, hence are not expected to have any impact once adopted.

 

Note 3 - Due to Related Parties

 

 

March 31, 2012

 

 

December 31, 2011

 

Due to significant shareholders

 

$

24,374       

 

 

$

71,298       

 

 

Stephen C. Carlson was contracted through December 31, 2010 as a consultant to provide advisory services on a non-exclusive basis. At December 31, 2010 the Company owed $10,000 to Mr. Carlson for these provided services. On December 30, 2010, in conjunction with the acquisition of N4E, the Board of Directors of Sibling appointed Stephen C. Carlson as CEO, with a term of office that commenced December 31, 2010. The Company entered into an agreement on March 1, 2011 as amended June 1, 2011 with Stephen Carlson to convert debt for consulting services to N4E prior to the acquisition by the Company on December 30, 2010 and debt for services as CEO during the first quarter of 2011, in exchange for the Company’s restricted Common Stock in the aggregate of 966,666 shares for an accrued amount of $29,000.

 

The Company entered into an agreement on October 1, 2011 with Stephen C. Carlson to convert debt for services as CEO for the period April 1, 2011 to September 30, 2011 in exchange for the Company’s restricted Common Stock in the aggregate of 596,747 shares for an accrued amount of $44,756. The Company owed him a balance of $41,767 at December 31, 2011, including the $5,000 note payable described below. Mr. Carlson resigned as CEO and Board Member as of January 24, 2012. The Company issued 557,600 shares of common stock valued at $22,304 ($0.04 per share) to him in consideration of all accrued consulting fees as of January 24, 2012. As of result of the stock issuance, at March 31, 2012 the Company owed Mr. Carlson $16,154 for reimbursement of advances made on behalf of the Company, including the $5,000 note payable described below. Mr. Carlson surrendered 162,010 shares of series common stock in conjunction with his resignation.

 

Gerald F. Sullivan was contracted through December 31, 2010 as a consultant to provide advisory services on a nonexclusive basis. At December 31, 2010 the Company owed $32,000 to Mr. Sullivan for these provided services. The Company entered into an agreement on March 1, 2011 as amended June 1, 2011 with Gerald F. Sullivan to convert debt for consulting services originally incurred with the formation and development of strategy and business plans in exchange for the Company’s restricted Common Stock in the aggregate of 1,700,000 shares for accrued compensation of $51,000. The Company owed him a balance of $14,364 at March 31, 2012 for cash advances made to the company for operating expenses.

 

On December 30, 2010, in conjunction with the acquisition of N4E, the Board of Directors of Sibling appointed Oswald A. Gayle as CFO of the Company with a term of office that commenced December 31, 2010. During this period, he accrued total compensation of $21,200. The Company entered into an agreement with Oswald A. Gayle on March 1, 2011 to convert debt for services as CFO during the first quarter of 2011 in exchange for the Company’s restricted Common Stock in the aggregate of 472,266 shares for an accrued amount of $14,168. The Company entered into an agreement on October 1, 2011 with Oswald A. Gayle to convert debt for services as CFO for the period April 1, 2011 to September 30, 2011 in exchange for the Company’s restricted Common Stock in the aggregate of 661,173 shares for an accrued amount of $49,588. The company owed him a balance of $21,308 at December 31, 2011. The Company accepted his resignation on February 12, 2012, and issued 532,775 shares of stock in consideration of accrued consulting fees of $21,308 through the date of his resignation. Mr. Gayle also surrendered 200,000 shares of series common stock as a part of his resignation. No further amounts are owed to Mr. Gayle.

 

In January 2012 the Company modified its relationship with Dixon McLeod, who was a founder of NEWCO4EDUCATION, LLC. Mr. McLeod had been issued 200,000 shares of series common stock in conjunction with the merger with the Company in December 2010. He surrendered 68,000 shares of series common stock at the time of his termination. This change was not as a result of any disagreements with the Company, and he remains available to the Company as a consultant on an ‘as-needed’ basis. The shares of series common stock were subsequently reissued by the Company.

 

10



 

NOTE 4 - Notes Payable - Related Party

 

On January 21, 2011 Stephen C. Carlson loaned the Company $5,000 in the form of a Promissory Note with an annual interest rate of 3.0%. There was a balance due of $5,000 due on this loan at March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011. At March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2010 there was $594 and $469, respectively in accrued interest on this note.

 

 

March 31, 2012

 

December 31, 2011

 

Short Term Note

$

32,500

 

$

32,500

 

Outstanding Debenture

$

30,000

 

$

30,000

 

Total Short Term Notes

$

62,500

 

$

62,500

 

 

At March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 the Company had a note payable balance of $32,500. This represents a short term note with an annual interest rate of 12.0%. In the event that a Liquidity Event occurs earlier than the agreed to three month period, then the full principal amount together with any interest due and outstanding, shall become payable in full no later than five business following the liquidity event, or the fifth business day following the Liquidity Event, whichever is earlier. As further consideration for this obligation, the Company agreed to issue warrants for the purchase of unregistered common stock to the Payee in an amount equal to the amount loaned under the agreement and, which shall expire in two years. The pricing for the purchase of the common stock shall be set at eighty percent (80%) of the ten day closing price of the stock of the target prior to the request for the issuance of the warrant by the Payee. At March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 this note had accrued interest in the amount of $6,038 and $5,027, respectively.

 

On December 30, 2010, the Company entered into Conversion Agreements with all but one of the holders of the Series AA debentures previously issued by SIBE and held on that date. Pursuant to the conversion agreements, the holders accepted a total of 1,039,985 shares of convertible series common stock and one-hundred percent (100%) of the membership interests of a new, wholly-owned subsidiary of SIBE, Debt Resolution, LLC (DR LLC) in full settlement of their debentures, underlying warrants and accrued interest as of that date. The Conversion Agreements released all claims that 43 of the holders of the debentures had, have, or might have against SIBE. Following this transaction, the Company now has a debenture balance of $30,000 and accrued interest of $18,748 and $17,626 as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011,  respectively, which is in default.

 

Note 5 – Reverse Merger with NEWCO4EDUCATION, LLC

 

On December 30, 2010, the Company, pursuant to a Securities Exchange Agreement, acquired all of the outstanding membership interests of NEWCO4EDUCATION, LLC by issuance of 8,839,869 shares of convertible series common stock. Each share of series common stock will entitle the holder thereof to a number of votes equal to the series conversion ratio determined as of the record date on all matters submitted to a vote of the stockholders of the Corporation. The holders of Series Common Stock shall be entitled to receive dividends when, as, and if declared by the Board of Directors out of funds legally available for that purpose. The Exchange Agreement was contingent on the consummation of two other transactions, which were completed as follows:

 

On December 29, 2010, the Company entered into a Loan Assignment Agreement with Sibling Theatricals, Inc. ("STI") and Debt Resolution, LLC ("DR LLC"), a newly formed subsidiary of the Company. Pursuant to the Loan Assignment Agreement, the Company assigned the Loan Receivable with STI and the related accrued interest receivable and certain related liabilities underlying these theatrical assets for 1 million membership interests in DR LLC. The Company's ownership interest in DR LLC was transferred to the Series AA debenture holders the next day as part of the settlement of those debt obligations (see below). The Company effectively exited the theatricals business as a result of these transactions.

