XNAS:SEAC SeaChange International, Inc. Annual Report 10-K Filing - 1/31/2012

Effective Date 1/31/2012

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SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 


 

FORM 10-K

 


 

x   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
     
For the fiscal year ended January 31, 2012
     
o   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

Commission File Number: 0-21393

 


 

SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 


 

Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction
of incorporation or organization)
04-3197974
(IRS Employer
Identification No.)

 

50 Nagog Park, Acton, MA 01720

(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)

 

(978)-897-0100

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities Registered Pursuant To Section 12(b) Of The Act:

 

Common Stock, $.01 par value

 

Securities Registered Pursuant To Section 12(g) Of The Act:

 

None

 


 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o No x

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o No x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes   x    No   o

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or in any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer o Accelerated filer x
   
Non-accelerated filer o Smaller reporting company o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No x

 

As of July 29, 2011, the aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, based upon the closing price for the registrant’s Common Stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market on such date was $300,598,856. The number of shares of the registrant’s Common Stock outstanding as of the close of business on March 29, 2012 was 32,756,219.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE:

 

Portions of the definitive Proxy Statement (which is expected to be filed within 120 days after the Company’s fiscal year end) relating to the registrant’s Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on or about July 18, 2012 to be filed pursuant to Regulation 14A are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 
 

 

PART I

 

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT FOR PURPOSES OF THE "SAFE HARBOR" PROVISIONS OF THE PRIVATE SECURITIES LITIGATION REFORM ACT OF 1995

 

The statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K of SeaChange International, Inc. ("SeaChange," the "Company," "us," or "we"), including, but not limited to the statements contained in Item 1, "Business," and Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of the Financial Condition and Results of Operations, along with statements contained in other reports that we have filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the SEC), external documents and oral presentations, which are not historical facts are considered to be "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Act of 1934, as amended. These statements which may be expressed in a variety of ways, including the use of forward looking terminology such as "believe," "expect," "seek," "intend," "may," "will," "should," "could," "potential," "continue," "estimate," "plan," or "anticipate," or the negatives thereof, other variations thereon or compatible terminology, relate to, among other things, our transition to being a company that primarily provides software solutions, the effect of certain legal claims against us, projected changes in our revenues, earnings and expenses, exchange rate sensitivity, interest rate sensitivity, liquidity, product introductions, industry changes and general market conditions. We do not undertake any obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements.

 

These forward-looking statements, and any forward looking statements contained in other public disclosures of the Company which make reference to the cautionary factors contained in this Form 10-K, are based on assumptions that involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change based on the considerations described below. We discuss many of these risks and uncertainties in greater detail in Item 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K under the heading "Risk Factors." These and other risks and uncertainties may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to differ materially from anticipated future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements.

 

The following discussion should be read in conjunctions with our "Management Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations," and our financial statements and footnotes contained in this Annual Report.

 

ITEM 1. Business

 

SeaChange International, Inc., a Delaware corporation founded on July 9, 1993, is an industry leader in the delivery of multi-screen video. Our products and services facilitate the aggregation, licensing, management and distribution of video, television programming and advertising content. We sell our products and services worldwide primarily to cable system operators, including Cablevision Systems, Comcast Cable Communications Management, LLC, Cox Communications, Inc, Virgin Media, Limited, and Rogers Communications, Inc; and telecommunications companies, including AT&T Services, Inc, Telekom Austria Group, Turk Telekom and Verizon Communications, Inc.

 

Our products and services are designed to enable our customers to reduce capital expenditures and operating expenses, reduce subscriber turnover and access new revenue generating opportunities from subscribers, advertisers and electronic commerce initiatives. Using our products and services, we believe our customers can increase their revenues by offering additional services such as on-demand television programming on a variety of devices, including cellular telephones, personal computers (PCs) and tablets. This capability allows the operator to offer programming incorporating the ability for subscribers to pause, rewind and fast-forward on-demand content. Our products also allow our customers to insert advertising into broadcast and on-demand programming. Our advertising products allow our customers to target advertising to specific subscribers in a particular geographic and/or demographic market. In addition, our systems enable broadband system operators to offer other interactive television services that allow subscribers to customize and/or dynamically interact with their television, enhancing their viewing experience.

 

The primary thrust of our business has been to enable the delivery of video assets in the evolving “on-demand” television environment. Through acquisitions and partnerships we have expanded our capabilities, products and services to address the needs of video content owners, broadcasters, and content aggregators, and to address the delivery of content to devices other than the television, such as mobile phones, tablets and PCs. Traditionally, our products and services included hardware and software for content management and delivery systems, middleware that drives set top box applications, advertising systems that help pay for content and services that involve the acquisition and distribution of video content. As the industry is evolving, we are evaluating our non-core assets and focusing on higher margin, recurring revenue generating software products. We believe that our strategy of expanding into adjacent product lines will position us to further support and maintain our existing customer base. By providing our customers more technologically advanced software platforms, they can further reduce their infrastructure costs and improve reliability. Additionally we are positioned to take advantage of new customers entering the on-demand marketplace allowing us to serve adjacent markets, such as telecommunications.

 

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Our core technologies provide a foundation for products and services that can be deployed in next generation video delivery systems capable of increased levels of subscriber interactivity. We have received several awards for technological excellence, including Emmy Awards for our patented MediaCluster ® technology and for our role in the growth of video-on-demand.

