XNYS:SPW SPX Corp Quarterly Report 10-Q Filing - 6/30/2012

Effective Date 6/30/2012

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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

 

x                QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2012

 

o                   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from            to            

 

Commission file number 1-6948

 

SPX CORPORATION

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

Delaware

 

38-1016240

(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or
Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

13515 Ballantyne Corporate Place, Charlotte, North Carolina 28277

(Address of Principal Executive Offices) (Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code (704) 752-4400

 

 

(Former Name, Former Address, and Former Fiscal Year, if Changed Since Last Report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  x Yes o No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  x YES o NO

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large Accelerated Filer x

 

Accelerated Filer o

 

 

 

Non-Accelerated Filer o

 

Smaller Reporting Company o

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  o Yes x No

 

Common shares outstanding July 27, 2012 50,730,264

 

 

 



 

PART I—FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. Financial Statements

 

SPX CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(Unaudited; in millions, except per share amounts)

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

2012

 

2011

 

Revenues

 

$

1,260.3

 

$

1,136.8

 

$

2,425.5

 

$

2,121.7

 

Costs and expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of products sold

 

923.0

 

822.4

 

1,786.8

 

1,514.5

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

249.5

 

231.9

 

523.0

 

474.3

 

Intangible amortization

 

9.4

 

5.7

 

18.1

 

11.3

 

Impairment of goodwill and other intangible assets

 

 

24.7

 

 

24.7

 

Special charges, net

 

8.4

 

4.2

 

10.8

 

6.6

 

Operating income

 

70.0

 

47.9

 

86.8

 

90.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income (expense), net

 

(2.8

)

(0.9

)

19.0

 

2.1

 

Interest expense

 

(27.9

)

(23.7

)

(56.4

)

(47.7

)

Interest income

 

1.6

 

1.4

 

2.9

 

2.7

 

Equity earnings in joint ventures

 

6.9

 

5.0

 

16.4

 

13.8

 

Income from continuing operations before income taxes

 

47.8

 

29.7

 

68.7

 

61.2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income tax provision

 

(9.3

)

(4.7

)

(22.3

)

(15.5

)

Income from continuing operations

 

38.5

 

25.0

 

46.4

 

45.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from discontinued operations, net of tax

 

10.3

 

7.3

 

15.5

 

13.3

 

Gain (loss) on disposition of discontinued operations, net of tax

 

(0.6

)

2.7

 

(0.9

)

0.8

 

Income from discontinued operations, net of tax

 

9.7

 

10.0

 

14.6

 

14.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

48.2

 

35.0

 

61.0

 

59.8

 

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests

 

0.8

 

0.7

 

0.1

 

2.4

 

Net income attributable to SPX Corporation common shareholders

 

$

47.4

 

$

34.3

 

$

60.9

 

$

57.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amounts attributable to SPX Corporation common shareholders:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations, net of tax

 

$

37.7

 

$

24.3

 

$

46.3

 

$

43.3

 

Income from discontinued operations, net of tax

 

9.7

 

10.0

 

14.6

 

14.1

 

Net income

 

$

47.4

 

$

34.3

 

$

60.9

 

$

57.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic income per share of common stock:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations attributable to SPX Corporation common shareholders

 

$

0.75

 

$

0.48

 

$

0.92

 

$

0.86

 

Income from discontinued operations attributable to SPX Corporation common shareholders

 

0.20

 

0.20

 

0.29

 

0.28

 

Net income per share attributable to SPX Corporation common shareholders

 

$

0.95

 

$

0.68

 

$

1.21

 

$

1.14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-average number of common shares outstanding — basic

 

49.954

 

50.554

 

50.283

 

50.410

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diluted income per share of common stock:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations attributable to SPX Corporation common shareholders

 

$

0.74

 

$

0.47

 

$

0.90

 

$

0.85

 

Income from discontinued operations attributable to SPX Corporation common shareholders

 

0.19

 

0.20

 

0.29

 

0.27

 

Net income per share attributable to SPX Corporation common shareholders

 

$

0.93

 

$

0.67

 

$

1.19

 

$

1.12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-average number of common shares outstanding — diluted

 

50.909

 

51.365

 

51.184

 

51.158

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive income (loss)

 

$

(82.7

)

$

69.5

 

$

(4.7

)

$

183.8

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these statements.

 

2



 

SPX CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Unaudited; in millions, except share data)

 

 

 

June 30,
2012

 

December 31,
2011

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and equivalents

 

$

327.5

 

$

551.0

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

1,305.1

 

1,224.5

 

Inventories

 

613.1

 

591.9

 

Other current assets

 

161.5

 

132.7

 

Deferred income taxes

 

91.7

 

66.4

 

Assets of discontinued operations

 

734.4

 

720.1

 

Total current assets

 

3,233.3

 

3,286.6

 

Property, plant and equipment:

 

 

 

 

 

Land

 

44.6

 

48.4

 

Buildings and leasehold improvements

 

316.3

 

302.9

 

Machinery and equipment

 

785.9

 

775.0

 

 

 

1,146.8

 

1,126.3

 

Accumulated depreciation

 

(502.5

)

(476.3

)

Property, plant and equipment, net

 

644.3

 

650.0

 

Goodwill

 

1,776.4

 

1,773.7

 

Intangibles, net

 

950.8

 

972.4

 

Other assets

 

739.1

 

709.1

 

TOTAL ASSETS

 

$

7,343.9

 

$

7,391.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

535.1

 

$

643.4

 

Accrued expenses

 

1,005.8

 

982.0

 

Income taxes payable

 

29.2

 

26.7

 

Short-term debt

 

237.4

 

71.3

 

Current maturities of long-term debt

 

331.6

 

4.2

 

Liabilities of discontinued operations

 

205.0

 

234.4

 

Total current liabilities

 

2,344.1

 

1,962.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term debt

 

1,594.5

 

1,925.6

 

Deferred and other income taxes

 

144.7

 

131.1

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

1,085.3

 

1,135.8

 

Total long-term liabilities

 

2,824.5

 

3,192.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commitments and contingent liabilities (Note 13)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity:

 

 

 

 

 

SPX Corporation shareholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock (99,279,410 and 50,703,300 issued and outstanding at June 30, 2012, respectively, and 98,702,606 and 51,073,419 issued and outstanding at December 31, 2011, respectively)

 

997.2

 

993.6

 

Paid-in capital

 

1,539.7

 

1,502.2

 

Retained earnings

 

2,523.7

 

2,488.3

 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

(312.2

)

(246.5

)

Common stock in treasury (48,576,110 and 47,629,187 shares at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively)

 

(2,583.2

)

(2,510.3

)

Total SPX Corporation shareholders’ equity

 

2,165.2

 

2,227.3

 

Noncontrolling interests

 

10.1

 

10.0

 

Total equity

 

2,175.3

 

2,237.3

 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

 

$

7,343.9

 

$

7,391.8

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these statements.