 

On December 30, 2010, the Company entered into Conversion Agreements with all but one of the holders of the Series AA convertible debentures held on that date. Pursuant to the conversion agreements, the holders accepted a total of 1,039,985 shares of convertible series common stock and one-hundred percent (100%) of the membership interests of DR LLC in full settlement of their debentures, underlying warrants and accrued interest as of that date. The Conversion Agreements released all claims that 43 of the holders of the debentures had, have, or might have against the Company.

 

Note 6 - Capital Stock

On December 30, 2010, the Board of Directors, pursuant to authority granted in the Company’s certificate of formation created a a new series of common stock to effect a debt settlement. As a result, the 100,000,000 authorized shares of common stock are now divided into 2 series, 90,000,000 shares of equity common stock, and 10,000,000 shares of series common stock.

 

11



Series common stock automatically converts into common stock upon vote of two-thirds vote by the holders of the series common stock . The series common stockholders enjoy certain anti-dilution rights whereby the series common stockholders will always enjoy a 95% ownership of the common stock outstanding as if the series common stockholders had converted their shares. As of March 31, 2012, each share of series common stock converts into 141.7026889 shares of common stock, based on 73,684,306 shares of common stock issued and outstanding. Voting and dividend rights of the series common stock holders are based on the number of shares of equity common stock as of the series common stockholders converted. Approximately 73% of the series common stockholders have executed a letter to management effective December 30, 2010, agreeing not to vote to convert their series common stock to equity common stock, unless there is sufficient authorized common stock available to accommodate such conversion in total for all of the series common stockholders.

 

On December 30, 2010, the Company issued 8,839,869 shares of our series common stock pursuant to a Securities Exchange Agreement by and among the Company, N4E, and the N4E Members. Six shareholders of the series common stock entered into stock restriction agreements whereby these six individuals agreed to continue to render services to the Company for up to two years, through December 30, 2012.  If the individual does not fulfill the two year term under the Stock Restriction Agreement the Company may purchase a pro-rata portion of the series common shares held by the shareholder for $1.00.  If the individual terminates their employment before December 30, 2011 then the Company may repurchase, or cancel, 67% of the series common stock holdings subject to the Stock Restriction Agreement.  If the individual terminates their employment between December 30, 2011 and December 31, 2012, then the Company may repurchase, or cancel, 33.34% of their series common stock holdings.   These individuals were part of the founders of the Company and are paid separately for current services.  Any changes as a result of these claw back provisions are considered to be capital and have no effect on the operations of the Company.  As of December 30, 2011 and 2010 no shares have been reacquired by the Company as a result of termination by any of these individuals.

 

In conjunction with the acquisition of N4E, the Company issued 1,039,985 shares of our series common stock pursuant to debt conversion agreements with the holders of the Company’s Series AA Debentures and related warrants.

 

During the first quarter, 2011, the Company took steps to significantly reduce outstanding debts associated with the acquisition of N4E by issuance of the Company’s common stock as follows:

 

On January 14, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Mr. Richard Smyth, pursuant to which the Company issued 2,471,500 shares of common stock valued at $49,430, in payment of consulting services rendered to N4E in connection with the formation and development of the strategy and business plans of N4E.

 

 On January 14, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Meshugeneh LLC, pursuant to which the Company issued 4,250,000 shares of common stock valued at $85,000 in payment of consulting services rendered to N4E in connection with the formation and development of the strategy and business plans of N4E.

 

On January 14, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Betsey V. Peterzell, pursuant to which the Company issued 1,075,000 shares of common stock valued at $51,500 in payment of legal services rendered to N4E.

 

On January 14, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Michael Baybak, pursuant to which the Company issued 2,000,000 shares of common stock valued at $40,000 for services rendered to the Company in connection with the acquisition of N4E.

 

On March 1, 2011, as amended June 1, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Viraxid Corporation, pursuant to which the Company issued 833,334 shares of common stock valued at $41,666 for accounting and bookkeeping services rendered to N4E.

 

On March 1, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Gerald F. Sullivan, Chairman, pursuant to which the Company issued 1,700,000 shares of common stock valued at $85,000 for services rendered to the Company in connection with the formation and development of strategy and business plans of N4E. These were issued on March 31, 2011.

 

On October 24, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Gerald F. Sullivan, Chairman, pursuant to which the Company issued 200,000 shares of common stock valued at $40,000, as an incentive bonus. These were issued on October 24, 2011.

 

On March 1, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Stephen C. Carlson, CEO, pursuant to which the Company issued 966,666 shares of common stock valued $48,334, for consulting services rendered to N4E in connection with the development of strategy and business plans of N4E and for services rendered to the Company as CEO during the first quarter of 2011. These were issued on March 31, 2011.

 

On October 1, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Stephen C. Carlson, CEO, pursuant to which the Company issued 596,747 shares of common stock valued $119,349 to convert debt for services as CEO for the period April 1, 2011 to September 30, 2011. These were issued on October 3, 2011.

12



On October 24, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement Stephen C. Carlson, CEO, pursuant to which the Company issued 200,000 shares of common stock valued at $40,000, as an incentive bonus. These were issued on October 24, 2011.

 

On March 1, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Oswald A. Gayle, CFO, pursuant to which the Company issued 472,266 shares of common stock valued at $23,614 for services rendered to the Company as CFO during the first quarter of 2011. These were issued on March 31, 2011.

 

On October 1, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Oswald A. Gayle, CFO, pursuant to which the Company issued 661,173 shares of common stock valued at $132,235 to convert debt for services as CFO for the period April 1, 2011 to September 30, 2011. These were issued on October 3, 2011.

 

On October 24, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement Oswald A. Gayle, CFO, pursuant to which the Company issued 200,000 shares of common stock valued at $40,000, as an incentive bonus. These were issued on October 24, 2011.

 

On October 24, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Dr. Amy Savage-Austin, a director, pursuant to which the Company issued 200,000 shares of common stock valued at $40,000 as an incentive bonus. These were issued on October 24, 2011.

 

On October 24, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Dr. Gerry L. Bedore, Jr., a key advisor, pursuant to which the Company issued 1,000,000 shares of common stock valued at $200,000 as an incentive bonus. These were issued on October 24, 2011.

 

On October 24, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Dr. Timothy G. Drake, a key advisor, pursuant to which the Company issued 1,000,000 shares of common stock valued at $200,000 as an incentive bonus. These were issued on October 24, 2011.

