XNAS:PVFC Annual Report 10-K Filing - 6/30/2012

Effective Date 6/30/2012

Form 10-K
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

(Mark One)

x

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012

OR

 

¨

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the transition period from                  to             

Commission File Number 0-24948

 

 

PVF CAPITAL CORP.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Ohio   34-1659805
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
30000 Aurora Road, Solon, Ohio   44139
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (440) 248-7171

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Shares (par value $0.01 per share)   The Nasdaq Stock Market, LLC

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files.)    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer

 

¨

  

Accelerated filer

 

¨

Non-accelerated filer

 

¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

  

Smaller reporting company

 

x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

The Registrant’s voting shares are listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol “PVFC.” The aggregate market value of voting shares held by nonaffiliates of the Registrant was approximately $31,809,603 based on the closing sale price of the registrant’s common shares as listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market as of December 31, 2010 ($1.82 per share). Solely for purposes of this calculation, directors and executive officers are treated as affiliates.

As of September 7, 2012, the Registrant had 25,921,009 common shares, $0.01 par value, outstanding.

 

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

1. Portions of Proxy Statement for the 2012 Annual Meeting of Shareholders. (Part III)

 

 

 


Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

          Page  

PART I

     

Item 1.

   Business      1   

Item 1A.

   Risk Factors      30   

Item 1B.

   Unresolved Staff Comments      36   

Item 2.

   Properties      36   

Item 3.

   Legal Proceedings      37   

Item 4.

   Mine Safety Disclosures      37   

PART II

     

Item 5.

  

Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

     38   

Item 6.

   Selected Financial Data      38   

Item 7.

   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      40   

Item 7A.

   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk      54   

Item 8.

   Financial Statements and Supplementary Data      57   

Item 9.

   Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure      109   

Item 9A.

   Controls and Procedures      109   

Item 9B.

   Other Information      110   

PART III

     

Item 10.

   Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance      111   

Item 11.

   Executive Compensation      111   

Item 12.

  

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

     111   

Item 13.

   Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence      112   

Item 14.

   Principal Accountant Fees and Services      112   

PART IV

     

Item 15.

   Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules      113   

SIGNATURES

     117   


Table of Contents

PART I

 

Item 1. Business

General

PVF Capital Corp. (“PVF” or the “Company”) is the holding company for Park View Federal Savings Bank (“Park View Federal” or the “Bank”). PVF owns and operates Park View Federal, PVF Service Corporation (“PVFSC”), a real estate subsidiary, and Mid Pines Land Company (“MPLC”), a real estate subsidiary. In addition, PVF owns PVF Holdings, Inc., a financial services subsidiary which is currently inactive, and two other subsidiaries, PVF Mortgage Corp. and PVF Community Development Corp., both of which are chartered for future operation, but are also currently inactive. These securities were cancelled during 2010 and both entities have subsequently been dissolved. PVF also created PVF Capital Trust I and PVF Capital Trust II for the sole purpose of issuing trust preferred securities. Park View Federal has operated continuously for 92 years, having been founded as an Ohio chartered savings and loan association in 1920. PVF’s main office is located at 30000 Aurora Road, Solon, Ohio 44139 and its telephone number is (440) 248-7171.

Park View Federal’s principal business consists of attracting deposits from the general public and investing these funds primarily in loans secured by first mortgages on real estate, as well as other commercial and consumer loans located in the Bank’s market area, which consists of Portage, Lake, Geauga, Cuyahoga, Summit, Medina and Lorain Counties in Ohio. Historically, Park View Federal has emphasized the origination of loans for the purchase or construction of residential real estate, commercial real estate and multi-family residential property and land loans. To a lesser extent, Park View Federal has also originated loans secured by second mortgages, including home equity lines of credit and loans secured by savings deposits. Over the past few years, portfolio real estate lending has been minimal as Park View Federal has continued to focus on problem asset resolution. Recently, the Bank has increased its lending activity in the commercial and industrial loan segment, including Small Business Administration (“SBA”) lending, which it initiated in late fiscal 2011.

Park View Federal derives its income principally from interest earned on loans and, to a lesser extent, loan servicing and other fees, gains on the sale of loans and interest earned on investments. Park View Federal’s principal expenses are interest expense on deposits and borrowings and non-interest expense such as compensation and employee benefits, office occupancy expenses and other miscellaneous expenses. Funds for these activities are provided principally by deposits, Federal Home Loan Bank of Cincinnati (“FHLB of Cincinnati”) advances and other borrowings, repayments of outstanding loans, sales of loans and operating revenues. The business of PVF consists primarily of the business of Park View Federal.

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012, PVF and Park View Federal, as a federally chartered savings and loan holding company and federal savings association, respectively, have been subject to examination and comprehensive federal regulation and oversight by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the “OCC”). As of July 21, 2011, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) imposed new restrictions and an expanded framework of regulatory oversight for financial institutions and has altered the jurisdictions of existing bank regulatory agencies. In particular, the Dodd-Frank Act has transferred the regulatory responsibilities and authority over federal savings associations and savings and loan holding companies from the Office of Thrift Supervision (the “OTS”) to the OCC and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve Board”), respectively. Park View Federal has also been and continues to be subject to regulation and examination by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”), which insures the Bank’s savings deposits up to applicable limits through the Deposit Insurance Fund (the “DIF”). Park View Federal is a member of, and owns capital stock in, the FHLB of Cincinnati, which is one of 12 regional banks in the Federal Home Loan Bank System (the “FHLB”). For additional information on the regulation of PVF and Park View Federal, see the section captioned “Regulation.”

From October 19, 2009 until August 27, 2012, each of PVF and Park View Federal was subject to an Order to Cease and Desist. The order governing the Bank was terminated on August 27, 2012, but PVF’s order remains in effect. For further discussion see Note 13 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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PVF’s Internet site, parkviewfederal.com, provides the Company’s annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) free of charge as soon as reasonably practicable after the Company has filed the report with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission”).

Market Area

Park View Federal conducts its business through seventeen offices located in its geographic market area, which consists of Cuyahoga, Summit, Medina, Lorain, Lake, Portage and Geauga Counties in Ohio. At June 30, 2012, over 85% of Park View Federal’s net loan portfolio and generally all of the Bank’s deposits were from Park View Federal’s market area.

The economy in Park View Federal’s market area has historically been based on the manufacture of durable goods. Though manufacturing continues to remain an important sector of the economy, diversification has occurred with the growth of healthcare, education, service, financial and wholesale and retail trade industries. In recent years, the healthcare industry has grown significantly in Park View Federal’s market area and has overtaken manufacturing as Cleveland’s largest sector employer.

Park View Federal’s market area continued to experience dramatic declines in the housing market, with falling home prices and increased foreclosures and higher rates of unemployment, which have resulted in significant write-downs of asset values by financial institutions, including government-sponsored entities and major commercial and investment banks. These write-downs, initially in the area of mortgage-backed securities but spread to credit default swaps and other derivative securities, caused many financial institutions to seek additional capital, to merge with larger and stronger institutions and, in some cases, to fail. Concerns continue about the stability of the financial markets, as well as the strength of counterparties, lenders, and financial institutions.

Lending Activities

General

Park View Federal’s lending activities include the origination of commercial real estate and business loans, consumer loans, and conventional fixed-rate and adjustable-rate mortgage loans for acquisition or refinancing of single-family residential homes located in the Bank’s primary market area. Permanent mortgage loans on condominiums, multi-family (over four units) and nonresidential properties are also offered by Park View Federal. Historically, construction financing of single-family residential properties was a primary component of the Bank’s lending activity; however, depressed market conditions in the last several years have forced a curtailment of lending activity within this segment and lead the Bank to focus its new substantive lending activity in the commercial and industrial loan segment, including a specialized focus in SBA lending, subject to market conditions and applicable lending restrictions imposed under the Home Owners’ Loan Act (“HOLA”). The Company’s SBA lending activities are focused on general small businesses within its market area and on an industry-specific basis throughout the Midwestern United States.

Loan Portfolio Composition

Park View Federal’s loans receivable and loans receivable held for sale totaled $566.7 million at June 30, 2012, representing 71.6% of total assets at such date. It is Park View Federal’s policy to concentrate its lending in its market area.

 

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Set forth below is certain data relating to the composition of Park View Federal’s loan portfolio by type of loan on the dates indicated. As lending activity to commercial and industrial customers has increased, the composition of the loan portfolio will continue to change.

 

    At June 30,  
    2012     2011     2010     2009     2008  
    Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent  
(dollars in thousands)                                                            

Real estate loans receivable held for investment:

                   

One-to-four family residential

  $ 122,314        22.58   $ 135,996        24.85   $ 154,794        26.35   $ 158,956        23.78   $ 168,532        23.59

Home equity line of credit

    71,555        13.21        79,979        14.61        83,261        14.17        88,407        13.23        87,876        12.30   

Multi-family residential

    54,105        9.99        48,656        8.89        48,902        8.33        58,568        8.76        52,421        7.34   

Commercial

    204,038        37.67        192,109        35.10        211,690        36.04        192,115        28.74        174,404        24.41   

Commercial equity line of credit

    22,336        4.12        17,020        3.11        24,971        4.25        46,287        6.92        36,913        5.17   

Land

    31,184        5.76        39,030        7.13        51,811        8.82        60,922        9.11        73,545        10.29   

Construction—residential

    2,122        0.39        6,276        1.15        14,433        2.46        39,237        5.87        55,442        7.76   

Construction—multi-family

    5,375        0.99        1,594        0.29        3,294        0.56        5,211        0.78        5,803        0.81   

Construction—commercial

    7,733        1.43        4,237        0.77        5,294        0.90        20,381        3.05        38,303        5.36   

Non-real estate

    37,556        6.93        53,366        9.75        21,937        3.73        32,155        4.81        33,592        4.70   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
    558,318        103.08        578,263        105.66        620,387        105.61        702,239        105.05        726,831        101.73   

Deferred loan fees

    (637     (0.12     (984     (0.18     (1,462     (0.25     (2,296     (0.34     (2,685     (0.38

Allowance for loan losses

    (16,053     (2.96     (29,997     (5.48     (31,519     (5.36     (31,483     (4.71     (9,654     (1.35
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other items

    (16,690     (3.08     (30,981     (5.66     (32,981     (5.61     (33,779     (5.05     (12,339     (1.73
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total loans receivable, net

  $ 541,628        100.00   $ 547,282        100.00   $ 587,406        100.00   $ 668,460        100.00   $ 714,492        100.00
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loans receivable held for sale, net

    25,063        $ 9,392        $ 8,718        $ 27,078        $ 7,831     
 

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

     

 

 

   

Loan Maturity

The following table presents at June 30, 2012 the amount of loan principal repayments scheduled to be received by Park View Federal during the periods shown based upon the time remaining before contractual maturity. Loans with adjustable rates are reported as due in the year in which they reprice. Demand loans, loans having no schedule of repayments, no stated maturity date and overdrafts are reported as due in one year or less. The table below does not include any estimate of prepayments that may cause Park View Federal’s actual repayment experience to differ from that shown below.

 

     Due During
the Year
Ending
June 30,
2013
     Due More than
One Year
Through Five
Years After
June 30, 2012
     Due More than
Five Years
After June 30,
2012
     Total  
(In thousands)                            

Real estate mortgage loans

   $ 82,699       $ 215,775       $ 195,275       $ 493,749   

Real estate construction loans

     4,212         10,466         552         15,230   

Non-real estate loans

     22,801         20,304         6,234         49,339   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 109,712       $ 246,545       $ 202,061       $ 558,318   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

     Due After
June 30, 2013
 
(In thousands)       

Fixed rate

   $ 137,885   

Adjustable rate

     310,721   
  

 

 

 
   $ 448,606   
  

 

 

 

 

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Scheduled contractual principal repayments of loans do not reflect the actual life of such assets. The average life of loans may be substantially less than their contractual terms because of prepayments.

Origination, Purchase and Sale of Loans

Residential Lending

Park View Federal generally has authority to originate and purchase loans secured by real estate located throughout the United States. Consistent with its emphasis on being a community-oriented financial institution, Park View Federal concentrates its lending activities in its market area.

