XNYS:HRB H&R Block Inc Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 7/31/2012

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Table of Contents

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

[X] QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended July 31, 2012

OR

 

[    ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission file number 1-6089

 

LOGO

H&R Block, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

MISSOURI   44-0607856

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

One H&R Block Way

Kansas City, Missouri 64105

(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)

(816) 854-3000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes     Ö    No             

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

Yes     Ö    No             

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one) :

 

  Large accelerated filer      Ö        Accelerated filer     Non-accelerated filer     Smaller reporting company  
        (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes          No     Ö    

The number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s Common Stock, without par value, at the close of business on August 31, 2012 was 271,109,828 shares.


Table of Contents

 

 

LOGO

Form 10-Q for the Period Ended July 31, 2012

 

 

Table of Contents

 

 

 

          Page  

PART I

   Financial Information   

Item 1.

  

Consolidated Balance Sheets
As of July 31, 2012 and April 30, 2012

     1   
  

Consolidated Statements of Operations and
Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Three months ended July 31, 2012 and 2011

     2   
  

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
Three months ended July 31, 2012 and 2011

     3   
  

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     4   

Item 2.

  

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     30   

Item 3.

  

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

     35   

Item 4.

  

Controls and Procedures

     35   

PART II

  

Other Information

  

Item 1.

  

Legal Proceedings

     35   

Item 1A.

  

Risk Factors

     35   

Item 2.

  

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

     36   

Item 6.

  

Exhibits

     36   

SIGNATURES

     37   

 

 


Table of Contents

 

LOGO

 

 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS    (amounts in 000s, except share and per share  amounts)  
As of    July 31, 2012     April 30, 2012  
     (Unaudited)        

ASSETS

    

Cash and cash equivalents

     $   939,871        $ 1,944,334   

Cash and cash equivalents – restricted

     43,109        48,100   

Receivables, less allowance for doubtful accounts
of $43,477 and $44,589

     116,357        193,858   

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

     318,262        314,702   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     1,417,599        2,500,994   

Mortgage loans held for investment, less allowance for
loan losses of $22,185 and $26,540

     386,759        406,201   

Investments in available-for-sale securities

     380,765        371,315   

Property and equipment, at cost, less accumulated depreciation and
amortization of $636,384 and $622,313

     253,993        252,985   

Intangible assets, net

     260,125        264,451   

Goodwill

     431,101        427,566   

Other assets

     463,935        426,055   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

     $3,594,277        $ 4,649,567   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

    

Liabilities:

    

Customer banking deposits

     $648,378        $827,549   

Accounts payable, accrued expenses and other current liabilities

     414,604        567,079   

Accrued salaries, wages and payroll taxes

     35,234        163,992   

Accrued income taxes

     278,539        336,374   

Current portion of long-term debt

     600,642        631,434   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     1,977,397        2,526,428   

Long-term debt

     408,992        409,115   

Other noncurrent liabilities

     362,215        388,132   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

     2,748,604        3,323,675   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies

    

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Common stock, no par, stated value $.01 per share, 800,000,000 shares authorized, shares issued
of 316,628,110 and 397,886,599

     3,166        3,979   

Additional paid-in capital

     744,616        796,784   

Accumulated other comprehensive income

     7,350        12,145   

Retained earnings

     955,873        2,523,997   

Less treasury shares, at cost

     (865,332     (2,011,013
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

     845,673        1,325,892   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

     $3,594,277        $ 4,649,567   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

-1-


Table of Contents

 

LOGO

 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS   

(Unaudited, amounts in 000s,

except per share amounts)

 

 
AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)   
Three months ended July 31,    2012      2011  

Revenues:

     

Service revenues

   $ 79,896       $ 83,020   

Interest income

     9,873         10,340   

Product and other revenues

     6,720         7,263   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     96,489         100,623   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Expenses:

     

Cost of revenues:

     

Compensation and benefits

     39,585         47,221   

Occupancy and equipment

     79,951         83,503   

Depreciation and amortization of property and equipment

     16,305         16,472   

Provision for bad debt and loan losses

     4,645         7,291   

Interest

     22,077         22,936   

Other

     30,861         35,161   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     193,424         212,584   

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     75,478         92,653   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     268,902         305,237   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Operating loss

     (172,413      (204,614

Other income, net

     3,144         4,013   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations before tax benefit

     (169,269      (200,601

Income tax benefit

     (63,619      (81,446
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss from continuing operations

     (105,650      (119,155

Net loss from discontinued operations

     (1,791      (55,943
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss

   $ (107,441    $ (175,098
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Basic and diluted loss per share:

     

Net loss from continuing operations

   $ (0.38    $ (0.39

Net loss from discontinued operations

     (0.01      (0.18
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss

   $ (0.39    $ (0.57
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Basic and diluted shares

     277,155         305,491   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Dividends paid per share

   $ 0.20       $ 0.15   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Comprehensive income (loss):

     

Net loss

   $ (107,441    $ (175,098

Unrealized gains on securities, net of taxes:

     

Unrealized holding gains arising during the period,
net of taxes of $152 and $704

     170         1,069   

Reclassification adjustment for gains (losses) included
in income, net of taxes of $ – and $58

             (94

Change in foreign currency translation adjustments

     (4,965      484   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income (loss)

     (4,795      1,459   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Comprehensive loss

   $ (112,236    $ (173,639
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

-2-


Table of Contents

 

LOGO

 

 
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS    (unaudited, amounts in 000s)  
Three months ended July 31,    2012     2011  

Net cash used in operating activities

   $ (373,140   $ (394,549
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

    

Purchases of available-for-sale securities

     (28,990     (39,275

Principal repayments on mortgage loans held for investment, net

     12,652        11,192   

Purchases of property and equipment, net

     (13,273     (10,953

Payments made for business acquisitions, net

     (2,972     (3,457

Proceeds from sale of businesses, net

            21,230   

Franchise loans:

    

Loans funded

     (5,062     (16,477

Payments received

     5,154        5,320   

Other, net

     25,776        18,167   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

     (6,715     (14,253
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

    

Repayments of long-term debt

     (30,831       

Customer banking deposits, net

     (179,519     (186,245

Dividends paid

     (54,201     (45,894

Repurchase of common stock, including shares surrendered

     (339,088     (2,002

Proceeds from exercise of stock options, net

     468        1,762   

Other, net

     (19,939     (24,916
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

     (623,110     (257,295
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Effects of exchange rates on cash

     (1,498     962   

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents

     (1,004,463     (665,135

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the period

     1,944,334        1,677,844   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of the period

   $ 939,871      $ 1,012,709   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Supplementary cash flow data:

    

Income taxes paid

   $ 19,747      $ 99,357   

Interest paid on borrowings

     13,494        37,634   

Interest paid on deposits

     1,336        1,820   

Transfers of foreclosed loans to other assets

     3,074        1,573   

Accrued additions to property and equipment

     7,107        3,376   

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

-3-


Table of Contents

 

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS   (unaudited)

 

 

1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of Presentation

The consolidated balance sheet as of July 31, 2012, the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss) for the three months ended July 31, 2012 and 2011, and the condensed consolidated statements of cash flows for the three months ended July 31, 2012 and 2011 have been prepared by the Company, without audit. In the opinion of management, all adjustments, which include only normal recurring adjustments, necessary to present fairly the financial position, results of operations and cash flows at July 31, 2012 and for all periods presented have been made. See note 13 for discussion of our presentation of discontinued operations.

“H&R Block,” “the Company,” “we,” “our” and “us” are used interchangeably to refer to H&R Block, Inc. or to H&R Block, Inc. and its subsidiaries, as appropriate to the context.

Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles have been condensed or omitted. These consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes thereto included in our April 30, 2012 Annual Report to Shareholders on Form 10-K. All amounts presented herein as of April 30, 2012 or for the year then ended, are derived from our April 30, 2012 Annual Report to Shareholders on Form 10-K.

Management Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. Significant estimates, assumptions and judgments are applied in the determination of contingent losses arising from our discontinued mortgage business, contingent losses associated with pending claims and litigation, allowance for loan losses, fair value of reporting units, valuation allowances based on future taxable income, reserves for uncertain tax positions and related matters. Estimates have been prepared on the basis of the most current and best information available as of each balance sheet date. As such, actual results could differ materially from those estimates.

Seasonality of Business

Our operating revenues are seasonal in nature with peak revenues occurring in the months of January through April. Therefore, results for interim periods are not indicative of results to be expected for the full year.

 

2. Loss Per Share and Stockholders’ Equity

Basic and diluted loss per share is computed using the two-class method. The two-class method is an earnings allocation formula that determines net income per share for each class of common stock and participating security according to dividends declared and participation rights in undistributed earnings. Per share amounts are computed by dividing net income from continuing operations attributable to common shareholders by the weighted average shares outstanding during each period. The dilutive effect of potential common shares is included in diluted earnings per share except in those periods with a loss from continuing operations. Diluted earnings per share excludes the impact of shares of common stock issuable upon the lapse of certain restrictions or the exercise of options to purchase 9.2 million shares for the three months ended July 31, 2012, and 14.5 million shares for the three months ended July 31, 2011, as the effect would be antidilutive due to the net loss from continuing operations during those periods.

 

-4-


Table of Contents

The computations of basic and diluted loss per share from continuing operations are as follows:

 

      (in 000s, except per share amounts)  
Three months ended July 31,    2012     2011  

Net loss from continuing operations attributable to shareholders

   $ (105,650   $ (119,155

Amounts allocated to participating securities (nonvested shares)

     (73     (114
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss from continuing operations attributable to common shareholders

   $ (105,723   $ (119,269
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Basic weighted average common shares

     277,155        305,491   

Potential dilutive shares

              
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Dilutive weighted average common shares

     277,155        305,491   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss per share from continuing operations:

    

Basic

   $ (0.38   $ (0.39

Diluted

     (0.38     (0.39

The weighted average shares outstanding for the three months ended July 31, 2012 decreased to 277.2 million from 305.5 million for the three months ended July 31, 2011, primarily due to share repurchases completed during fiscal years 2013 and 2012. During the three months ended July 31, 2012, we purchased and immediately retired 21.3 million shares of our common stock at a cost of $315.0 million. The cost of shares retired during the current period was allocated to the components of stockholders’ equity as follows:

 

              (in 000s)

Common stock

   $ 213      

Additional paid-in capital

     12,578      

Retained earnings

     302,209      
  

 

 

    
   $ 315,000      
    

 

 

      

In addition to the shares we repurchased as described above, during the three months ended July 31, 2012, we acquired 0.1 million shares of our common stock at an aggregate cost of $1.6 million. These shares represent shares swapped or surrendered to us in connection with the vesting or exercise of stock-based awards. During the three months ended July 31, 2011, we acquired 0.1 million shares at an aggregate cost of $2.0 million for similar purposes.