 

Fiscal 2012 was a transition year for us. During fiscal 2012, we were engaged in an evaluation of strategic alternatives regarding the future direction of the Company and as announced last quarter, the Board of Directors decided that it is in the best interest of shareholders to continue as a standalone publicly traded company. In addition, during our fourth quarter of fiscal 2012, we announced a restructuring plan that will reduce our operating costs in excess of $5.0 million in annualized cost savings that will be realized in fiscal 2013. We also experienced leadership changes at the senior management level, but we have made swift replacements with the addition of a new Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer and the elimination of the position of President of the company. In fiscal year 2013, the Company will continue to focus on significantly improving and streamlining its operations while continuing to transform into a pure play software company, which we use to mean a company primarily focused on software solutions. We are also continuing to evaluate alternatives for certain non-core businesses. On March 21, 2012, we signed a definitive asset sale agreement to divest certain portions of our broadcast server and storage business, while retaining video streaming and related hardware. This transaction is expected to close in the near future once customary regulatory approvals are received. Accordingly, our broadcast server and storage business unit is reflected in our financial statements as a discontinued operation. This divesture will allow us to focus on our core software and services operations including, our next generation back office, home gateway software and advertising solutions.

 

With the divestiture of a portion of our broadcast servers and storage business, our operations are now realigned into two business segments, the software segment and the media services segment. The software segment includes product revenues from our Back Office including video streamers, Home Gateway and Advertising products as well as related services such as professional services, installation, training, project management, product maintenance, and technical support. Our media services segment is comprised of the operations of On-Demand Group (ODG) whose activities include content acquisition and preparation services for television and wireless service providers. Financial information about our business segments is included in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

Software

 

Our Software business segment is comprised of three distinct product groups: back office products including video streamers, advertising products and in-home gateway products. Our revenue sources from the Software segment consists of:

 

product revenues from our advertising, back-office including video streamers, and home gateway product solutions, related services such as professional services, installation, training, project management, product maintenance, technical support and software development for those software products.

 

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Back-Office Products:

 

In 2006, we began selling our SeaChange Axiom® on-demand back office software independent of our hardware while offering subscription services in an effort to increase market share and generate a more predictable recurring revenue stream. Additionally, by porting our software to other third party hardware platforms, we increased our market share with opportunities at competitive vendors’ installations. In 2008, we saw the need to move video to mobile devices, such as cellular telephones, PCs and tablets, and purchased Mobix Interactive Limited, a United Kingdom based company that had developed software and services allowing mobile service operators to offer video products. To further enhance our back office product offerings, in September 2009, we acquired a private software company, eventIS Group B.V. (“eventIS”), in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, who was a leading provider of video-on-demand back office software products supporting operators primarily in Europe. Their software complemented and extended the capabilities of our video-on-demand software products.

 

The integration of the software from eventIS and Mobix with our legacy Axiom product has become the basis for our next generation back office software platform, Adrenalin. Adrenalin is backward compatible with Axiom and is modular, allowing our installed base to gradually adopt new functionality and features to support multi-screen video distribution. The purpose of back office software is to allow operators to centralize video distribution systems thereby reducing dependence on hardware and ultimately controlling operating expenses. The software automates and streamlines functionality in four crucial areas:

 

·Ingest of content including custom workflow, transcoding, encryption and distribution.

 

·Content Management including data analysis and management of metadata.

 

·Business management such as advertising placement, contract rights and subscriber entitlements, cloud-based monitoring and management and recommendation of social media applications.

 

·Publishing and purchasing, which allows content to be formatted for viewing on any device as well as in High Definition or 3D formats.

 

According to SNL Kagan, a leading research firm for the television industry, there are 80 million cable television subscribers in Europe compared to 70 million in the United States. However, unlike in the U.S., digital cable penetration rates are quite low. Penetration rates growth in Europe are expected to rise with the increased investments in video-on-demand products and services from European cable television providers and we believe that through our acquisitions and development of next generation back office product offerings, we have positioned ourselves to capitalize on that penetration rate.

 

Advertising Products:

 

As more content moves to mobile devices, the ability to generate additional revenue by inserting personalized, targeted advertising on these devices becomes crucial to operators in offsetting content rights costs and reducing subscriber fees for viewing the content. Our Infusion Advanced Advertising Platform is the foundation for the new breed of linear video advertising operations. Infusion scales to support operators’ migration to consolidated regional and national advertising systems that are managed from increasingly web-centric and virtualized datacenters. Infusion supports dynamic targeted advertising across multiple screens. This translates into more advertising spots available for sale by the operators. Advertisers can now reach their audiences in video being viewed on cell phones, tablets, PCs and TVs while targeting those ads to the particular viewer.

 

With our AdPulse advertising software platform, ads and content are maintained in separate databases. They are ingested, managed and updated separately allowing for fast and easy refresh, simple rotation of ad copy and targeting by geographic, demographic and viewing characteristics. Because the ads are tracked separately from the content, the data provided includes detailed ad viewing and trick-mode (fast forward, rewind, and pause) usage leading to easier analysis of reach and effectiveness.

 

Video-on-demand, digital video recorders (DVRs) and over-the-top services, which we use to mean the delivery of content without the service provider being involved in the control or distribution of the content itself, are also changing the way audiences view programming. Therefore, our next generation advertising product strategy is creating new opportunities for our customers to capture local, regional and national advertising revenue from linear, targeted linear and targeted dynamic on-demand advertising.

 

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Home Gateway Products:

 

In February 2010, we acquired VividLogic Inc (“VividLogic”), a private software company located in San Mateo, California. VividLogic’s products and services have enabled us to expand our software product portfolio to participate more competitively in the home gateway market, which we use to mean the market for the porting of video distribution to home devices.

 

As the state of video consumption evolves, we are using the VividLogic platform to produce software that ports to any gateway hardware and acts as a hub for all video distribution to devices throughout the home. Our Nucleus™ software product is a hybrid gateway, standards-based solution supporting both QAM and IP-delivered video. Nucleus delivers a unified user experience across all platforms throughout the home. The Nucleus Engine provides full control over set-top box functionality including channel changes, VOD/DVR playback and trick mode such as fast forward or rewind. It enables media sharing including photos, audio/MP3, video files and recorded assets. The Nucleus Presentation Manager supports next generation user interfaces (UI) including our own Nitro User Interface. It supports applications and widgets such as smartphone and tablet remote control.