Generally, Park View Federal originates fixed-rate, single-family mortgage loans in conformity with Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae guidelines, so as to permit their being swapped with Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae in exchange for mortgage-backed securities secured by such loans or their sale in the secondary market. Most such loans are sold or swapped, as the case may be, with servicing rights retained, and are sold in furtherance of Park View Federal’s goal of better matching the maturities and interest rate sensitivity of its assets and liabilities. Park View Federal generally retains responsibility for collecting and remitting loan payments, inspecting the properties, making certain insurance and tax payments on behalf of borrowers and otherwise servicing the loans it sells or converts into mortgage-backed securities, and receives a fee for performing these services. Sales of loans also provide funds for additional lending and other purposes.

The Company does not originate sub-prime loans and only originates Alt A loans for sale, without recourse, in the secondary market. The Company considers subprime borrowers typically to have weakened credit histories that include payment delinquencies and possibly more severe problems such as charge-offs, judgments and bankruptcies. They may also display reduced repayment capacity as measured by credit scores, debt-to-income ratios, or other criteria that may encompass borrowers with incomplete credit histories. Subprime loans are loans to borrowers displaying one or more of these characteristics at the time of origination or purchase. The Company also does not originate any hybrid loans, low-doc/no-doc loans or payment option ARMs. All one-to-four family loans are underwritten according to agency underwriting standards. Exceptions, if any, are submitted to the Company’s board loan committee for approval. Any exposure the Company may have to these types of loans is immaterial.

Commercial Lending

Park View Federal also originates loans to commercial borrowers for their operating companies, including traditional lines of credit, revolving lines of credit and term loans and for the purpose of purchasing commercial owner-occupied, investment, and/or multi-family properties. During the last year, the Bank has augmented its commercial lending activities with SBA guaranties, which enables the guaranteed portion of these loans to either be held in the portfolio or to be sold in the secondary market.

Loan Underwriting Policies

Residential Lending

Park View Federal historically has been and continues to be an originator of single-family residential real estate loans in its market area. Park View Federal currently originates fixed-rate residential mortgage loans in accordance with underwriting guidelines promulgated by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae and adjustable-rate mortgage loans for terms of up to 30 years. Park View Federal offers adjustable-rate residential mortgage loans with interest rates which adjust based upon changes in an index based on the weekly average yield on United States Treasury securities adjusted to a constant maturity of one year, as made available by the Federal Reserve Board (the “Treasury Rate Index”), plus a margin of 2.50% to 3.50%. The amount of any increase or decrease in the interest rate is usually limited to 2% per year, with a limit of 6% over the life of the loan. The date of the first rate adjustment may range from one to ten years from the original date of the loan.

 

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Park View Federal’s lending activities are subject to the Bank’s written, nondiscriminatory underwriting guidelines and to loan origination procedures prescribed by Park View Federal’s Board of Directors and its management. Detailed loan applications are obtained to determine the borrower’s ability to repay, and the more significant items on these applications are verified through the use of credit reports, financial statements and confirmations. Property valuations are performed by independent outside appraisers approved by Park View Federal’s Board of Directors. As prescribed by Park View Federal’s Credit Policy and supporting approved lending authorities, Park View Federal’s residential underwriter has authority to approve all fixed-rate single-family residential mortgage loans which meet Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae underwriting guidelines and those adjustable-rate single-family residential mortgage loans which meet the Bank’s underwriting standards and are in amounts of less than $700,000. All loans in excess of the above amounts or any exceptions to guidelines must be approved by Park View Federal’s Loan Committee. All loans secured by savings deposits can be approved by lending officers based in Park View Federal’s branch offices.

It is Park View Federal’s policy to have a mortgage creating a valid lien on real estate and to obtain a title insurance policy which insures that the property is free of prior encumbrances. When a title insurance policy is not obtained, a lien verification is received. Borrowers must also obtain hazard insurance policies prior to closing and, when the property is in a flood plain as designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, paid flood insurance policies. Most borrowers are also required to advance funds on a monthly basis together with each payment of principal and interest to a mortgage escrow account from which Park View Federal makes disbursements for items such as real estate taxes and homeowners insurance.

Park View Federal’s lending policies permit it to lend up to 95% of the appraised value of the real property securing a mortgage loan. Private Mortgage insurance is required on those loans whose loan-to-value ratios exceed 80%.

Interest rates charged by Park View Federal on loans are affected principally by competitive factors, the demand for such loans and the supply of funds available for lending purposes and, in the case of fixed-rate single-family residential loans, rates established by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. These factors are, in turn, affected by general economic conditions, monetary policies of the federal government, including the Federal Reserve Board, legislative tax policies and government budgetary matters.

Commercial and Multi-Family Residential Real Estate Lending

The commercial real estate loans originated by Park View Federal are secured primarily by office buildings, shopping centers, warehouses and other income-producing commercial property. Park View Federal’s multi-family residential loans are primarily secured by apartment buildings. These loans are generally for a term of up to 5 years, amortization periods from 10 to 25 years and with interest rates that adjust either annually or every three to five years based upon changes in the Treasury Rate Index or FHLB advance rate, plus a negotiated margin.

Commercial real estate lending entails significant additional risks as compared with residential property lending. Commercial real estate loans typically involve large loan balances to single borrowers or groups of related borrowers. The payment experience on such loans depends on the successful operation of the real estate project. These risks can be significantly impacted by supply and demand conditions in the market for office and retail space, and, as such, may be subject to fluctuation based upon current economic conditions. To minimize these risks, Park View Federal generally limits itself to its market area and to borrowers with which it has substantial experience or who are otherwise well known to the Bank. Park View Federal obtains financial statements and, in most cases, the personal guarantees from all principals obtaining commercial real estate loans.

The HOLA includes a provision that limits Park View Federal’s non-residential real estate lending to no more than four times its total capital. This maximum limitation, which at June 30, 2012 was $281.5 million, has not materially limited the Bank’s lending practices.

 

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Under HOLA, the maximum amount which Park View Federal may lend to any one borrower is 15% of the Bank’s unimpaired capital and surplus, or $12.9 million at June 30, 2012. Loans in an amount equal to an additional 10% of unimpaired capital and surplus may be made to the same borrower if such loans are fully secured by readily marketable collateral. Park View Federal may request a waiver from the OCC to exceed the 15% loans-to-one borrower limitation on a case-by-case basis. See “—Loans-to-One Borrower” for more information and a discussion of the loans-to-one borrower regulations.

Construction Loans

While Park View Federal continues to offer residential and commercial construction loans, market conditions have decreased the volume of activity within this loan segment. When originated, loans for the construction of owner-occupied, single-family residential properties are underwritten in connection with the permanent loan on the property and have a construction term of six to 18 months. Interest rates on residential construction loans made to the eventual occupant are set at competitive rates, and are usually fixed for the construction term. Interest rates on commercial construction loans are set at a variable rate based on the prime rate or the London Interbank Offer Rate (“LIBOR”) index, and adjust quarterly or monthly, respectively. Generally, the construction period for commercial properties is less than 24 months.

Construction financing is generally considered to involve a higher degree of risk of loss than long-term financing on improved, occupied real estate. Risk of loss on a construction loan is dependent largely upon the accuracy of the initial estimate of the property’s value at completion of construction or development and the estimated cost (including interest) of construction. During the construction phase, a number of factors could result in delays and cost overruns. If the estimate of construction costs proves to be inaccurate, Park View Federal may be required to advance funds beyond the amount originally committed to ensure completion of the development. If the estimate of value proves to be inaccurate, Park View Federal may be confronted, at or prior to the maturity of the loan, with a project having a value which is insufficient to assure full repayment.

Land Loans

As with the construction loan segment, market conditions have slowed the origination of loans to builders and developers for the acquisition and/or development of vacant land. Park View Federal will continue to allow attrition in the construction and the land loan segments, as the Bank shifts its balance sheet composition from real estate and land-focused to commercial and industrial lending (in purpose and in collateral).

Historically, the proceeds of the land loan were used to acquire the land itself and/or to make site improvements necessary to develop the land into saleable lots. As in the past, Park View Federal will not originate land loans to borrowers wishing to speculate in the value of land, and limits land loans to borrowers who expect to begin development of the property within two years of the date of the loan.

Land development and acquisition loans involve significant additional risks when compared with loans on existing residential properties. All of these loans originated are within the Park View Federal’s market area.

Home Equity Line of Credit Loans

Park View Federal originates loans secured by mortgages on residential real estate. Such loans are for an initial ten-year draw period followed by a ten-year repayment period.

Commercial Non-Real Estate Business Loans

Park View Federal originates commercial business loans secured by non-real estate assets such as accounts receivable, inventory, furniture and fixtures, equipment and certain intangible assets. Such loans are part of a new lending strategy for Park View Federal. Generally, these loans are made for up to $5.0 million to any one

 

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borrowing relationship (person or company). This new activity follows Park View Federal Credit Policy and supporting Underwriting Guidelines in establishing collateral values, advance rates and required levels of due diligence. Generally, Park View Federal requires the personal guarantee of all borrowers for such loans.

Loan Participation Interests

From time to time, Park View Federal sells participation interests in mortgage loans and commercial loans originated by it and purchases whole loans or participation interests in loans originated by other lenders. Park View Federal held whole loans and participations in loans originated by other lenders of approximately $12.4 million at June 30, 2012. Loans which Park View Federal purchases must meet or exceed the underwriting standards for loans originated by the Bank.

Mortgage Banking Activity

The Company originates conventional loans secured by first lien mortgages on one-to-four family residential properties located within its market area for either portfolio or sale into the secondary market. During the year ended June 30, 2012, Park View Federal recorded a gain of $10.9 million on the sale of $350.8 million in loans receivable originated for sale. Cyclically low market rates resulted in increased refinancing activity for the year. The sold loans were generally sold on a servicing retained basis.

In addition to interest earned on loans and income recognized on the sale of loans, Park View Federal receives fees for servicing loans that it has sold. During the year ended June 30, 2012, Park View Federal reported a net loan servicing loss of $1.8 million, as the result of the accelerated repayment of loans serviced along with an impairment charge against the value of its mortgage loan servicing asset and, at June 30, 2012, was servicing approximately $1.0 billion of loans for others. The income from loan servicing during this period was attributable to the generation of mortgage loan servicing fees of $2.3 million, which was reduced by amortization expense of $3.6 million of the mortgage servicing assets resulting from heavy refinance activity and an impairment charge of $.5 million resulting from low interest rates and accelerated prepayment speeds during the year. Park View Federal has been able to keep delinquencies on residential loans serviced for others to a relatively low level of the aggregate outstanding balance of loans serviced, as a result of its policy of limiting servicing to loans it originates and subsequently sells to Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. Because of the success Park View Federal has experienced in this area and because it has data processing equipment that will allow it to expand its portfolio of serviced loans without incurring significant incremental expenses, the Bank intends in the future to augment its portfolio of loans serviced by continuing to originate and either swap such fixed-rate single-family residential mortgage loans with Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae in exchange for mortgage-backed securities or sell such loans for cash, while retaining servicing.

In addition to loan servicing fees, Park View Federal receives fees in connection with loan commitments and originations, loan modifications, late payments and changes of property ownership and for miscellaneous services related to its loans. Loan origination fees are calculated as a percentage of the amount loaned. Park View Federal typically receives fees in connection with the origination of fixed-rate and adjustable-rate residential mortgage loans. All loan origination fees are deferred and accreted into income over the contractual life of the loan according to the interest method of recognizing income. If a loan is prepaid, refinanced or sold, all remaining deferred fees with respect to such loan are taken into income at such time.

Income from these activities varies from period to period with the volume and type of loans originated, sold and purchased, which in turn is dependent on prevailing mortgage interest rates and their effect on the demand for loans in Park View Federal’s market area.

Non-performing Loans and Other Problem Assets

It is the Bank’s policy to monitor its loan portfolio and to anticipate and address payment delinquencies, loans with attributes of potential future delinquency and those with delinquencies due to loan maturities. When a borrower fails to make a payment on a loan, Park View Federal takes immediate steps to have the delinquency

 

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cured and the loan restored to current status. Within its Credit Policy, Park View Federal delineates its approaches to consumer and commercial loan delinquencies. Remedies to all delinquencies begin with contact to the borrower, once a loan is past its due date. For serious commercial loan delinquencies, a separate work out plan may be developed and followed until the delinquency is cured and the loan is returned to accrual status. For consumer delinquencies exceeding 90 days, Park View Federal will institute additional measures to enforce its remedies resulting from the loan’s default, including commencing foreclosure action. It is Park View Federal’s desire to work with the borrower towards an acceptable loan modification, loan restructuring or forbearance agreement.

The following table sets forth information with respect to Park View Federal’s non-performing loans and other problem assets at the dates indicated. Amounts are net of deferred loan fees.