 

3



 

SPX CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited; in millions)

 

 

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

Cash flows from (used in) operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

61.0

 

$

59.8

 

Less: Income from discontinued operations, net of tax

 

14.6

 

14.1

 

Income from continuing operations

 

46.4

 

45.7

 

Adjustments to reconcile income from continuing operations to net cash from (used in) operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Special charges, net

 

10.8

 

6.6

 

Impairment of goodwill and other intangible assets

 

 

24.7

 

Gain on sale of a business

 

(20.5

)

 

Deferred and other income taxes

 

0.1

 

(5.0

)

Depreciation and amortization

 

57.1

 

42.2

 

Pension and other employee benefits

 

28.7

 

29.5

 

Stock-based compensation

 

28.3

 

25.7

 

Other, net

 

6.0

 

3.2

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of effects from acquisitions and divestitures:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable and other assets

 

(174.9

)

(45.1

)

Inventories

 

(7.8

)

(65.0

)

Accounts payable, accrued expenses and other

 

(154.1

)

(28.7

)

Cash spending on restructuring actions

 

(11.7

)

(13.2

)

Net cash from (used in) continuing operations

 

(191.6

)

20.6

 

Net cash used in discontinued operations

 

(29.5

)

(10.1

)

Net cash from (used in) operating activities

 

(221.1

)

10.5

 

Cash flows used in investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from asset sales and other

 

8.7

 

0.2

 

(Increase) decrease in restricted cash

 

1.8

 

(2.8

)

Business acquisitions, net of cash acquired

 

(30.5

)

(7.4

)

Capital expenditures

 

(37.1

)

(44.4

)

Net cash used in continuing operations

 

(57.1

)

(54.4

)

Net cash used in discontinued operations

 

(2.0

)

(48.1

)

Net cash used in investing activities

 

(59.1

)

(102.5

)

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Borrowings under senior credit facilities

 

586.0

 

375.0

 

Repayments under senior credit facilities

 

(467.9

)

(340.0

)

Repayments under senior notes

 

 

(49.5

)

Borrowings under trade receivables agreement

 

98.0

 

86.0

 

Repayments under trade receivables agreement

 

(59.3

)

(29.0

)

Net borrowings under other financing arrangements

 

3.9

 

5.8

 

Purchases of common stock

 

(75.0

)

 

Proceeds from the exercise of employee stock options and other, net of minimum withholdings paid on behalf of employees for net share settlements

 

4.6

 

(0.9

)

Financing fees paid

 

(0.2

)

(11.2

)

Dividends paid (includes noncontrolling interest distributions for the six months ended July 2, 2011 of $2.9)

 

(25.3

)

(28.1

)

Net cash from continuing operations

 

64.8

 

8.1

 

Net cash from discontinued operations

 

 

 

Net cash from financing activities

 

64.8

 

8.1

 

Change in cash and equivalents due to changes in foreign currency exchange rates

 

(8.1

)

23.6

 

Net change in cash and equivalents

 

(223.5

)

(60.3

)

Consolidated cash and equivalents, beginning of period

 

551.0

 

455.4

 

Consolidated cash and equivalents, end of period

 

$

327.5

 

$

395.1

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these statements.

 

4



 

SPX CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(Unaudited; in millions, except per share data)

 

(1)                                 BASIS OF PRESENTATION

 

We prepared the condensed consolidated financial statements pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) for interim reporting. As permitted under those rules and regulations, certain footnotes or other financial information that are normally required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) can be condensed or omitted. The financial statements represent our accounts after the elimination of intercompany transactions and, in our opinion, include the adjustments (consisting only of normal and recurring items) necessary for their fair presentation.

 

We account for investments in unconsolidated companies where we exercise significant influence but do not have control using the equity method. In determining whether we are the primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity (“VIE”), we perform a qualitative analysis that considers the design of the VIE, the nature of our involvement and the variable interests held by other parties to determine which party has the power to direct the activities of the VIE that most significantly impact the entity’s economic performance, and the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive benefits that could potentially be significant to the VIE. We do have interests in VIEs, primarily joint ventures, in which we are the primary beneficiary and others in which we are not. Our VIEs are considered immaterial, individually and in aggregate, to our consolidated financial statements.

 

Our significant investments reported under the equity method are our 44.5% interest in the EGS Electrical Group, LLC and Subsidiaries (“EGS”) joint venture and our 45% interest in Shanghai Electric — SPX Engineering & Technologies Co., Ltd. (“Shanghai Electric JV”). We account for our EGS investment on a three-month lag, and its revenues and our equity earnings, as included in our condensed consolidated statements of operations, totaled $126.6 and $7.2 and $114.3 and $4.8 for the three months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011, respectively. For the six months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011, EGS’s revenues and our equity earnings, as included in our condensed consolidated statements of operations, totaled $259.7 and $16.5 and $233.3 and $13.3, respectively. Our equity earnings from the Shanghai Electric JV were not material for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012. See Note 3 for further details on the Shanghai Electric JV.

 

Preparing financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses. Actual results could differ from these estimates. The unaudited information included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements contained in our 2011 Annual Report on Form 10-K, as amended (“2011 Annual Report on Form 10-K/A”). Interim results are not necessarily indicative of full year results. We have reclassified certain prior year amounts, including the results of discontinued operations and reportable and other operating segment information, to conform to the current year presentation. Unless otherwise indicated, amounts provided in these Notes pertain to continuing operations. See Note 3 for information on discontinued operations and Note 4 for information on our reportable and other operating segments.

 

We establish actual interim closing dates using a “fiscal” calendar, which requires our businesses to close their books on the Saturday closest to the end of the first calendar quarter, with the second and third quarters being 91 days in length. Our fourth quarter ends on December 31. The interim closing dates for the first, second and third quarters of 2012 are March 31, June 30 and September 29, compared to the respective April 2, July 2 and October 1, 2011 dates. We had one fewer day in the first quarter of 2012 and will have two more days in the fourth quarter of 2012 than in the respective 2011 periods.

 

(2)                                 NEW ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

The following is a summary of new accounting pronouncements that apply or may apply to our business.

 

In May 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued guidance to develop a single, converged fair value framework, amend the requirements of fair value measurement and enhance related disclosure requirements, particularly for recurring Level 3 fair value measurements. This guidance clarifies the concepts of (i) the highest and best use and valuation premise for nonfinancial assets, (ii) application to financial assets and financial liabilities with offsetting positions in market risks or counterparty credit risk, (iii) premiums or discounts in fair value measurements and (iv) fair value measurement of an instrument classified in a reporting entity’s shareholders’ equity. The guidance is effective for interim and annual reporting periods in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011, and must be applied prospectively. We adopted the guidance on January 1, 2012 with no material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In June 2011, the FASB issued, and in December 2011 amended, guidance to revise the presentation of comprehensive income by requiring entities to report components of comprehensive income in either a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or two separate but consecutive statements. In annual periods, the single continuous statement of comprehensive income must include the components of net income, a total for net income, the components of other comprehensive income (“OCI”), a total for OCI, and a total for comprehensive income. The separate but consecutive statements must report components of net income and total net income in the statement of net income, which must be immediately followed by a statement of OCI that must include the components of OCI, a total for OCI, and a total for comprehensive income. In condensed financial statements of interim periods, an entity shall report a total for comprehensive income in a single continuous statement or in two consecutive statements. The guidance

 

5



 

is effective for the first reporting period in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011 and must be applied retrospectively for all periods presented in the financial statements. We adopted the guidance on January 1, 2012 with no material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In September 2011, the FASB issued an amendment to guidance related to testing goodwill for impairment. Under the revised guidance, entities testing goodwill for impairment have the option of performing a qualitative assessment to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount as a basis for determining whether it is necessary to perform the two-step goodwill impairment test under the Intangibles — Goodwill and Other Topic of the Accounting Standards Codification (“Codification” or “ASC”). If an entity determines, on the basis of qualitative factors, that the fair value of the reporting unit is more likely than not less than the carrying amount, the two-step impairment test would be required. The amendment is effective for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011. We adopted this guidance on January 1, 2012 with no material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In December 2011, the FASB issued an amendment to disclosure requirements related to offsetting, whereby entities are required to disclose both gross information and net information about both instruments and transactions eligible for offset in the statement of financial position and instruments and transactions subject to an agreement similar to a master netting arrangement. These disclosures assist users of financial statements in evaluating the effect or potential effect of netting arrangements on a company’s financial position, including the effect or potential effect of rights of setoff associated with the recognized assets and recognized liabilities within the scope. The amendment applies to a) recognized financial and derivative instruments that are offset in accordance with either ASC 210-20 or ASC 815-10 and b) financial and derivative instruments and other transactions that are subject to an enforceable master netting arrangement or similar agreement that covers similar instruments and transactions. This amendment will be effective for annual reporting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013, and interim periods within those annual periods, and shall be applied retrospectively for all comparative periods presented. We have not yet adopted this guidance and do not expect the adoption to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

(3)                                 ACQUISITIONS, DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS AND FORMATION OF SHANGHAI ELECTRIC JV

 

Acquisitions

 

On March 21, 2012, in our Flow Technology reportable segment, we completed the acquisition of Seital S.r.l. (“Seital”), a supplier of disk centrifuges (separators and clarifiers) to the global food and beverage, biotechnology, pharmaceutical and chemical industries, for a purchase price of $28.8, net of cash acquired of $2.5 and including debt assumed of $0.8. Seital had revenues of approximately $14.0 in the twelve months prior to the date of acquisition.