We also retired 60.0 million shares of treasury stock during the three months ended July 31, 2012. This retirement of treasury stock had no impact on our total consolidated stockholders’ equity. The cost of treasury shares retired during the current period was allocated to the following components of stockholders’ equity:

 

              (in 000s)

Common stock

   $ 600      

Additional paid-in capital

     36,000      

Retained earnings

     1,104,197      
  

 

 

    
   $ 1,140,797      
    

 

 

      

During the three months ended July 31, 2012 and 2011, we issued 0.3 million and 0.5 million shares of common stock, respectively, due to the vesting or exercise of stock-based awards.

During the three months ended July 31, 2012, we granted 0.3 million stock options and 1.3 million nonvested units under our stock-based compensation plans. The weighted average fair value of options granted was $2.36. These awards generally either vest over a three year period with one-third vesting each year or cliff vest at the end of a three-year period. Stock-based compensation expense of our continuing operations totaled $2.4 million and $3.3 million for the three months ended July 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively. At July 31, 2012, unrecognized compensation cost for options totaled $6.0 million, and for nonvested shares and units totaled $31.8 million.

 

-5-


Table of Contents
3. Receivables

Short-term receivables of our continuing operations consist of the following:

 

      (in 000s)  
As of    July 31, 2012     July 31, 2011     April 30, 2012  

Loans to franchisees

   $ 60,459      $ 62,313      $ 61,252   

Receivables for tax preparation and related fees

     35,194        36,203        42,286   

Emerald Advance lines of credit

     24,215        30,699        23,717   

Royalties from franchisees

     2,096        707        5,781   

Other

     37,870        42,652        105,411   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
     159,834        172,574        238,447   

Allowance for doubtful accounts

     (43,477     (48,692     (44,589
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 116,357      $ 123,882      $ 193,858   
    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The short-term portion of Emerald Advance lines of credit (EAs) and loans made to franchisees is included in receivables, while the long-term portion is included in other assets in the consolidated balance sheets. These amounts are as follows:

 

      (in 000s)  
      Emerald Advance
Lines of Credit
     Loans
to Franchisees
 

As of July 31, 2012:

     

Short-term

   $ 24,215       $ 60,459   

Long-term

     11,689         112,810   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 35,904       $ 173,269   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

As of July 31, 2011:

     

Short-term

   $ 30,699       $ 62,313   

Long-term

     18,539         123,962   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 49,238       $ 186,275   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

As of April 30, 2012:

     

Short-term

   $ 23,717       $ 61,252   

Long-term

     13,007         109,837   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 36,724       $ 171,089   
    

 

 

    

 

 

 

We review the credit quality of our EA receivables based on pools, which are segregated by the year of origination, with older years being deemed more unlikely to be repaid. These amounts as of July 31, 2012, by year of origination, are as follows:

 

      (in 000s)

2012

   $ 7,756      

2011

     6,637      

2010

     3,546      

2009 and prior

     5,111      

Revolving loans

     12,854      
  

 

 

    
   $ 35,904      
    

 

 

      

As of July 31, 2012 and April 30, 2012, $30.3 million and $31.4 million, respectively, of EAs were on non-accrual status and classified as impaired, or more than 60 days past due.

Loans made to franchisees at July 31, 2012 totaled $173.3 million, and consisted of $129.3 million in term loans made to finance the purchase of franchises and $44.0 million in revolving lines of credit made to existing franchisees primarily for the purpose of funding their off-season needs. Loans made to franchisees at April 30, 2012 totaled $171.1 million, and consisted of $127.0 million in term loans made to finance the purchase of franchises and $44.1 million in revolving lines of credit. As of July 31, 2012, loans totaling $1.1 million were past due; however, we had no loans to franchisees on non-accrual status.

 

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Activity in the allowance for doubtful accounts for the three months ended July 31, 2012 and 2011 is as follows:

 

      (in 000s)  
      Emerald Advance
Lines of Credit
     Loans
to Franchisees
     All
Other
     Total  

Balance as of April 30, 2012

   $ 6,200       $   –       $ 38,389       $ 44,589   

Provision

                     297         297   

Charge-offs

                     (1,409      (1,409
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance as of July 31, 2012

   $ 6,200       $       $ 37,277       $ 43,477   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance as of April 30, 2011

   $ 4,400       $       $ 43,543       $ 47,943   

Provision

     950                 423         1,373   

Charge-offs

                     (624      (624
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance as of July 31, 2011

   $ 5,350       $       $ 43,342       $ 48,692   
    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

There were no changes to our methodology related to the calculation of our allowance for doubtful accounts during the three months ended July 31, 2012.

 

4. Mortgage Loans Held for Investment and Related Assets

The composition of our mortgage loan portfolio as of July 31, 2012 and April 30, 2012 is as follows:

 

      (dollars in 000s)  
As of    July 31, 2012        April 30, 2012  
      Amount     % of Total        Amount     % of Total  

Adjustable-rate loans

   $ 222,474        55%         $ 238,442        56%   

Fixed-rate loans

     183,196        45%           190,870        44%   
  

 

 

   

 

 

      

 

 

   

 

 

 
     405,670        100%           429,312        100%   

Unamortized deferred fees and costs

     3,274             3,429     

Less: Allowance for loan losses

     (22,185          (26,540  
  

 

 

        

 

 

   
   $ 386,759           $ 406,201     
    

 

 

              

 

 

         

Our loan loss allowance as a percent of mortgage loans was 5.5% at July 31, 2012, compared to 6.2% at April 30, 2012.

Activity in the allowance for loan losses for the three months ended July 31, 2012 and 2011 is as follows:

 

      (in 000s)  
Three months ended July 31,    2012      2011  

Balance, beginning of the period

   $ 26,540       $ 92,087   

Provision

     4,000         5,625   

Recoveries

     1,186         49   

Charge-offs

     (9,541      (6,458
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance, end of the period

   $ 22,185       $ 91,303   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Our allowance decreased significantly from the prior year primarily due to a change in the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012, whereby we now charge-off loans 180 days past due to the value of the collateral less costs to sell.

 

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Table of Contents

When determining our allowance for loan losses, we evaluate loans less than 60 days past due on a pooled basis, while loans we consider impaired, including those loans more than 60 days past due or modified as TDRs, are evaluated individually. The balance of these loans and the related allowance is as follows:

 

      (in 000s)  
As of    July 31, 2012      April 30, 2012  
      Portfolio Balance      Related Allowance      Portfolio Balance      Related Allowance  

Pooled

   $ 238,999       $ 7,701       $ 248,772       $ 9,237   

Impaired:

           

Individually (TDRs)

     67,587         6,931         71,949         7,752   

Individually

     99,084         7,553         108,591         9,551   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 405,670       $ 22,185       $ 429,312       $ 26,540   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Our portfolio includes loans originated by Sand Canyon Corporation, previously known as Option One Mortgage Corporation, and its subsidiaries (SCC) and purchased by H&R Block Bank (HRB Bank), which constitute 58% of the total loan portfolio at July 31, 2012. We have experienced higher rates of delinquency and believe that we have greater exposure to loss with respect to this segment of our loan portfolio. Our remaining loan portfolio totaled $171.6 million at July 31, 2012 and is characteristic of a prime loan portfolio, and we believe therefore subject to a lower loss exposure. Detail of our mortgage loans held for investment and the related allowance at July 31, 2012 is as follows:

 

                              (dollars in 000s)  
      Outstanding      Loan Loss Allowance      % 30+ Days  
     Principal Balance         Amount         % of Principal         Past Due   

Purchased from SCC

   $ 234,040       $ 17,724         7.6%         34.9%   

All other

     171,630         4,461         2.6%         9.5%   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 405,670       $ 22,185         5.5%         24.1%   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Credit quality indicators at July 31, 2012 include the following:

 

(in 000s)  
Credit Quality Indicators    Purchased from SCC      All Other      Total Portfolio  

Occupancy status:

        

Owner occupied

   $ 168,756       $ 109,934       $ 278,690   

Non-owner occupied

     65,284         61,696         126,980   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 234,040       $ 171,630       $ 405,670   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Documentation level:

        

Full documentation

   $ 74,959       $ 125,811       $ 200,770   

Limited documentation

     7,080         17,750         24,830   

Stated income

     131,633         17,447         149,080   

No documentation

     20,368         10,622         30,990   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 234,040       $ 171,630       $ 405,670   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Internal risk rating:

        

High

   $ 80,268       $       $ 80,268   

Medium

     153,772                 153,772   

Low

             171,630         171,630   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 234,040       $ 171,630       $ 405,670   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Loans given our internal risk rating of “high” were originated by SCC, generally have no documentation or are stated income, and are non-owner occupied. Loans given our internal risk rating of “medium” were generally full documentation or stated income, with loan-to-value at origination of more than 80%, and have credit scores at origination below 700. Loans given our internal risk rating of “low” were generally full documentation, with loan-to-value at origination of less than 80% and have credit scores greater than 700.

 

-8-


Table of Contents

Our mortgage loans held for investment include concentrations of loans to borrowers in certain states, which may result in increased exposure to loss as a result of changes in real estate values and underlying economic or market conditions related to a particular geographical location. Approximately 58% of our mortgage loan portfolio consists of loans to borrowers located in the states of Florida, California, New York and Wisconsin.

Detail of the aging of the mortgage loans in our portfolio as of July 31, 2012 is as follows:

 

      (in 000s)  
     

Less than 60

Days Past Due

    

60–89 Days

Past Due

    

90+ Days

Past Due  (1)

    

Total

Past Due

     Current      Total  

Purchased from SCC

   $ 21,167       $ 2,658       $ 77,457       $ 101,282       $ 132,758       $ 234,040   

All other

     6,436         1,828         13,830         22,094         149,536         171,630   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 27,603       $ 4,486       $ 91,287       $ 123,376       $ 282,294       $ 405,670   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

(1)      We do not accrue interest on loans past due 90 days or more.