 

Media Services

 

Through the acquisition of On Demand Group (ODG) in fiscal 2006, we expanded our media content services, which consists of content aggregation and distribution. In Europe, ODG is a leader in the development and deployment of Pay TV services. This segment specializes in aggregating content for video-on-demand and Pay-Per-View platforms, and provides marketing, promotional and production services to cable operators and telecommunications providers throughout Europe, the Middle East and, more recently, Latin America. In addition, ODG also specializes in branded service creation and end-to-end management of such services, such as with its 'TV on-demand' service which it developed to run on mobile, cable and telecommunication network operators in these regions.

 

ODG also sources, acquires, packages, and markets video-on-demand services by providing access to content from local and Hollywood studio providers in multiple formats including music videos, television programs and feature length movies. Through ODG, we have a content rights management system and a content preparation center for incorporating video content for VOD services from the major content suppliers around the world.   

 

Strategy

 

Our strategy is to maintain and expand our installed customer base while increasing our revenue base with new customers, especially in the telecommunications industry, delivering exceptional customer service, positioning ourselves as an industry leader in the delivery of multi-screen video through our transformation to a pure play software company, while continually focusing on our customer's critical needs and problems.

 

We plan to execute this strategy by:

 

·Growing revenues through the introduction of our next generation software platforms, such as Adrenalin for back office, Infusion and AdPulse for our advertising product line and the expansion of our home gateway product line;

 

·Reducing our overall cost structure and further streamlining our operations;

 

·Divesting of business units or product offerings that are not core or profitable to our business; and

 

·Acquiring or investing in businesses that will enhance our product offerings and be accretive to our business

 

6
 

 

Research and Product Development

 

We believe that our success will depend on our ability to develop and introduce timely new integrated solutions and enhancements to our existing products that meet changing customer requirements in our current and future customer base as well as new markets. We have made and will continue to make substantial investments in our products and new technologies. Our current research and development activities are focused on developing next generation back office software, gateway software and advertising solutions in the multi-screen video market. Our direct sales and marketing groups closely monitor changes in customer needs, changes in the marketplace and emerging industry standards to help us focus our research and development efforts to address our customer's needs, help solve their problems, and lower their operating and capital costs. Our lead engineers are deeply involved in industry standards bodies such as the NCTA and the SCTE where they help define the direction of the next generation of products and standards. Our research and development efforts are performed at our Acton, MA headquarters, Milpitas, CA and Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

 

During fiscal 2012, we have realigned our research and development efforts to focus on the next generation networks and video delivery platforms which are vital to our customer’s success. We are achieving this by reducing or ending our investment on certain legacy product lines, evaluating divestiture of non-core business units and assets while reallocating resources to our three fundamental software products: Adrenalin for the back office, Nucleus the new Home Gateway software for the delivery of video and applications throughout the home and next generation advertising products such as Infusion and AdPulse.

 

As of January 31, 2012, we had a research and development staff of 427 employees, representing 37% of our total employee workforce. As of January 31, 2011 and 2010, we had a research and development staff of 469 and 502 which represented 39% and 41% of our total workforce, respectively. Upon completion of our divestiture of our former broadcast servers and storage business unit, our research and development staff will be reduced by approximately 99 employees with many of them moving to the acquiring entity.

 

Selling and Marketing

 

We sell and market our products worldwide through a direct sales organization, independent agents and distributors. Direct and indirect sales activities are primarily conducted from our Massachusetts headquarters and our European facility in Eindhoven, as well as through sales representatives deployed in different regions of the globe. We also market certain of our products to systems integrators and value-added resellers. Our sales cycle tends to be long, in some instances twelve to twenty-four months, and purchase orders are typically in excess of one million dollars. As a result our revenues are sometimes difficult to predict as to what quarter or fiscal year our revenues may be realized.

 

In light of the complexity of our digital video products, we primarily utilize a direct sales process. Working closely with customers to understand and define their needs enables us to obtain better information regarding market requirements, enhance our expertise in our customers’ industries, and more effectively and precisely convey to customers how our solutions address the customer’s specific needs. In addition to the direct sales process, customer references and visits by potential customers to sites where our products are in place are often critical in the sales process.

 

We use several marketing programs to focus on our targeted markets to support the sale and distribution of our products. We attend and exhibit our products at a limited number of prominent industry trade shows and conferences and we present our technology at seminars and smaller conferences to promote the awareness of our products. We also publish articles in trade and technical journals.

 

Our Media Services segment based in London uses a direct sales force to market and sell its services to customers throughout Europe, Middle East, and Latin America. This group is highly specialized in providing content and marketing solutions for cable, telecommunications and mobile operators who want to offer pay video services but do not have the capabilities in-house to license, format and market the content.

 

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As of January 31, 2012, we had a marketing and sales staff of 77 employees, representing 7% of our total employee workforce. As of January 31, 2011 and 2010, we had a marketing and sales staff of 94 and 93 people representing 8% of our total workforce for both of these years, respectively. Upon completion of our divestiture of our former broadcast servers and storage business unit, our sales and marketing staff will be reduced by approximately 15 employees.

 

Manufacturing and Quality Control

 

Our hardware manufacturing operation consists primarily of component and subassembly procurement, systems integration and final assembly, testing and quality control of the complete systems. We rely on independent contractors to manufacture components and subassemblies to our specifications.