 

     At June 30,  
     2012     2011     2010     2009     2008  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Non-accruing loans: (1)

          

Real estate

   $ 20,076      $ 50,261      $ 68,862      $ 69,534      $ 22,406   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Accruing loans which are contractually past due 90 days or more:

          

Real estate

     —          —          65        727        2,966   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total non-accrual and 90 days past due loans

   $ 20,076      $ 50,261      $ 68,927      $ 70,261      $ 25,372   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ratio of non-performing loans to total loans

     3.60     8.69     11.14     10.04     3.50
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other non-performing assets (2)

   $ 7,734      $ 7,973      $ 8,174      $ 11,608      $ 4,065   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total non-performing assets

   $ 27,810      $ 58,234      $ 77,101      $ 81,869      $ 29,437   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total non-performing assets to total assets

     3.51     7.40     8.97     8.97     3.39
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Troubled debt restructuring (3)

   $ 1,806      $ 3,041      $ 2,985      $ —        $ —     

 

(1)

Nonaccrual status denotes loans on which, in the opinion of management, the collection of additional interest is unlikely, or loans that meet the nonaccrual criteria established by regulatory authorities. Nonaccrual loans include all loans classified as doubtful or loss, and all loans greater than 90 days past due with a loan-to-value ratio greater than 60%.

(2)

Other non-performing assets represent property acquired by Park View Federal through foreclosure or repossession.

(3)

Excludes all nonaccrual loans disclosed as troubled debt restructurings in note 3 in notes to the financial statements.

All nonperforming loans are specifically evaluated and an updated valuation obtained at least annually to determine the amount of impairment. Additionally, in determining the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses, a factor is applied to the amount of impaired loans to estimate possible declining values of the underlying collateral as well as possible valuation adjustments above the specific factor applied against collateral whose valuation is greater than twelve months old. As such, the length of time that a loan has been nonperforming is not additionally factored in determining the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses. The following is a schedule as

 

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of June 30, 2012 and 2011 detailing the length of time our nonaccrual loans and accruing loans that were contractually past due 90 days have been contractually past due, along with detail as to the composition of these loans:

 

     At June 30, 2012  
     (In thousands)  
     90 days
or less
     91 to
365 days
     1 to 2
Years
     2 to 3
Years
     Over
3 Years
     Total  

One-to-four residential

   $ 870       $ 1,721       $ 2,164       $ 1,225       $ 484       $ 6,464   

Home equity line of credit

     490         744         496         997         —           2,727   

Multi-family residential

     —           325         —           —           —           325   

Commercial real estate

     265         1,559         1,247         723         133         3,927   

Land

     671         299         3,004         764         458         5,196   

Residential construction

     119         —           —           111         125         355   

Multi-family construction

     —           —           —           —           —           —     

Commercial construction

     —           —           —           644         —           644   

Non-mortgage

     200         238         —           —           —           438   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 2,615       $ 4,886       $ 6,911       $ 4,464       $ 1,200       $ 20,076   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

     At June 30, 2011  
     (In thousands)  
     90 days
or less
     91 to
365 days
     Over
1 Year
     Total  

One-to-four residential

   $ 1,885       $ 2,565       $ 5,731       $ 10,181   

Home equity line of credit

     401         633         2,506         3,540   

Multi-family residential

     —           1,836         368         2,204   

Commercial real estate

     2,718         4,301         5,071         12,090   

Land

     2,477         4,073         7,712         14,262   

Residential construction

     122         545         1,979         2,646   

Multi-family construction

     —           —           —           —     

Commercial construction

     —           2,987         828         3,815   

Non-mortgage

     1,322         201         —           1,523   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 8,925       $ 17,141       $ 24,195       $ 50,261   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

The decrease in nonaccruals from 2011 is primarily the result of the change in methodology used to recognize specific impairment. Historically, the Company recognized specific impairment on individual loans through the utilization of a specific valuation allowance, but did not charge off the impaired loan amount until the loan was disposed and removed from the loan accounting system. During 2012, Park View Federal implemented an enhanced loan accounting system, which provides for the systematic recording of charged-off loans for financial recognition without losing the ability to track the legal contractual amounts. As such, the Bank charged off those principal loan amounts which had previously been specifically impaired through a specific valuation allowance and continued to be carried in loans outstanding. In addition to reducing loan balances, including nonperforming loans, this new enhanced loan accounting system had the impact of elevating reported charge-offs for the periods and reducing the allowance for loan losses associated with specific reserves. Since these charge-offs associated with the implementation of this loan accounting system were previously specifically reserved and included in the Company’s historical loss factors, the allowance for loan losses did not need to be replenished after recording these charge-offs.

The level in nonaccrual loans and accruing loans which are contractually past due more than 90 days at June 30, 2012 and June 30, 2011continues to remain elevated and is attributable to poor current local and national economic conditions. Residential markets locally and nationally have been impacted by a significant increase in foreclosures and value declines as a result of the problems faced by sub-prime borrowers and the

 

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resulting contraction of residential credit available to all but the most credit worthy borrowers. Land development projects nationally and locally have seen slow sales and price decreases. As a savings institution, Park View Federal has significant exposure to the residential market in the greater Cleveland, Ohio area. As a result, Park View Federal has seen a continued high level of non-performing loans. Due to an increase in foreclosure activity in the area, the foreclosure process in Cuyahoga County, one of Park View Federal’s primary markets, has become elongated. As such, loans have remained past due for considerable periods prior to being collected, transferred to real estate owned (“OREO”), or charged off.

Of the $20.1 million in nonaccrual loans at June 30, 2012, $10.8 million were individually identified as impaired. All of these loans are collateralized by various forms of non-residential real estate or residential construction loans. These loans were reviewed for the likelihood of full collection based primarily on the value of the underlying collateral. To the extent Park View Federal believes the collection of loan principal is in doubt, it charges off all or a portion of the loan balance or establishes specific loss reserves. Management’s evaluations of the underlying collateral include a consideration of the potential impact of erosion in real estate values due to poor local economic conditions and a potentially long foreclosure process. This evaluation involves discounting the original appraised values of the real estate and estimated disposition costs along with unpaid real estate taxes to arrive at an estimate of the net realizable value of the collateral. A new appraisal or evaluation is obtained within 90 days from the time a loan becomes criticized. Additionally, a new appraisal is obtained annually as long as the loan remains criticized, regardless of loan type. For criticized loans where the appraisal or evaluation is more than twelve months old, an additional adjustment is made to the existing appraised value until such time that an updated appraisal has been obtained. Based on actual experience for updating valuations, this additional adjustment approximates 10%. The estimated disposition costs are deemed to be 9% based on actual experience. In determining the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses, a factor is applied to the amount of impaired loans to estimate possible declining values of the underlying collateral as well as possible valuation adjustments above the specific factor applied against collateral whose valuation is greater than twelve months old.

The remaining nonaccrual loans are homogeneous one-to-four family loans. The loss allocations applied to adversely classified loans are based on current appraisals on the underlying collateral, the potential impact of continuing erosion in real estate values and the estimated cost of disposal. Additionally, the loss allocations consider the potential that the value of this collateral may erode during the foreclosure process. Through this analysis, management established specific reserves for these loans to the extent such losses are identifiable.

Impaired loans represent nonaccrual loans in the nonresidential real estate, non real estate and residential construction loan categories. Foreclosure proceedings for these loans are subject to external factors, such as bankruptcy and other legal proceedings that may delay the disposition of the loan, but generally occur within a period of time ranging from 12 to 60 months from the time they are initiated until the loan is ultimately collected, transferred to REO, or charged off. Management is not aware of any loans where information known about a possible credit would cause serious doubts of the borrower to comply with payments terms related to the credit causing the credit to be deemed nonaccrual.

It is Park View Federal’s policy not to record as income partial interest payments on nonaccrual loans. At June 30, 2012, gross interest income of $3.5 million would have been recorded on loans accounted for on a nonaccrual basis if such loans had been current and accruing.

Management has reviewed its non-accruing loans and believes that the allowance for loan losses is adequate to absorb probable losses on these loans.

Park View Federal has adversely classified $33.9 million of loans at June 30, 2012, including $20.1 million in non-performing loans discussed above. This compares to $64.0 million of adversely classified loans and $50.3 million in non-performing loans at June 30, 2011. A special mention loan has potential weaknesses that deserve management’s close attention. If left uncorrected, these potential weaknesses may result in deterioration of the repayment prospects or in the institutions credit position at some future date.

 

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Real estate acquired by Park View Federal as a result of foreclosure is classified as OREO until such time as it is sold. At June 30, 2012, Park View Federal had 43 real estate owned properties totaling $7.7 million. These properties include raw land, partially developed land and, in some cases, developed and partially developed commercial and residential properties. Park View Federal faces the possibility of declines in value of these properties below their carrying amount. During the year ended June 30, 2012, Park View Federal recognized a write-down on OREO of $1.7 million. Occasionally, Park View Federal will finish development or construction of these projects or homes. In these cases, Park View Federal also faces the risk that costs to complete construction will exceed original estimates or other execution risks.

The following table presents the activity in other real estate owned for the year ended June 30, 2012:

 

     June 30, 2012  

Beginning Balance

   $ 7,972,753   

Additions

     9,314,588   

Dispositions

     (7,824,966

Impairment write-downs

     (1,728,797
  

 

 

 

Ending Balance

   $ 7,733,578   
  

 

 

 

Asset Classification and Allowance for Loan Losses

Federal regulations require savings institutions to review their assets on a regular basis and to classify them as “substandard,” “doubtful,” or “loss,” if warranted. If an asset or portion thereof is classified as a loss, the insured institution must either establish specific allowances for loan losses in the amount of 100% of the portion of the asset classified as a loss, or charge off such amount. An asset which does not currently warrant classification, but which possesses weaknesses or deficiencies deserving close attention is required to be designated as “special mention.” As part of its Credit Policy, Park View Federal outlines its risk rating methodology to ensure appropriate grading of non-homogenous loans. The Asset Classification Committee reviews the recommendations of Park View Federal’s Special Assets team for potential downgrades and allocation of specific reserve allowance to loans. Currently, general loss allowances (up to 1.25% of risk-based assets) established to cover losses related to assets classified substandard or doubtful may be included in determining an institution’s regulatory capital, while specific valuation allowances for loan losses do not qualify as regulatory capital. For additional information regarding regulatory capital requirements, see the section captioned “Regulatory Capital Requirements.” OCC examiners may disagree with the insured institution’s classifications and amounts reserved. If an institution does not agree with an examiner’s classification of an asset, it may appeal this determination. At June 30, 2012, total nonaccrual and 90 days past due loans and other non-performing assets were $20.1 million, all of which were classified as substandard. For additional information, see the section captioned “—Non-performing Loans and Other Problem Assets” and Note 3 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

In originating loans, Park View Federal recognizes that credit losses will be experienced and that the risk of loss will vary with, among other things, the type of loan being made, the creditworthiness of the borrower over the term of the loan, general economic conditions and, in the case of a secured loan, the quality of the security for the loan. It is management’s policy to maintain an adequate allowance for loan losses based on, among other things, Park View Federal’s and the industry’s historical loan loss experience, evaluation of economic conditions and regular reviews of delinquencies and loan portfolio quality. Park View Federal increases its allowance for loan losses by charging provisions for loan losses against the Bank’s income.

General allowances are made pursuant to management’s assessment of risk in Park View Federal’s loan portfolio as a whole. Specific allowances are provided for individual loans when ultimate collection is considered questionable by management after reviewing the current status of loans, which are contractually past due and considering the net realizable value of the security for the loan. Management continues to monitor Park View Federal’s asset quality and to charge off loans against the allowance for loan losses when appropriate or to

 

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provide specific loss reserves when necessary. Although management believes it uses the best information available to make determinations with respect to the allowance for loan losses, future adjustments may be necessary if economic conditions differ substantially from the economic conditions in the assumptions used in making the initial determinations.

As of December 31, 2011, the Company implemented an enhanced loan accounting system, which provides for the systematic recording of charged-off loans for financial recognition without losing its ability to track the legal contractual amounts. As such, during the current fiscal year, the Company charged off those loan amounts which had previously been specifically impaired through the use of the Specific Valuation Allowance approximately $13.0 million. As of June 30, 2012, any remaining specific impairments known in prior periods as specific valuation allowances are now tracked as specific allocations to the allowance. In addition to reducing loan balances, including nonperforming loans, this new enhanced loan accounting system had the impact of elevating reported charge-offs for the period and reducing the allowance for loan losses associated with specific reserves.