         

Information related to our non-accrual loans is as follows:

 

      (in 000s)  
As of    July 31, 2012      April 30, 2012  

Loans:

     

Purchased from SCC

   $ 81,539       $ 88,347   

Other

     16,178         16,626   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     97,717         104,973   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

TDRs:

     

Purchased from SCC

     3,398         3,166   

Other

     509         1,270   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     3,907         4,436   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total non-accrual loans

   $ 101,624       $ 109,409   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Information related to impaired loans is as follows:

 

                              (in 000s)  
      Balance With
Allowance
    

Balance With

No Allowance

    

Total

Impaired Loans

     Related
Allowance
 

As of July 31, 2012:

           

Purchased from SCC

   $ 45,719       $ 94,184       $ 139,903       $ 11,653   

Other

     8,199         18,569         26,768         2,831   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 53,918       $ 112,753       $ 166,671       $ 14,484   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

As of April 30, 2012:

           

Purchased from SCC

   $ 56,128       $ 97,591       $ 153,719       $ 14,917   

Other

     7,137         19,684         26,821         2,386   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 63,265       $ 117,275       $ 180,540       $ 17,303   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Information related to the allowance for impaired loans is as follows:

 

      (in 000s)  
As of    July 31, 2012      April 30, 2012  

Portion of total allowance for loan losses allocated to impaired loans and TDR loans:

     

Based on collateral value method

   $ 7,553       $ 9,551   

Based on discounted cash flow method

     6,931         7,752   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 14,484       $ 17,303   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

-9-


Table of Contents

Information related to activities of our non-performing assets is as follows:

 

              (in 000s)  
Three months ended July 31,    2012      2011  

Average impaired loans:

     

Purchased from SCC

   $ 147,555       $ 230,150   

All other

     26,841         36,477   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 174,396       $ 266,627   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Interest income on impaired loans:

     

Purchased from SCC

   $ 1,011       $ 1,556   

All other

     82         119   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 1,093       $ 1,675   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Interest income on impaired loans recognized on a cash basis on non-accrual status:

     

Purchased from SCC

   $ 994       $ 1,498   

All other

     73         114   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 1,067       $ 1,612   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Activity related to our real estate owned (REO) is as follows:

 

             (in 000s)  
Three months ended July 31,    2012     2011  

Balance, beginning of the period

   $ 14,972      $ 19,532   

Additions

     3,074        1,573   

Sales

     (1,801     (3,722

Writedowns

     (788     (793
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, end of the period

   $ 15,457      $ 16,590   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

5. Investments in Available-for-Sale Securities

The amortized cost and fair value of securities classified as available-for-sale (AFS) held at July 31, 2012 and April 30, 2012 are summarized below:

 

            (in 000s)  
As of   July 31, 2012     

April 30, 2012

 
    

Amortized

Cost

   

Gross

Unrealized

Gains

   

Gross

Unrealized

Losses (1)

   

Fair

Value

    

Amortized

Cost

   

Gross

Unrealized

Gains

   

Gross

Unrealized

Losses (1)

   

Fair

Value

 

Short-term:

                

Municipal bonds

  $ 1,006      $ 20      $      $ 1,026       $ 1,008      $ 29      $      $ 1,037   

Long-term:

                

Mortgage-backed securities

    370,318        5,898        (78     376,138         361,184        5,620        (121     366,683   

Municipal bonds

    4,221        406               4,627         4,236        396               4,632   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
    374,539        6,304        (78     380,765         365,420        6,016        (121     371,315   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

  $ 375,545      $ 6,324      $ (78   $ 381,791       $ 366,428      $ 6,045      $ (121   $ 372,352   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

(1)      At July 31, 2012, mortgage-backed securities with a cost of $7.9 million and gross unrealized losses of $5 thousand had been in a continuous loss position for more than twelve months. At April 30, 2012, mortgage-backed securities with a cost of $8.1 million and gross unrealized losses of $21 thousand had been in a continuous loss position for more than twelve months.

           

 

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Table of Contents

We had no sales of AFS securities during the three months ended July 31, 2012 or 2011.

Contractual maturities of AFS debt securities at July 31, 2012, occur at varying dates over the next 30 years, and are set forth in the table below.

 

              (in 000s)  
As of July 31, 2012    Cost Basis      Fair Value  

Maturing in:

     

Less than one year

   $ 1,006       $ 1,026   

Two to five years

     4,221         4,627   

Beyond

     370,318         376,138   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 375,545       $ 381,791   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

6. Goodwill and Intangible Assets

Changes in the carrying amount of goodwill for the three months ended July 31, 2012 consist of the following:

 

      (in 000s)  
      Tax Services  

Balance at April 30, 2012:

  

Goodwill

   $ 459,863   

Accumulated impairment losses

     (32,297
  

 

 

 
     427,566   
  

 

 

 

Changes:

  

Acquisitions

     3,651   

Disposals and foreign currency changes

     (116
  

 

 

 

Balance at July 31, 2012:

  

Goodwill

     463,398   

Accumulated impairment losses

     (32,297
  

 

 

 
   $ 431,101   
  

 

 

 
  

 

 

 
    

 

 

 

We test goodwill for impairment annually or more frequently if events occur or circumstances change which would, more likely than not, reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying value.

Intangible assets of our Tax Services segment consist of the following:

 

(in 000s)  
As of            July 31, 2012                     April 30, 2012         
      Gross
Carrying
Amount
     Accumulated
Amortization
    Net      Gross
Carrying
Amount
     Accumulated
Amortization
    Net  

Customer relationships

   $ 89,839       $ (48,298   $ 41,541       $ 90,433       $ (46,504   $ 43,929   

Noncompete agreements

     22,225         (21,443     782         22,337         (21,425     912   

Reacquired franchise rights

     214,330         (15,113     199,217         214,330         (14,083     200,247   

Franchise agreements

     19,201         (4,694     14,507         19,201         (4,373     14,828   

Purchased technology

     14,700         (11,080     3,620         14,700         (10,665     4,035   

Trade name

     1,300         (842     458         1,300         (800     500   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 361,595       $ (101,470   $ 260,125       $ 362,301       $ (97,850   $ 264,451   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Amortization of intangible assets of our continuing operations for the three months ended July 31, 2012 and 2011 totaled $4.2 and $5.1 million, respectively. Estimated amortization of intangible assets for fiscal years 2013 through 2017 is $16.4 million, $14.6 million, $11.3 million, $10.8 million and $10.1 million, respectively.

 

-11-


Table of Contents
7. Fair Value Measurement

We use the following classification of financial instruments pursuant to the fair value hierarchy methodologies for assets measured at fair value:

   

Level 1 – inputs to the valuation are quoted prices in an active market for identical assets.

   

Level 2 – inputs to the valuation include quoted prices for similar assets in active markets utilizing a third-party pricing service to determine fair value.

   

Level 3 – valuation is based on significant inputs that are unobservable in the market and our own estimates of assumptions that we believe market participants would use in pricing the asset.

Financial instruments are broken down in the tables that follow by recurring or nonrecurring measurement status. Recurring assets are initially measured at fair value and are required to be remeasured at fair value in the financial statements at each reporting date. Assets measured on a nonrecurring basis are assets that, as a result of an event or circumstance, were required to be remeasured at fair value after initial recognition in the financial statements at some time during the reporting period.

The following table presents the assets that were remeasured at fair value on a recurring basis during the three months ended July 31, 2012 and 2011 and the unrealized gains on those remeasurements:

 

      (dollars in 000s)  
      Total      Level 1      Level 2      Level 3      Gain (loss)  

July 31, 2012:

              

Mortgage-backed securities

   $ 376,138       $       $ 376,138       $       $ 5,820   

Municipal bonds

     5,653                 5,653                 426   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 381,791       $       $ 381,791       $       $ 6,246   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

As a percentage of total assets

     10.6%         –%         10.6%         –%      

July 31, 2011:

              

Mortgage-backed securities

   $ 192,491       $       $ 192,491       $       $ 1,936   

Municipal bonds

     7,758                 7,758                 449   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 200,249       $       $ 200,249       $       $ 2,385   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

As a percentage of total assets

     4.6%         –%         4.6%         –%      
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Our AFS securities are carried at fair value on a recurring basis. These include certain agency and agency-sponsored mortgage-backed securities and municipal bonds. Quoted market prices are not available for these securities. As a result, we use a third-party pricing service to determine fair value and classify the securities as Level 2. The service’s pricing model is based on market data and utilizes available trade, bid and other market information for similar securities. The fair values provided by third-party pricing service are reviewed and validated by management of HRB Bank. There were no transfers of AFS securities between hierarchy levels during the three months ended July 31, 2012 and 2011.

The following table presents the assets that were remeasured at fair value on a non-recurring basis during the three months ended July 31, 2012 and 2011 and the losses on those remeasurements:

 

      (dollars in 000s)  
      Total      Level 1      Level 2      Level 3      Gain (loss)  

July 31, 2012:

              

REO

   $ 16,384       $       $       $ 16,384       $ (261

Impaired mortgage loans held for investment

     93,666                         93,666         (4,337
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 110,050       $       $       $ 110,050       $ (4,598
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

As a percentage of total assets

     3.1%         –%         –%         3.1%      

July 31, 2011:

              

REO

     3,446                         3,446         (482

Impaired mortgage loans held for investment

     61,997                         61,997         (1,473
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 65,443       $       $       $ 65,443       $ (1,955
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

As a percentage of total assets

     1.5%         –%         –%         1.5%      
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

-12-


Table of Contents

The following methods were used to estimate the fair value of each class of financial instrument above:

   

Real estate owned – REO includes foreclosed properties securing mortgage loans. Foreclosed assets are recorded at estimated fair value, generally based on independent market prices or appraised values of the collateral, less costs to sell upon foreclosure. The assets are remeasured quarterly based on independent appraisals or broker price opinions. Subsequent holding period gains and losses arising from the sale of REO are reported when realized. Because our REO is valued based on significant inputs that are unobservable in the market and our own estimates of assumptions that we believe market participants would use in pricing the asset, these assets are classified as Level 3.

   

Impaired mortgage loans held for investment – The fair value of impaired mortgage loans held for investment is generally based on the net present value of discounted cash flows for TDR loans or the appraised value of the underlying collateral for all other loans. Impaired and TDR loans are required to be evaluated at least annually, based on HRB Bank’s Loan Policy. Impaired loans are typically remeasured every six months, while TDRs are evaluated quarterly. These loans are classified as Level 3.

We have established various controls and procedures to ensure that the unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of these instruments are appropriate. Appraisals are obtained from certified appraisers and reviewed internally by HRB Bank’s asset management group. The inputs and assumptions used in our discounted cash flow model for TDRs are reviewed and approved by the management team of HRB Bank each time the balances are remeasured. Significant changes in fair value from the previous measurement are presented to HRB Bank management for approval. There were no changes to the unobservable inputs used in determining the fair values of our level 3 financial assets.