 

In May of 2009, we announced that we had achieved TL9000 certification across multiple locations. The QuEST Forum, a consortium of telecommunications suppliers and service providers, developed the TL9000 standard using the framework of the ISO 9000 international standard as a basis to pursue a goal of global telecommunications quality and industry-wide performance excellence. We continue to maintain this certification for quality management systems.

 

As of January 31, 2012, 2011, and 2010, we had a manufacturing staff of approximately 27, 29, and 31 people respectively, representing approximately 2% of our total workforce.

 

Our Customers

 

We currently sell our products primarily to cable system operators, broadcast and telecommunications companies and mobile communications providers. Our customer base is highly concentrated among a limited number of large customers, primarily due to the fact that the cable and telecommunications industries in the United States are dominated by a limited number of large companies. A significant portion of our revenues across each of our segments in any given fiscal period have been derived from substantial orders placed by these large organizations. For the year ended January 31, 2012, Comcast and Virgin Media comprised 20% and 11%, respectively, of our total revenues. For the year ended January 31, 2011, Comcast and Virgin Media comprised 22% and 12%, respectively, of our total revenues. We expect that we will continue to be dependent upon a limited number of customers for a significant portion of our revenues in the near future, even as we intend to penetrate new markets and customers. As a result of this customer concentration, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected by the failure of anticipated orders to materialize and by deferrals or cancellations of orders as a result of changes in customer requirements or new product announcements or introductions. In addition, the concentration of customers may cause variations in revenue, expenses and operating results on a quarterly basis due to seasonality of orders or the timing and relative size of orders received and shipped during a fiscal quarter.

 

We do not believe that our backlog at any particular time is meaningful as an indicator of our future level of sales for any particular period. Because of the nature of our products and our use of standard components, substantially the entire backlog at the end of a quarter can be manufactured and shipped to the customer before the end of the following quarter. However, because of the requirements of particular customers, these orders may not be shipped or, if shipped, the related revenues may not be recognized in the ensuing quarter. Therefore, there is no direct correlation between the backlog at the end of any quarter and our total sales for the following quarter or other periods.

 

Competition

 

The markets in which we compete are characterized by intense competition, with a large number of suppliers providing different types of products to different segments of the markets. In new markets for our products, we compete principally based on price. In markets in which we have an established presence, we compete principally on the basis of the breadth of our products’ features and benefits, including the flexibility, scalability, professional quality, ease of use, reliability and cost effectiveness of our products, and our reputation and the depth of our expertise, customer service and support. While we believe that we currently compete favorably overall with respect to these factors and that our ability to provide integrated solutions to manage, store and distribute digital video differentiates us from our competitors, in the future we may not be able to continue to compete successfully with respect to these factors.

 

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In the market for multi-screen video-on-demand, we compete with various companies offering video software and server platforms such as Concurrent Computer Corp., Arris Group Inc. (through its 2007 acquisition of C-Cor Corporation), Cisco Systems, Inc., Motorola Mobility Inc., and Ericsson Inc.

 

In the media home gateway market we compete with set top box manufacturers and gateway vendors who offer proprietary software and hardware solutions. However, because our software has been integrated with the two largest chip manufactures, Intel and Broadcom, we believe we obtain a competitive advantage when these chips are designed into the networks by the operators.

 

Our Media Services business unit is unique in that the principal competition it faces is from service provider customers who decide to take the licensing and marketing of content in-house and would not have a need for the services we provide. However, it has been our experience that most operators outside of North America do not wish to deal with the complexities of negotiating content rights contracts and license agreements.

 

In the digital advertisement insertion market, we generally compete with Arris Group Inc. We expect the competition in each of the markets in which we operate to intensify in the future as existing and new competitors with significant market presence and financial resources, including computer hardware and software companies and television equipment manufacturers enter these rapidly evolving markets.

 

Many of our current and prospective competitors have significantly greater financial, technical, manufacturing, sales, marketing and other resources. As a result, these competitors may be able to devote greater resources to the development, promotion, sale and support of their products. Moreover, these companies may introduce additional products that are competitive with ours or enter into strategic relationships to offer complete solutions, and in the future our products may not be able to compete effectively with these products.

 

Proprietary Rights

 

Our success and our ability to compete are dependent, in part, upon our proprietary rights. We have been granted nineteen U.S. patents and have filed foreign patent applications related thereto for various technologies developed and used in our products. In addition, we rely on a combination of contractual rights, trademark laws, trade secrets and copyright laws to establish and protect our proprietary rights in our products. It is possible that in the future not all of these patent applications will be issued or that, if issued, the validity of these patents would not be upheld. It is also possible that the steps taken by us to protect our intellectual property will be inadequate to prevent misappropriation of our technology or that our competitors will independently develop technologies that are substantially equivalent or superior to our technology. In addition, the laws of some foreign countries in which our products are or may be distributed do not protect our proprietary rights to the same extent as do the laws of the United States. We have been involved, and continue to be involved, in significant intellectual property litigation, and we may be a party to litigation in the future to enforce our intellectual property rights or as a result of an allegation that we infringe others’ intellectual property.

 

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Employees

 

The table below represents the number of employees that we employ in different geographic areas across the world. We believe that our relations with our employees are good. None of our employees are represented by a collective bargaining agreement.

 

   January 31, 
Country  2012 (1)   2011   2010 
United States   449    521    618 
China   0    117    154 
Philippines   193    235    164 
United Kingdom   172    170    122 
Netherlands   87    79    66 
Other International   82    87    99 
Total employees by country   983    1,209    1,223 

 

 

(1)FY12 in the above table does not include 170 employees that are included in the divestiture of our broadcast servers and storage business unit.