The following table shows how Park View Federal’s allowance for loan losses is allocated at each of the dates indicated:

 

     June 30, 2012      June 30, 2011  

General allowance

   $ 14,634,531       $ 16,961,901   

Specific allowance

     1,418,334         13,034,992   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total allowance

   $ 16,052,865       $ 29,996,893   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Management’s approach includes establishing a specific valuation allowance by evaluating individual non-performing loans for probable losses based on a systematic approach involving estimating the realizable value of the underlying collateral. Additionally, management establishes a general valuation allowance for pools of performing loans segregated by collateral type. For the general valuation allowance, management is applying a prudent loss factor based on Park View Federal’s historical loss experience, trends based on changes to non-performing loans and foreclosure activity, effectiveness of its credit administration processes and management’s subjective evaluation of the local population and economic environment. The loan portfolio is segregated into categories based on collateral type and a loss factor is applied to each category. The initial basis for each loss factor is Park View Federal’s loss experience for each category. Historical loss percentages are calculated and adjusted by taking charge-offs in each risk category during the past 18 months and dividing the total by the average balance of each category.

A provision for loan losses is recorded when necessary to bring the allowance to a level consistent with this analysis. Management believes it uses the best information available to make a determination as to the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses. The current period provision for loan losses reflects the impact on the loss factors applied to pools of performing loans due to the recent increase in Park View Federal’s historical loss experience.

Management’s ongoing analysis of the allowance for loan losses considers changes in nonaccrual loans and changes in probable loan losses as economic conditions deteriorate and the underlying collateral is subjected to an elongated foreclosure process.

Investment Activities

Park View Federal’s investment policy currently allows for investment in various types of liquid assets, including U.S. government and U.S. government sponsored enterprise securities, time deposits at the FHLB of Cincinnati, certificates of deposit or bankers’ acceptances at other federally insured depository institutions, and Trust Preferred, corporate and mortgage-backed securities. The general objective of Park View Federal’s

 

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investment policy is to maximize returns without compromising liquidity or creating undue credit or interest rate risk. Park View Federal’s equity investments consisted of floating rate preferred stock issued by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. During 2010, these securities were sold, resulting in a pre-tax gain of $24,000.

Park View Federal reports its investments, other than marketable equity securities and securities available for sale, at cost as adjusted for discounts and unamortized premiums. Park View Federal has the intent and ability and generally holds all securities until maturity.

In the fiscal year ended June 2012, Park View Federal did not sell mortgage-backed securities available for sale. At present, management is not aware of any conditions or circumstances which could impair its ability to hold its remaining securities to maturity. In accordance with its general investment policy, Park View Federal held U.S. government sponsored enterprise, Trust Preferred, corporate and mortgage-backed securities, and FHLB of Cincinnati stock at June 30, 2012. For additional information regarding Park View Federal’s investment activities, see Note 2 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

Deposit Activity and Other Sources of Funds

General

Deposits are the primary source of Park View Federal’s funds for lending, investment activities and general operational purposes. In addition to deposits, Park View Federal derives funds from loan principal and interest repayments, maturities of securities and interest payments thereon. Although loan repayments are a relatively stable source of funds, deposit inflows and outflows are significantly influenced by general interest rates and money market conditions. Borrowings may be used on a short-term basis to compensate for reductions in the availability of funds, or on a longer term basis for general operational purposes.

Deposits

Park View Federal attracts deposits principally from within its primary market area by offering a variety of deposit instruments, including checking accounts, money market accounts, regular savings accounts and certificates of deposit, which generally range in maturity from seven days to five years. Deposit terms vary according to the minimum balance required, the length of time the funds must remain on deposit and the interest rate. Maturities, terms, service fees and withdrawal penalties for its deposit accounts are established by Park View Federal on a periodic basis. Park View Federal generally reviews its deposit mix and pricing on a weekly basis. In determining the characteristics of its deposit accounts, Park View Federal considers the rates offered by competing institutions, funds acquisition costs and liquidity requirements, growth goals and federal regulations. Under the terms of the Bank Order, Park View Federal was prohibited from accepting brokered deposits or offering rates more than 75 basis points above the national average rate. As noted in Note 21 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, the OCC removed the Bank Order. See Note 21 for additional information with respect to the termination of the Bank Order.

Park View Federal competes for deposits with other institutions in its market area by offering deposit instruments that are competitively priced and providing customer service through convenient and attractive offices, knowledgeable and efficient staff, and hours of service that meet customers’ needs. To provide additional convenience, Park View Federal participates in the nationwide MoneyPass® ATM/debit card Automated Teller Machine network, through which customers can gain access to their accounts at any time.

Park View Federal’s deposits decreased by $3.4 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012, as compared to the fiscal year ended June 30, 2011. Deposit balances totaled $656.0 million, $652.6 million and $667.5 million at the fiscal years ended June 30, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

 

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The following table sets forth the deposits in Park View Federal as of June 30, 2012 were:

 

Weighted
Average
Interest
Rate

  

Category

   Minimum
Balance
     Balance
(in thousands)
     Percentage
of Total
Deposits
 

0.16%

  

NOW accounts

   $ 50       $ 37,112         5.66

0.10   

  

Passbook statement accounts

     5         47,261         7.20   

0.53   

  

Money market accounts

     1,000         136,240         20.77   

0.00   

  

Non-interest earning demand accounts

     50         50,799         7.74   
        

 

 

    

 

 

 
           271,412         41.38   
    

Certificates of Deposit

                    

1.43   

  

3 months or less

     500         3,483         0.53   

0.49   

  

3-6 months

     500         14,834         2.26   

0.80   

  

6-12 months

     500         97,118         14.81   

1.15   

  

1-3 years

     500         223,856         34.13   

2.94   

  

More than three years

     500         45,276         6.90   
        

 

 

    

 

 

 

1.24   

  

Total certificates of deposit

        384,567         58.62   
        

 

 

    

 

 

 
  

Total deposits

      $ 655,979         100.00
        

 

 

    

 

 

 

The following table sets forth the average balances and average interest rates based on month-end balances for interest-bearing demand deposits and time deposits during the periods indicated:

 

     For the Year Ended June 30,  
     2012     2011     2010  
     Interest-
Bearing
Demand
Deposits
    Savings
Deposits
    Time
Deposits
    Interest-
Bearing
Demand
Deposits
    Savings
Deposits
    Time
Deposits
    Interest-
Bearing
Demand
Deposits
    Savings
Deposits
    Time
Deposits
 

Average balance

   $ 168,005      $ 47,722      $ 406,142      $ 137,140      $ 51,707      $ 431,439      $ 108,232      $ 64,995      $ 497,236   

Average rate paid

     0.50     0.11     1.03     0.71     0.23     1.91     0.97     0.86     2.56

The rates currently paid on certificates maturing within one year or less are lower than the rates currently being paid on similar certificates of deposit maturing thereafter. Park View Federal will seek to retain these deposits to the extent consistent with its long-term objective of maintaining positive interest rate spreads. Depending upon interest rates existing at the time such certificates mature, Park View Federal’s cost of funds may be significantly affected by the rollover of these funds. A decrease in such cost of funds, if any, may have a material impact on Park View Federal’s operations. To the extent such deposits do not roll over, Park View Federal may, if necessary, use other sources of funds, including borrowings from the FHLB of Cincinnati, to replace such deposits. For additional information, see the section captioned “Borrowings.”

The following table indicates the amount of Park View Federal’s certificates of deposit of $100,000 or more by time remaining until maturity as of June 30, 2012:

 

Maturity Period

   Certificates
of Deposit
 
     (In thousands)  

Over three through six months

   $ 36,369   

Three through six months

     25,057   

Over six through 12 months

     52,826   

Over 12 months

     36,488   
  

 

 

 

Total

   $ 150,740   
  

 

 

 

 

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Borrowings

Savings deposits historically have been the primary source of funds for Park View Federal’s lending, investments and general operating activities. Park View Federal is authorized, however, to use advances from the FHLB of Cincinnati to supplement its supply of lendable funds and to meet deposit withdrawal requirements. The FHLB of Cincinnati functions as a central reserve bank providing credit for savings institutions and certain other member financial institutions. As a member of the FHLB, Park View Federal is required to own stock in the FHLB of Cincinnati and is authorized to apply for advances. Advances are pursuant to several different programs, each of which has its own interest rate and range of maturities. Park View Federal has a Blanket Agreement for advances with the FHLB under which the Bank may borrow up to 50% of assets subject to normal collateral and underwriting requirements. Park View Federal currently has two commitments with the FHLB of Cincinnati for flexible lines of credit, referred to as a cash management advance (“CMA”) and a Repo advance (“REPO”), in the amounts of $30 million and $200 million, respectively, which can be drawn on to the extent of collateral pledged. At June 30, 2012, Park View Federal had borrowing capacity of $230.0 million on these lines of credit. The CMA and the REPO were not drawn down at June 30, 2012. Advances from the FHLB of Cincinnati are secured by Park View Federal’s stock in the FHLB of Cincinnati and other eligible assets. In addition, PVFSC had a loan with an outstanding balance of $1.0 million as of June 30, 2012 collateralized by real estate. For additional information, refer to Note 7 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

The following table sets forth certain information regarding Park View Federal’s advances from the FHLB of Cincinnati for the periods indicated:

 

     At June 30,  
     2012     2011     2010  
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Amounts outstanding at end of period

   $ 35,000      $ 35,000      $ 35,000   

Weighted average rate

     2.96     2.96     2.96

Maximum amount outstanding at any month end

   $ 35,000      $ 35,000      $ 45,000   

Approximate average outstanding balance

   $ 35,000      $ 35,000      $ 35,056   

Weighted average rate

     2.96     2.96     2.95

Subsidiary Activities

Park View Federal is required to give the FDIC and the OCC 30 days prior notice before establishing or acquiring a new subsidiary or commencing a new activity through an existing subsidiary. Both the FDIC and the OCC have the authority to prohibit the initiation of, and to order the termination of, subsidiary activities determined to pose a risk to the safety or soundness of the institution.

As a federally chartered savings bank, Park View Federal is permitted to invest an amount equal to 2% of its assets in subsidiaries, with an additional investment of 1% of assets where such investment serves primarily community, inner-city and community development purposes. Under such limitations, as of June 30, 2012, Park View Federal was authorized to invest up to approximately $24 million in the shares of, or as loans to, subsidiaries, including the additional 1% investment for community, inner-city and community development purposes. Institutions meeting their applicable minimum regulatory capital requirements may invest up to 50% of their regulatory capital in conforming first mortgage loans to subsidiaries in which they own 10% or more of the capital stock. Park View Federal currently exceeds its regulatory capital requirements.

PVF has three active subsidiaries, Park View Federal, PVFSC and MPLC. PVFSC is engaged in the activities of land acquisition and real estate investment and MPLC holds an investment in land adjacent to PVF’s Corporate Center. PVF has three nonactive subsidiaries, PVF Community Development Corp., PVF Mortgage Corp. and PVF Holdings, Inc., which have been chartered for future activity. Park View Federal has created various limited liability companies that have taken title to property acquired through or in lieu of foreclosure.

 

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PVF Service Corporation

At June 30, 2012, PVFSC had the following investments (1) a $.1 million investment in a joint venture that owns real estate leased to Park View Federal for use as a branch office in Avon, Ohio; (2) a $0.1 million investment in a joint venture for a branch office location in Mayfield Heights, Ohio. (3) an interest in Park View Plaza, a joint venture, which is a strip center in Cleveland, Ohio that includes Park View Federal’s Cleveland branch office; (4) an interest in a joint venture containing a title company, PVF Title Services, LLC; and (5) a $4.2 million investment in office properties used by PVF and Park View Federal that includes the Corporate Center in Solon, Ohio, and branch offices in Bainbridge, Ohio and Chardon, Ohio. In November 2008, PVFSC refinanced a line of credit loan for $1.6 million. The balance at June 30, 2012 was $1.0 million, and the loan is secured by the Corporate Center in Solon, Ohio.

Mid Pines Land Company

At June 30, 2012, MPLC had an investment of $0.6 million in land adjacent to PVF’s Corporate Center in Solon, Ohio.

Competition

Park View Federal faces strong competition both in originating real estate and other loans and in attracting deposits. Park View Federal competes for real estate and other loans principally on the basis of interest rates and the loan fees it charges, the type of loans it originates and the quality of services it provides to borrowers. Its competition in originating real estate loans comes primarily from other savings institutions, commercial banks and mortgage bankers making loans secured by real estate that are located in Park View Federal’s market area.