The following table presents the quantitative information about our Level 3 fair value measurements:

 

      (dollars in 000s)
      Fair Value at
July 31, 2012
     Valuation
Technique
   Unobservable Input   

Range

(Weighted Average)

REO

   $ 15,457       Third party    Cost to list/sell    5% -36% (6%)
      pricing    Loss severity    0% -95% (45%)

Impaired mortgage loans

   $ 91,531       Collateral-    Cost to list/sell    0% - 30% (7%)

held for investment – non TDRs

      based    Time to sell (months)    24 (24)
         Collateral depreciation    (38%) - 100% (48%)
         Loss severity    0% - 100% (57%)

Impaired mortgage loans

   $ 60,656       Discounted    Aged default performance    31% - 55% (43%)

held for investment – TDRs

      cash flow    Loss severity    0% - 21% (4%)
  

 

 

    

 

  

 

  

 

    

 

 

    

 

  

 

  

 

 

8. Fair Value of Financial Instruments
  The carrying amounts and estimated fair values of our financial instruments are as follows:

 

      (in 000s)  
As of    July 31, 2012      April 30, 2012          
      Carrying
Amount
     Estimated
Fair Value
     Carrying
Amount
     Estimated
Fair Value
     Fair Value
Hierarchy
 

Assets:

              

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 939,871       $ 939,871       $ 1,944,334       $ 1,944,334         Level 1   

Cash and cash equivalents – restricted

     43,109         43,109         48,100         48,100         Level 1   

Receivables, net – short-term

     116,357         116,357         193,858         193,858         Level 1   

Mortgage loans held for investment, net

     386,759         238,658         406,201         248,535         Level 3   

Investments in available-for- sale securities

     381,791         381,791         372,352         372,352         Level 2   

Receivables, net – long-term

     128,930         128,930         127,468         127,468         Level 1 & 3   

Note receivable (including interest)

     56,917         62,748         55,444         55,444         Level 3   

Liabilities:

              

Deposits

     653,681         653,382         833,047         831,251         Level 1 & 3   

Long-term debt

     1,009,634         1,037,169         1,040,549         1,077,223         Level 3   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

-13-


Table of Contents

Fair value estimates, methods and assumptions are set forth below. The fair value was not estimated for assets and liabilities that are not considered financial instruments.

   

Cash and cash equivalents, including restricted – Fair value approximates the carrying amount.

   

Receivables – short-term – For short-term balances, the carrying values reported in the balance sheet approximate fair market value due to the relative short-term nature of the respective instruments.

   

Mortgage loans held for investment, net – The fair value of mortgage loans held for investment is determined using market pricing sources based on projected future cash flows of each individual asset, and loan characteristics including channel and performance characteristics.

   

Investments in available-for-sale securities – We use a third-party pricing service to determine fair value. The service’s pricing model is based on market data and utilizes available trade, bid and other market information for similar securities.

   

Receivables – long-term – The carrying values for the long-term portion of loans to franchisees approximate fair market value due to the variable interest rates (Level 1). Long-term EA receivables are carried at net realizable value which approximates fair value (Level 3). Net realizable value is determined based on historical collection rates.

   

Note receivable – The fair value of the long-term note receivable from M&P assumes no prepayment and is determined using market pricing sources for similar instruments based on projected future cash flows.

   

Deposits – The fair value of deposits with no stated maturity such as non-interest-bearing demand deposits, checking, money market and savings accounts was equal to the amount payable on demand (Level 1). The fair value of IRAs and other time deposits is estimated by discounting the future cash flows using the rates currently offered by HRB Bank for products with similar remaining maturities (Level 3).

   

Long-term debt – The fair value of borrowings is based on rates currently available to us for obligations with similar terms and maturities, including current market yields on our Senior Notes.

 

9. Income Taxes

We file a consolidated federal income tax return in the United States and file tax returns in various state and foreign jurisdictions. The U.S. federal consolidated tax returns for the years 1999 through 2010 are currently under examination by the Internal Revenue Service, with the 1999-2007 years currently at the appellate level. Federal returns for tax years prior to 1999 are closed by statute. Historically, tax returns in various foreign and state jurisdictions are examined and settled upon completion of the exam.

We had gross unrecognized tax benefits of $208.0 million and $206.4 million at July 31, 2012 and April 30, 2012, respectively. The gross unrecognized tax benefits increased $1.6 million in the current year, due primarily to accruals of tax on positions related to current and prior years partially offset by settlements with taxing authorities. We believe it is reasonably possible that the balance of unrecognized tax benefits could decrease by approximately $66 million before April 30, 2013 due to expiration of statutes of limitations and anticipated settlements of audit issues. This amount is included in accrued income taxes in our consolidated balance sheet. The remaining amount is classified as long-term and is included in other noncurrent liabilities in the consolidated balance sheet.

 

10. Interest Income and Expense

The following table shows the components of interest income and expense of our continuing operations:

 

      (in 000s)  
Three months ended July 31,    2012      2011  

Interest income:

     

Mortgage loans, net

   $ 4,417       $ 5,661   

Other

     5,456         4,679   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 9,873       $ 10,340   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Interest expense:

     

Borrowings

   $ 20,754       $ 21,129   

Deposits

     1,323         1,656   

FHLB advances

             151   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 22,077       $ 22,936   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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11. Commitments and Contingencies

Changes in deferred revenue balances related to our Peace of Mind (POM) program, the current portion of which is included in accounts payable, accrued expenses and other current liabilities and the long-term portion of which is included in other noncurrent liabilities in the consolidated balance sheets, are as follows:

 

      (in 000s)  
Three months ended July 31,    2012     2011  

Balance, beginning of period

   $ 141,080      $ 140,603   

Amounts deferred for new guarantees issued

     573        553   

Revenue recognized on previous deferrals

     (26,983     (27,181
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, end of period

   $ 114,670      $ 113,975   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
    

 

 

   

 

 

 

In addition to amounts accrued for our POM guarantee, we had accrued $15.5 million and $16.3 million at July 31, 2012 and April 30, 2012, respectively, related to our standard guarantee, which is included with our standard tax preparation services. The current portion of this liability is included in accounts payable, accrued expenses and other current liabilities and the long-term portion is included in other noncurrent liabilities in the consolidated balance sheets,

We have recorded liabilities totaling $7.1 million and $6.8 million as of July 31, 2012 and April 30, 2012, respectively, in conjunction with contingent payments related to recent acquisitions of our continuing operations, with the short-term amount recorded in accounts payable, accrued expenses and deposits and the long-term portion included in other noncurrent liabilities. Our estimate is typically based on performance targets and financial conditions at the time of acquisition. Should actual results differ materially from our assumptions, the potential payments will differ from the above estimate and any differences will be recorded in our results from continuing operations.

We have contractual commitments to fund certain franchisees requesting revolving lines of credit. Our total obligation under these lines of credit was $88.0 million at July 31, 2012, and net of amounts drawn and outstanding, our remaining commitment to fund totaled $44.0 million.

We routinely enter into contracts that include embedded indemnifications that have characteristics similar to guarantees. Other guarantees and indemnifications of the Company and its subsidiaries include obligations to protect counterparties from losses arising from the following: (1) tax, legal and other risks related to the purchase or disposition of businesses; (2) penalties and interest assessed by federal and state taxing authorities in connection with tax returns prepared for clients; (3) indemnification of our directors and officers; and (4) third-party claims relating to various arrangements in the normal course of business. Typically, there is no stated maximum payment related to these indemnifications, and the terms of the indemnities may vary and in many cases are limited only by the applicable statute of limitations. The likelihood of any claims being asserted against us and the ultimate liability related to any such claims, if any, is difficult to predict. While we cannot provide assurance we will ultimately prevail in the event any such claims are asserted, we believe the fair values of guarantees and indemnifications relating to our continuing operations are not material as of July 31, 2012.

Variable Interests

We evaluated our financial interests in variable interest entities (VIEs) as of July 31, 2012 and determined that there have been no significant changes related to those financial interests.

Discontinued Operations – Loss Contingencies Arising From Representations and Warranties

Overview. SCC ceased originating mortgage loans in December 2007 and, in April 2008, sold its servicing assets and discontinued its remaining operations. The sale of servicing assets did not include the sale of any mortgage loans.

Mortgage loans originated by SCC were sold either as whole loans to single third-party buyers or in the form of residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBSs). In connection with the sale of loans and/or RMBSs, SCC made certain representations and warranties. These representations and warranties varied based on the nature of the transaction and the buyer’s or insurer’s requirements, but generally pertained

 

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to the ownership of the loan, the validity of the lien securing the loan, borrower fraud, the loan’s compliance with the criteria for inclusion in the transaction, including compliance with SCC’s underwriting standards or loan criteria established by the buyer, ability to deliver required documentation, and compliance with applicable laws. Representations and warranties related to borrower fraud in whole loan sale transactions to institutional investors, which represented approximately 68% of the disposal of loans originated in calendar years 2005, 2006 and 2007, included a “knowledge qualifier” limiting SCC’s liability to those instances where SCC had knowledge of the fraud at the time the loans were sold. Representations and warranties made in other sale transactions did not include a knowledge qualifier as to borrower fraud. In the event that there is a breach of a representation and warranty and such breach materially and adversely affects the value of a mortgage loan or a securitization insurer’s or bondholder’s interest in the mortgage loan, SCC may be obligated to repurchase the loan, may be obligated to indemnify certain parties, or enter into settlement arrangements related to losses, collectively referred to as “representation and warranty claims.”

Claim History. Representation and warranty claims received by SCC have primarily related to alleged breaches of representations and warranties related to a loan’s compliance with the underwriting standards established by SCC at origination and borrower fraud. Claims received since May 1, 2008 are as follows:

 

     (in millions)  
    Fiscal Year        Fiscal Year          Fiscal Year 2011              Fiscal Year 2012          
 
Fiscal Year
2013
  
  
  
     2009     2010     Q1     Q2     Q3      Q4      Q1     Q2      Q3      Q4     Q1      Total  

Loan Origination Year:

  

                        

2005

  $ 62      $ 15      $ 6      $ 1      $       $ 1       $      $       $ 4       $      $ 18       $ 107   

2006

    217        108        100        15        29         50         29        130         29         137        123         967   

2007

    153        22        3        5        4         4         2        353         2         406        1         955   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

  $ 432      $ 145      $ 109      $ 21      $ 33       $ 55       $ 31      $ 483       $ 35       $ 543      $ 142       $ 2,029   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 
                                                                                                      
Note: The table above excludes amounts related to indemnity agreements.            

SCC received $142 million in claims during the first quarter of fiscal year 2013, most of which were asserted by a private-label securitization trustee on behalf of certificate holders ($136 million) with the remainder asserted by monoline insurers ($6 million). The amount of claims received varies from period to period, and these variances have been and are expected to continue to fluctuate substantially. Although there is no certainty regarding future claim volume, SCC has experienced, and may in the future continue to experience, an increase in representation and warranty claims which may be due to mortgage delinquency rates, housing prices, expected expiration of applicable statutes of limitations and developments in securities litigation and other proceedings to which SCC is not a party, among other factors.