 

Executive Officers

 

Executive officers of the Company as of March 31, 2012 and their biographical information as set forth below:

 

Raghu Rau

 

Chief Executive Officer, and Board member. Mr. Rau became the Chief Executive officer on November 30, 2011; has served as a Director of the Company since July 15, 2010; Mr. Rau currently also serves on the Board of Aviat Networks, Inc.. Since 2010, Mr. Rau has also served as a director of Microtune, Inc., the receiver solutions company. From 1992 to 2008, he held a number of positions with Motorola, Inc., including leadership positions in marketing and strategy and held the title of Senior Vice President, Mobile TV Solutions Business from 2007 to 2008. Age 62.

 

Michael D. Bornak

 

Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary, and Senior Vice President of Finance and Administration since January 23, 2012; prior thereto, served as Chief Financial Officer of Tollgrade Communications, Inc. from September 2009; prior thereto served as Chief Financial Officer of Solar Power Industries, Inc. from June 2008 to July 2009; Chief Financial Officer for MHF Logistical Solutions, Inc. from February 2005 to June 2008; Vice President of Finance and Chief Financial Officer of Portec Rail Products, Inc. from January 1998 to February 2005. Mr. Bornak is also a Certified Public Accountant. Age 49.

 

Steven M. Davi

 

Senior Vice President, Chief Technology Officer since March, 2012.; prior thereto served as Senior Vice President, Software Engineering from July 2005; Mr. Davi joined the company in November 1997, having served as head of our engineering teams for back-office, advertising, applications and multi-screen video software; prior thereto Mr. Davi served in engineering and managerial positions at Banyan Systems Inc., Prior to joining Banyan Systems, he was in various engineering positions within the networking division at Data General. He holds a Bachelors degree and a Masters degree in Computer Science. Age 48.

 

Erwin van Dommelen

 

President, SeaChange Software Division, joined us in 2009 when the Company acquired Netherlands-based video software provider eventIS where he served as CEO; prior thereto held numerous technical and management positions including Director/Practice Manager at KPMG UK; Program Director High Speed Data and Voice at Cablecom; and Project Manager/System Architect at Philips Digital Television Services. Mr. van Dommelen attended the Hogeschool (University of Applied Sciences) Utrecht, graduating in Telecommunication Science. Age 45.

 

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Ira Goldfarb

 

Executive Vice President, Worldwide Sales and Service since October 2010; prior thereto joined the Company in 1994 as U.S. Central Regional Sales Vice President; prior thereto held several sales management positions at Digital Equipment Corporation beginning in September 1983. Age 54.

 

Anthony Kelly

 

Executive Vice President, Senior Vice President of SeaChange since September 2005; prior thereto held the position of Chief Executive Officer of ODG since 1996;prior thereto Mr. Kelly served as a director of the Lambie Nairn Group from May 1992 to December 1994 and as an executive at Video Networks Limited from December 1992 to April 1995. Prior to that, from July 1990 to April 1992,  Mr. Kelly served as CEO of the Palace Group, a major UK independent film producer and distributor. Age 50.

 

Geographic Information

 

Geographic information is included in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

Available Information

 

SeaChange is subject to the informational requirements pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). SeaChange files periodic reports, proxy statements and other information with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Such reports, proxy statements and other information may be obtained by visiting the Public Reference Room of the SEC at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20549 or by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. In addition, the SEC maintains an internet site (http://www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically.

 

Financial and other information about SeaChange, including SeaChange’s Code of Ethics and Business Conduct and charters for SeaChange’s Audit Committee, Compensation Committee and Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee, is available on our website (www.schange.com). We make available free of charge on our website our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. The information contained on our web site is not incorporated by reference into this document and should not be considered a part of this Annual Report. Our web site address is included in this document as an inactive textual reference only.

 

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ITEM 1A. Risk Factors

 

We wish to caution each reader of this Form 10-K to consider the following factors and other factors discussed herein and in other past reports, including but not limited to prior year Form 10-K and quarterly Form 10-Q reports filed with the SEC. Our business and results of operations could be materially affected by any of the following risks. The factors discussed herein are not exhaustive. Therefore, the factors contained herein should be read together with other reports that we file with the SEC from time to time, which may supplement, modify, supersede, or update the factors listed in this document.

 

Our business is dependent on customers’ continued spending on video systems and services, and reductions by customers in spending adversely affect our business.

 

Our performance is dependent on customers’ continued spending for video systems and services. Spending for these systems and services is cyclical and can be curtailed or deferred on short notice. A variety of factors affect the amount of spending, and, therefore, our sales and profits, including:

 

·general economic conditions;

 

·customer specific financial or stock market conditions;

 

·availability and cost of capital;

 

·governmental regulation;

 

·demand for services;

 

·competition from other providers of video systems and services;

 

·acceptance of new video systems and services by our customers; and

 

·real or perceived trends or uncertainties in these factors.

 

Any reduction in spending by our customers would adversely affect our business. We continue to have limited visibility into the capital spending plans of our current and prospective customers. Fluctuations in our revenue can lead to even greater fluctuations in our operating results. Our planned expense levels depend in part on our expectations of future revenue. Our planned expenses include significant investments, particularly within our research and development organization, which we believe are necessary to continue to provide innovative solutions to meet our current and prospective customers’ needs. As a result, it is difficult to forecast revenue and operating results. If our revenue and operating results are below the expectations of our investors and market analysts, it could cause a decline in the price of our common stock.

 

Our future success is dependent on the continued development of the multi-screen video market and if the multi-screen video does not continue to develop, our business may not continue to grow.