 

On August 24, 2011, in our Flow Technology reportable segment, we entered into an agreement to purchase Clyde Union (Holdings) S.A.R.L. (“Clyde Union”), a global supplier of pump technologies utilized in oil and gas processing, power generation and other industrial applications. On November 1, 2011, and again upon consummation of the acquisition on December 22, 2011, we executed amendments to that agreement. The amended agreement provided for (i) an initial payment of 500.0 British Pounds (“GBP”), less debt assumed and other adjustments of GBP 11.0. In addition, the purchase price includes a potential earn-out payment (equal to Annual 2012 Group EBITDA (as defined by the related agreement) × 10, less GBP 475.0). In no event shall the earn-out payment be less than zero or more than GBP 250.0. The sellers of Clyde Union also contributed GBP 25.0 of cash to the acquired business at the time of sale.

 

We financed the acquisition with available cash and committed senior secured financing. See Note 10 to the condensed consolidated financial statements for further details on the senior secured financing. The estimated fair value of the contingent consideration (earn-out payment) was less than $1.0 at June 30, 2012 as well as at December 31, 2011.

 

The assets acquired and liabilities assumed were recorded at preliminary estimates of fair values as determined by management, based on information currently available and on current assumptions as to future operations, and are subject to change upon the completion of acquisition accounting, including the finalization of asset valuations. We are continuing to revise and finalize our estimates of fair value for certain assets and liabilities, which resulted in a net increase to goodwill of $55.9 during the six months ended June 30, 2012.

 

The following is a summary of the recorded preliminary fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed for Clyde Union at the date of acquisition, and reflects acquisition accounting adjustments recorded during the first and second quarters of 2012:

 

Assets acquired:

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets, including cash and equivalents of $44.3

 

 

 

$

349.2

 

Property, plant and equipment

 

 

 

76.7

 

Goodwill

 

 

 

370.7

 

Intangible assets

 

 

 

378.8

 

Other assets

 

 

 

25.1

 

Total assets acquired

 

 

 

1,200.5

 

Liabilities assumed:

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities

 

 

 

270.5

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

 

 

161.2

 

Total liabilities assumed

 

 

 

431.7

 

Noncontrolling interests

 

 

 

1.8

 

Net assets acquired

 

 

 

$

767.0

 

 

6



 

The identifiable intangible assets acquired consist of trademarks, customer lists, customer relationships and technology of $76.8, $7.5, $234.4 and $60.1, respectively, with such amounts based on a preliminary assessment of the related fair values. The customer lists, customer relationships and technology assets are being amortized over 1.5, 30.0 and 27.0 years, respectively.

 

The qualitative factors that comprise the recorded goodwill include expected synergies from combining our existing and Clyde Union’s operations, expected market growth for existing Clyde Union operations, as well as other factors. None of this goodwill is deductible for income tax purposes.

 

The following unaudited pro forma information presents our results of operations for the three and six months ended July 2, 2011, as if the acquisition of Clyde Union had taken place on January 1, 2011. The unaudited pro forma financial information is not intended to represent or be indicative of our consolidated results of operations that would have been reported had the acquisition been completed as of the date presented, and should not be taken as representative of our future consolidated results of operations. The pro forma results include estimates and assumptions that management believes are reasonable; however, these results do not include any anticipated cost savings or expenses of the planned integration of Clyde Union. These pro forma results of operations have been prepared for comparative purposes only and include the following adjustments to the July 2, 2011 historical results for the periods presented:

 

·                  Additional depreciation and amortization expense associated with the fair value adjustments to the acquired Clyde Union property, plant and equipment and intangible assets of approximately $1.0 and $2.0 for the three and six months ended July 2, 2011, respectively.

 

·                  The elimination of interest expense related to the portion of Clyde Union’s long-term debt that was paid off at the time of the acquisition of $3.5 and $6.8 for the three and six months ended July 2, 2011, respectively.

 

·                  The addition of interest expense associated with the term loans that were drawn down in order to finance the Clyde Union acquisition of $4.9 and $9.9 for the three and six months ended July 2, 2011, respectively.

 

·                  The elimination of rent expense associated with a facility in Scotland that had been leased by Clyde Union and which we purchased on December 23, 2011 of $0.5 and $1.0 for the three and six months ended July 2, 2011, respectively.

 

·                  A reduction in bonding costs for Clyde Union due to more favorable rates under our senior credit facilities of $1.5 and $2.5 for the three and six months ended July 2, 2011, respectively.

 

·                  The above modifications were adjusted for the applicable income tax impact.

 

 

 

Three months
ended

 

Six months
ended

 

 

 

July 2, 2011

 

July 2, 2011

 

Revenues

 

$

1,260.9

 

$

2,348.6

 

Income from continuing operations attributable to SPX Corporation common shareholders

 

26.0

 

35.7

 

Net income attributable to SPX Corporation common shareholders

 

36.0

 

49.8

 

Income from continuing operations attributable to SPX Corporation common shareholders:

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

$

0.51

 

$

0.71

 

Diluted

 

$

0.51

 

$

0.70

 

Net income attributable to SPX Corporation common shareholders:

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

$

0.71

 

$

0.99

 

Diluted

 

$

0.70

 

$

0.97

 

 

On October 31, 2011, in our Flow Technology reportable segment, we completed the acquisition of e&e Verfahrenstechnik GmbH (“e&e”), a supplier of extraction, evaporation, vacuum and freeze drying technologies to the global food and beverage, pharmaceutical and bioenergy industries for a purchase price of approximately 11.7 Euros, net of cash assumed of 3.8 Euros, with an additional potential earn-out of 3.5 Euros. e&e had revenues of approximately 15.3 Euros in the twelve months prior to the date

 

7



 

of acquisition.

 

In March 2011, in our Flow Technology reportable segment, we completed the acquisition of B.W. Murdoch Ltd. (“Murdoch”), an engineering company supplying processing solutions for the food and beverage industry, for a purchase price of $8.1, after payment of a working capital settlement of $0.7 during the third quarter of 2011. Murdoch had revenues of approximately $13.0 in the twelve months prior to the date of acquisition.

 

The pro forma effects of the Seital, e&e and Murdoch acquisitions were not material, individually or in the aggregate, to our results of operations.

 

Discontinued Operations

 

As part of our operating strategy, we regularly review and negotiate potential divestitures, some of which are or may be material. As a result of this continual review, we determined that certain of our businesses would be better strategic fits with other companies or investors.

 

We report businesses or asset groups as discontinued operations when, among other things, we commit to a plan to divest the business or asset group, actively begin marketing the business or asset group, and when the sale of the business or asset group is deemed probable within the next twelve months.

 

On January 23, 2012, we entered into an agreement to sell our Service Solutions business to Robert Bosch GmbH for cash proceeds of $1,150.0. We expect the sale to close during the second half of 2012, resulting in a net gain of approximately $450.0. We have reported, for all periods presented, the financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows of this business as a discontinued operation in our condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

In addition to the business discussed above, we recognized net losses of $0.6 and $0.9 during the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively, and net gains of $2.7 and $0.8 during the three and six months ended July 2, 2011, respectively, resulting from adjustments to gains/losses on sales from previously discontinued businesses. Refer to the consolidated financial statements contained in our 2011 Annual Report on Form 10-K/A for the disclosure of all discontinued businesses during the 2009 through 2011 period.