Park View Federal generally attracts all its deposits through its branch offices primarily from the communities in which these branch offices are located. Consequently, competition for deposits is principally from other savings institutions, commercial banks, credit unions and brokers in these communities. Park View Federal competes for deposits and loans by offering a variety of deposit accounts at competitive rates, a wide array of loan products, convenient business hours and branch locations, a commitment to outstanding customer service and a well-trained staff. In addition, Park View Federal believes it has developed strong relationships with local businesses, realtors, builders and the public in general, giving it an excellent image in the community.

Employees

As of June 30, 2012, PVF and its subsidiaries had 168 full-time employees and 31 part-time employees, none of whom was represented by a collective bargaining agreement. PVF believes it enjoys a good relationship with its personnel.

Regulation

General

For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012, PVF and Park View Federal, as a federally chartered savings and loan holding company and federal savings association, respectively, have been subject to examination and comprehensive federal regulation and oversight by the OCC. Park View Federal has also been and continues to be subject to regulation and examination by the FDIC, which insures the deposits of Park View Federal to the maximum extent permitted by law, and other certain requirements established by the Federal Reserve Board.

The investment and lending authority of savings institutions is prescribed by federal laws and regulations, and such institutions are prohibited from engaging in any activities not permitted by such laws or regulations. Such regulations and supervision primarily are intended for the protection of depositors and not for the purpose of protecting shareholders.

 

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Federal law provides federal banking regulators, including the OCC, the Federal Reserve Board and the FDIC, with substantial enforcement powers. The enforcement authority of the OCC and the Federal Reserve Board over savings institutions and their holding companies includes, among other things, the ability to assess civil money penalties, to issue cease and desist or removal orders and to initiate injunctive actions. In general, these enforcement actions may be initiated for violations of laws and regulations and unsafe and unsound practices. Other actions or inactions may provide the basis for enforcement action, including misleading or untimely reports filed with the OCC and the Federal Reserve Board.

Recently Enacted Regulatory Reform

Federal regulators continue to implement many provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act, which was signed into law by President Obama on July 21, 2010. The following discussion summarizes significant aspects of the new law that affect or already affecting PVF and Park View Federal:

 

   

Effective July 21, 2011, the OCC assumed responsibility from the OTS for the examination, supervision and regulation of federal savings associations and rulemaking for federal and state savings associations,and the authority of the other remaining bank regulatory agencies has been restructured;

 

   

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has been established and empowered to exercise broad regulatory, supervisory and enforcement authority with respect to both new and existing consumer financial protection laws;

 

   

New capital regulations for thrift holding companies have been adopted and any new trust preferred securities no longer count toward Tier 1 capital;

 

   

The prohibition on the payment of interest on demand deposits has been repealed, effective July 21, 2011;

 

   

The standard maximum amount of deposit insurance per customer has been permanently increased to $250,000 and non-interest-bearing transaction accounts have unlimited deposit insurance through December 31, 2012;

 

   

The deposit insurance assessment base calculation has been expanded to equal a depository institution’s total assets minus the sum of its average tangible equity during the assessment period; and

 

   

New corporate governance requirements, which are generally applicable to most larger public companies, now require new compensation practices, including, but not limited to, providing shareholders the opportunity to cast a non-binding vote on executive compensation, to consider the independence of compensation advisors and requiring new executive compensation disclosure.

Many provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act have not yet been implemented and will require interpretation and rule making by federal regulators. PVF is closely monitoring all relevant sections of the Dodd-Frank Act to ensure continued compliance with the applicable portions of the law and its rules and regulations. While the ultimate effect of the Dodd-Frank Act on us cannot currently be determined, the law and its implementing rules and regulations are increasing compliance costs and may restrictour operations, all of which may have a material adverse affect on our operating results and financial condition.

Regulation of Park View Federal

General

As a savings institution, Park View Federal is subject to extensive regulation by federal banking regulators, and its deposits are insured by the DIF, which is administered by the FDIC. The lending activities and other investments of Park View Federal must comply with various federal regulatory requirements. The OCC periodically examines Park View Federal for compliance with various regulatory requirements. The FDIC also has the authority to conduct special examinations of FDIC-insured savings institutions. Park View Federal must regularly file reports describing its activities and financial condition. Park View Federal is also subject to certain

 

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reserve requirements promulgated by the Federal Reserve Board. This supervision and regulation is intended primarily for the protection of depositors. Certain of these regulatory requirements are referred to below or elsewhere herein. The discussion is not intended to be a complete explanation of all applicable laws and regulations and is qualified in its entirety by reference to the actual statutes and regulations involved.

Regulatory Capital Requirements

Under current OCC regulations, savings institutions must maintain “tangible” capital equal to at least 1.5% of adjusted total assets, Tier 1 capital (core) equal to at least 4.0% (or 3.0% if the institution is the highest rated under the OCC examination rating system) of adjusted total assets and “total capital,” a combination of Tier 1 and “supplementary” capital, equal to at least 8.0% of “risk-weighted” assets. The OCC continues to enforce, regulations which impose certain restrictions on savings associations that have a total risk-based capital ratio that is less than 8.0%, a ratio of Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets of less than 4.0% or a ratio of Tier 1 capital to adjusted total assets of less than 4.0% (or 3.0% if the institution is the highest rated). For purposes of these regulations, Tier 1 capital generally consists of common shareholders’ equity (including retained earnings), certain noncumulative perpetual preferred stock and related surplus and minority interests in equity accounts of consolidated subsidiaries, less intangibles other than certain mortgage servicing rights and credit card relationships. For additional information regarding regulatory capital requirements, see the section captioned “Prompt Corrective Regulatory Action.” Investments in subsidiaries that are engaged as principal in activities not permissible for national banks must also be deducted from Tier 1 capital. Park View Federal was in compliance with all applicable regulatory capital requirements at June 30, 2012.

In determining compliance with the risk-based capital requirement, a savings institution calculates its total capital, which may include both core capital and supplementary capital, provided the amount of supplementary capital does not exceed the savings institution’s core capital. Supplementary capital is defined to include certain preferred stock issues, certain approved subordinated debt, certain other capital instruments, a portion of the savings institution’s allowances for loan and lease losses allowances, and up to 45% of unrealized net gains on equity securities. Total core and supplementary capital are reduced by the amount of capital instruments held by other depository institutions pursuant to reciprocal arrangements and equity investments other than those deducted from core and tangible capital. At June 30, 2012, Park View Federal had no equity investments for which federal regulations require a deduction from total capital.

The risk-based capital requirements are measured against risk-weighted assets, which equal the sum of each asset and the credit-equivalent amount of each off-balance sheet item after being multiplied by an assigned risk weight. Under the OCC risk-weighting system, one-to four-family first mortgages not more than 90 days past due with loan-to-value ratios under 80% and multi-family mortgages (or residential property consisting of five or more dwelling units) with loan-to-value ratios under 80% are assigned a risk weight of 50%. Consumer, home equity and land loans, residential and nonresidential construction loans and commercial real estate loans are assigned a risk weight of 100%. Mortgage-backed securities issued, or fully guaranteed as to principal and interest, by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac are assigned a 20% risk weight. Cash and United States government securities backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government are given a 0% risk weight. At June 30, 2012, Park View Federal’s risk-weighted assets were $595.1 million, and its total risk-based capital was $77.9 million, or 13.10%, of risk-weighted assets.

 

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The table below presents Park View’s capital position at June 30, 2012, relative to its various minimum regulatory capital requirements:

 

     At June 30, 2012  
     Amount      Percent of
Assets (1)
 
     (Dollars in thousands)  

Tangible Capital

   $ 70,387         8.74

Tangible Capital Requirement

     12,084         1.50   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Excess

     58,303         7.24
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Tier 1/Core Capital

   $ 70,387         8.74

Tier 1/Core Capital Requirement

     64,448         8.00   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Excess

     5,939         0.74
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Tier 1 Risk-Based Capital

   $ 70,387         11.83

Tier 1 Risk-Based Capital Requirement

     23,802         4.00   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Excess

     46,585         7.83
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Risk-Based Capital

   $ 77,932         13.10

Risk-Based Capital Requirement

     71,407         12.00   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Excess

     6,525         1.10
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1)

Based upon adjusted total assets for purposes of the tangible, core and Tier 1 capital requirements, and risk-weighted assets for purposes of the Tier 1 risk-based and risk-based capital requirements.

In addition to requiring generally applicable capital standards for savings institutions, the OCC has the authority to establish the minimum level of capital for a savings institution at such amount or at such ratio of capital-to-assets as is determined to be necessary or appropriate for such institution in light of the particular circumstances of the institution. The failure of any savings institution to maintain capital at or above such level as an unsafe or unsound practice and such a savings institution may be issued a directive requiring such savings institution to submit and adhere to a plan for increasing capital. On October 19, 2009, Park View Federal was directed by the OTS to raise its Tier 1 core capital and total risk-based capital ratios to 8.0% and 12.0%, respectively. As of June 30, 2012, Park View Federal continued to exceed the minimum capital ratios required under the Bank Order. As discussed in Note 21 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, the OCC has terminated the Bank Order.

The banking regulators have proposed and are considering new regulations that would increase the amount and the calculation of capital required for all financial institutions.

Regulatory Agreements

On October 19, 2009, PVF and Park View Federal, entered into the Company and Bank Orders with the OTS, whereby the Company and the Bank each consented to the issuance of the Cease and Desist Order promulgated by the OTS without admitting or denying that grounds existed for the OTS to initiate an administrative proceeding against PVF or Park View Federal. Effective July 21, 2011, the OCC and the Federal Reserve Board succeeded to all powers, authorities, rights and duties of the OTS relating to the Bank and Company Orders, respectively, as a result of the Dodd-Frank Act.

The Bank Order required Park View Federal to take several actions, including but not limited to: (i) by December 31, 2009, meet and maintain (1) a Tier 1 (core) capital ratio of at least 8.0% and (2) a total risk-based capital ratio of at least 12.0% after the funding of an adequate allowance for loan and lease losses and submit a

 

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detailed plan to accomplish this; (ii) if Park View Federal fails to meet these capital requirements at any time after December 31, 2009, within 15 days thereafter prepare a written contingency plan detailing actions to be taken, with specific time frames, providing for (a) a merger with another federally insured depository institution or holding company thereof, or (b) voluntary liquidation; (iii) adopt revisions to Park View Federal’s liquidity policy to, among other things, increase the Bank’s minimum liquidity ratio; (iv) reduce the level of adversely classified assets to no more than 50% of core capital plus allowance for loan and lease losses by December 31, 2010 and to reduce the level of adversely classified assets and assets designated as special mention to no more than 65% of core capital plus allowance for loan and lease losses by December 31, 2010; (v) submit for OCCapproval a new business plan that will include the requirements contained in the Bank Order and that also will include well supported and realistic strategies to achieve consistent profitability by September 30, 2010; (vi) restrict quarterly asset growth to an amount not to exceed net interest credited on deposit liabilities until the OCC approves of the new business plan; (vii) cease to accept, renew or roll over any brokered deposit or act as a deposit broker, without the prior written waiver of the FDIC; and (viii) not declare or pay dividends or make any other capital distributions from Park View Federal without receiving prior OCC approval. On August 27, 2012, the OCC terminated the Bank Order. The Company Order remains in effect.

The Company Order requires PVF to take several actions, including, but not limited to: (i) submit a capital plan that includes, among other things, (1) the establishment of a minimum tangible capital ratio of tangible equity capital to total tangible assets commensurate with PVF’s consolidated risk profile, and (2) specific plans to reduce the risks to the Company from its current debt levels and debt servicing requirements; (ii) not declare, make or pay any cash dividends or other capital distributions or purchase, repurchase or redeem or commit to purchase, repurchase or redeem PVF equity stock without the prior non-objection of the OTS, except that this provision does not apply to immaterial capital stock redemptions that arise in the normal course of PVF’s business in connection with its share-based compensation plans; and (iii) not incur, issue, renew, roll over or increase any debt or commit to do so without the prior non-objection of the OTS (debt includes loans, bonds, cumulative preferred stock, hybrid capital instruments such as subordinated debt or trust preferred securities, and guarantees of debt).