 

A large portion of our expected revenue growth is expected to come from sales and services related to our multi-screen video products. However, the multi-screen video market continues to develop as a commercial market, both within and outside North America. The potential size of the multi-screen video market and the timing of its development are uncertain. The success of this market requires that broadband system operators continue to upgrade their cable networks to support digital two-way transmission service and successfully market multi-screen video and similar services to their cable television subscribers. Some cable system operators, particularly outside of North America, are still in the early stages of commercial deployment of multi-screen video service to major residential cable markets and, accordingly, to date our digital video systems have been commercially available only to a limited number of subscribers. Also, the telecommunications companies have also begun to adapt their networks to support digital two-way transmission and begun marketing multi-screen video services. If cable system operators and telecommunications companies fail to make the capital expenditures necessary to upgrade their networks or determine that broad deployment of multi-screen video services is not viable as a business proposition or if our digital video systems cannot support a substantial number of subscribers while maintaining a high level of performance, our revenues will not grow as we have planned.

 

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If we are unable to successfully introduce new products or enhancements to existing products on a timely basis, our financial condition and operating results may be adversely affected by a decrease in sales of our products.

 

Because our business plan is based on technological development of new products and enhancements to our existing products, our future success is dependent on our successful introduction of these new products and enhancements on a timely basis. In the future we may experience difficulties that could delay or prevent the successful development, introduction and marketing of these and other new products and enhancements, or find that our new products and enhancements do not adequately meet the requirements of the marketplace or achieve market acceptance. Announcements of currently planned or other new product offerings may cause customers to defer purchasing our existing products. Moreover, despite testing by us and by current and potential customers, errors or failures may be found in our products, and, even if discovered, may not be successfully corrected in a timely manner. These errors or failures could cause delays in product introductions and shipments, or require design modifications that could adversely affect our competitive position. Currently, we are focused on the provision of next generation software products, including SeaChange AdrenalinTM Back Office, SeaChange Nucleus TM Soft Box, and SeaChange Infusion TM Advanced Advertising Platform. Our inability to develop new products or enhancements on a timely basis or the failure of these new products or enhancements to achieve market acceptance could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our business is impacted by worldwide economic cycles, which are difficult to predict.

 

The global economy and financial markets experienced disruption in recent years, including, among other things, extreme volatility in security prices, diminished credit availability, rating downgrades of certain investments and declining valuations of others. These economic developments and the rate of recovery from these developments affect businesses such as ours and those of our customers and vendors in a number of ways that could result in unfavorable consequences to us. A continued slow recovery from these events or further disruption and deterioration in economic conditions may reduce customer purchases of our products and services, thereby reducing our revenues and earnings. In addition, these events may, among other things, result in increased price competition for our products and services, increased risk in the collectability of our accounts receivable from our customers, increased risk in potential reserves for doubtful accounts and write-offs of accounts receivable, and higher operating costs as a percentage of revenues. We have taken actions to address the effects of the economic crisis and the slow recovery, including implementing cost control and cost reduction measures. It is possible that we may need to take further actions to control our cost structure and implement further cost reduction measures. We cannot predict whether these measures will be sufficient to offset certain of the negative trends that might affect our business.

 

We have taken and continue to take measures to address the variability in the market for our products and services, which could have long-term negative effects on our business or impact our ability to adequately address a rapid increase in customer demand.

 

We have taken and continue to take measures to address the variability in the market for our products and services, to increase average revenue per unit of our sales and to reduce our operating expenses, rationalize capital expenditure and minimize customer turnover. These measures include shifting more of our operations to lower cost regions, outsourcing and off shoring manufacturing processes and general and administrative functions, implementing cost reduction programs, reducing the number of our employees, and reducing and rationalizing planned capital expenditures and expense budgets. As previously announced we are selling our broadcast servers and storage business unit and continue to evaluate the divestiture of non-core operations as we focus on becoming a company that primarily provides software solutions. We cannot ensure that the measures we have taken will not impair our ability to effectively develop and market products and services, to remain competitive in the industries in which we compete, to operate effectively, to operate profitably during slowdowns or to effectively meet a rapid increase in customer demand. These measures may have long-term negative effects on our business by reducing our pool of technical talent, decreasing or slowing improvements in our products and services, making it more difficult to hire and retain talented individuals and to quickly respond to customers or competitors in an upward cycle.

 

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Our business has been subject to uncertainties introduced by the evaluation of strategic options completed by us in fiscal 2012.

 

As previously disclosed, we completed an evaluation of strategic options in fiscal 2012 and concluded that it was in the best interests of stockholders to remain a standalone public company, and to focus on improving and streamlining our operations. This strategic review resulted in the expenditure of substantial management time and resources, and may result in our customers reducing the level of orders they place with us, employees deciding to leave the Company, a third party expressing interest in acquiring the Company, and other factors that may have a negative effect on our business. It is also possible that we may be unsuccessful in improving and streamlining our operations. These factors may create uncertainty in our operations that could cause our revenues to decline and that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations and may cause fluctuations in our stock price.

 

We may be unsuccessful in our efforts to become a pure play software company, by which we mean a company that primarily provides software solutions.

 

Our efforts to become a company that primarily provides software solutions may result in a reduction both in the range of products and services we offer and in the range of our current and potential future customers. Each of these factors may increase the level of execution risk in our strategy, in that there may be increased variability in our revenues. If we are unsuccessful in this transition, our business, financial condition and results of operation may be adversely affected, and the market price of our common stock may decrease.

 

Because our customer base is highly concentrated among a limited number of large customers, the loss of or reduced demand by, or return of product by one or more of these customers, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our customer base is highly concentrated among a limited number of large customers, and, therefore, a limited number of customers account for a significant percentage of our revenues in any fiscal period. We generally do not have written agreements that require customers to purchase fixed minimum quantities of our products. Our sales to specific customers tend to vary significantly from year to year and from quarter to quarter depending upon these customers’ budgets for capital expenditures and our new product introductions. We believe that a significant amount of our revenues will continue to be derived from a limited number of large customers in the future. The loss of, reduced demand for products or related services by, or return of a product previously purchased by any of our major customers could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, the industry has experienced consolidation among our customers which may cause delays or reductions in capital expenditure plans and/or increased competitive pricing pressures as the number of available customers decline and their relative purchasing power increases in relation to suppliers. Any of these factors could adversely affect our business.