 

The final sales price for certain of the divested businesses is subject to adjustment based on working capital existing at the respective closing dates. The working capital figures are subject to agreement with the buyers or, if we cannot come to agreement, an arbitration or other dispute-resolution process. Final agreement of the working capital figures for certain of these transactions has yet to occur. In addition, changes in estimates associated with liabilities retained in connection with a business divestiture (e.g., income taxes) may occur. It is possible that the sales price and resulting gains/losses on these, and other previous divestitures, may be materially adjusted in subsequent periods.

 

For the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011, income from discontinued operations and the related income taxes are shown below:

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

2012

 

2011

 

Income from discontinued operations

 

$

15.9

 

$

9.3

 

$

23.4

 

$

16.1

 

Income tax (provision) benefit

 

(6.2

)

0.7

 

(8.8

)

(2.0

)

Income from discontinued operations, net

 

$

9.7

 

$

10.0

 

$

14.6

 

$

14.1

 

 

For the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011, results of operations for our businesses reported as discontinued operations were as follows:

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

2012

 

2011

 

Revenues

 

$

244.8

 

$

247.2

 

$

471.0

 

$

461.3

 

Pre-tax income

 

17.1

 

10.1

 

25.1

 

18.8

 

 

8



 

The major classes of assets and liabilities, excluding intercompany balances, of the businesses reported as discontinued operations included in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets are shown below:

 

 

 

June 30,
2012

 

December 31,
2011

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

$

210.0

 

$

191.8

 

Inventories

 

126.4

 

127.7

 

Other current assets

 

10.3

 

9.3

 

Property, plant and equipment, net

 

46.0

 

48.7

 

Goodwill and intangibles, net

 

277.8

 

283.9

 

Other assets

 

63.9

 

58.7

 

Assets of discontinued operations

 

$

734.4

 

$

720.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

84.0

 

$

109.3

 

Accrued expenses

 

105.8

 

109.4

 

Income taxes payable

 

0.6

 

1.5

 

Deferred and other income taxes

 

6.3

 

6.6

 

Other liabilities

 

8.3

 

7.6

 

Liabilities of discontinued operations

 

$

205.0

 

$

234.4

 

 

Formation of Shanghai Electric JV

 

On December 30, 2011, we and Shanghai Electric Group Co., Ltd. (“Shanghai Electric”) established the Shanghai Electric JV, a joint venture to supply dry cooling and moisture separator reheater products and services to the power sector in China and other selected regions of the world. We contributed and sold certain assets of our dry cooling products business in China to the joint venture in consideration for a 45% ownership interest in the joint venture and cash payments of RMB 96.7, with RMB 51.5 received on January 18, 2012, RMB 25.8 to be received no later than December 31, 2012, and the remaining RMB payment contingent upon the joint venture achieving defined sales order volumes. In addition, we are licensing our dry cooling and moisture separator reheater technologies to the joint venture, for which we will receive a royalty. We also will continue to manufacture dry cooling components in our China factories and have entered into an exclusive supply agreement with the joint venture for these products. Final approval for the transaction was not received until January 13, 2012. We accounted for the transaction under the deconsolidation criteria of the Codification and thus recorded a pre-tax gain during the first quarter of 2012 of $20.5, with such gain included in “Other income (expense), net.” The amount of the pre-tax gain is equal to the difference between (i) the fair value of the consideration received and to be received plus the fair value of our retained non-controlling investment in the dry cooling products business in China and (ii) the carrying value of the assets contributed and sold to the joint venture. We account for our investment in the Shanghai Electric JV under the equity method of accounting, as we exercise significant influence but do not have control over the joint venture. The carrying amount of our investment in the Shanghai Electric JV was $33.8 at June 30, 2012 and is reported in “Other assets” within our condensed consolidated balance sheet. The initial fair value of our investment in the Shanghai Electric JV was based on a discounted cash flow projection for the dry cooling products business in China.

 

(4)                                 INFORMATION ON REPORTABLE SEGMENTS AND OTHER OPERATING SEGMENTS

 

We are a global, multi-industry manufacturer of highly specialized, engineered solutions with operations in over 35 countries. We offer a diverse collection of products, such as pumps, valves, fluid handling equipment, metering and mixing solutions, cooling, heating and ventilation products, power transformers, and TV and radio broadcast antennas. Our products are used by a broad array of customers in various industries, including food and beverage processing, power generation, chemical processing, pharmaceuticals, infrastructure, mineral processing, petrochemical, telecommunications and transportation.

 

Prior to 2012, we aggregated our operating segments into four reportable segments; however, because of the impending sale of our Service Solutions business (a business previously reported within the Test and Measurement reportable segment) and its current classification as a discontinued operation, we are no longer reporting the remaining two businesses of the Test and Measurement reportable segment as a separate reportable segment, as the operating results of these two businesses have not been, and are not expected to be, material to our consolidated operating results. These two businesses, along with our remaining operating segments, which do not meet the quantitative threshold criteria of the Segment Reporting Topic of the Codification, were combined within our “All Other” category Industrial Products and Services. This is not considered a reportable segment.

 

The factors considered in determining our aggregated segments are the economic similarity of the businesses, the nature of products sold or services provided, production processes, types of customers and distribution methods. In determining our segments, we apply the threshold criteria of the Segment Reporting Topic of the Codification to operating income or loss of each segment before

 

9



 

considering impairment and special charges, pensions and postretirement expense, stock-based compensation and other indirect corporate expenses. This is consistent with the way our chief operating decision maker evaluates the results of each segment.

 

Flow Technology Reportable Segment

 

Our Flow Technology segment designs, manufactures and markets products and solutions to process, blend, filter, dry, meter and transport fluids with a focus on creating innovative new products and systems, and also provides comprehensive aftermarket support services. Primary offerings include engineered pumps, mixers, process systems, heat exchangers, valves, and dehydration and drying technologies. The segment continues to focus on optimizing its global footprint while taking advantage of cross-product integration opportunities and increasing its competitive position in global end markets. Flow Technology’s solutions focus on key business drivers, such as product flexibility, process optimization, sustainability and safety.

 

Thermal Equipment and Services Reportable Segment

 

Our Thermal Equipment and Services segment engineers, manufactures and services cooling, heating and ventilation products for markets throughout the world. Primary offerings include dry, wet and hybrid cooling systems for the power generation, refrigeration, HVAC and industrial markets, as well as boilers, heating and ventilation products for the commercial and residential markets. This segment also provides thermal components for power generation plants and engineered services to maintain, refurbish, upgrade and modernize power stations. The segment continues to focus on expanding its global reach, as well as its thermal components and service offerings. The segment’s South African subsidiary has a Black Economic Empowerment shareholder, which holds a noncontrolling 25.1% interest.

 

Industrial Products and Services

 

Industrial Products and Services comprises operating segments that design, manufacture and market power systems, industrial tools and hydraulic units, precision machine components for the aerospace industry, crystal growing machines for the solar power generation market, television, radio and cell phone and data transmission broadcast antenna systems, communications and signal monitoring systems, fare collection systems, portable cable and pipe locators, and precision controlled industrial ovens and chambers. These operating segments continue to focus on global expansion opportunities.

 

Corporate Expense

 

Corporate expense generally relates to the cost of our Charlotte, NC corporate headquarters and our Asia Pacific center in Shanghai, China.