The Bank Order did, and the Company Order still does, also impose certain on-going reporting obligations and additional restrictions on severance and indemnification payments, changes in directors and management, employment agreements and compensation arrangements that PVF and Park View Federal may enter into, third party service contracts and transactions with affiliates.

PVF believes it is in compliance with the requirements the Company Order that are required to date. As discussed in Note 21 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, the OCC has terminated the Bank Order.

Prompt Corrective Regulatory Action

Under the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1991 (“FDICIA”), federal banking regulators are required to take prompt corrective action if an insured depository institution fails to satisfy certain minimum capital requirements. All institutions, regardless of their capital levels, are restricted from making any capital distribution or paying any management fees if the institution would thereafter fail to satisfy any of its capital requirements. An institution that fails to meet the minimum level for any relevant capital measure (an “undercapitalized institution”) is: (i) subject to increased monitoring by the appropriate federal banking regulator; (ii) required to submit an acceptable capital restoration plan within 45 days; (iii) subject to asset growth limits; and (iv) required to obtain prior regulatory approval for acquisitions, branching and new lines of businesses. The capital restoration plan must include a guarantee by the institution’s holding company that the institution will comply with the plan until it has been adequately capitalized on average for four consecutive quarters, under which the holding company would be liable up to the lesser of 5% of the institution’s total assets or the amount necessary to bring the institution into capital compliance as of the date it failed to comply with its capital restoration plan. A “significantly undercapitalized” institution, as well as any undercapitalized institution that did not submit an acceptable capital restoration plan, may be subject to regulatory demands for

 

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recapitalization, broader application of restrictions on transactions with affiliates, limitations on interest rates paid on deposits, asset growth and other activities, possible replacement of directors and officers, and restrictions on capital distributions by any bank holding company controlling the institution. Any company controlling the institution could also be required to divest the institution or the institution could be required to divest subsidiaries. The senior executive officers of a significantly undercapitalized institution may not receive bonuses or increases in compensation without prior approval and the institution is prohibited from making payments of principal or interest on its subordinated debt. In their discretion, the federal banking regulators may also impose the foregoing sanctions on an undercapitalized institution if the regulators determine that such actions are necessary to carry out the purposes of the prompt corrective action provisions. If an institution’s ratio of tangible capital to total assets falls below a “critical capital level,” the institution will be subject to conservatorship or receivership within specified time periods.

Under regulations jointly adopted by the federal banking regulators, a savings institution’s capital adequacy for purposes of the FDICIA prompt corrective action rules is determined on the basis of the institution’s total risk-based capital ratio (the ratio of its total capital to risk-weighted assets), Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio (the ratio of its core capital to risk-weighted assets) and leverage ratio (the ratio of its Tier 1 or core capital to adjusted total assets). The following table shows the capital ratio requirements for each prompt corrective action category:

 

    Well Capitalized     Adequately
Capitalized
    Undercapitalized     Significantly
Undercapitalized
 

Total risk-based capital ratio

    10.0% or more        8.0% or more        Less than 8.0     Less than 6.0%   

Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio

    6.0% or more        4.0% or more        Less than 4.0     Less than 3.0%   

Leverage ratio

    5.0% or more        4.0% or more     Less than 4.0 %*      Less than 3.0%   

 

*

3.0% if the institution has the highest examination rating.

A “critically undercapitalized” savings institution is defined as a savings institution that has a ratio of “tangible equity” to total assets of less than 2.0%. Tangible equity is defined as core capital plus cumulative preferred stock less all intangibles other than qualifying supervisory goodwill and certain servicing rights. The OCC may reclassify a well capitalized savings association as adequately capitalized and may require an adequately capitalized or undercapitalized institution to comply with the supervisory actions applicable to institutions in the next lower capital category (but may not reclassify a significantly undercapitalized institution as critically undercapitalized) if the OCC determines, after notice and an opportunity for a hearing, that the savings institution is in an unsafe or unsound condition or that the institution has received and not corrected a less-than-satisfactory rating for any examination rating category. At June 30, 2012, Park View Federal met the capital requirements to be deemed a well capitalized institution for purposes of the prompt corrective action regulations. For more information regarding the position of Park View Federal with respect to the FDICIA prompt corrective action rules, see Notes 13 and 21 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

Safety and Soundness Standards

Interagency Guidelines Establishing Standards for Safety and Soundness require savings institutions to maintain internal controls and information systems and internal audit systems that are appropriate for the size, nature and scope of the institution’s business. The guidelines also establish certain basic standards for loan documentation, credit underwriting, interest rate risk exposure, and asset growth. The guidelines further provide that savings institutions should maintain safeguards to prevent the payment of compensation, fees and benefits that are excessive or that could lead to material financial loss, and should take into account factors such as comparable compensation practices at peer institutions. If the OCC determines that a savings institution is not in compliance with the safety and soundness guidelines, it may require the institution to submit an acceptable plan to achieve compliance with the guidelines. Failure to submit or implement a compliance plan may subject the institution to regulatory sanctions. Additionally, a savings institution should maintain systems, commensurate with its size and the nature and scope of its operations, to identify problem assets and prevent deterioration in

 

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those assets as well as to evaluate and monitor earnings and ensure that earnings are sufficient to maintain adequate capital and reserves.

Federal Home Loan Bank System

Park View Federal is a member of the FHLB, which consists of 12 regional FHLBs subject to supervision and regulation by the FHFA. The FHLB provides a central credit facility primarily for member institutions. As a member of the FHLB, Park View Federal is required to acquire and hold specified amounts of capital stock in the FHLB of Cincinnati. Park View Federal was in compliance with this requirement with an investment in FHLB of Cincinnati stock at June 30, 2012 of $12.8 million. The FHLB of Cincinnati’s ability to pay dividends to its shareholders is subject to a variety of factors such as legal requirements, the Bank’s financial condition and income and economic conditions.

Long-term advances may be made only for the purpose of providing funds for residential housing finance, small business loans, small farm loans and small agri-business loans. At June 30, 2012, Park View Federal had $35 million in advances outstanding from the FHLB of Cincinnati. For more information regarding Park View Federal’s sources of funds, see the section captioned “Borrowings.

Loan and Investment Powers

Federal savings associations, such as Park View Federal, are subject to certain lending and investment restrictions imposed by the HOLA and the OCC’s implementing regulations thereunder. Under these laws and regulations, federal savings associations may invest in mortgage loans secured by residential and commercial real estate, commercial and consumer loans, certain types of debt securities and certain other assets. Federal savings associations may also establish service corporations that may engage in activities not otherwise permissible, including certain real estate equity investments and securities and insurance brokerage activities. These investment powers are subject to various limitations. At June 30, 2012, Park View Federal met all lending restrictions imposed under the HOLA.

Qualified Thrift Lender Test

Pursuant to the provisions of HOLA, savings association must meet the standard of a qualified thrift lender (“QTL”). Under the QTL test, Park View Federal is required to maintain at least 65% of its “portfolio assets” in certain “qualified thrift investments” on a monthly basis in at least nine months of the most recent twelve-month period. “Portfolio assets” means, in general, an association’s total assets less the sum of: (1) specified liquid assets up to 20% of total assets; (2) goodwill and other intangible assets; and (3) the value of property used to conduct Park View Federal’s business. “Qualified thrift investments” include various types of loans made for residential and housing purposes, investments related to such purposes, including certain mortgage-backed and related securities and consumer loans. If a savings association fails the QTL test, it must operate under certain restrictions on its activities. The Dodd-Frank Act made non-compliance potentially subject to agency enforcement action for violation of law. At June 30, 2012, Park View Federal qualified as a QTL. Additionally, Park View Federal had also met the QTL test in each of the prior 12 months.

Uniform Lending Standards

Under current federal banking regulations, savings institutions must adopt and maintain written policies that establish appropriate limits and standards for extensions of credit that are secured by liens or interests in real estate or are made for the purpose of financing permanent improvements to real estate. These policies must establish loan portfolio diversification standards, prudent underwriting standards including loan-to-value limits that are clear and measurable, loan administration procedures and documentation, approval and reporting requirements. Park View Federal believes that its current lending policies conform to these guidelines.

 

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Insurance of Deposit Accounts

The deposits of Park View Federal are insured to the maximum extent permitted by the DIF and are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. Under the FDIC’s risk-based assessment system, insured institutions are assigned to one of four risk categories based on supervisory evaluations, regulatory capital levels, and certain other factors, with less risky institutions paying lower assessments. An institution’s assessment rate depends upon the category to which it is assigned.

In order to cover losses to the DIF, the FDIC imposed on all insured institutions a special emergency assessment of five basis points of total assets minus Tier 1 capital, as of June 30, 2009 (capped at ten basis points of an institution’s deposit assessment base). The amount of Park View Federal’s special assessment, which was paid on September 30, 2009, was $430,387. The FDIC provided for similar assessments during the final two quarters of 2009, if deemed necessary. However, in lieu of further special assessments, the FDIC required insured institutions to prepay estimated quarterly risk-based assessments for the fourth quarter of 2009 through the fourth quarter of 2012. Nevertheless, pursuant to discretionary authority granted to the FDIC, the FDIC determined to exempt Park View Federal from having to prepay its quarterly risk-based assessment for the fourth quarter of 2009, and all of 2010, 2011 and 2012.

The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (“EESA”) instituted two temporary programs effective through December 31, 2009 to further insure customer deposits at FDIC-member banks: deposit accounts were insured up to $250,000 per customer (up from $100,000) and noninterest-bearing transactional accounts were fully insured (unlimited coverage). The Dodd-Frank Act made permanent the $250,000 per customer insurance limit for deposit accounts, and in November 2010, the FDIC issued a final rule under the Dodd-Frank Act that continued temporary unlimited coverage for noninterest-bearing transaction accounts. The separate coverage for noninterest-bearing transaction accounts became effective on December 31, 2010 and terminates on December 31, 2012.

All FDIC-insured depository institutions must pay an additional quarterly assessment, based on deposit levels, to provide funds for the payment of interest on bonds issued by the Financing Corporation (“FICO”), a federal corporation chartered under the authority of the Federal Housing Finance Board. The FICO bonds were issued to capitalize the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation. The FICO assessments are adjusted quarterly to reflect changes in the assessment bases of the FDIC’s insurance funds and do not vary regardless of a depository institution’s capitalization or supervisory evaluations.

The FDIC has authority to increase insurance assessments. A significant increase in insurance premiums would likely have an adverse effect on the operating expenses and results of operations of the Company. Management cannot predict what insurance assessment rates will be in the future. As insurer, the FDIC is authorized to conduct examinations of, and to require reporting by, insured institutions. It also may prohibit any insured institution from engaging in any activity determined by regulation or order to pose a serious threat to the FDIC. In addition, the FDIC has the authority to initiate enforcement actions against savings institutions, after giving the OTS an opportunity to take such action.

Dividend Limitations

Under applicable federal regulations, Park View Federal may not pay dividends on its capital stock if its regulatory capital would thereby be reduced below the amount then required for the liquidation account established for the benefit of certain depositors of the Bank at the time of Park View Federal’s conversion from mutual to stock form.

Federal regulations require that savings institutions submit notice to the OCC prior to making a capital distribution (which includes dividends, share repurchases and amounts paid to shareholders of another institution in a cash merger) ifthe institution is a subsidiary of a holding company. A savings institution must make

 

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application to the OCC to pay a capital distribution if: (1) the institution would not be adequately capitalized following the distribution; (2) the institution’s total distributions for the calendar year exceed the institution’s net income for the calendar year to date plus its net income (less distributions) for the preceding two years; or (3) the distribution would otherwise violate applicable law or regulation or an agreement with or conditions imposed by the OTS and/or OCC. As a subsidiary of a savings and loan holding company, Park View Federal must, at a minimum, provide prior notice to the OCC of capital distributions. The OCC may disapprove or deny a capital distribution if in the view of the OTS, the capital distribution would constitute an unsafe or unsound practice.

In addition to the foregoing, earnings of Park View Federal appropriated to bad debt reserves and deducted for federal income tax purposes are not available for payment of cash dividends without payment of taxes at the then current tax rate by the Bank on the amount of earnings removed from the reserves for such distributions. For additional information regarding federal income taxes, see the “Taxation.” Park View Federal intends to make full use of this favorable tax treatment and does not contemplate using any earnings of the Bank in a manner which would limit Park View Federal’s bad debt deduction or create Federal tax liabilities.

PVF is currently prohibited from paying dividends under the terms of the Company Order. For additional information, see the section captioned “Regulatory Capital Requirements.”