 

Cancellation or deferral of purchases of our products or the return of previously purchased products could cause a substantial variation in our operating results, resulting in a decrease in the market price of our common stock and making period-to-period comparisons of our operating results less meaningful.

 

We derive a substantial portion of our revenues from purchase orders that exceed $1.0 million in value. Therefore, any significant cancellation or deferral of purchases of our products or the return of previously purchased products could result in a substantial variation in our operating results in any particular quarter due to the resulting decrease in revenue and gross margin. In addition, to the extent significant sales occur earlier than expected, operating results for subsequent quarters may be adversely affected because our operating costs and expenses are based, in part, on our expectations of future revenues, and we may be unable to adjust spending in a timely manner to compensate for any revenue shortfall. Because of these factors, in some future quarter our operating results may be below the expectations of public market analysts and investors which may adversely affect the market price of our common stock. In addition, these factors may make period-to-period comparisons of our operating results less meaningful.

 

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Due to the lengthy sales cycle involved in the sale of our products, our quarterly results may vary and should not be relied on as an indication of future performance.

 

Digital video-on-demand, advertising, and content products and services are relatively complex and their purchase generally involve a significant commitment of capital, with attendant delays frequently associated with large capital expenditures and implementation procedures within an organization. Moreover, the purchase of these products typically requires coordination and agreement among a potential customer’s corporate headquarters and its regional and local operations. For these and other reasons, the sales cycle associated with the purchase of our digital video-on-demand, advertising, and content products and services is typically lengthy and subject to a number of significant risks, including customers’ budgetary constraints and internal acceptance reviews, over which we have little or no control. Based upon all of the foregoing, we believe that our quarterly revenues and operating results are likely to vary significantly in the future, that period-to-period comparisons of our results of operations are not necessarily meaningful and that these comparisons should not be relied upon as indications of future performance.

 

If there were a decline in demand or average selling prices for our products, including our back office and advertising products, our revenues and operating results would be materially affected.

 

We expect our back office and advertising products to continue to account for a significant portion of our revenues. Accordingly, a decline in demand or average selling prices for these products, whether as a result of new product introductions by others, price competition, technological change, inability to enhance the products in a timely fashion, or otherwise, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

If we are unable to manage our growth and the related expansion in our operations effectively, our business may be harmed through a diminished ability to monitor and control effectively our operations, and a decrease in the quality of work and innovation of our employees.

 

Our ability to successfully offer new products and services and implement our business plan in a rapidly evolving market requires effective planning and management. We are also continuing to transition towards greater reliance on our software products and services for an increased portion of our total revenue, particularly as we explore the divestiture of non-core business units as evidenced by our agreement to divest a portion of our broadcast servers and storage business unit executed on March 21, 2012. In light of the growing complexities in managing our expanding portfolio of products and services, our anticipated future operations may continue to strain our operational and administrative resources. To manage future growth effectively, we must continue to improve our operational controls and internal controls over financial reporting, and to integrate the businesses we have acquired and our new personnel and to manage our expanding international operations. A failure to manage our growth may harm our business through a decreased ability to monitor and control effectively our operations, and a decrease in the quality of work and innovation of our employees upon which our business is dependent.

 

Because our business is susceptible to risks associated with international operations, we may not be able to maintain or increase international sales of our products and services, and we may not realize the full amount of the anticipated savings in connection with our continued trend towards the manufacture and assembly of our products outside of North America and Europe.

 

Our international operations are expected to continue to account for a significant portion of our business in the future. However, in the future we may be unable to maintain or increase international sales of our products and services. Our international operations are subject to a variety of risks, including:

 

·difficulties in establishing and managing international distribution channels; 

 

·difficulties in selling, servicing and supporting overseas products and services and in translating products and services into foreign languages;

 

·the uncertainty of laws and enforcement in certain countries relating to the protection of intellectual property;

 

·multiple and possibly overlapping tax structures;

 

·negative tax consequences such as withholding taxes and employer payroll taxes;
differences in labor laws and regulations affecting our ability to hire and retain employees; and
economic or political changes in international markets.

 

15
 

 

We are exposed to fluctuations in currency exchange rates that could negatively impact our financial results and cash flows.

 

To date, most of our revenues have been denominated in U.S. dollars, while a significant portion of our international expenses are incurred in the local currencies of countries in which we operate. Because a portion of our business is conducted outside the United States, we face exposure to adverse movements in foreign currency exchange rates. These exposures may change over time as business practices evolve, and they could have a material adverse impact on our financial results and cash flows. An increase in the value of the dollar could increase the real cost to our customers of our products in those markets outside the United States where we often sell in dollars, and a weakened dollar could increase local currency operating costs. In preparing our consolidated financial statements, certain financial information is required to be translated from foreign currencies to the United States dollar using either the spot rate or the weighted-average exchange rate. If the United States dollar changes relative to applicable local currencies, there is a risk our reported sales, operating expenses, and net income could significantly fluctuate. We are not able to predict the degree of exchange rate fluctuations, nor can we estimate the effect any future fluctuations may have upon our future operations.

 

Our ability to compete could be jeopardized if we are unable to protect our intellectual property rights from third-party challenges.