 

On November 18, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Robert Copenhaver, a director, pursuant to which the Company issued 1,000,000 shares of common stock valued at $130,000 as an incentive bonus. These were issued on November 18, 2011.

 

On November 18, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with Michael Hanlon, a director, pursuant to which the Company issued 1,000,000 shares of common stock valued at $130,000 as an incentive bonus. These were issued on November 18, 2011.

 

On November 18, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with William W. Hanby, a key advisor, pursuant to which the Company issued 1,000,000 shares of common stock valued at $130,000 as an incentive bonus. These were issued on November 18, 2011.

 

For the period January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011, the Company sold 571,429 shares at a price of $0.0175 per share or $10,000 in the aggregate to one accredited investor.

 

In January, 2012, the Company issued 532,775 shares of common stock valued at $21,308 ($.04 per share) to Oswald Gayle, the former CFO, in full satisfaction of all amounts owed to him for his services. As a part of his resignation he tendered 200,000 shares of series common stock which he had acquired as a result of his position as a founding member of NEWCO4EDUCATION, LLC.

 

In January, 2012, the Company issued 557,600 shares of common stock valued at $22,304 ($0.04 per share) to Steve Carlson, the former CEO, in partial satisfaction of amounts owed to him for his services.

 

In February 2012, the Company issues 1,000,000 shares of common stock values at $30,000 ($0.03 per share) to The Partnership of Atlanta Incorporated for consulting services.

 

During the first quarter of 2012 the Company negotiated the return of 430,010 shares of series common stock. Since these series common shares reacquired do not trade, we valued such series common shares using their comparable common stock equivalent. Each series common stock converts into 141.7026889 shares of common stock, as of March 31, 2012, based on 73,684,306 shares outstanding. The trading price of the common stock on the day such series common stock was reacquired was $0.03 a share. As a result we recorded the fair value of the series common stock to treasury stock in the amount of $1,828,007. Within the same quarter we reissued the same amount of series common shares to two consultants. The trading price of the common stock on March 30th, 2012 was $0.03 a share for purposes of recording a fair value expense, using the same common stock equivalent approach. As result we recorded compensation expense in the amount of $1,828,007 for the 430,010 series common stock issued for services in the first quarter.

 

13



Note 7 - Supplemental Cash Flow Information

 

Actual amounts paid for interest and income taxes for the 3 months ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 are as follows:

 

 

March 31,

 

 

 

 

2012

 

 

2011

 

 

Interest

 

$

-

 

 

$

-

 

 

Income Taxes

 

$

-

 

 

$

-

 

 

Non-cash Investing and Financing Transactions: 

 

 

March 31,

 

 

 

2012

 

 

2011

 

Stock issued to settle liabilities to be settled in stock

 

$

21,308

 

 

$

-

 

Stock issued for consulting fees / prepaid

 

$

-

 

 

$

-

 

Stock issued to settle related party liabilities and accrued expenses

 

$

22,304

 

 

$

-

 

 

 

Note 8 - Legal Proceedings

 

The Company may at times become involved in litigation or legal proceedings as a normal course of business, but there are no note worthy legal proceedings being pursued as of the date of this audit report.

 

Note 9 –Subsequent Events

 

ASC Topic 855-10, Subsequent Events, requires the Company to disclose the date through which subsequent events have been evaluated, as well as whether that date is the date the financial statements were issued. The Company has evaluated all other subsequent events through the date these consolidated financial statements were issued.

 

On April 9th, 2012, Rob Copenhaver, resigned as CEO of the Company to pursue another opportunity.  Mr. Copenhaver will continue as a member of the Board of Directors and the Company looks forward to his continued contribution in this role. 

 

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT FOR FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. We have based these forward-looking statements on our current expectations and projections about future events. These forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risk, uncertainties and assumptions about us that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may”, “will”, “should”, “could”, “would”, “expect”,” plan”,” anticipate”, “believe”, “estimate”, “continue”, or the negative of such terms or other similar expressions. Factors that might cause or contribute to such a discrepancy include, but are not limited to, those listed under the heading “Risk Factors” and those listed in our other Securities and Exchange Commission filings. The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our Financial Statements and related Notes thereto included elsewhere in this report.

 

The statements contained in sections titled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”, with the exception of historical facts are forward looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, which reflect our current expectations and beliefs regarding our future results of operations, performance, and achievements. These statements are subject to risks and uncertainties and are based upon assumptions and beliefs that may or may not materialize. These forward looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements concerning:

 

• our anticipated financial performance and business plan;

• the sufficiency of existing capital resources;

• our ability to raise additional capital to fund cash requirements for future operations;

• the ability of the Company to generate revenues to fund future operations;

• the volatility of the stock market and;

• general economic conditions.

 

14



We wish to caution readers that the Company’s operating results are subject to various risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those discussed or anticipated; including the factors set forth in the section entitled “Risk Factors” included elsewhere in this report. We also wish to advise readers not to place any undue reliance on the forward looking statements contained in this report, which reflect our beliefs and expectations only as of the date of this report. We assume no obligation to update or revise these forward looking statements to reflect new events or circumstances or any changes in our beliefs or expectations, other that is required by law.

 

 

ITEM 2.    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF

                   OPERATIONS

 

Results of Operations

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2012, the Company’s operations included satisfying continuous public disclosure requirements and the continued focus on the development and deployment of software, systems, and procedures to enhance the rate of learning in both primary and secondary education. The Company took steps to create specifications for its initial internet based offerings, to seek qualified vendors to supply software and systems, and we have begun the process of development of a marketing plan for its deployment. We have engaged a digital advertising and marketing agency to support our needs in an outsourcing arrangement, and have rolled out its new product identifications. We continue to seek qualified executives in support of our plans for growth, and we expect to expand both the management team, and our Board of Directors during the near term. We experienced some delays as a result of staffing changes, and now expect our initial offerings to be available during the summer of 2012, a delay of several months from our original schedule.

 

The Company has not generated revenues since inception and we cannot determine when we will generate revenue from operations and we expect to continue to operate at a loss for the foreseeable future.  In order to act upon our operating plan discussed herein, we must be able to raise sufficient funds from (i) debt financing; or, (ii) new investments from private investors.

 

Net Loss

 

 For the period from inception to March 31, 2012, the Company recorded a net loss of $4,707,292. The Company’s net loss is primarily attributable to general and administrative expenses. A large portion of the cumulative general and administrative expenses as of March 31, 2012  were related to the issuance of stock in connection with converting certain of the accured expenses related to management, and to providing advice to undertake for, and consult with us, concerning management, marketing, consulting, strategic planning, corporate organization and structure, financial matters in connection with the operation of our business, expansion of services, acquisitions and business opportunities, and review and advice regarding our overall progress, needs and condition

 

Capital Expenditures

 

The Company expended no amounts on capital expenditures for the period from June 10, 2010 (inception) to March 31, 2012.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

The Company is in the development stage and, since inception, has experienced significant changes in liquidity, capital resources and shareholders’ equity. The Company had current and total assets of $0 and $63 respectively as of March 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 . The working capital deficit was $879,705 at March 31, 2012. Net stockholders equity in the Company was $(879,705) at March 31, 2012.