 

Financial data for our reportable segments and other operating segments, including the results of acquisitions from the dates of the respective acquisitions, were as follows:

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

2012

 

2011

 

Revenues (1):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flow Technology reportable segment

 

$

677.3

 

$

492.8

 

$

1,305.4

 

$

948.7

 

Thermal Equipment and Services reportable segment

 

350.2

 

431.9

 

670.7

 

757.2

 

Industrial Products and Services

 

232.8

 

212.1

 

449.4

 

415.8

 

Total revenues

 

$

1,260.3

 

$

1,136.8

 

$

2,425.5

 

$

2,121.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flow Technology reportable segment

 

$

69.8

 

$

56.6

 

$

116.2

 

$

113.0

 

Thermal Equipment and Services reportable segment

 

16.0

 

35.8

 

26.3

 

57.1

 

Industrial Products and Services

 

30.2

 

24.1

 

56.0

 

51.5

 

Total income for reportable and other operating segments

 

116.0

 

116.5

 

198.5

 

221.6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corporate expense

 

(22.0

)

(24.2

)

(54.4

)

(56.2

)

Pension and postretirement expense

 

(9.1

)

(9.0

)

(18.2

)

(18.1

)

Stock-based compensation expense

 

(6.5

)

(6.5

)

(28.3

)

(25.7

)

Impairment of goodwill and other intangible assets

 

 

(24.7

)

 

(24.7

)

Special charges, net

 

(8.4

)

(4.2

)

(10.8

)

(6.6

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated operating income

 

$

70.0

 

$

47.9

 

$

86.8

 

$

90.3

 

 

10



 


(1)                                                         Under the percentage of completion method, we recognized revenues of $359.4 and $397.3 in the three months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011, respectively. For the six months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011, revenues under the percentage of completion method were $734.7 and $698.9, respectively. Costs and estimated earnings in excess of billings on contracts accounted for under the percentage of completion method were $348.6 and $355.9 as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively, and are reported as a component of “Accounts receivable, net.” Billings in excess of costs and estimated earnings on uncompleted contracts accounted for under the percentage of completion method were $279.1 and $279.0 as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively. The June 30, 2012 balance includes $277.3 reported as a component of “Accrued expenses” and $1.8 as a component of “Other long-term liabilities” in the condensed consolidated balance sheet. The December 31, 2011 balance includes $275.4 reported as a component of “Accrued expenses” and $3.6 as a component of “Other long-term liabilities” in the condensed consolidated balance sheet.

 

(5)                                 SPECIAL CHARGES

 

Special charges, net, for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011 are summarized and described in more detail below:

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

2012

 

2011

 

Flow Technology reportable segment

 

$

5.9

 

$

2.2

 

$

7.2

 

$

3.8

 

Thermal Equipment and Services reportable segment

 

2.2

 

1.0

 

2.4

 

1.8

 

Industrial Products and Services

 

(0.1

)

0.8

 

 

0.8

 

Corporate

 

0.4

 

0.2

 

1.2

 

0.2

 

Total

 

$

8.4

 

$

4.2

 

$

10.8

 

$

6.6

 

 

Flow Technology reportable segment — Charges for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 related primarily to costs associated with the initial integration of Clyde Union, costs related to the reorganization of the segment’s systems business, charges related to a cost reduction initiative at a location in Denmark and asset impairment charges of $0.3. Charges for the three and six months ended July 2, 2011 related primarily to the integration of Anhydro and Gerstenberg, the reorganization of the segment’s systems business, the transition of certain European back-office positions to the shared service center in Manchester, United Kingdom, and additional costs associated with restructuring activities initiated in 2010.

 

Thermal Equipment and Services reportable segment — Charges for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 related primarily to costs associated with restructuring initiatives at two locations in China, including asset impairment charges of $1.3, and severance costs associated with transferring certain functions of our boiler and heating products business to a location in Chicago, IL. Charges for the three and six months ended July 2, 2011 related primarily to costs associated with headcount reductions at facilities in Germany and Italy and lease exit costs associated with two facilities in Germany.

 

Industrial Products and Services — Charges for the three and six months ended July 2, 2011 related to an asset impairment charge of $0.8.

 

Corporate — Charges for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012 related primarily to costs associated with consolidating certain corporate functions, our legal entity reduction initiative, and an asset impairment charge of $0.2. Charges for the three and six months ended July 2, 2011 related primarily to our legal entity reduction initiative.

 

The following is an analysis of our restructuring and integration liabilities for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011:

 

 

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

Beginning balance

 

$

10.9

 

$

17.6

 

Special charges (1)

 

9.0

 

5.7

 

Utilization — cash

 

(11.7

)

(13.2

)

Currency translation adjustment and other

 

0.1

 

1.0

 

Ending balance

 

$

8.3

 

$

11.1

 

 


(1)         The six months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011 exclude $1.8 and $0.9, respectively, of non-cash special charges that did not impact the restructuring and integration related liabilities.

 

11



 

(6)                                 INVENTORIES

 

Inventories comprised the following amounts:

 

 

 

June 30,
2012

 

December 31,
2011

 

Finished goods

 

$

179.0

 

$

163.9

 

Work in process

 

169.9

 

179.5

 

Raw material and purchased parts

 

288.5

 

271.5

 

Total FIFO cost

 

637.4

 

614.9

 

Excess of FIFO cost over LIFO inventory value

 

(24.3

)

(23.0

)

Total inventories

 

$

613.1

 

$

591.9

 

 

Inventories include material, labor, and factory overhead costs and are reduced, when necessary, to estimated realizable values. Certain domestic inventories are valued using the last-in, first-out (“LIFO”) method. These inventories were approximately 18% and 15% of the total inventory at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively. Other inventories are valued using the first-in, first-out (“FIFO”) method. Progress payments, which are netted against work in process, were $3.5 and $3.7 at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively.

 

(7)                                 GOODWILL AND OTHER INTANGIBLE ASSETS

 

The changes in the carrying amount of goodwill, by reportable segment and other operating segments, were as follows:

 

 

 

December 31,
2011

 

Goodwill
resulting from
business
combinations

 

Impairments

 

Foreign
Currency
Translation
and other (1)

 

June 30, 2012

 

Flow Technology reportable segment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross Goodwill

 

$

1,019.9

 

$

24.9

 

$

 

$

11.0

 

$

1,055.8

 

Accumulated Impairments

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goodwill

 

1,019.9

 

24.9

 

 

11.0

 

1,055.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thermal Equipment and Services reportable segment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross Goodwill

 

597.8

 

 

 

(33.2

)

564.6

 

Accumulated Impairments

 

(134.9

)

 

 

 

(134.9

)

Goodwill

 

462.9

 

 

 

(33.2

)

429.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Industrial Products and Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross Goodwill

 

450.6

 

 

 

0.3

 

450.9

 

Accumulated Impairments

 

(159.7

)

 

 

(0.3

)

(160.0

)

Goodwill

 

290.9

 

 

 

 

290.9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross Goodwill

 

2,068.3

 

24.9

 

 

(21.9

)

2,071.3

 

Accumulated Impairments

 

(294.6

)

 

 

(0.3

)

(294.9

)

Goodwill

 

$

1,773.7

 

$

24.9

 

$

 

$

(22.2

)

$

1,776.4

 

 


(1)                                 Includes the allocation of goodwill of $24.3 related to the deconsolidation of our dry cooling products business in China (see Note 3) and reductions in goodwill associated with foreign currency translation adjustments of $50.7, partially offset by adjustments resulting from revisions to estimates of fair value of certain assets and liabilities associated with the Clyde Union and other acquisitions of $52.8.

 

12



 

Other Intangibles

 

Identifiable intangible assets comprise the following:

 

 

 

June 30, 2012

 

December 31, 2011

 

 

 

Gross
Carrying
Value

 

Accumulated
Amortization

 

Net
Carrying
Value

 

Gross
Carrying
Value

 

Accumulated
Amortization

 

Net
Carrying
Value

 

Intangible assets with determinable lives:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patents

 

$

8.5

 

$

(7.9

)

$

0.6

 

$

8.5

 

$

(7.6

)

$

0.9

 

Technology

 

183.5

 

(34.9

)

148.6

 

182.2

 

(30.5

)

151.7

 

Customer relationships

 

402.9

 

(52.3

)

350.6

 

400.4

 

(44.7

)

355.7

 

Other

 

32.2

 

(14.7

)

17.5

 

38.7

 

(11.0

)

27.7

 

 

 

627.1

 

(109.8

)

517.3

 

629.8

 

(93.8

)

536.0

 

Trademarks with indefinite lives

 

433.5

 

 

433.5

 

436.4

 

 

436.4

 

Total

 

$

1,060.6

 

$

(109.8

)

$

950.8

 

$

1,066.2

 

$

(93.8

)

$

972.4

 

 

Estimated annual amortization expense related to these intangible assets is $17.3 for the remainder of 2012, $35.0 in 2013, $30.6 in 2014, $30.1 in 2015, and $29.9 in 2016.