Nearly all claims asserted against SCC since May 1, 2008 relate to loans originated during calendar years 2005 through 2007, of which, approximately 95% relate to loans originated in calendar years 2006 and 2007. During calendar years 2005 through 2007, SCC originated approximately $84 billion in loans, of which less than 1% were sold directly to government sponsored entities. Government sponsored entities also purchased bonds backed by SCC-originated mortgage loans and, with respect to these bonds, have the same rights as other certificate holders in private label securitizations. SCC may not be subject to representation and warranty losses on loans for a variety of reasons, including loans that have been paid in full, repurchased, or were sold without recourse, among others.

The majority of claims asserted since May 1, 2008 determined by SCC to represent a valid breach of its representations and warranties, relate to loans that became delinquent within the first two years following the origination of the mortgage loan. Based on its experiences to date, SCC believes the longer a loan performs prior to an event of default, the less likely the default will be related to a breach of a representation and warranty. A loan that defaults within the first two years following the origination of the mortgage loan does not necessarily default due to a breach of a representation and warranty. Exclusive of loans that have been paid in full or for which a representation and warranty claim has been asserted and deemed valid, loans originated in 2005, 2006 and 2007 that defaulted in the first two years totaled $3.9 billion, $6.1 billion and $2.7 billion, respectively.

 

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Reviewed Claims. Since May 2008, SCC has denied approximately 92% of all claims reviewed, excluding loans covered by other settlements. Losses on representation and warranty claims totaled approximately $134 million for the period May 1, 2008 through July 31, 2012. Loss severity rates have approximated 62% and SCC has not observed any material trends related to average losses. Repurchased loans are considered held for sale and are included in prepaid expenses and other current assets on the consolidated balance sheets. The net balance of all mortgage loans and REO held for sale by SCC was $10.7 million at July 31, 2012.

SCC generally has 60 to 120 days to respond to a claimed breach of a representation and warranty and performs a loan-by-loan review of all claims during this time. Counterparties are able to reassert claims that SCC has denied. Claims totaling approximately $260 million remained subject to review as of July 31, 2012, of which, approximately $28 million represent a reassertion of previously denied claims.

Liability for Estimated Contingent Losses. SCC estimates probable losses arising from representations and warranties on loans it originated which collateralize RMBSs by assessing claim activity, both known and projected. Projections of future claims are based on an analysis that includes a review of the terms and provisions of related agreements, the historical claim and validity rate experience and inquiries from various third-parties. SCC’s methodology for calculating this liability also includes an assessment of the probability that individual counterparties (private label securitization trustees on behalf of certificate holders, monoline insurers and whole-loan purchasers) will assert future claims.

SCC has accrued a liability as of July 31, 2012 for estimated contingent losses arising from representations and warranties on loans it originated which collateralize RMBSs of $129.3 million, which represents SCC’s estimate of the probable loss that may occur. While SCC uses what it believes to be the best information available to it in estimating its liability, assessing the likelihood that claims will be asserted in the future and estimating probable losses are inherently subjective and require considerable management judgment. To the extent that the volume of claims, the level of valid claims, the level of disputed claims, the counterparties asserting claims, the nature and severity of claims, or the value of residential home prices, among other factors, differ in the future from current estimates, future losses may differ from the current estimates and those differences may be significant. Because the rate at which future claims may be determined to be valid and actual loss severity rates may differ significantly from historical experience, SCC is not able to estimate reasonably possible loss outcomes in excess of its current accrual. A 1% increase in both assumed validity rates and loss severities would result in losses beyond SCC’s accrual of approximately $28 million. This sensitivity is hypothetical and is intended to provide an indication of the impact of a change in key assumptions on this loss contingency. In reality, changes in one assumption may result in changes in other assumptions, which could affect the sensitivity and the amount of losses.

A rollforward of our accrued liability for these loss contingencies is as follows:

 

             (in 000s)  
Three months ended July 31,    2012     2011  

Balance at beginning of period

   $ 130,018      $ 126,260   

Provisions

              

Payments

     (753     (485
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at end of period

   $ 129,265      $ 125,775   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Discontinued Operations – Indemnification Obligations

Losses may also be incurred with respect to various indemnification claims related to loans and securities SCC originated and sold. Losses from indemnification obligations can be significant and are frequently not subject to a stated term or limit. SCC believes it is not probable that it will be required to perform under its indemnification obligations; however, there can be no assurances as to the outcome or impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows related to claims which may arise from those indemnification obligations.

In connection with the sale of RSM McGladrey, Inc. (RSM) and McGladrey Capital Markets LLC (MCM), we indemnified the buyers against certain litigation matters, as discussed in note 12. The indemnities are not subject to a stated term or limit.

 

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12. Litigation and Related Contingencies

We are a defendant in a large number of litigation matters, arising both in the ordinary course of business and otherwise, including as described below. The matters described below are not all of the lawsuits to which we are subject. In some of the matters, very large and/or indeterminate amounts, including punitive damages, are sought. U.S. jurisdictions permit considerable variation in the assertion of monetary damages or other relief. Jurisdictions may permit claimants not to specify the monetary damages sought or may permit claimants to state only that the amount sought is sufficient to invoke the jurisdiction of the trial court. In addition, jurisdictions may permit plaintiffs to allege monetary damages in amounts well exceeding reasonably possible verdicts in the jurisdiction for similar matters. We believe that the monetary relief which may be specified in a lawsuit or claim bears little relevance to its merits or disposition value due to this variability in pleadings and our experience in litigating or resolving through settlement numerous claims over an extended period of time.

The outcome of a litigation matter and the amount or range of potential loss at particular points in time may be difficult to ascertain. Among other things, uncertainties can include how fact finders will evaluate documentary evidence and the credibility and effectiveness of witness testimony, and how trial and appellate courts will apply the law. Disposition valuations are also subject to the uncertainty of how opposing parties and their counsel will themselves view the relevant evidence and applicable law.

In addition to litigation matters, we are also subject to other claims and regulatory investigations arising out of our business activities, including as described below.

We accrue liabilities for litigation and regulatory loss contingencies when it is probable that a loss has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. Liabilities have been accrued for a number of the matters noted below. If a range of loss is estimated, and some amount within that range appears to be a better estimate than any other amount within that range, then that amount is accrued. If no amount within the range can be identified as a better estimate than any other amount, we accrue the minimum amount in the range.

For such matters where a loss is believed to be reasonably possible, but not probable, or the loss cannot be reasonably estimated, no accrual has been made. It is possible that litigation and regulatory matters could require us to pay damages or make other expenditures or accrue liabilities in amounts that could not be reasonably estimated at July 31, 2012. While the potential future liabilities could be material in the particular quarterly or annual periods in which they are recorded, based on information currently known, we do not believe any such liabilities are likely to have a material effect on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows. As of July 31, 2012, we have accrued liabilities of $44.4 million, compared to $79.0 million at April 30, 2012.

For some matters where a liability has not been accrued, we are able to estimate a reasonably possible range of loss. For those matters, and for matters where a liability has been accrued, as of July 31, 2012, we estimate the aggregate range of reasonably possible losses in excess of amounts accrued to be approximately $0 to $132 million, of which approximately 70% relates to our discontinued operations.

For other matters, we are not currently able to estimate the reasonably possible loss or range of loss. We are often unable to estimate the possible loss or range of loss until developments in such matters have provided sufficient information to support an assessment of the range of possible loss, such as quantification of a damage demand from plaintiffs, discovery from other parties and investigation of factual allegations, rulings by the court on motions or appeals, analysis by experts, and the progress of settlement negotiations. On a quarterly and annual basis, we review relevant information with respect to litigation contingencies and update our accruals, disclosures and estimates of reasonably possible losses or ranges of loss based on such reviews.

Litigation and Other Claims Pertaining to Discontinued Mortgage Operations

Although SCC ceased its mortgage loan origination activities in December 2007 and sold its loan servicing business in April 2008, SCC and the Company have been, remain, or may in the future be subject to regulatory investigations, claims and lawsuits pertaining to SCC’s mortgage business activities that occurred prior to such termination and sale. These investigations, claims and lawsuits include actions by state and federal regulators, third party indemnitees, individual plaintiffs, and cases in which plaintiffs seek to represent a class of others alleged to be similarly situated. Among other things, these

 

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investigations, claims and lawsuits allege discriminatory or unfair and deceptive loan origination and servicing practices, fraud and other common law torts, rights to indemnification, and violations of securities laws, the Truth in Lending Act (TILA), Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Housing Act. Given the non-prime mortgage environment, the number of these investigations, claims and lawsuits has increased over time and is expected to continue to increase further. The amounts claimed in these investigations, claims and lawsuits are substantial in some instances, and the ultimate resulting liability is difficult to predict and thus in many cases cannot be reasonably estimated. In the event of unfavorable outcomes, the amounts that may be required to be paid in the discharge of liabilities or settlements could be substantial and could have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows. Certain of these matters are described in more detail below.

On February 1, 2008, a class action lawsuit was filed in the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts against SCC and other related entities styled Cecil Barrett, et al. v. Option One Mortgage Corp., et al. (Civil Action No. 08-10157-RWZ). Plaintiffs allege discriminatory practices relating to the origination of mortgage loans in violation of the Fair Housing Act and Equal Credit Opportunity Act, and seek declaratory and injunctive relief in addition to actual and punitive damages. The court dismissed H&R Block, Inc. from the lawsuit for lack of personal jurisdiction. In March 2011, the court issued an order certifying a class, which defendants sought to appeal. On August 24, 2011, the First Circuit Court of Appeals declined to hear the appeal, noting that the district court could reconsider its certification decision in light of a recent ruling by the United States Supreme Court in an unrelated matter. SCC has filed a motion to decertify the class, which remains pending. A portion of our loss contingency accrual is related to this lawsuit for the amount of loss that we consider probable and estimable. We believe SCC has meritorious defenses to the claims in this case and it intends to defend the case vigorously, but there can be no assurances as to its outcome or its impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

On December 9, 2009, a putative class action lawsuit was filed in the United States District Court for the Central District of California against SCC and H&R Block, Inc. styled Jeanne Drake, et al. v. Option One Mortgage Corp., et al. (Case No. SACV09-1450 CJC). Plaintiffs allege breach of contract, promissory fraud, intentional interference with contractual relations, wrongful withholding of wages and unfair business practices in connection with not paying severance benefits to employees when their employment transitioned to American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc. in connection with the sale of certain assets and operations of Option One. Plaintiffs seek to recover severance benefits of approximately $8 million, interest and attorney’s fees, in addition to penalties and punitive damages on certain claims. On September 2, 2011, the court granted summary judgment in favor of the defendants on all claims. Plaintiffs have filed an appeal, which remains pending. We have not concluded that a loss related to this matter is probable, nor have we established a loss contingency related to this matter. We believe we have meritorious defenses to the claims in this case and intend to defend the case vigorously, but there can be no assurances as to its outcome or its impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