 

We will require additional funding over the next 12 months estimated of at least $1,000,000 to develop our new business. Presently, we have only $0 worth of liquid assets with which to pay our expenses. Current and anticipated capital needs may vary based on our acquisitions, or technology development activities. As a result, we may raise capital through the issuance of debt, the sale of equity, or a combination of both.

 

We do not presently have any firm commitments for additional working capital and there are no assurances that such capital will be available to us when needed or upon terms and conditions which are acceptable to us. If we are able to secure additional working capital through the sale of equity securities, the ownership interests of our current stockholders will be diluted. If we raise additional working capital through the issuance of debt or additional dividend paying securities, our future interest and dividend expenses will increase.

 

If we are unable to secure additional working capital as needed, our ability to develop new business, increase sales, meet our operating and financing obligations as they become due or continue our business and operations could be in jeopardy.

 

15



As of May 17, 2012, the corporate offices are at 1355 Peachtree Street, Suite 1159, Atlanta, GA 30309. We rent a single office from an executive office provider with multiple locations nationwide, and the rent is approximately $900 per month.

 

The Company has no current plans for the purchase or sale of any plant or equipment.

 

There are no full time employees at the Company.  The Company has no current plans to add employees. The individuals working for the benefit of the Company are generally part time, and have been compensated primarily through the issuance of stock, or accrued expenses underlying consulting agreements.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

 In Note 2 to the attached interim financial statements for the periods ended March 31, 2012 included in this Form 10-Q, we discuss those accounting policies that are considered significant in determining the results of operations and our financial position. We believe that the accounting principles utilized by us conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

(a)    Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with United States generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

(b)    Income Taxes

 

The Company follows the liability method of accounting for income taxes. Under this method, deferred income tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the estimated tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying values and their respective income tax basis (temporary differences). The effect on deferred income tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

(c)    Derivative Financial Instruments

 

Our derivative financial instruments consist of embedded and free-standing derivatives related primarily to the $32,500 short term note. The embedded derivatives include the conversion features at 80% of market. In addition, under the accounting provisions, "Accounting for Derivative Financial Instruments Indexed to, and Potentially Settled in, a Company’s Own Stock ," the Company is required to classify certain other non-employee stock options and warrants (free-standing derivatives) as liabilities. The accounting treatment of derivative financial instruments requires that the Company record the derivatives at their fair values as of the inception date of the agreement and at fair value as of each subsequent balance sheet date. Any change in fair value of these instruments will be recorded as non-operating, non-cash income or expense at each reporting date. If the fair value of the derivatives is higher at the subsequent balance sheet date, the Company will record a non-operating, non-cash charge. If the fair value of the derivatives is lower at the subsequent balance sheet date, the Company will record non-operating, non-cash income. The Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model was utilized to fair value the derivative at March 31, 2012with the following assumptions: dividend yield of 0%, annual volatility of 327% to 327%, risk free interest rate of 1.20% to 1.20%, and expected life of one year.

 

(d) Financial Instruments

 

In accordance with the requirements of Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 825, “Financial Instruments,” the Company has determined the estimated fair value of financial instruments using available market information and appropriate valuation methodologies. The carrying values of cash, promissory notes, accounts payable and amounts due to related parties approximate fair values due to the short-term maturity of the instruments.

 

Effect of Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 2011-04, “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820) Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRSs.” ASU No. 2011-04 is intended to improve the comparability of fair value measurements presented and disclosed in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP and IFRSs, by ensuring that fair value has the same meaning in U.S. GAAP and IFRSs and that their respective disclosure requirements are the same except for inconsequential differences in wording and style. The amendments in ASU No. 2011-04 apply to all reporting entities that are required or permitted to measure or disclose the fair value of an asset, a liability, or an instrument classified in a reporting entity’s shareholders’ equity in the financial statements. Some of the disclosures required by ASU No. 2011-04 are not required for nonpublic entities.

 

16



These amendments change the wording used to describe many of the requirements in U.S. GAAP for measuring fair value and for disclosing information about fair value measurements. For many of the requirements, the Board does not intend for the amendments to result in a change in the application of the requirements in ASC Topic 820. Some of the amendments clarify the Board’s intent about the application of existing fair value measurement requirements. Other amendments change a particular principle or requirement for measuring fair value or for disclosing information about fair value measurements. The adoption of ASU 2011-04 did not have a material impact on the Company’s results of operations or financial condition.

 

All other new accounting pronouncements issued but not yet effective or adopted have been deemed not to be relevant to us, hence are not expected to have any impact once adopted.

 

Going Concern

 

The Company has not generated any revenues or completed development of any commercially acceptable products or services to date, has a working capital deficiency of $879,705 at March 31, 2012 and has incurred losses of $4,707,292 since inception, and further significant losses are expected to be incurred in the Company’s development stage.

 

The Company will depend almost exclusively on outside capital through the issuance of common shares, and advances from related parties to finance ongoing operating losses. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent on raising additional capital and ultimately on generating future profitable operations. There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to raise the necessary funds when needed to finance its ongoing costs. These factors raise substantial doubt about the ability of the Company to continue as a going concern. The accompanying financial statements do not include any adjustments relative to the recoverability and classification of asset carrying amounts or the amount and classification of liabilities that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Item 3.  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

 

The Company is subject to certain market risks, including changes in interest rates and currency exchange rates.  The Company does not undertake any specific actions to limit those exposures.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

 

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

The Company’s management has identified what it believes are deficiencies in the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures.  The deficiencies in the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures resulted in failures to timely file periodic reports within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. 

 

The deficiencies in our disclosure controls and procedures included (i) lack of segregation of duties and (ii) lack of sufficient resources to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that the Company files or submits to the SEC are recorded, processed, summarized, and reported, within the time periods specified in the SEC's rules and forms.

 

The Company intends to take corrective action to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company pursuant to the reports that the Company files or submits to the SEC is accumulated and communicated to the Company's management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. 

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2012, we continued our comprehensive evaluation relating to the effectiveness of disclosure controls and procedures. As a result of such review, we have implemented several changes, among which included:

 

•              We have started the documentation of formal policies and procedures necessary to adequately review significant accounting transactions

 

•              We have more specifically defined existing key controls, and developed additional controls, applicable to the review of significant accounting transactions and the accounting treatment of such transactions

 

•              We have implemented a formal audit committee with a financial expert, and  the Company now has the board oversight role within the financial reporting process

 

17



•              We have enhanced the documentation regarding conclusions reached in the implementation of generally accepted accounting principles

 

•              We have added additional levels of review by qualified personnel of the application of each key control.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2012, there were no other changes in our internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

 

PART II.