 

At June 30, 2012, the net carrying value of intangible assets with determinable lives consisted of $452.2 in the Flow Technology reportable segment, $54.8 in the Thermal Equipment and Services reportable segment, and $10.3 in Industrial Products and Services. Trademarks with indefinite lives consisted of $279.6 in the Flow Technology reportable segment, $130.0 in the Thermal Equipment and Services reportable segment, and $23.9 in Industrial Products and Services.

 

We annually test the recoverability of our goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets during the fourth quarter based on a measurement date as of the end of the third quarter and continually monitor impairment indicators across all our reporting units. Any significant change in market conditions and estimates or judgments used to determine expected future cash flows that indicate a reduction in fair value may give rise to impairment in the period that the change becomes known.

 

Based on our annual impairment testing during the fourth quarter of 2010, our SPX Heat Transfer Inc. reporting unit had an estimated fair value that was comparable to the carrying value of its net assets.  In the second quarter of 2011, SPX Heat Transfer Inc. experienced an additional decline in its revenues and profitability, furthering a trend which began late in the first quarter of 2011, in comparison to (i) recent historical results and (ii) expected results for the period, due to the challenging conditions within the U.S. power market.  As such, during the second quarter of 2011, we updated the projection of future discounted cash flows for SPX Heat Transfer Inc., which indicated the reporting unit’s fair value was less than the carrying value of its net assets.  Accordingly, we recorded an impairment charge of $24.7 during the second quarter of 2011 associated with SPX Heat Transfer Inc.’s goodwill ($17.2) and indefinite-lived intangible assets ($7.5).

 

(8)                                 WARRANTY

 

The following is an analysis of our product warranty accrual for the first six months of 2012 and 2011:

 

 

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

Balance at beginning of period

 

$

56.8

 

$

47.7

 

Acquisitions

 

 

0.2

 

Provisions

 

10.4

 

9.3

 

Usage

 

(14.2

)

(9.9

)

Balance at end of period

 

53.0

 

47.3

 

Less: Current portion of warranty

 

41.9

 

39.0

 

Non-current portion of warranty

 

$

11.1

 

$

8.3

 

 

13



 

(9)                                 EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLANS

 

Net periodic benefit expense for our pension and postretirement plans includes the following components:

 

Domestic Pension Plans

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

2012

 

2011

 

Service cost

 

$

2.4

 

$

2.4

 

$

4.7

 

$

5.0

 

Interest cost

 

13.5

 

14.2

 

27.0

 

28.7

 

Expected return on plan assets

 

(15.9

)

(16.2

)

(31.8

)

(32.7

)

Amortization of unrecognized losses

 

6.8

 

5.8

 

13.7

 

11.6

 

Amortization of unrecognized prior service credits

 

(0.1

)

(0.2

)

(0.2

)

(0.4

)

Curtailment loss

 

 

 

0.1

 

 

Total net periodic benefit expense

 

6.7

 

6.0

 

13.5

 

12.2

 

Less: Net periodic benefit expense of discontinued operations

 

 

 

 

 

Net periodic benefit expense of continuing operations

 

$

6.7

 

$

6.0

 

$

13.5

 

$

12.2

 

 

Foreign Pension Plans

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

2012

 

2011

 

Service cost

 

$

0.6

 

$

0.7

 

$

1.3

 

$

1.3

 

Interest cost

 

3.6

 

3.6

 

7.2

 

7.2

 

Expected return on plan assets

 

(4.0

)

(4.2

)

(8.2

)

(8.3

)

Amortization of unrecognized losses

 

0.3

 

0.3

 

0.7

 

0.5

 

Total net periodic benefit expense

 

0.5

 

0.4

 

1.0

 

0.7

 

Less: Net periodic benefit expense of discontinued operations

 

0.3

 

0.1

 

0.6

 

0.2

 

Net periodic benefit expense of continuing operations

 

$

0.2

 

$

0.3

 

$

0.4

 

$

0.5

 

 

Postretirement Plans

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

2012

 

2011

 

Service cost

 

$

0.1

 

$

0.1

 

$

0.2

 

$

0.2

 

Interest cost

 

1.5

 

1.8

 

2.9

 

3.6

 

Amortization of unrecognized losses

 

0.9

 

1.1

 

1.9

 

2.3

 

Amortization of unrecognized prior service credits

 

(0.3

)

(0.3

)

(0.7

)

(0.7

)

Net periodic postretirement benefit expense of continuing operations

 

$

2.2

 

$

2.7

 

$

4.3

 

$

5.4

 

 

During the first six months of 2012, we made contributions and direct benefit payments of approximately $27.0 to our foreign and qualified domestic pension plans, of which $0.7 related to businesses classified as discontinued operations.

 

14



 

(10)                          INDEBTEDNESS

 

The following summarizes our debt activity (both current and non-current) for the six months ended June 30, 2012:

 

 

 

December 31,
2011

 

Borrowings

 

Repayments

 

Other (4)

 

June 30,
2012

 

Domestic revolving loan facility

 

$

 

$

586.0

 

$

(436.0

)

$

 

$

150.0

 

Foreign revolving loan facility

 

30.9

 

 

(31.9

)

1.0

 

 

Term Loan 1(1)

 

300.0

 

 

 

 

300.0

 

Term Loan 2(1)

 

500.0

 

 

 

 

500.0

 

6.875% senior notes

 

600.0

 

 

 

 

600.0

 

7.625% senior notes

 

500.0

 

 

 

 

500.0

 

Trade receivables financing arrangement (2)

 

 

98.0

 

(59.3

)

 

38.7

 

Other indebtedness (3)

 

70.2

 

14.5

 

(10.6

)

0.7

 

74.8

 

Total debt

 

2,001.1

 

$

698.5

 

$

(537.8

)

$

1.7

 

2,163.5

 

Less: short-term debt

 

71.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

237.4

 

Less: current maturities of long-term debt(1)

 

4.2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

331.6

 

Total long-term debt

 

$

1,925.6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

1,594.5

 

 


(1)          On February 8, 2012, the lenders agreed, with respect to the proceeds from the pending sale of our Service Solutions business, to waive the mandatory prepayments required by the senior credit facilities. The waiver requires that a portion of the proceeds from the pending sale be used to repay $325.0 of the term loans ($300.0 for Term Loan 1 and $25.0 for Term Loan 2).  As we expect the sale to close during the second half of 2012 and to make these debt repayments at the time of the closing, we have classified $325.0 of the term loans as “Current maturities of long-term debt” within our condensed consolidated balance sheet as of June 30, 2012.  In addition, we have allocated approximately $2.5 and $5.0 of interest expense associated with the $325.0 of expected term loan repayments to discontinued operations within our condensed consolidated statements of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively.

 

(2)          Under this arrangement, we can borrow, on a continuous basis, up to $130.0, as available.

 

(3)          Includes balances under a purchase card program of $42.2 and $40.4 at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively.

 

(4)          “Other” includes debt assumed and foreign currency translation on any debt instruments denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar.

 

Senior Credit Facilities

 

We have senior credit facilities with a syndicate of lenders that provide for committed senior secured financing in the initial amount of $2,600.0, consisting of the following (each with a final maturity of June 30, 2016, except for the $325.0 relating to the term loans as described above):

 

·                  An incremental term loan (“Term Loan 1”), in an aggregate principal amount of $300.0;

 

·                  An incremental term loan (“Term Loan 2”), in an aggregate principal amount of $500.0;

 

·                  A domestic revolving credit facility, available for loans and letters of credit, in an aggregate principal amount up to $300.0;

 

·                  A global revolving credit facility, available for loans in U.S. Dollars, Euros, British Pounds and other currencies in an aggregate principal amount up to the equivalent of $300.0;

 

·                  A participation foreign credit instrument facility, available for performance letters of credit and guarantees, in an aggregate principal amount in various currencies up to the equivalent of $1,000.0; and

 

·                  A bilateral foreign credit instrument facility, available for performance letters of credit and guarantees, in an aggregate principal amount in various currencies up to the equivalent of $200.0.