On October 15, 2010, the Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) of Chicago filed a lawsuit in the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois (Case No. 10CH45033) styled Federal Home Loan Bank of Chicago v. Bank of America Funding Corporation, et al. against multiple defendants, including various SCC-related entities, H&R Block, Inc. and other entities, arising out of FHLB’s purchase of RMBSs. The plaintiff seeks rescission and damages under state securities law and for common law negligent misrepresentation in connection with its purchase of two securities originated and securitized by SCC. These two securities had a total initial principal amount of approximately $50 million, of which approximately $41 million remains outstanding. The plaintiff agreed to voluntarily dismiss H&R Block, Inc. from the suit. The remaining defendants, including SCC, have filed motions to dismiss, which are pending. We have not concluded that a loss related to this matter is probable, nor have we accrued a liability related to this matter. We believe SCC has meritorious defenses to the claims in this case and intends to defend the case vigorously, but there can be no assurances as to its outcome or its impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

On February 22, 2012, a lawsuit was filed by SCC against American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc. (now known as Homeward Residential, Inc. (Homeward)) in the Supreme Court of the State of New York,

 

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County of New York, styled Sand Canyon Corporation v. American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc. (Index No. 650504/2012), alleging breach of contract and breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing in connection with the Cooperation Agreement entered into with SCC in connection with SCC’s sale of its mortgage loan servicing business to the defendant in 2008. SCC is seeking relief to, among other things, require the defendant to provide loan files only by the method prescribed in applicable agreements. The defendant filed a motion to dismiss, which was denied. 

On May 31, 2012, a lawsuit was filed by Homeward in the Supreme Court of the State of New York, County of New York, against SCC styled Homeward Residential, Inc. v. Sand Canyon Corporation (Index No. 651885/2012). SCC removed the case to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York on June 28, 2012 (Case No. 1:12-cv-05067-PGG). Plaintiff, in its capacity as the master servicer for Option One Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-2 and for the benefit of the trustee and the certificate holders of such trust, asserts claims for breach of contract, anticipatory breach, indemnity and declaratory judgment in connection with alleged losses incurred as a result of the breach of representations and warranties relating to loans sold to the trust and representation and warranties related to SCC. Plaintiff seeks specific performance of repurchase obligations and/or damages to compensate the trust and its certificate holders for alleged actual and anticipated losses, as well as a repurchase of all loans due to alleged misrepresentations by SCC as to itself and representations given as to the loans’ compliance with its underwriting standards and the value of underlying real estate. We have not concluded that a loss related to this matter is probable, nor have we accrued a liability related to this matter. We believe SCC has meritorious defenses to the claims in this case and intends to defend the case vigorously, but there can be no assurances as to its outcome or its impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

As of July 31, 2012, underwriters and depositors were involved in multiple lawsuits related to securitization transactions in which SCC participated. These lawsuits allege a variety of claims, including violations of federal and state securities law and common law fraud, based on alleged materially inaccurate or misleading disclosures. SCC has received notice of a claim for indemnification from underwriters or depositors relating to 10 of these lawsuits and involving approximately 33 securitization transactions collateralized in whole or in part by loans originated by SCC. Because we are not the servicer for any of these securitizations, are not party to these lawsuits (with the exception of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Chicago v. Bank of America Funding Corporation case discussed above), and do not have control of this litigation, we do not have precise information regarding the current aggregate unpaid principal balance of the mortgage loans that SCC sold in those transactions, nor, in many cases, the portion of any unpaid balance that is subject to litigation. Additional lawsuits against the underwriters or depositors may be filed in the future, and SCC may receive additional indemnification requests from underwriters or depositors with respect to existing or new lawsuits. We have not concluded that a loss related to any of these indemnification claims is probable, nor have we accrued a liability related to any of these claims. We believe SCC has meritorious defenses to these indemnification claims and intends to defend them vigorously, but there can be no assurance as to their outcome or their impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

American International Group, Inc. has threatened to assert claims of various types, including violations of state securities laws, common law torts and fraud, and breach of contract, in the approximate amount of $650 million in connection with the sale and securitization of SCC-originated mortgage loans. We have not concluded that a loss related to these threatened claims is probable, nor have we accrued a liability related to either of these threatened claims. We believe SCC has meritorious defenses to these threatened claims and will defend them vigorously if a lawsuit is filed asserting these claims, but, if such suit is filed, there can be no assurance as to its outcome or its impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

On April 3, 2012, the Nevada Attorney General issued a subpoena to SCC indicating it was conducting an investigation concerning “the alleged commission of a practice declared to be unlawful under the Nevada Deceptive Trade Practices Act.” A majority of the documents requested in the subpoena involve SCC’s lending to minority (African American and Latino) borrowers. No complaint has been filed to date. SCC plans to continue to cooperate with the Nevada Attorney General.

 

 

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Employment-Related Claims and Litigation

We have been named in several wage and hour class action lawsuits throughout the country, including Alice Williams v. H&R Block Enterprises LLC, Case No. RG08366506 (Superior Court of California, County of Alameda, filed January 17, 2008) (alleging improper classification and failure to compensate for all hours worked and to provide meal periods to office managers in California); Arabella Lemus, et al. v. H&R Block Enterprises LLC, et al., Case No. CGC-09-489251 (United States District Court, Northern District of California, filed June 9, 2009) (alleging failure to timely pay compensation to tax professionals in California); Delana Ugas, et al. v. H&R Block Enterprises LLC, et al., Case No. BC417700 (United States District Court, Central District of California, filed July 13, 2009) (alleging failure to compensate tax professionals in California for all hours worked and to provide meal periods); and Barbara Petroski, et al. v. H&R Block Eastern Enterprises, Inc., et al., Case No. 10-CV-00075 (United States District Court, Western District of Missouri, filed January 25, 2010) (alleging failure to compensate tax professionals nationwide for off-season training).

A class was certified in the Lemus case in December 2010 (consisting of tax professionals who worked in company-owned offices in California from 2007 to 2010) and in the Williams case in March 2011 (consisting of office managers who worked in company-owned offices in California from 2004 to 2011). In the Ugas case, the court initially certified a class (consisting of tax professionals who worked in company-owned offices in California from 2006 to 2011), but subsequently decertified the class in a ruling dated July 9, 2012. Plaintiffs are appealing the decertification ruling. In the Petroski case, a conditional class was certified under the Fair Labor Standards Act in March 2011 (consisting of tax professionals nationwide who worked in company-owned offices and who were not compensated for certain training courses occurring on or after April 15, 2007). Two classes were also certified under state laws in California and New York (consisting of tax professionals who worked in company-owned offices in those states).

The plaintiffs in the wage and hour class action lawsuits seek actual damages, pre-judgment interest and attorneys’ fees, in addition to statutory penalties under state and federal law, which could equal up to 30 days of wages per tax season for class members who worked in California. A portion of our loss contingency accrual is related to these lawsuits for the amount of loss that we consider probable and estimable. The amounts claimed in these matters are substantial in some instances, and the ultimate liability with respect to these matters is difficult to predict. We believe we have meritorious defenses to the claims in these cases and intend to defend the cases vigorously, but there can be no assurances as to the outcome of these cases or their impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows, individually or in the aggregate.

To avoid the cost and inherent risk associated with litigation, we reached agreements to settle the Lemus and Williams cases in January and February 2012, respectively, subject to approval by the courts in California in which the cases are pending. In Lemus, the settlement would require a maximum payment of $35 million, although the actual cost of the settlement would depend on the number of valid claims submitted by class members. The federal court granted preliminary approval of the settlement on February 10, 2012, and final approval on August 22, 2012. The time for appeal has not yet expired. In Williams, the settlement would require a maximum payment of $7.5 million, although the actual cost of the settlement would depend on the number of valid claims submitted by class members. The court granted preliminary approval of the settlement on June 7, 2012. A final approval hearing is scheduled to occur in September 2012. We have recorded a liability for our estimate of the expected loss with respect to these settlements. If for any reason these settlements are not approved, we will continue to defend the cases vigorously, but there can be no assurances as to the outcome or its impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

RAL and RAC Litigation

We have been named in a putative class action styled Sandra J. Basile, et al. v. H&R Block, Inc., et al., April Term 1992 Civil Action No. 3246 in the Court of Common Pleas, First Judicial District Court of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia County, instituted on April 23, 1993. The plaintiffs allege inadequate disclosures with respect to the refund anticipation loan (RAL) product and assert claims for violation of consumer protection statutes, negligent misrepresentation, breach of fiduciary duty, common law fraud, usury, and violation of the TILA. Plaintiffs seek unspecified actual and punitive damages, injunctive relief, attorneys’ fees and costs. A Pennsylvania class was certified, but later decertified by the trial court in

 

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December 2003. An appellate court subsequently reversed the decertification decision. We are appealing the reversal. We have not concluded that a loss related to this matter is probable, nor have we accrued a loss contingency related to this matter. We believe we have meritorious defenses to this case and intend to defend the case vigorously, but there can be no assurances as to the outcome of this case or its impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

A series of class action lawsuits were filed against us in various federal courts beginning on November 17, 2011 concerning the RAL and refund anticipation check (RAC) products. The plaintiffs generally allege we engaged in unfair, deceptive and/or fraudulent acts in violation of various state consumer protection laws by facilitating RALs that were accompanied by allegedly inaccurate TILA disclosures, and by offering RACs without any TILA disclosures. Certain plaintiffs also allege violation of disclosure requirements of various state statutes expressly governing RALs and provisions of those statutes prohibiting tax preparers from charging or retaining certain fees. Collectively, the plaintiffs seek to represent clients who purchased RAL or RAC products in up to forty-two states and the District of Columbia during timeframes ranging from 2007 to the present. The plaintiffs seek equitable relief, disgorgement of profits, compensatory and statutory damages, restitution, civil penalties, attorneys’ fees and costs. These cases were consolidated by the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation into a single proceeding in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois for coordinated pretrial proceedings, styled IN RE: H&R Block Refund Anticipation Loan Litigation (MDL No. 2373). We filed a motion to compel arbitration, which remains pending. We have not concluded that a loss related to this matter is probable, nor have we accrued a loss contingency related to this matter. We believe we have meritorious defenses to the claims in these cases and intend to defend the cases vigorously, but there can be no assurances as to the outcome of these cases or their impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Compliance Fee Litigation