 

ITEM 1A  RISK FACTORS

 

Risks Related to Our Business

 

Our future operating results are highly uncertain. Before deciding to invest in us or to maintain or increase your investment, you should carefully consider the risks described below, in addition to the other information contained in this annual report. If any of these risks actually occur, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be seriously harmed. In that event, the market price for our common stock could decline and you may lose all or part of your investment.

 

Effective December 30, 2010, We Entered A New Business; This Makes It Difficult To Evaluate Our Business

 

We have yet to enter into any agreement to acquire an EMO or manage a charter school. We have not recorded any revenue from our new business initiatives. Our management team has only recently begun to work together, and has no experience in operating educational management organizations and charter schools. We have no operating history on which you can base your evaluation of our business and prospects. Accordingly, the Company should be evaluated in light of the expenses, delays, uncertainties, and other difficulties frequently encountered by unseasoned business enterprises entering new markets with unproven products. No assurance can be given that the Company will ever achieve profitable operations. Our failure to address these expenses, delays, uncertainties, and other difficulties could cause our operating results to suffer and result in the loss of all or part of your investment.

 

We Have A History Of Losses And Expect Losses In The Future

 

The Company has incurred losses since inception. We do not currently own, operate, or have agreements to acquire any school operations and therefore have no revenues. As a result of our technology initiatives and existing, and anticipated operating expenses, we expect to incur substantial net losses for the foreseeable future. Our ability to become profitable will depend upon our ability to generate and sustain revenue that is greater than our expenses. In order to generate revenue, we will need to enter into management agreements with charter schools, acquire other EMOs, and successfully acquire, and successfully launch our technology initiatives, or develop and license curricula, computer based education services, and school operation and management tools. Our ability to execute our business plans, and generate revenue, will be dependent, in part, on our ability to obtain financing sufficient to execute our business plan. Even if we do achieve profitability, we may not sustain or increase profitability on a quarterly or annual basis. Failure to become and remain profitable may adversely affect the market price of our common stock, our ability to raise capital, and our ability to continue operations.

 

Political risks

 

Charter Schools are authorized by state statutes. State legislatures may amend these statutes and the amendments may be unfavorable to our business. Courts may declare these statutes unconstitutional in whole or in part. In either event, we may be unable to grow our business and the market price of our common stock would be adversely affected.

 

The Private, For-Profit Management Of Charter Schools Is A Relatively New And Uncertain Industry, And It May Not Become Publicly Accepted

 

Our future is highly dependent upon the development, acceptance, and expansion of the market for private, for-profit management of charter schools. This market has only recently developed. The development of this market has been accompanied by significant press coverage and public debate concerning for-profit management of charter schools. If this business model fails to gain acceptance among the general public, educators, politicians and school boards, we may be unable to grow our business and the market price of our common stock would be adversely affected.

 

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The Success Of Our Business Depends On Our Ability To Improve The Academic Achievement Of The Students Enrolled In Our Schools, And We May Face Difficulties In Doing So In The Future

 

We believe that the success of our business will be dependent, among other things, upon our ability to demonstrate general improvements in academic performance at the charter schools we intend to manage and operate. We anticipate that the management agreements with charter schools will contain performance requirements related to test scores and other measures of student achievement. If average student performance at our schools increases, whether due to improvements in achievement over time by individual students in our schools or changes in the average performance levels of new students entering our schools, aggregate absolute improvements in student performance will be more difficult to achieve. If academic performance at our schools declines, or simply fails to improve, we could lose business and our reputation could be seriously damaged, which would impair our ability to

gain new business or renew existing school management agreements.

 

We Could Incur Losses At Our Schools If We Are Unable To Enroll Enough Students

 

We expect that the amount of revenue we will receive for operating a charter school will be dependent on the number of students enrolled, while the majority of the facility, operating, and on-site administrative costs will be fixed. Therefore, achieving site-specific enrollment objectives will be an important factor in our ability to achieve satisfactory financial performance at any particular school. We may be unable to expand or maintain enrollment in the charter schools we manage. To the extent we are unable to meet enrollment objectives at a school, the school will be less financially successful and our financial performance will be adversely affected.

 

We Desire Rapid Growth, Which May Strain Our Resources And May Not Be Sustainable

 

We desire to grow rapidly. Rapid growth may strain our managerial, operational, and other resources. If we are to manage our rapid growth successfully, we will need to hire and retain management personnel and other employees. We must also develop and improve our operational systems, procedures, and controls on a timely basis. If we fail to successfully manage our growth, we could experience client dissatisfaction, cost inefficiencies and lost growth opportunities, which could harm our operating results. We cannot guarantee that we will continue to grow at our historical rate.

 

We May Not Be Able To Attract And Retain Highly Skilled Principals And Teachers In The Numbers Required To Grow Our Business

 

Once we have acquired EMOs with management agreements with charter schools or entered into management agreements with charter schools, our success is likely to depend to a high degree upon our ability to attract and retain highly skilled school principals and teachers. We may need to hire new principals and new teachers to address turnover at the charter schools we manage. Currently, there is a well-publicized nationwide shortage of teachers and other educators in the United States. In addition, we may find it difficult to attract and retain principals and teachers for a variety of reasons, including the following:

 

? charter schools generally require our teachers to work a longer day and a longer year than most public schools;

 

? charter schools tend to have a larger proportion of our schools in challenging locations, such as low-income urban areas, which may

    make attracting principals and teachers more difficult; and

 

? charter schools generally impose more accountability on principals and teachers than do public schools as a whole.

 

These factors may increase the challenge we face in an already difficult market for attracting principals and teachers. Other EMO’s have experienced higher levels of turnover among teachers than is generally found in public schools nationally, which we attribute in part to these factors. If we fail to attract and retain principals and teachers in sufficient numbers or of a sufficient quality, we could experience client dissatisfaction and lost growth opportunities, which would adversely affect our business.

 

Our Business Could Suffer If We Lose The Services Of Key Executives

 

Our future success depends upon the continued services of a number of our key executive personnel, particularly our Chairman of the Board of Directors, our Chief Executive Officer, or Chief Financial Officer. These executives will be instrumental in determining our strategic direction and focus and in publicly promoting the concept of private management of public schools. If we lose the services of either or any of our other executive officers or key employees, our ability to grow our business would be seriously compromised and the market price of our common stock may be adversely affected. We do not maintain any key man insurance on any of our executives.