 

The remaining balance on Term Loan 2 (i.e., the remaining balance after payment of the $25.0 noted above in connection with the sale of our Service Solutions business) is repayable in quarterly installments (with annual aggregate repayments, as a percentage of the initial principal amount, adjusted for prepayments, of 0% for 2012, 0% for 2013, 15% for 2014 and 20% for 2015, together with a single quarterly payment of 5% at the end of the first fiscal quarter of 2016), with the remaining balance repayable in full on June 30, 2016.

 

15



 

Our senior credit facilities require that we maintain:

 

·                  A Consolidated Interest Coverage Ratio (as defined in the credit agreement generally as the ratio of consolidated adjusted EBITDA for the four fiscal quarters ended on such date to consolidated interest expense for such period) as of the last day of any fiscal quarter of at least 3.50 to 1.00; and

 

·                  A Consolidated Leverage Ratio as of the last day of any fiscal quarter of not more than 3.25 to 1.00 (or 3.50 to 1.00 for the four fiscal quarters after certain permitted acquisitions by us).

 

Our senior credit facilities also contain covenants that, among other things, restrict our ability to incur additional indebtedness, grant liens, make investments, loans, guarantees or advances, make restricted junior payments, including dividends, redemptions of capital stock and voluntary prepayments or repurchase of certain other indebtedness, engage in mergers, acquisitions or sales of assets, enter into sale and leaseback transactions or engage in certain transactions with affiliates and otherwise restrict certain corporate activities. We do not expect these covenants to restrict our liquidity, financial condition or access to capital resources in the foreseeable future. Our senior credit facilities also contain customary representations, warranties, affirmative covenants, and events of default.

 

We are permitted under our senior credit facilities to repurchase our capital stock and pay cash dividends in an unlimited amount if our Consolidated Leverage Ratio is (after giving pro forma effect to such payments) less than 2.50 to 1.00. If our Consolidated Leverage Ratio is (after giving pro forma effect to such payments) greater than or equal to 2.50 to 1.00, the aggregate amount of such repurchases and dividend declarations cannot exceed (A) $100.0 in any fiscal year plus (B) an additional amount for all such repurchases and dividend declarations made after June 30, 2011 equal to the sum of (i) $300.0 and (ii) a positive amount equal to 50% of cumulative Consolidated Net Income (as defined in the credit agreement generally as consolidated net income subject to certain adjustments solely for the purposes of determining this basket) during the period from July 1, 2011 to the end of the most recent fiscal quarter preceding the date of such repurchase or dividend declaration for which financial statements have been (or were required to be) delivered (or, in case such Consolidated Net Income is a deficit, minus 100% of such deficit).

 

At June 30, 2012, we had $71.2 and $764.7 of outstanding letters of credit issued under our revolving credit and our foreign credit instrument facilities of our senior credit agreement, respectively. In addition, we had $4.1 of letters of credit outstanding under separate arrangements in China, India and South Africa.

 

The weighted-average interest rate of our outstanding borrowings under our senior credit facilities was approximately 2.37% at June 30, 2012.

 

At June 30, 2012, we were in compliance with all covenant provisions of our senior credit facilities, and the senior credit facilities did not impose any restrictions on our ability to repurchase shares or pay dividends, other than those inherent in the credit agreement.  In addition, we were in compliance with all covenant provisions of our senior notes as of June 30, 2012.

 

(11)                          DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

 

Currency Forward Contracts

 

We manufacture and sell our products in a number of countries and, as a result, are exposed to movements in foreign currency exchange rates. Our objective is to preserve the economic value of non-functional currency denominated cash flows and to minimize their impact. Our principal currency exposures relate to the Euro, Chinese Yuan, South African Rand and British Pound.

 

From time to time, we enter into currency protection agreements (“FX forward contracts”) to manage the exposure on contracts with forecasted transactions denominated in non-functional currencies and to manage the risk of transaction gains and losses associated with assets/liabilities denominated in currencies other than the functional currency of certain subsidiaries. In addition, some of our contracts contain currency forward embedded derivatives (“FX embedded derivatives”), as the currency of exchange is not “clearly and closely” related to the functional currency of either party to the transaction. Certain of our FX forward contracts are designated as cash flow hedges, as deemed appropriate. To the extent these derivatives are effective in offsetting the variability of the hedged cash flows, changes in the derivatives’ fair value are not included in current earnings, but are included in accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”). These changes in fair value will subsequently be reclassified into earnings as a component of revenues or cost of products sold, as applicable, when the forecasted transaction impacts earnings. In addition, if the forecasted transaction is no longer probable, the cumulative change in the derivatives’ fair value will be recorded as a component of “Other income (expense), net” in the period it occurs. To the extent that a previously designated hedging transaction is no longer an effective hedge, any ineffectiveness measured in the hedging relationship is recorded in earnings in the period it occurs. We had FX forward contracts with an aggregate notional amount of $121.3 and $66.1 outstanding as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively. These FX forward contracts typically have maturity dates ranging from one to two years. We had FX embedded derivatives with an aggregate notional amount outstanding of $122.4 and $73.2 at June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively. The unrealized loss, net of taxes, recorded in AOCI related to FX forward contracts was $3.5 and $3.7 as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively. We anticipate reclassifying approximately $2.1 of the unrealized loss to income over the next 12 months.

 

16



 

Commodity Contracts

 

From time to time, we enter into commodity contracts to manage the exposure on forecasted purchases of commodity raw materials (“commodity contracts”). At June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, the outstanding notional amount of commodity contracts was 3.3 million and 2.9 million pounds of copper, respectively. We designate and account for these contracts as cash flow hedges and, to the extent these commodity contracts are effective in offsetting the variability of the forecasted purchases, the change in fair value is included in AOCI. We reclassify the AOCI associated with our commodity contracts to cost of products sold when the forecasted transaction impacts earnings. The unrealized loss, net of taxes, recorded in AOCI was $0.3 and $0.7 as of June 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively. We anticipate reclassifying the unrealized loss to income over the next 12 months.  The amount of gain/loss recognized during the periods ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011 related to the ineffectiveness of the hedges was not material.

 

The following summarizes the fair value of our derivative financial instruments:

 

 

 

June 30, 2012

 

December 31, 2011

 

 

 

Balance Sheet
Classification

 

Fair Value

 

Balance Sheet
Classification

 

Fair Value

 

Derivative contracts designated as hedging instruments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FX forward contracts

 

Other current assets

 

$

0.4

 

Other current assets

 

$

 

FX forward contracts

 

Accrued expenses

 

$

(0.9

)

Accrued expenses

 

$

(0.4

)

Commodity contracts

 

Accrued expenses

 

(0.6

)

Accrued expenses

 

(0.8

)

 

 

 

 

$

(1.5

)

 

 

$

(1.2

)

Derivative contracts not designated as hedging instruments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FX forward contracts

 

Other current assets

 

$

0.1

 

Other current assets

 

$

 

FX embedded derivatives

 

Other current assets

 

1.4

 

Other current assets

 

1.2

 

 

 

 

 

$

1.5

 

 

 

$

1.2

 

FX forward contracts

 

Accrued expenses

 

$

(1.2

)

Accrued expenses

 

$

(0.4

)

FX embedded derivatives

 

Accrued expenses

 

(1.2

)

Accrued expenses

 

(0.3

)

FX embedded derivatives

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

(14.2

)

Other long-term liabilities

 

(14.8

)

 

 

 

 

$

(16.6

)

 

 