Federal Reserve System

Federal Reserve Board regulations require federally chartered savings associations to maintain non-interest-earning cash reserves against their transaction accounts (primarily NOW and demand deposit accounts). At June 30, 2012, Park View Federal met its reserve requirements. Since required reserves must be maintained in the form of either vault cash, an account at a Federal Reserve Bank or a pass-through account as defined by the Federal Reserve Board, the effect of this reserve requirement is to reduce Park View Federal’s interestincome.

Interstate Branching

Federal law permits federal savings institutions to branch in any state or states of the U.S. and its territories, subject to certain exceptions. Except in supervisory cases or when interstate branching is otherwise permitted by state law or other statutory provision, an institution may not establish an out-of-state branch unless: (i) the institution qualifies as a “domestic building and loan association” under §7701(a)(19) of the Code or meets the QTL test and the total assets attributable to all branches of the association in the state would qualify such branches taken as a whole for treatment as a domestic building and loan association or as a QTL; and (ii) such branch would not result in (1) formation of a prohibited multi-state multiple savings and loan holding company, or (2) a violation of certain statutory restrictions on branching by savings institution subsidiaries of bank holding companies. Federal savings institutions generally may not establish new branches unless the institution meets or exceeds minimum regulatory capital requirements. The OCC will also consider the institution’s record of compliance with the Community Reinvestment Act in connection with any branch application.

Loans to One Borrower Limitations

Under federal law, loans and extensions of credit, to anyone may generally not exceed 15% of the unimpaired capital and surplus of the savings institution. Loans and extensions of credit fully secured by certain readily marketable collateral may represent an additional 10% of unimpaired capital and surplus. At June 30, 2012, Park View Federal’s lending limit under this restriction is $12.9 million.

Enforcement

Effective July 21, 2011, the OCC assumed primary enforcement responsibility over federal savings institutions. In this regard, the OCC has the authority to bring actions against the institution and all institution-affiliated parties, including shareholders, and any attorneys, appraisers and accountants, who knowingly or recklessly participate in wrongful action likely to have an adverse effect on an insured institution. Formal enforcement action may range from the issuance of a capital directive or cease and desist order to removal of

 

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officers and/or directors to institution of receivership, conservatorship or termination of deposit insurance. Civil penalties cover a wide range of violations and can amount to $25,000 per day, or even $1 million per day in especially egregious cases. The FDIC has the authority to recommend to the OCC that enforcement action to be taken with respect to a particular savings institution. If action is not taken by the Director, the FDIC has authority to take such action under certain circumstances. Federal law also establishes criminal penalties for certain violations.

Transactions with Affiliates

Transactions between savings institutions and any affiliate are governed by Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act. An affiliate of a savings institution is any company or entity which controls, is controlled by or is under common control with the savings institution. In a holding company context, the parent holding company of a savings institution (such as PVF) and any companies which are controlled by such parent holding company are affiliates of the savings institution. Generally, Sections 23A and 23B: (i) limit the extent to which the savings institution or its subsidiaries may engage in “covered transactions” with any one affiliate to an amount equal to 10% of such institution’s capital stock and surplus, and contain an aggregate limit on all such transactions with all affiliates to an amount equal to 20% of such capital stock and surplus; (ii) specify certain collateral requirements for particular transactions with affiliates; and (iii) require that all such transactions be on terms substantially the same, or at least as favorable, to the institution or subsidiary as those provided to an unaffiliated customer. The term “covered transaction” includes the making of loans, purchase of assets, issuance of a guarantee and similar other types of transactions. In addition to the restrictions imposed by Sections 23A and 23B, no savings institution may: (i) loan or otherwise extend credit to an affiliate, except for any affiliate which engages only in activities which are permissible for bank holding companies; or (ii) purchase or invest in any stocks, bonds, debentures, notes or similar obligations of any affiliate, except for affiliates which are subsidiaries of the savings institution. Park View Federal is also prohibited from extending credit to or offering any other services, or fixing or varying the consideration for such extension of credit or service, on condition that the customer obtain some additional services from the institution or certain of its affiliates or not obtain services of a competitor of the institution, subject to certain exceptions.

Savings institutions are also subject to the restrictions contained in Section 22(h) and Section 22(g) of the Federal Reserve Act on loans to executive officers, directors and principal shareholders. Under Section 22(h), loans to a director, executive officer or to a greater than 10% shareholder of a savings institution, and certain affiliated entities of the foregoing, may not exceed, together with all other outstanding loans to such person and affiliated entities the institution’s loan to one borrower limit (generally equal to 15% of the institution’s unimpaired capital and surplus and an additional 10% of such capital and surplus for loans fully secured by certain readily marketable collateral). Section 22(h) also prohibits loans, above specified amounts to directors, executive officers and greater than 10% shareholders of a savings institution, and their respective affiliates, unless such loan is approved in advance by a majority of the board of directors of the institution with any “interested” director not participating in the voting. The specified amounts are the greater of $25,000 or 5% of capital and surplus (and any loan or loans aggregating to $500,000 or more). Further, loans to directors, executive officers and principal shareholders must be made on terms substantially the same as offered in comparable transactions to other persons. There is an exception to that requirement where such loans are made pursuant to a benefit or compensation program that is widely available to employees of the institution and the program does not give preference to directors or executive officers over other employees.

Section 22(g) of the Federal Reserve Act and Regulation O promulgated by the Federal Reserve Board requires that loans to executive officers of depository institutions not be made on terms more favorable than those afforded to other borrowers, requires approval for such extensions of credit by the board of directors of the institution, and imposes reporting requirements for and additional restrictions on the type, amount and terms of credits to such officers. Extensions of credit to executive officers, directors, and greater than 10% shareholders of a depository institution by any other institution which has a correspondent banking relationship with the institution are prohibited, unless such extension of credit is on substantially the same terms as those prevailing at

 

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the time for comparable transactions with other persons and does not involve more than the normal risk of repayment or present other unfavorable features.

Regulation of PVF

General

PVF is a savings and loan holding company as defined by HOLA. Effective July 21, 2011, the Dodd-Frank Act regulatory restructuring transferred to the Federal Reserve Board the responsibility for regulating and supervising savings and loan holding companies, such as PVF. As a subsidiary of a savings and loan holding company, Park View Federal is subject to certain restrictions in its dealings with PVF and affiliates thereof.

Capital

Savings and loan holding companies are not currently subject to specific regulatory capital requirements. The Dodd-Frank Act, however, requires the Federal Reserve Board to promulgate consolidated capital requirements for depository institution holding companies that are no less stringent, both quantitatively and in terms of components of capital, than those applicable to institutions themselves. There is a five-year transition period from the July 21, 2010 (the date of enactment of the Dodd-Frank Act) before the capital requirements will apply to savings and loan holding companies.

Source of Strength

The Dodd-Frank Act also extends the “source of strength” doctrine to savings and loan holding companies. The regulatory agencies must promulgate regulations implementing the “source of strength” policy that holding companies act as a source of strength to their subsidiary depository institutions by providing capital, liquidity and other support in times of financial stress.

Activities Restrictions

The Board of Directors of PVF presently intends to operate the Company as a unitary savings and loan holding company. Since PVF became a unitary savings and loan holding company before May 4, 1999, there are generally no restrictions on the activities of the Company; however, this broad latitude to engage in activities can be restricted if the Federal Reserve Board determines an activity constitutes a serious risk to the financial safety, soundness or stability of its subsidiary savings association or if the association fails to qualify as a QTL. The Federal Reserve Board may impose restrictions it deems necessary to address such risk, including limiting (i) payment of dividends by the savings association; (ii) transactions between the savings association and its affiliates; and (iii) any activities of the savings association that might create a serious risk that the liabilities of the holding company and its affiliates may be imposed on the savings association.

If PVF were to acquire control of another savings institution to be held as a separate subsidiary, the Company would become a multiple savings and loan holding company. Except where such acquisition is pursuant to the authority to approve emergency thrift acquisitions and each subsidiary savings institution meets the QTL test, the activities of PVF and any of its subsidiaries (other than Park View Federal or other subsidiary savings institutions) would thereafter be subject to further restrictions.

Restrictions on Acquisitions

According to federal law, savings and loan holding companies are generally prohibited from acquiring, without prior approval: (i) control of any other savings institution or savings and loan holding company or substantially all the assets thereof: or (ii) more than 5% of the voting shares of a savings institution or holding company thereof which is not a subsidiary. Except with the prior approval of the Federal Reserve Board, no director or officer of a savings and loan holding company or person owning or controlling by proxy or otherwise

 

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more than 25% of such company’s stock, may also acquire control of any savings institution, other than a subsidiary savings institution, or of any other savings and loan holding company.

Acquisition of the Company

Under the Federal Change in Bank Control Act (“CIBCA”), a notice must be submitted to the Federal Reserve Board if any person (including a company), or group acting in concert, seeks to acquire control of a savings and loan holding company or savings institution. Under certain circumstances, a change of control may occur, and prior notice is required, upon the acquisition of 10% or more of the outstanding voting stock of the company or institution, unless the Federal Reserve Board has found that the acquisition will not result in a change of control of PVF. Under the CIBCA, the Federal Reserve Board has 60 days from the filing of a complete notice to act, taking into consideration certain factors, including the financial and managerial resources of the acquirer and the anti-trust effects of the acquisition. Any company that acquires control would then be subject to regulation as a savings and loan holding company.

Taxation

General

PVF and its subsidiaries currently file a consolidated federal income tax return based on a fiscal year ending June 30. Consolidated returns have the effect of eliminating intercompany distributions, including dividends, from the computation of consolidated taxable income for the taxable year in which the distributions occur.

Federal Income Taxation

PVF and Park View Federal are both subject to the federal tax laws and regulations which apply to corporations generally. In addition to the regular income tax, PVF and Park View Federal may be subject to an alternative minimum tax. The alternative minimum tax is imposed to the extent it exceeds the corporation’s regular income tax. Payments of alternative minimum tax may be used as credits against regular tax liabilities in future years.

Savings institutions are subject to the provisions of the Code in the same general manner as other corporations. Prior to legislation in 1996, institutions such as Park View Federal, which met certain definitional tests and other conditions prescribed by the Code, benefitted from certain favorable provisions regarding their deductions from taxable income for annual additions to their bad debt reserve. Legislation that is effective for tax years beginning after December 31, 1995 repealed the reserve method available to thrifts and required institutions to recapture into taxable income over a six taxable year period the portion of the tax loan loss reserve that exceeds the pre-1988 tax loan loss reserve. Park View Federal had no such excess reserve. Park View Federal is no longer allowed to use the percentage of taxable income method for tax loan loss provisions, but is allowed to use the experience method of accounting for bad debts as long as it is not considered a large thrift. Beginning with its June 30, 1997 taxable year, Park View Federal was treated the same as a small commercial bank. Institutions with less than $500 million in assets were still permitted to make deductible bad debt additions to reserves, using the experience method. Beginning with the June 30, 2000 taxable year, Park View Federal began being taxed as a large thrift and is only able to take a tax deduction when a loan is actually charged off.

Earnings appropriated to Park View Federal’s bad debt reserve and claimed as a tax deduction are not available for the payment of cash dividends or for distribution to shareholders (including distributions made on dissolution or liquidation), unless the Bank includes the amount in taxable income, along with the amount deemed necessary to pay the resulting federal income tax.

Park View Federal’s federal income tax returns through June 30, 2009 were audited by the Internal Revenue Service. Subsequent fiscal years remain open to audit.

 

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For further information regarding federal income taxes, see Note 10 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

State Income Taxation

Park View Federal is subject to Ohio franchise tax based on its equity capital plus certain reserve amounts. Total equity capital for this purpose is reduced by certain exempted assets. The resulting net taxable value of capital is taxed at a rate of 1.3%. PVF generally elects to be taxed as a qualifying holding company and pay Ohio tax based on its net income only. The other subsidiaries of PVF are taxed on the greater of a tax based on net income or net worth.

Executive Officers of the Registrant

The following sets forth information with respect to the executive officers of PVF.

 

Name

   Age as of
September 24, 2012
  

Title

Robert J. King, Jr.

   57   

President and Chief Executive Officer of PVF and Park View Federal

James H. Nicholson

   50   

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of PVF and Park View Federal

Jeffrey N. Male

   63   

Vice President and Secretary of PVF and Executive Vice President and Chief Residential Lending Officer of Park View Federal

Jane Grebenc

   53   

Executive Vice President of Retail Banking of Park View Federal (1)

Lonnie L. Shiffert

   54   

Executive Vice President of Corporate Banking of Park View Federal

Mary Ann Stropkay

   40   

Senior Vice President and Chief Credit Officer of Park View Federal

 

(1)

Mrs. Grebenc has announced her resignation from the Company effective September 28, 2012.