 

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Our Management Agreements Will Be Terminable Under Specified Circumstances And Generally Expire After A Term Of Five Years

 

We expect that our school management agreements will generally have a term of five years. When we expand by adding an additional school under an existing management agreement, the term with respect to that school generally expires at the end of the initial five-year period. We have no experience in negotiating school management agreements, and we cannot be assured that any school management agreements will be negotiated or renewed. In addition, school management agreements may be terminable by the school district or charter board at will, with or without good reason, and our school management agreements may be terminated for cause, including a failure to meet specified educational standards, such as academic performance based on standardized test scores. In addition, as a result of changes within a school district, such as changes in the political climate, we could from time to time face pressure to permit a school district or charter board to terminate our school management agreement even if they do not have a legal right to do so. If we fail to renew a significant number of school management agreements at the end of their term, or if school management agreements are terminated prior to their expiration, our reputation and financial results would be adversely affected.

 

Our Management Agreements Will Involve Financial Risk

 

Our school management agreements will provide that we will operate a school in return for per- pupil funding that generally does not vary with our actual costs. To the extent our actual costs under a school management agreement exceed our budgeted costs, or our actual revenue is less than planned because we are unable to enroll as many students as we anticipated or for any other reason, we would lose money at that school. We expect that our school management agreements will require us to continue operating a school for the duration of the school management agreement even if it becomes unprofitable to do so.

 

We May Need To Advance Or Loan Money To Charter Schools Or Their Related Charter Holding Equity That May Not Be Repaid

 

We may have to loan charter boards funds to finance the purchase or renovation of school facilities we manage or for other reasons. Loans to charter schools may be accelerated upon termination of the corresponding management agreement with the charter school. If these advances or loans are not repaid when due, our financial results could be adversely affected.

 

We Could Become Liable For Financial Obligations Of Charter Boards

 

We could have facility financing obligations for charter schools we no longer operate, because the terms of our facility financing obligations for some charter schools might exceed the term of the management agreement for those schools. While the charter board is generally responsible for locating and financing its own school building, the holders of school charters, which are often non-profit organizations, typically do not have the resources required to obtain the financing necessary to secure and maintain the school building. For this reason, if we want to obtain a management agreement with a particular charter board, we may help the charter board arrange for the necessary financing. For some of the charter schools we expect to manage, we may enter into a long-term lease for the school facility which may exceed the initial term of the management agreement. If our management agreements were to be

terminated, or not renewed in these charter schools, our obligations to make lease payments would continue, which could adversely affect our financial results for the school building, typically in the form of loan guarantees or cash advances. Although the term of these arrangements may be coterminous with the term of the corresponding management agreement, our guarantee may not expire until the loan is repaid in full. The lenders under these facilities may not be committed to release us from our obligations unless replacement credit support is provided. The default by any charter school under a credit facility that we have guaranteed could result in a claim against us for the full amount of the borrowings. Furthermore, in the event any charter board becomes insolvent or has its charter revoked, our loans and advances to the charter board may not be recoverable, which could adversely affect our financial

results.

 

We Expect Our Market To Become More Competitive

 

We expect the market for providing private, for-profit management of charter schools will become increasingly competitive. A variety of companies and entities could enter the market, including colleges and universities, other private companies that operate higher education or professional education schools, and others. Our existing competitors and these new market entrants could have financial, marketing and other resources significantly greater than ours. We will also compete for charter school funding with existing public schools that may pursue alternative reform initiatives, such as magnet schools and inter- district choice programs. In addition, in jurisdictions where voucher programs have been authorized, we will compete with existing private schools for public tuition funds.

Voucher programs provide for the issuance by local or other governmental bodies of tuition vouchers to parents worth a certain amount of money that they can redeem at any approved school of their choice, including private schools. If we are unable to compete successfully against any of these existing or potential competitors, our revenues could be reduced, resulting in increased losses.

 

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Failure To Raise Necessary Additional Capital Could Restrict Our Growth And Hinder Our Ability To Compete

 

We are not certain when we will have positive cash flow, if at all. We expect that we will regularly need to raise funds in order to operate our business and may need to raise additional funds in the future. We cannot be certain that we will be able to obtain additional financing on favorable terms, if at all. If we issue additional equity securities, stockholders may experience dilution or the new equity securities may have rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of existing holders of common stock. If we cannot raise funds on acceptable terms, if and when needed, we may not be able to take advantage of future opportunities, grow our business or respond to competitive pressures or unanticipated requirements, which could seriously harm our business.

 

We Expect To Derive A Substantial Portion Of Our Revenues From Public School Funding, Which Is Dependent On Support From Federal, State, And Local Governments. Changes Or Reductions In Funding For Public School Systems Could Reduce Our Revenues And Cash Flows And Negatively Impact Our Margins And Impede The Growth Of Our Business.

 

The availability of funding to purchase our products and services is subject to many factors that affect government spending. These factors include downturns in general economic conditions, like those which we are currently experiencing, that can reduce government tax revenues and may affect education funding, emergence of other priorities that can divert government funding from educational objectives, periodic changes in government leadership that can change spending priorities, and the government appropriations process, which is often slow and unpredictable. In many instances, customers rely on specific funding appropriations to purchase our products. Curtailments, delays, or reductions in this funding can delay or reduce revenues and cash flow we had otherwise forecasted to receive.

 

If We Are Unable To Adapt Our Products And Services To Technological Changes, To The Emergence Of New Computing Devices And To More Sophisticated Online Services, We May Lose Market Share And Service Revenue, And Our Business Could Suffer.

 

We need to anticipate, develop and introduce new products, services and applications on a timely and cost effective basis that keeps pace with technological developments and changing customer needs. We may encounter difficulties responding to these changes that could delay our introduction of products and services or require us to make larger than anticipated investments to maintain existing products. Software industries are characterized by rapid technological change and obsolescence, frequent product introductions, and

evolving industry standards. Accordingly, it is difficult to predict the problems we may encounter in developing versions of our products and services and we may need to devote significant resources to the creation, support and maintenance of our products and services. If we fail to develop or sell products and services cost effectively that respond to these or other technological developments and changing customer needs, we may be unable to successfully market our products and services and our revenue and business could materially suffer.

 

Misuse Or Misappropriation Of Our Proprietary Rights Or Inadvertent Infringement By Us On The Rights Of Others Could Adversely Affect Our Results Of Operations.

 

The intellectual property rights in the software we intend to develop will be essential to our business. We intend to rely on a combination of the laws of copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets, as well as license agreements, employment and employment termination agreements, third-party non-disclosure agreements, and other methods to protect our proprietary rights. We intend to enforce our intellectual property rights when we become aware of any infringements or potential infringements and believe they warrant such action. If we were unsuccessful in our ability to protect these rights, our operating results could be adversely affected. Third parties may assert infringement claims against us in the future. We may be required to modify our products, services or technologies or obtain a license to permit our continued use of those rights. We may not be able to do so in a timely manner or upon

reasonable terms and conditions. Failure to do so could harm our business and operating results. In addition, we leverage certain third party generated products through license and/or royalty agreements and we have the risk that certain of these relationships will not continue or that the underlying products will not be properly supported or updated by the third parties.