On April 16, 2012 and April 19, 2012, putative class action lawsuits were filed against us in Missouri state and federal courts, respectively, concerning a compliance fee charged to retail tax clients beginning in the 2011 tax season. These cases are styled Manuel H. Lopez III v. H&R Block, Inc., et al., in the Circuit Court of Jackson County, Missouri (Case # 1216CV12290), and Ronald Perras v. H&R Block, Inc., et al., in the United States District Court for the Western District of Missouri (Case No. 4:12-cv-00450-DGK). Taken together, the plaintiffs seek to represent all retail tax clients nationwide who were charged a compliance fee, and assert claims of violation of state consumer laws, money had and received, and unjust enrichment. We filed a motion to compel arbitration, which remains pending. We have not concluded that a loss related to these lawsuits is probable, nor have we accrued a liability related to either of these lawsuits. We believe we have meritorious defenses to the claims in these cases and intend to defend the cases vigorously, but there can be no assurances as to the outcome of these cases or their impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Express IRA Litigation

On January 2, 2008, the Mississippi Attorney General in the Chancery Court of Hinds County, Mississippi First Judicial District (Case No. G 2008 6 S 2) filed a lawsuit regarding our former Express IRA product that is styled Jim Hood, Attorney for the State of Mississippi v. H&R Block, Inc., H&R Block Financial Advisors, Inc., et al. The complaint alleges fraudulent business practices, deceptive acts and practices, common law fraud and breach of fiduciary duty with respect to the sale of the product in Mississippi and seeks equitable relief, disgorgement of profits, damages and restitution, civil penalties and punitive damages. We believe we have meritorious defenses to the claims in this case and intend to defend the case vigorously, but there can be no assurances as to its outcome or its impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Although we sold H&R Block Financial Advisors, Inc. (HRBFA) effective November 1, 2008, we remain responsible for any liabilities relating to the Express IRA litigation, among other things, through an indemnification agreement. A portion of our accrual is related to these indemnity obligations.

 

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Litigation and Claims Pertaining to the Discontinued Operations of RSM McGladrey

On April 17, 2009, a shareholder derivative complaint was filed by Brian Menezes, derivatively and on behalf of nominal defendant International Textile Group, Inc. against MCM in the Court of Common Pleas, Greenville County, South Carolina (C.A. No. 2009-CP-23-3346) styled Brian P. Menezes, Derivatively on Behalf of Nominal Defendant, International Textile Group, Inc. (f/k/a Safety Components International, Inc.) v. McGladrey Capital Markets, LLC (f/k/a RSM EquiCo Capital Markets, LLC), et al. Plaintiffs filed an amended complaint in October 2011 styled In re International Textile Group Merger Litigation, adding a putative class action claim against MCM. Plaintiffs allege claims of aiding and abetting, civil conspiracy, gross negligence and breach of fiduciary duty against MCM in connection with a fairness opinion MCM provided to the Special Committee of Safety Components International, Inc. (SCI) in 2006 regarding the merger between International Textile Group, Inc. and SCI. Plaintiffs seek actual and punitive damages, pre-judgment interest, attorneys’ fees and costs. On February 8, 2012, the court dismissed plaintiffs’ civil conspiracy claim against all defendants. Plaintiffs’ other claims remain pending. We have not concluded that a loss related to this matter is probable, nor have we established a loss contingency related to this matter. We believe we have meritorious defenses to the claims in this case and intend to defend the case vigorously, but there can be no assurances as to its outcome or its impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

Although we sold MCM effective January 31, 2012, we remain responsible for any liabilities relating to certain litigation matters through an indemnification agreement. A portion of our accrual is related to these indemnity obligations.

Other

We are from time to time party to investigations, claims and lawsuits not discussed herein arising out of our business operations. These investigations, claims and lawsuits may include actions by state attorneys general, other state regulators, federal regulators, individual plaintiffs, and cases in which plaintiffs seek to represent a class of others similarly situated. We believe we have meritorious defenses to each of these investigations, claims and lawsuits, and we are defending or intend to defend them vigorously. The amounts claimed in these matters are substantial in some instances; however, the ultimate liability with respect to such matters is difficult to predict. In the event of an unfavorable outcome, the amounts we may be required to pay in the discharge of liabilities or settlements could have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

We are also party to claims and lawsuits that we consider to be ordinary, routine litigation incidental to our business, including claims and lawsuits (Other Claims) concerning the preparation of customers’ income tax returns, the fees charged customers for various products and services, relationships with franchisees, intellectual property disputes, employment matters and contract disputes. While we cannot provide assurance that we will ultimately prevail in each instance, we believe the amount, if any, we are required to pay in the discharge of liabilities or settlements in these Other Claims will not have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

 

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13. Discontinued Operations

Our discontinued operations consist of the wind-down of our former Business Services segment and SCC. We sold RSM and MCM in fiscal year 2012. SCC exited its mortgage business in fiscal year 2008.

The results of operations of our discontinued operations are as follows:

 

             (in 000s)  
Three months ended July 31,    2012     2011  

Revenues

   $      $ 167,136   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Pretax income (loss) from operations:

    

RSM and related businesses

   $ 528      $ 7,131   

Mortgage

     (3,463     (2,654
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
     (2,935     4,477   

Income taxes (benefit)

     (1,144     2,196   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss) from operations

     (1,791     2,281   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Pretax impairment on sales of businesses

            (99,697

Income tax benefit

            (41,473
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss on sales of businesses

            (58,224
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss from discontinued operations

   $ (1,791   $ (55,943
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

14. Regulatory Requirements – HRB Bank

The following table sets forth HRB Bank’s regulatory capital requirements, as calculated in its Call Report:

 

      (dollars in 000s)  
      Actual     Minimum Capital
Requirement
    Minimum to be
Well Capitalized
 
      Amount      Ratio     Amount      Ratio     Amount      Ratio  

As of June 30, 2012:

               

Total risk-based capital ratio (1)

   $ 461,856         123.8   $ 29,856         8.0   $ 37,321         10.0

Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio (2)

     456,945         122.4     N/A         N/A        22,392         6.0

Tier 1 capital ratio (leverage) (3)

     456,945         38.7     47,227         4.0 %(5)      59,034         5.0

Tangible equity ratio (4)

     456,945         38.7     17,710         1.5     N/A         N/A   

As of March 31, 2012:

               

Total risk-based capital ratio (1)

   $ 458,860         120.3   $ 30,513         8.0   $ 38,141         10.0

Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio (2)

     453,800         119.0     N/A         N/A        22,885         6.0

Tier 1 capital ratio (leverage) (3)

     453,800         29.4     185,252         12.0     77,188         5.0

Tangible equity ratio (4)

     453,800         29.4     23,157         1.5     N/A         N/A   

(1)      Total risk-based capital divided by risk-weighted assets.

         

(2)      Tier 1 (core) capital less deduction for low-level recourse and residual interest divided by risk-weighted assets.

         

(3)      Tier 1 (core) capital divided by adjusted total assets.

         

(4)      Tangible capital divided by tangible assets.

         

(5)      Effective April 5, 2012, the minimum capital requirement was changed to 4% by the OCC, although HRB Bank plans to maintain a minimum of 12.0% leverage capital at the end of each calendar quarter.

          

As of July 31, 2012, HRB Bank’s leverage ratio was 40.2%.

 

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15. Segment Information
  Results of our continuing operations by reportable operating segment are as follows:

 

      (in 000s)  
Three months ended July 31,    2012     2011  

Revenues:

    

Tax Services

   $ 90,253      $ 91,425   

Corporate

     6,236        9,198   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 96,489      $ 100,623   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Pretax loss:

    

Tax Services

   $ (140,905   $ (169,483

Corporate

     (28,364     (31,118
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations before tax benefit

   $ (169,269   $ (200,601
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
    

 

 

   

 

 

 

As of July 31, 2012, the results of operations of our previously reported Business Services segment are presented as discontinued operations in the consolidated statements of operations. The prior year has been reclassified to reflect them as discontinued operations.

 

16. Subsequent Events

In August 2012, we terminated our previous committed line of credit (CLOC) agreement and we entered into a new five-year, $1.5 billion Credit and Guarantee Agreement (2012 CLOC). Funds available under the 2012 CLOC may be used for general corporate purposes or for working capital needs. The 2012 CLOC bears interest at an annual rate of LIBOR plus an applicable rate ranging from 0.750% to 1.45% or PRIME plus an applicable rate ranging from 0.000% to 0.450% (depending on the type of borrowing and our then current credit ratings) and includes an annual facility fee ranging from 0.125% to 0.300% of the committed amounts (also depending on our then current credit ratings). The 2012 CLOC is subject to various conditions, triggers, events or occurrences that could result in earlier termination and contains customary representations, warranties, covenants and events of default, including, without limitation: (1) a covenant requiring the Company to maintain a debt-to-EBITDA ratio calculated on a consolidated basis of no greater than (a) 3.50 for fiscal quarters ending on April 30, July 31, and October 31 of each year and (b) 3.75 for the fiscal quarter ending on January 31 of each year, (2) a covenant requiring us to maintain an interest coverage (EBITDA-to-interest expense) ratio calculated on a consolidated basis of not less than 2.50 as of the last date of any fiscal quarter, and (3) covenants restricting our ability to incur additional debt, incur liens, merge or consolidate with other companies, sell or dispose of their respective assets (including equity interests), liquidate or dissolve, make investments, loans, advances, guarantees and acquisitions, and engage in certain transactions with affiliates or certain restrictive agreements. In addition, the 2012 CLOC includes provisions which allow us to cure any potential default, including an equity cure. We will also maintain compensating balances, not legally restricted as to withdrawal.

 

17. New Accounting Standards

In September 2011, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update 2011-08, “Intangibles – Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Testing Goodwill for Impairment.” Under the amendments in this guidance, an entity may consider qualitative factors before applying Step 1 of the goodwill impairment assessment, but may no longer be permitted to carry forward estimates of a reporting unit’s fair value from a prior year when specific criteria are met. These amendments were effective for us as the beginning of our current fiscal year. We adopted this guidance as of May 1, 2012, and this new guidance did not have a material effect on our consolidated financial statements.

 

18. Condensed Consolidating Financial Statements

Block Financial LLC (Block Financial) is an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company. Block Financial is the Issuer and the Company is the Guarantor of the Senior Notes issued on January 11, 2008 and October 26, 2004, our CLOC, and other indebtedness issued from time to time. These condensed

 

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consolidating financial statements have been prepared using the equity method of accounting. Earnings of subsidiaries are, therefore, reflected in the Company’s investment in subsidiaries account. The elimination entries eliminate investments in subsidiaries, related stockholders’ equity and other intercompany balances and transactions.