Robert J. King, Jr.

Mr. King was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer of PVF and Park View Federal in July, 2009 and began service on September 10, 2009. Mr. King succeeded Marty E. Adams, who served as interim chief executive of PVF and Park View Federal from March 4, 2009 to September 9, 2009. Prior to joining PVF, Mr. King was senior managing director of FSI Group, LLC, a private equity operation focused on investing in the financial sector. Prior to that, Mr. King held numerous positions with Fifth Third Bank, which he joined in 1975. During his tenure with the Cincinnati-based company, he served in various positions, including vice president of Institutional Asset Administration, director of marketing, commercial lending officer, customer service manager and marketing research specialist. In 1989, he joined Fifth Third Bank (Northeastern Ohio) as an executive vice president and was promoted to president and chief executive officer the following year. In 1997, Fifth Third’s Board of Directors appointed King Chairman of Fifth Third Bank (Northeastern Ohio), a position he held until his retirement in 2004. He also was an executive vice president of Fifth Third Bancorp and regional president of Fifth Third affiliates in Toledo, Dayton, Columbus and southern Ohio. Mr. King currently serves on the boards of directors of United Way Services, the Cleveland Orchestra, the Diversity Center, Ursuline College, Cleveland Development Partners, Musical Arts Association and Cleveland Area Boy Scouts. Mr. King is a director of The Andersons, Inc. and Shiloh Industries, Inc., companies with a class of securities registered under Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act.

 

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James H. Nicholson

In November 2009, James H. Nicholson was appointed Chief Financial Officer of PVF and Park View Federal. From 2006 to 2009, Mr. Nicholson served Huntington Bank in several capacities, including regional chief operating officer (Akron/Canton Region) and regional president and chief operating officer (Eastern Ohio Region). Mr. Nicholson previously served as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Unizan Financial Corp. and President and Chief Executive Officer and director of Unizan Bank, National Association from 2002 until Huntington Bancshares, Inc.’s acquisition of Unizan Financial in 2006. Previously, Mr. Nicholson’s served BancFirst Ohio Corp. and The First National Bank of Zanesville as Controller from 1990 to 1994, Chief Financial Officer until 1996, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer until 1997, and President and Chief Executive Officer and a director of the bank until the merger with Unizan Financial (formerly UNB Corp.) in 2002. Mr. Nicholson became a director of BancFirst Ohio Corp. in 2000, and was also serving as its Executive Vice President and Corporate Secretary at the time of the 2002 merger.

Jeffrey N. Male

Mr. Male has been with Park View Federal since 1973. He has served in various capacities, including supervisor of the construction loan department, personnel director and manager of the collection, foreclosure and REO departments. Mr. Male was named Executive Vice President of Park View Federal in 2000. In 1986 Mr. Male was named Senior Vice President in charge of residential lending operations. He was named Vice President and Secretary of PVF upon its organization in 1994 and continues to serve in that position.

Jane Grebenc

In October 2009, Ms. Grebenc was appointed as Executive Vice President, Retail Banking. Previously, Ms. Grebenc served as Executive Vice President, Wealth Segment and Senior Executive, Private Bank at KeyBank National Association from 2008 to 2009. Ms. Grebenc previously served National City Corporation from 1982 to 2007 in several capacities, including Executive Vice President, Private Client Group (2006 to 2007), Executive Vice President, Loan Operations (2003 to 2006), Executive Vice President, Branch Network (1999 to 2003) and Executive Vice President, Retail Banking Group (1995 to 1998). Mrs. Grebenc has announced her resignation from the Company effective September 28, 2012.

Lonnie L. Shiffert

In November 2009, Mr. Shiffert was appointed as Chief Commercial Lending Officer. Previously, Mr. Shiffert served in several senior level commercial real estate positions with institutions in the Cleveland area, including with the Citizens Banking Company as Senior Vice President and Manager, Commercial Real Estate Department (2007 to 2009), Sky Bank as Senior Vice President and Manager, Commercial Real Estate Department (2006 to 2007), Fifth Third Bank as Senior Vice President and Manager, Commercial Real Estate Department (2004 to 2006), and Provident Bank as Senior Vice President and Manager, Commercial Real Estate Department (1998 to 2004).

Mary Ann Stropkay

In August 2010, Ms. Stropkay was appointed Senior Vice President and Chief Credit Officer. Previously, Ms. Stropkay served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Shore Bank Enterprise Cleveland, a 501(c)3 Community Development Finance Institution from 2007 to 2010. Ms. Stropkay served as a Senior Vice President in wealth management at FirstMerit Bank from 2005 to 2007. Prior to that, Ms. Stropkay served in a variety of capacities at National City Corporation from 1993 to 2005.

 

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Item 1A. Risk Factors

Our business could be impacted by any of the risks noted below, although such risks are not the only risks that we face. Additional risks that are not presently known or that we presently deem to be immaterial could also have a material, adverse impact on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Risks Relating to Economic and Market Conditions

Difficult market conditions and economic trends have adversely affected our industry and our business.

Beginning in the latter half of 2007, the U.S. and global financial markets experienced severe disruption and volatility, with business activity across a wide range of industries and regions greatly reduced. Although economic conditions have begun to show improvement in recent months, certain sectors of the U.S. economy, such as real estate, remain weak and unemployment rates, specifically in Ohio, remain high. Local governments and many businesses still face serious difficulties due to lower consumer spending and the lack of liquidity in the credit markets.

Market conditions encountered under the current economic cycle have also led to the failure and merger of a number of financial institutions. These failures, as well as projected future failures, have had a significant negative impact on the capitalization levels and of the DIF, which has led to a significant increase in deposit insurance premiums paid by financial institutions and pervasive regulatory modifications.

Our success depends, to a certain extent, upon economic and political conditions, local and national, as well as governmental monetary policies. Conditions such as inflation, recession, unemployment, changes in interest rates, money supply and other factors beyond our control may adversely affect our asset quality, deposit levels and loan demand and, therefore, our earnings and our capital. Because we have a significant amount of real estate loans, additional decreases in the value of real estate collateral securing the payment of such loans may result in significant credit losses, which could result in increased delinquencies, foreclosures and customer bankruptcies, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our operating results. Adverse changes in the economy may also have a negative effect on the ability of our borrowers, including those involving commercial real estate, to make timely repayments of their loans, which would have an adverse impact on our earnings and cash flows. Overall, while economic and market conditions have improved in the U.S. and in our primary geographic market, there can be no assurance that this improvement will continue.

Certain interest rate movements may hurt earnings and asset value.

Our results of operations depend substantially on our net interest income, which is the difference between the interest earned on loans, securities and other interest-earning assets and the interest paid on deposits and other borrowings. These rates are highly sensitive to many factors beyond our control, including general economic conditions, inflation, recession, unemployment, the money supply, and the policies of various governmental and regulatory authorities. While we have taken measures intended to manage the risks of operating in a changing interest rate environment, there can be no assurance that these measures will be effective in avoiding undue interest rate risk.

Increases in interest rates can affect the value of loans and other assets, including our ability to realize gains on the sale of assets. We originate loans for sale and for our portfolio. Increasing interest rates may reduce the origination of loans for sale and consequently the fee income we earn on such sales. Further, increasing interest rates may adversely affect the ability of borrowers to pay the principal or interest on loans and leases, resulting in an increase in nonperforming assets and a reduction of income recognized.

In contrast, decreasing interest rates have the effect of causing clients to refinance mortgage loans faster than anticipated. This causes the value of assets related to the servicing rights on loans sold to be lower than originally anticipated. If this happens, we may need to write down our servicing assets faster, which would accelerate our expense and lower our earnings.

 

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Changes in interest rates also affect the value of Park View Federal’s interest-earning assets and, in particular, the Bank’s securities portfolio. Generally, the value of fixed-rate securities fluctuates inversely with changes in interest rates. Unrealized gains and losses on securities available for sale are reported as a separate component of equity, net of tax. Decreases in the fair value of securities available for sale resulting from increases in interest rates could have an adverse effect on shareholders’ equity.

Our financial condition and results of operations are dependent on the economy in our market area.

Our market area consists of Portage, Lake, Geauga, Cuyahoga, Summit, Medina and Lorain Counties in Ohio. As of June 30, 2012, management estimates that more than 90% of our deposits and the majority of loans came from our market area. Because of our concentration of business activities in our market area, our financial condition and results of operations depend upon economic conditions in our market area. Adverse economic conditions in our market area could reduce our growth rate, affect the ability of our customers to repay their loans and generally affect our financial condition and results of operations. Conditions such as inflation, recession, unemployment, high interest rates, short money supply, scarce natural resources, international disorders, terrorism and other factors beyond our control may adversely affect our profitability. We are less able than larger institutions to spread the risks of unfavorable local economic conditions across a large number of diversified economies. Any sustained period of increased payment delinquencies, foreclosures or losses caused by adverse market or economic conditions in our market area could adversely affect the value of our assets, revenues, results of operations and financial condition. Moreover, we cannot give any assurance we will benefit from any market growth or favorable economic conditions in our primary market areas when and if they do occur.

Risks Related to Our Business

We have an elevated level of non-performing loans and classified assets relative to our total assets. If our allowance for loan losses is not sufficient to cover our actual loan losses, our ability to become profitable will be adversely affected.

At June 30, 2012, our non-performing loans totaled $20.1 million, representing 3.6% of total loans and 2.5% of total assets. In addition, loans which management has classified as either substandard, doubtful or loss totaled $33.9 million, which includes the non-performing loans previously mentioned, representing 6.1% of total loans and 4.3% of total assets. At June 30, 2012, our allowance for loan losses was $16.1 million, representing 80.1% of non-performing loans. In the event our loan customers do not repay their loans according to their terms and the collateral securing the payment of these loans is insufficient to pay any remaining loan balance, we may experience significant loan losses, which could have a material adverse effect on our operating results. We make various assumptions and judgments about the collectibility of our loan portfolio, including the creditworthiness of our borrowers and the value of the real estate and other assets serving as collateral for the repayment of many of our loans. In determining the amount of the allowance for loan losses, we review our loans and our loss and delinquency experience, and we evaluate economic conditions. If our assumptions are incorrect, our allowance for loan losses may not be sufficient to cover probable losses in our loan portfolio, resulting in additions to our allowance. The additions to our allowance for loan losses would be made through increased provision for loan losses, which would reduce our income.

In addition, the OCC periodically reviews our allowance for loan losses and may require us to increase our provision for loan losses or recognize further loan charge-offs. Any significant increase in our allowance for loan losses or loan charge-offs as required by the OCC would have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

Strong competition within Park View Federal’s market area could hurt profits and slow growth.

Park View Federal faces intense competition both in making loans and attracting deposits. This competition has made it more difficult for Park View Federal to make new loans and at times has forced the Bank to offer higher deposit rates. Price competition for loans and deposits might result in Park View Federal earning less on

 

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loans and paying more on deposits, which would reduce net interest income. Competition also makes it more difficult to increase loans and deposits. Competition also makes it more difficult to hire and retain experienced employees. Some of the institutions with which Park View Federal competes have substantially greater resources and lending limits than the Bank has and may offer services that Park View Federal does not provide. Management expects competition to increase in the future as a result of legislative, regulatory and technological changes and the continuing trend of consolidation in the financial services industry. Park View Federal’s profitability depends upon its continued ability to compete successfully in its market area.

Our past emphasis on construction and commercial real estate lending and land loans may expose us to increased lending risks.

At June 30, 2012, we had $204.0 million in loans secured by commercial real estate, $15.2 million in real estate construction loans, which included $2.1 million in residential construction loans, $5.4 million in loans for the construction of multi-family properties and $7.7 million for the construction of commercial properties and $31.2 million in loans secured by land. Commercial real estate loans, construction loans and land loans represented 37.7%, 2.8% and 5.8%, respectively, of our loan portfolio. While commercial real estate, construction and land loans are generally more interest rate sensitive and carry higher yields than do residential mortgage loans, these types of loans generally expose a lender to greater risk of non-payment and loss than single-family residential mortgage loans because repayment of the loans often depends on the successful operation of the property, the income stream of the borrowers and, for construction loans, the accuracy of the estimate of the property’s value at completion of construction and the estimated cost of construction. Such loans typica

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