 

If Our Security Measures Are Breached And Unauthorized Access Is Obtained To Our Web-Based Products, They May Be Perceived As Not Being Secure, Customers May Curtail Or Stop Using These Products And We May Incur Significant Legal And Financial Exposure And Liabilities.

 

We may develop web-based products that involve the storage of certain personal information with regard to the teachers and students using these products. If our security measures are breached and unauthorized access to this information occurs, our reputation will be damaged, our business may suffer, and we could incur significant liability. Because the techniques used to attempt unauthorized access to such systems change frequently and generally are not recognized until attempted on a target, we may be unable to anticipate these techniques or to implement adequate preventative measures. If an actual or perceived breach of our security occurs, the market perception of the security of our system could be harmed and we could lose sales and customers.

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Claims Relating To Content Available On Or Accessible From, Our Web Sites May Subject Us To Liabilities And Additional Expense.

 

If we develop web-based products that incorporate content not under our direct control including content from, and links to, third-party web sites, and content uploaded by our customers, we could be subject to claims relating to this content. In addition to exposing us to potential liability, claims of this type could require us to change our web sites in a manner that could be less attractive to our customers and divert our financial and development resources.

 

We Rely On Government Funds For Specific Education Programs, And Our Business Could Suffer If We Fail To Comply With Rules Concerning The Receipt And Use Of The Funds

 

We expect to benefit from funds from federal and state programs to be used for specific educational purposes. Funding from the federal government under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act provides federal funds for children from low-income families. A number of factors relating to these government programs could lead to adverse effects on our business:

 

             These programs have strict requirements as to eligible students and allowable activities. If we or the charter schools that we intend to manage fail to comply with the regulations governing the programs, we or the charter schools that we intend to manage could be required to repay the funds or be determined ineligible to receive these funds, which would harm our business.

 

             If the income demographics of a district's population were to change over the life of a management agreement for a charter school, resulting in a decrease in Title I funding for the charter school, we would receive less revenue for operating the charter school and our financial results could suffer.

 

             The authorization for the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, including Title I, has expired and this act is being funded by Congress on an interim appropriation basis. If Congress does not reauthorize or continue to provide interim appropriation for the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, we would receive less funding and our growth and financial results would suffer. Most federal education funds are administered through state and local education agencies, which allot funds to charter boards. These state and local education agencies are subject to extensive government regulation concerning their eligibility for federal funds. If these agencies were declared ineligible to receive federal education funds, the receipt of federal education funds by the charter schools we intend to manage could be delayed, which could in turn delay our payment from the charter schools we intend to manage. In addition, we could become ineligible to receive these funds if any of our high-ranking employees commit serious crimes.

 

We Could Be Subject To Extensive Government Regulation Because We Benefit From Federal Funds, And Our Failure To Comply With Government Regulations Could Result In The Reduction Or Loss Of Federal Education Funds

 

Because we expect to benefit from federal funds, we must also comply with a variety of federal laws and regulations not directly related to any federal education program, such as federal civil rights laws and laws relating to lobbying. Our failure to comply with these federal laws and regulations could result in the reduction or loss of federal education funds which would cause our business to suffer. In addition, our management agreements are potentially covered by federal procurement rules and regulations because our school district and charter board clients pay us, in part, with funds received from federal programs. Federal procurement rules and regulations generally require competitive bidding, awarding contracts based on lowest cost and similar requirements. If a court or federal agency determined that a management agreement was covered by federal procurement rules and regulations and was awarded

without compliance with those rules and regulations, then the management agreement could be voided and we could be required to repay any federal funds we received under the management agreement, which would hurt our business.

22



Risks Related to Our Securities

 

Since our common stock is thinly traded it is more susceptible to extreme rises or declines in price, and you may not be able to sell your shares at or above the price paid.

 

Since our common stock is thinly traded, its trading price is likely to be highly volatile and could be subject to extreme fluctuations in response to various factors, many of which are beyond our control, including:

 

•              Funding from federal and state education programs is allocated through formulas. If federal or state legislatures or, in some case, agencies were to change the formulas, we could receive less funding and the growth and financial performance of our business would suffer. Federal, state and local education programs are subject to annual appropriations of funds. Federal or state legislatures or local officials could drastically reduce the funding amount of appropriation for any program, which would hurt our business and our ability to grow.

 

•              the trading volume of our shares;

 

•              the number of securities analysts, market-makers and brokers following our common stock;

 

•              changes in, or failure to achieve, financial estimates by securities analysts;

 

•              new products or services introduced or announced by us or our competitors;

 

•              actual or anticipated variations in quarterly operating results;

 

•              You may have difficulty reselling shares of our common stock, either at or above the price you paid, or even at fair market value. The stock markets often experience significant price and volume changes that are not related to the operating performance of individual companies, and because our common stock is thinly traded it is particularly susceptible to such changes.

 

•              These broad market changes may cause the market price of our common stock to decline regardless of how well we perform as a company. In addition, securities class action litigation has often been initiated following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities. A securities class action suit against us could result in substantial legal fees, potential liabilities and the diversion of management’s attention and resources from our business. Moreover, and as noted below, our shares are currently traded on the “pink sheets” and, further, are subject to the penny stock regulations. Price fluctuations in such shares are particularly volatile and subject to manipulation by market-makers, short-sellers and option traders.

 

 

Because we are subject to the “Penny Stock” rules the level of trading activity in our stock may be reduced.

 

If a trading market does develop for our stock, it is likely we will be subject to the regulations applicable to "Penny Stock." The regulations of the SEC promulgated under the Exchange Act that require additional disclosure relating to the market for penny stocks in connection with trades in any stock defined as a penny stock. The SEC regulations define penny stocks to be any non-NASDAQ equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. Unless an exception is available, those regulations require the broker-dealer to deliver, prior to any transaction involving a penny stock, a standardized risk disclosure schedule prepared by the SEC, to provide the customer with current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction, monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the purchaser’s account, to make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser's written agreement to the transaction. These disclosure requirements may have the effect of reducing the level of trading activity, if any, in the secondary market for a stock that becomes subject to the penny stock rules. Consequently, these penny stock rules may affect the ability of broker-dealers to trade our securities. We believe that the penny stock rules discourage market investor interest in and limit the marketability of our common stock.

 

In addition to the "penny stock" rules promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission, the FINRA has adopted rules that require that in recommending an investment to a customer, a broker-dealer must have reasonable grounds for believing that the investment is suitable for that customer. Prior to recommending speculative low priced securities to their non-institutional customers, broker-dealers must make reasonable efforts to obtain information about the customer's financial status, tax status, investment objectives and other information. Under interpretations of these rules, the FINRA believes that there is a high probability that speculative low priced securities will not be suitable for at least some customers. The FINRA requirements make it more difficult for broker-dealers to recommend that their customers buy our common stock, which may limit your ability to buy and sell our stock.