 

Condensed Consolidating Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss)            (in 000s)  

Three months ended

July 31, 2012

   H&R Block, Inc.
(Guarantor)
    Block Financial
(Issuer)
    Other
Subsidiaries
    Eliminations     Consolidated
H&R Block
 

Total revenues

   $      $ 21,929      $ 74,616      $ (56   $ 96,489   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cost of revenues

            34,942        158,538        (56     193,424   

Selling, general and administrative

            7,640        67,838               75,478   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total expenses

            42,582        226,376        (56     268,902   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating loss

            (20,653     (151,760            (172,413

Other income (expense), net

     (169,269     1,324        1,820        169,269        3,144   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations before tax benefit

     (169,269     (19,329     (149,940     169,269        (169,269

Income tax benefit

     (63,619     (8,255     (55,364     63,619        (63,619
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss from continuing operations

     (105,650     (11,074     (94,576     105,650        (105,650

Net income (loss) from discontinued operations

     (1,791     (2,111     320        1,791        (1,791
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

     (107,441     (13,185     (94,256     107,441        (107,441

Other comprehensive income (loss)

     (4,795     135        (4,930     4,795        (4,795
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive loss

   $ (112,236   $ (13,050   $ (99,186   $ 112,236      $ (112,236
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

Three months ended

July 31, 2011

   H&R Block, Inc.
(Guarantor)
    Block Financial
(Issuer)
    Other
Subsidiaries
    Eliminations     Consolidated
H&R Block
 

Total revenues

   $      $ 21,773      $ 78,850      $      $ 100,623   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cost of revenues

            37,662        174,922               212,584   

Selling, general and administrative

            7,895        84,758               92,653   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total expenses

            45,557        259,680               305,237   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating loss

            (23,784     (180,830            (204,614

Other income (expense), net

     (200,601     3,281        732        200,601        4,013   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from continuing operations before tax benefit

     (200,601     (20,503     (180,098     200,601        (200,601

Income tax benefit

     (81,446     (1,850     (79,596     81,446        (81,446
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss from continuing operations

     (119,155     (18,653     (100,502     119,155        (119,155

Net loss from discontinued operations

     (55,943     (1,637     (54,306     55,943        (55,943
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

     (175,098     (20,290     (154,808     175,098        (175,098

Other comprehensive income

     1,459        922        537        (1,459     1,459   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive loss

   $ (173,639   $ (19,368   $ (154,271   $ 173,639      $ (173,639
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents
Condensed Consolidating Balance Sheets                           (in 000s)  
As of July 31, 2012   

H&R Block, Inc.

(Guarantor)

    

Block Financial

(Issuer)

   

Other

Subsidiaries

    Eliminations    

Consolidated

H&R Block

 

Cash & cash equivalents

   $       $ 342,859      $ 598,336      $ (1,324   $ 939,871   

Cash & cash equivalents – restricted

             859        42,250               43,109   

Receivables, net

             91,335        25,022               116,357   

Mortgage loans held for investment

             386,759                      386,759   

Intangible assets and goodwill, net

                    691,226               691,226   

Investments in subsidiaries

     957,349                641        (957,349     641   

Other assets

     7,734         591,132        817,448               1,416,314   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 965,083       $ 1,412,944      $ 2,174,923      $ (958,673   $ 3,594,277   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Customer deposits

   $       $ 649,702      $      $ (1,324   $ 648,378   

Long-term debt

             999,415        10,219               1,009,634   

Other liabilities

     248         (116,097     1,206,441               1,090,592   

Net intercompany advances

     119,162         105,832        (224,994              

Stockholders’ equity

     845,673         (225,908     1,183,257        (957,349     845,673   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 965,083       $ 1,412,944      $ 2,174,923      $ (958,673   $ 3,594,277   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
                                           
As of April 30, 2012   

H&R Block, Inc.

(Guarantor)

    

Block Financial

(Issuer)

   

Other

Subsidiaries

    Eliminations    

Consolidated

H&R Block

 

Cash & cash equivalents

   $       $ 515,147      $ 1,430,030      $ (843   $ 1,944,334   

Cash & cash equivalents – restricted

             8,814        39,286               48,100   

Receivables, net

             90,755        103,103               193,858   

Mortgage loans held for investment, net

             406,201                      406,201   

Intangible assets and goodwill, net

                    692,017               692,017   

Investments in subsidiaries

     2,525,473                715        (2,525,473     715   

Other assets

     8,887         623,032        732,423               1,364,342   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   $ 2,534,360       $ 1,643,949      $ 2,997,574      $ (2,526,316   $ 4,649,567   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Customer deposits

   $       $ 828,392      $      $ (843   $ 827,549   

Long-term debt

             999,325        41,224               1,040,549   

Other liabilities

     22,690         (33,609     1,466,496               1,455,577   

Net intercompany advances

     1,185,778         62,734        (1,248,512              

Stockholders’ equity

     1,325,892         (212,893     2,738,366        (2,525,473     1,325,892   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 2,534,360       $ 1,643,949      $ 2,997,574      $ (2,526,316   $ 4,649,567   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents
Condensed Consolidating Statements of Cash Flows            (in 000s)  

Three months ended

July 31, 2012

 

H&R Block, Inc.

(Guarantor)

   

Block Financial

(Issuer)

    Other
Subsidiaries
    Eliminations     Consolidated
H&R Block
 

Net cash used in operating activities:

  $ (20,577   $ (42,793   $ (309,770   $      $ (373,140
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing:

         

Purchases of available-for-sale securities

           (28,990                   (28,990

Mortgage loans originated for investment, net

           12,652                      12,652   

Purchase property & equipment

           (31     (13,242            (13,273

Payments made for business acquisitions, net

                  (2,972            (2,972

Loans made to franchisees

           (5,062                   (5,062

Repayments from franchisees

           5,154                      5,154   

Net intercompany advances

    413,392                      (413,392       

Other, net

           22,766        3,010               25,776   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

    413,392        6,489        (13,204     (413,392     (6,715
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing:

         

Repayments of long-term borrowings

                  (30,831            (30,831

Customer banking deposits

           (179,038            (481     (179,519

Dividends paid

    (54,201                          (54,201

Repurchase of common stock

    (339,088                          (339,088

Proceeds from exercise of stock options, net

    468                             468   

Net intercompany advances

           42,908        (456,300     413,392          

Other, net

    6        146        (20,091            (19,939
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

    (392,815     (135,984     (507,222     412,911        (623,110
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Effects of exchange rates on cash

                  (1,498            (1,498
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net decrease in cash

           (172,288     (831,694     (481     (1,004,463

Cash – beginning of period

           515,147        1,430,030        (843     1,944,334   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash – end of period

  $      $ 342,859      $ 598,336      $ (1,324   $ 939,871   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

-28-


Table of Contents

Three months ended

July 31, 2011

 

H&R Block, Inc.

(Guarantor)

   

Block Financial

(Issuer)

    Other
Subsidiaries
    Eliminations     Consolidated
H&R Block
 

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:

  $ 2,048      $ (22,900   $ (373,697   $      $ (394,549
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing:

         

Purchases of available-for-sale securities

           (39,275                   (39,275

Mortgage loans originated for investment, net

           11,192                      11,192   

Purchase property & equipment

           (54     (10,899            (10,953

Payments made for business acquisitions, net

                  (3,457            (3,457

Proceeds from sale of businesses, net

                  21,230               21,230   

Loans made to franchisees

           (16,477                   (16,477

Repayments from franchisees

           5,320                      5,320   

Net intercompany advances

    44,084                      (44,084       

Other, net

           12,031        6,136               18,167   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

    44,084        (27,263     13,010        (44,084     (14,253
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing:

         

Customer banking deposits

           (186,268            23        (186,245

Dividends paid

    (45,894                          (45,894

Repurchase of common stock

    (2,002                          (2,002

Proceeds from exercise of stock options, net

    1,762                             1,762   

Net intercompany advances

           33,312        (77,396     44,084          

Other, net

    2        22        (24,940            (24,916
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

    (46,132     (152,934     (102,336     44,107        (257,295
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Effects of exchange rates on cash

                  962               962   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net decrease in cash

           (203,097     (462,061     23        (665,135

Cash – beginning of period

           616,238        1,061,656        (50     1,677,844   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash – end of period

  $      $ 413,141      $ 599,595      $ (27   $ 1,012,709   
   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

-29-


Table of Contents

 

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Our subsidiaries provide tax preparation and retail banking services. We are the only major company offering a full range of software, online and in-office tax preparation solutions to individual tax clients.

TAX SERVICES

This segment primarily consists of our income tax preparation businesses – assisted, online and software, and includes our tax operations in the U.S. and its territories, Canada, and Australia. This segment also includes the activities of H&R Block Bank (HRB Bank) that primarily support the tax network.

 

 

Tax Services – Operating Results     (in 000s)  
Three months ended July 31,    2012     2011  

Tax preparation fees

   $ 32,893      $ 34,921   

Fees from Peace of Mind guarantees

     26,983        27,181   

Fees from Emerald Card activities

     12,056        11,241   

Royalties

     5,851        5,703   

Other

     12,470        12,379   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenues

     90,253        91,425   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Compensation and benefits:

    

Field wages

     32,408        36,847   

Corporate wages

     34,367        33,055   

Benefits and other compensation

     14,774        17,489   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
     81,549        87,391   

Occupancy and equipment

     79,851        83,337   

Depreciation and amortization

     20,471        21,450   

Marketing and advertising

     7,452        6,721   

Other

     41,835        62,009   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total expenses

     231,158        260,908   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Pretax loss

   $ (140,905   $ (169,483
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
                  

Three months ended July 31, 2012 compared to July 31, 2011

Tax Services’ revenues decreased $1.2 million, or 1.3% from the prior year. Tax preparation fees decreased $2.0 million, or 5.8%, due primarily to additional revenue in the prior year resulting from an extension of the Canadian tax season.

Total expenses decreased $29.8 million, or 11.4%, from the prior year. Compensation and benefits declined $5.8 million, or 6.7%, primarily due to the reduction in force at the end of fiscal year 2012. Occupancy and equipment expenses decreased $3.5 million, or 4.2%, primarily due to reductions in rent expense resulting from office closings related to our strategic realignment announced in April 2012. Other expenses declined $20.2 million, or 32.5%, primarily due to legal charges recorded in the prior year.

The pretax loss for the three months ended July 31, 2012 and 2011 was $140.9 million and $169.5 million, respectively.

 

-30-


Table of Contents

CORPORATE, ELIMINATIONS AND INCOME TAXES ON CONTINUING OPERATIONS

Corporate operating losses include net interest margin and gains or losses relating to mortgage loans held for investment, real estate owned and residual interests in securitizations, along with interest expense on borrowings and other corporate expenses.

 

Corporate – Operating Results  &nbs