$

(15.5

)

 

The following summarizes the effect of derivative financial instruments in cash flow hedging relationships on AOCI and the condensed consolidated statements of operations for the three months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011:

 

 

 

Amount of gain (loss)
recognized in AOCI,
pre-tax (1)

 

Classification of gain (loss)

 

Amount of gain (loss)
reclassified from AOCI to
income, pre-tax (1)

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

reclassified from AOCI

 

2012

 

2011

 

FX forward contracts

 

$

(0.6

)

$

0.5

 

Cost of products sold

 

$

(0.9

)

$

0.1

 

Commodity contracts

 

(0.8

)

0.2

 

Cost of products sold

 

(0.4

)

0.4

 

 

 

$

(1.4

)

$

0.7

 

 

 

$

(1.3

)

$

0.5

 

 

The following summarizes the effect of derivative financial instruments in cash flow hedging relationships on AOCI and the condensed consolidated statements of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011:

 

 

 

Amount of gain (loss)
recognized in AOCI,
pre-tax (1)

 

Classification of gain (loss)

 

Amount of gain (loss)
reclassified from AOCI to
income, pre-tax (1)

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

reclassified from AOCI

 

2012

 

2011

 

FX forward contracts

 

$

(0.6

)

$

 

Cost of products sold

 

$

(0.4

)

$

(0.5

)

Commodity contracts

 

0.2

 

 

Cost of products sold

 

(1.0

)

0.8

 

 

 

$

(0.4

)

$

 

 

 

$

(1.4

)

$

0.3

 

 


(1)          During the six months ended June 30, 2012, losses of $0.1 were recognized in other income, net relating to derivative ineffectiveness and amounts excluded from effectiveness testing. During the three and six months ended July 2, 2011, losses of $0.1 and $0.2, respectively, were recognized in other income (expense), net relating to derivative ineffectiveness and amounts excluded from effectiveness testing.

 

17



 

The following summarizes the effect of derivative financial instruments not designated as cash flow hedging relationships on the condensed consolidated statements of operations for the three months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011:

 

 

 

Classification of gain (loss) recognized in

 

Amount of gain (loss) recognized in income

 

 

 

income

 

2012

 

2011

 

FX forward contracts

 

Other expense, net

 

$

(0.5

)

$

0.9

 

FX embedded derivatives

 

Other expense, net

 

1.6

 

(2.7

)

 

 

 

 

$

1.1

 

$

(1.8

)

 

The following summarizes the effect of derivative financial instruments not designated as cash flow hedging relationships on the condensed consolidated statements of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011:

 

 

 

Classification of gain (loss) recognized in

 

Amount of gain (loss) recognized in income

 

 

 

income

 

2012

 

2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FX forward contracts

 

Other income, net

 

$

0.2

 

$

1.6

 

FX embedded derivatives

 

Other income, net

 

(1.3

)

(2.4

)

 

 

 

 

$

(1.1

)

$

(0.8

)

 

(12)                      EQUITY AND STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION

 

Earnings Per Share

 

The following table sets forth the number of weighted-average shares outstanding used in the computation of basic and diluted income per share:

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

June 30,

 

July 2,

 

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

2012

 

2011

 

Weighted-average shares outstanding used in basic income per share

 

49.954

 

50.554

 

50.283

 

50.410

 

Dilutive securities — employee stock options and restricted stock units

 

0.955

 

0.811

 

0.901

 

0.748

 

Weighted-average number of common and dilutive securities used for calculating diluted income per share

 

50.909

 

51.365

 

51.184

 

51.158

 

 

The total number of stock options that were not included in the computation of diluted income per share because their exercise price was greater than the average market price of common shares was 0.003 and 0.004 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, respectively, and 0.039 and 0.075 for the three and six months ended July 2, 2011, respectively. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2012, 0.752 and 0.500 unvested restricted stock units, respectively, were excluded from the computation of diluted income per share, compared to none for the three and six months ended July 2, 2011, because required market thresholds for vesting (as discussed below) were not met.

 

Stock-based Compensation

 

Under the 2002 Stock Compensation Plan, as amended in 2006, 2011 and 2012, the successor plan to the 1992 Stock Compensation Plan, up to 3.436 shares of our common stock were available for grant at June 30, 2012. The 2002 Stock Compensation Plan permits the issuance of new shares or shares from treasury upon the exercise of options, vesting of restricted stock units or granting of restricted stock. Each share of restricted stock and restricted stock unit granted reduces availability by two shares.

 

During the six months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011, we classified excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation of $3.3 and $6.4, respectively, as financing cash flows and included such amounts in “Proceeds from the exercise of employee stock options and other, net of minimum withholdings paid on behalf of employees for net share settlements” within our condensed consolidated statements of cash flows.

 

Restricted stock or restricted stock units may be granted to certain eligible employees or non-employee directors in accordance with applicable equity compensation plan documents and agreements. Subject to participants’ continued employment and other plan terms and conditions, the restrictions lapse and awards generally vest over three years. Market (“company performance”) thresholds have been instituted for vesting of the significant majority of restricted stock and restricted stock unit awards. This vesting is based on SPX shareholder return versus the S&P 500 composite index. On each vesting date, we compare the SPX shareholder return to the performance of the S&P 500 composite index for the prior year and for the cumulative period since the date of the grant. If SPX outperforms the S&P 500 composite index for the prior year, the one-third portion of the grant associated with that year will vest. If SPX outperforms the S&P composite index for the cumulative period, any unvested portion of the grant that was subject to vesting on or prior to the vesting date will vest. Additionally, a portion of our restricted stock and restricted stock unit awards vest based on the passage of time since the grant date. Restricted stock and restricted stock units that do not vest within the three-year vesting period are forfeited.

 

18



 

We grant restricted stock to non-employee directors under the 2006 Non-Employee Directors’ Stock Incentive Plan (the “Directors’ Plan”). Under the Directors’ Plan, up to 0.013 shares of our common stock were available for grant at June 30, 2012. Restricted stock grants have a three-year vesting period based on SPX shareholder return versus the S&P 500 composite index and are subject to the same company performance thresholds for employee awards described in the preceding paragraph. Restricted stock that does not vest within the three-year vesting period in accordance with these performance requirements is forfeited.

 

Stock options may be granted to key employees in the form of incentive stock options or nonqualified stock options, generally vest ratably over three years, which vesting may be subject to performance criteria, and expire no later than 10 years from the date of grant. The option price per share may be no less than the fair market value of our common stock at the close of business on the day prior to the date of grant. Upon exercise, the employee has the option to surrender previously owned shares at current value in payment of the exercise price and/or for withholding tax obligations, and, subject to certain restrictions, may receive a reload option having an exercise price equal to the current market value for the number of shares so surrendered. The reload option expires at the same time that the exercised option would have expired. Any future issuances of options under the plan will not have a reload feature, pursuant to the terms of the plan. We have not granted options to any of our employees since 2004.

 

The recognition of compensation expense for share-based awards, including stock options, is based on their grant date fair values. The fair value of each award is amortized over the lesser of the award’s requisite or derived service period, which is generally up to three years. Compensation expense within income from continuing operations related to restricted stock and restricted stock units totaled $28.3 and $25.7 for the six months ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011, respectively, with the related tax benefit being $10.7 and $9.1 for the periods ended June 30, 2012 and July 2, 2011, respectively.

 

We use the Monte Carlo simulation model valuation technique to determine fair value of our restricted stock and restricted stock units as they contain a “market condition.” The Monte Carlo simulation model utilizes multiple input variables that determine the probability of satisfying the market condition stipulated in the award and calculates the fair value of each restricted stock and restricted stock unit award. We used the following assumptions in determining the fair value of the awards granted on January 2, 2012 and March 1, 2011:

 

 

 

Annual expected
stock price
volatility

 

Annual expected
dividend yield

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

Correlation
between total
shareholder
return for SPX
and S&P 500
Composite Index

 

January 2, 2012:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPX Corporation </