 

23



Future sales of shares of our common stock by our stockholders could cause our stock price to decline.

 

Future sales of shares of our common stock could adversely affect the prevailing market price of our stock. If our significant stockholders sell a large number of shares, or if we issue a large number of shares, the market price of our stock could decline. Moreover, the perception in the public market that stockholders might sell shares of our stock could depress the market for our shares. If our significant stockholders sell substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market, such sales could create a circumstance commonly referred to as an “overhang,” in anticipation of which the market price of our common stock could fall. The existence of an overhang, whether or not sales have occurred or are occurring, also could make it more difficult for us to raise additional financing through the sale of equity or equity-related securities in the future at a time and price we deem reasonable or appropriate. Other situations include:

 

•              conditions or trends in our business industries;

•              announcements by us of significant contracts, acquisitions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or capital commitments;

•              additions or departures of key personnel;

•              sales of our common stock; and

•              general stock market price and volume fluctuations of publicly-traded, and particularly microcap, companies.

•              deliver to a prospective investor a standardized risk disclosure document that provides information about penny stocks and the  nature and level of risks in the penny stock market;

•              provide the prospective investor with current bid and ask quotations for the penny stock;

•              explain to the prospective investor the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction;

•              provide investors monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the their account; and

•              make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction.

 

We will issue additional shares of common stock upon conversion of our series common stock and may issue additional shares capital stock to raise capital or complete acquisitions, which would substantially reduce the equity interest of our current stockholders.

 

The outstanding shares of our series common stock automatically convert into 95% of the outstanding common stock (giving effect to the conversion) upon the vote of holders of two thirds of outstanding series common stock, voting as a separate series. In addition, we may issue a substantial number of additional shares of our common stock to complete a business combination or to raise capital. At this time, the Company is not aware of any intent of the holders of series common stock to vote to convert into common stock. The issuance of additional shares of our common stock may significantly reduce the equity interest of our existing stockholders and adversely affect prevailing market prices for our common stock.

 

We have not paid dividends in the past and do not expect to pay dividends in the future. Any return on investment may be limited to the value of our common stock.

 

We have never paid cash dividends on our common stock and do not anticipate doing so in the foreseeable future. The payment of dividends on our common stock will depend on earnings, financial condition and other business and economic factors affecting it at such time as the Board of Directors may consider relevant. As the date of this report, our management intends to follow a policy of retaining all of our earnings to finance the development and execution of our strategy and the expansion of our business. If we do not pay dividends, our common stock may be less valuable because a return on your investment will occur only if our stock price appreciates.

 

ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS)

 

In January, 2012, the Company issued 532,775 shares of restricted common stock valued at $21,308 ($.04 per share) to Oswald Gayle, the former CFO, in full satisfaction of all amounts owed to him for his services. As a part of his resignation he tendered 200,000 shares of series common stock which he had acquired as a result of his position as a founding member of NEWCO4EDUCATION, LLC.

 

In January, 2012, the Company issued 557,600 shares of restricted common stock valued at $22,304 ($0.04 per share) to Steve Carlson, the former CEO, in partial satisfaction of amounts owed to him for his services.

 

In February 2012, the Company issues 1,000,000 shares of restricted common stock values at $30,000 ($0.03 per share) to The Partnership of Atlanta Incorporated for consulting services.

 

24



The services acquired included marketing plans, artwork, web site specifications, market research pertaining to online education and resources, and advertising plans. The Company has entered into a long term agreement with The Partnership of Atlanta to provide ongoing marketing support in an “outsourcing” arrangement. We expect the monthly expense to be in the neighborhood of $10,000 per month. This agreement may be cancelled on 90 days written notice by either party.

 

During the first quarter of 2012 the Company negotiated the return of 430,010 shares of series common stock. Since these series common shares reacquired do not trade, we valued such series common shares using their comparable common stock equivalent. Each series common stock converts into 141.7026889 shares of common stock, as of March 31, 2012, based on 73,684,306 shares outstanding. The trading price of the common stock on the day such series common stock was reacquired was $0.03 a share. As a result we recorded the fair value of the series common stock to treasury stock in the amount of $1,828,007. Within the same quarter we reissued the same amount of series common shares to two consultants. The trading price of the common stock on March 30th, 2012 was $0.03 a share for purposes of recording a fair value expense, using the same common stock equivalent approach. As result we recorded compensation expense in the amount of $1,828,007 for the 430,010 series common stock issued for services in the first quarter.

 

Exemption From Registration

 

The securities issued during the first quarter of 2012 were issued without registration with the Commission, pursuant to Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.  The securities are offered and sold only to accredited investors as defined in Regulation D.  This exemption applies because the Company did not make any public offer to sell any securities, but rather, the Company only offered securities to persons known to the Company to be accredited investors and only sold securities to persons who represented to the Company in writing that they are accredited investors.

 

ITEM 6. EXHIBITS

 

Exhibits required to be attached by Item 601 of Regulation S-K are listed in the Index to Exhibits on page __ this Form 10-Q, and are incorporated herein by this reference.

 

Exhibit No.

                                                                        Description                          

 

 

10.1

Modification to Master Agreement by and between Sibling Entertainment Group Holdings, Inc. and The Partnership of Atlanta, Inc. dated May 9, 2012*

 

 

10.2

Restricted Stock Purchase and Restriction Agreement by and between Sibling Entertainment Group Holdings, Inc. and Blackstone Partners, LLC  dated as of March 30, 2012*

 

 

10.3

Restricted Stock Purchase and Restriction Agreement by and between Sibling Entertainment Group Holdings, Inc. and Atlanta Capital Partners, LLC  dated as of March 30, 2012*

 

 

31.1

Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, promulgated under the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.*

 

 

32.1

Certification pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002**

 

* Filed herewith

**Furnished herewith


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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

 

Dated: May 17, 2012

Sibling Entertainment Group Holdings, Inc.

                 

By:     /s/ Gerald F. Sullivan                                              

                 Gerald F. Sullivan

                 Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, and                Director (Principal Executive Officer and Principal

               Accounting Officer)

 

 

 

 

               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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PINX:SIBE Sibling Group Holdings Inc Quarterly Report 10-Q Filling

Sibling Group Holdings Inc PINX:SIBE Stock - Get Quarterly Report SEC Filing of Sibling Group Holdings Inc PINX:SIBE stocks, including company profile, shares outstanding, strategy, business segments, operations, officers, consolidated financial statements, financial notes and ownership information.

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PINX:SIBE Sibling Group Holdings Inc Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 3/31/2012
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