 

Our success and ability to compete depends upon our ability to protect our proprietary technology that is incorporated into our products. We rely on a combination of patent, copyright, trademark and trade secret laws and restrictions on disclosure to protect our intellectual property rights. Although we have issued patents, we cannot assure that any additional patents will be issued or that the issued patents will not be invalidated. We also enter into confidentiality or license agreements with our employees, consultants and corporate partners, and control access to and distribution of our software, documentation and other proprietary information. Despite these precautions, it may be possible for a third party to copy or otherwise misappropriate and use our products or technology without authorization, particularly in foreign countries where the laws may not protect our proprietary rights as fully as in the United States. We may need to resort to litigation in the future to enforce our intellectual property rights, to protect our trade secrets or to determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others. If competitors are able to use our technology, our ability to compete effectively could be harmed.

 

We have been and in the future could become subject to litigation regarding intellectual property rights, which could seriously harm our business and require us to incur significant legal costs to defend our intellectual property rights.

 

The industry in which we operate is characterized by vigorous protection and pursuit of intellectual property rights or positions, which on occasion, have resulted in significant and often protracted litigation. We have from time to time received, and may in the future receive, communications from third parties asserting infringements on patent or other intellectual property rights covering our products or processes. We are currently engaged in intellectual property litigation with Arris Group, Inc., and we may be a party to litigation in the future to enforce our intellectual property rights or as a result of an allegation that we infringe others’ intellectual property. Any parties asserting that our products infringe upon their proprietary rights would force us to defend ourselves and possibly our customers or manufacturers against the alleged infringement, as many of our commercial agreements require us to defend and/or indemnify the other party against intellectual property infringement claims brought by a third party with respect to our products. We have received certain claims for indemnification from customers but have not been made party to any litigation involving intellectual property infringement claims as a result. These claims and any resulting lawsuit, if successful, could subject us to significant liability for damages and invalidation of our proprietary rights. This possibility of multiple damages serves to increase the incentive for plaintiffs to bring such litigation. In addition, these lawsuits, regardless of their success, would likely be time-consuming and expensive to resolve and would divert management time and attention away from our operations. Although we carry general liability insurance, our insurance may not cover potential claims of this type or may not be adequate to indemnify us for all liability that may be imposed. In addition, any potential intellectual property litigation also could force us to stop selling, incorporating or using the products that use the infringed intellectual property or obtain from the owner of the infringed intellectual property right a license to sell or use the relevant technology, although this license may not be available on reasonable terms, or at all, or redesign those products that use the infringed intellectual property. If we are forced to take any of the foregoing actions, our business may be seriously harmed.

 

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If content providers, such as movie studios, limit the scope of content licensed for use in the digital video-on-demand market, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be negatively affected because the potential market for our products would be more limited than we currently believe and have communicated to the financial markets.

 

The success of the video-on-demand market is contingent on content providers, such as movie studios, permitting their content to be licensed for use in this market. Content providers may, due to concerns regarding either or both marketing and illegal duplication of the content, limit the extent to which they provide content to the video-on-demand market. A limitation of content for the video-on-demand market would indirectly limit the market for our video-on-demand system which is used in connection with that market.

 

Because we purchase certain material components used in manufacturing our products from sole suppliers and we use a limited number of third party manufacturers to manufacture our products, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected by a failure of these suppliers or manufacturers.

 

Certain key components of our products are currently purchased from a sole supplier, including computer chassis, switching gear, an interface controller video transmission board, and operating system and applications software. We have in the past experienced quality control problems, where products did not meet specifications or were damaged in shipping, and delays in the receipt of these components. These problems were generally of short duration and did not have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. However, we may in the future experience similar types of problems which could be more severe or more prolonged. While we believe that there are alternative suppliers available for these components, we believe that the procurement of these components from alternative suppliers could take up to a year. In addition, these alternative components may not be functionally equivalent or may be unavailable on a timely basis or on similar terms. The inability to obtain sufficient key components as required, or to develop alternative sources if and as required in the future, could result in delays or reductions in product shipments which, in turn, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, we rely on a limited number of third parties who manufacture certain components used in our products. While to date there has been suitable third party manufacturing capacity readily available at acceptable quality levels, in the future there may not be manufacturers that are able to meet our future volume or quality requirements at a price that is favorable to us. Any financial, operational, production or quality assurance difficulties experienced by these third party manufacturers that result in a reduction or interruption in supply to us could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

If we are not able to obtain necessary licenses or distribution rights for third-party technology at acceptable prices, or at all, our products could become obsolete or we may not be able to deliver certain product offerings.

 

We have incorporated third-party licensed technology into our current products and our product lines. From time to time, we may be required to license additional technology from third parties to develop new products or product enhancements or to provide specific solutions. Third-party licenses may not be available or continue to be available to us on commercially reasonable terms. The inability to maintain or re-license any third-party licenses required in our current products or to obtain any new third-party licenses necessary to develop new products and product enhancements or provide specific solutions could require us to obtain substitute technology of lower quality or performance standards or at greater cost. Such inabilities could delay or prevent us from making these products or enhancements or providing specific solutions, which could seriously harm the competitiveness of our products.

 

We may also incorporate open source software into our products. Although we monitor our use of open source closely, the terms of many open source licenses have not been interpreted by U.S. courts, and there is a risk that such licenses could be construed in a manner that could impose unanticipated conditions or restrictions on our ability to commercialize our products. We could also be subject to similar conditions or restrictions should there be any changes in the licensing terms of the open source software incorporated into our products. In either event, we could be required to seek licenses from third parties in order to continue offering our products, to re-engineer our products or to discontinue the sale of our products in the event re-engineering cannot be accomplished on a timely or successful basis, any of which could adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

17
 

 

If we are unable to successfully compete in our marketplace, our financial condition and operating results may be adversely affected.

 

We currently compete against large companies offering video software solutions. In the digital advertisement insertion market, we compete against suppliers of both analog tape-based and digital systems. In addition, a number of well-funded companies have been discussing broadband internet VOD services for home television viewing. If these products are developed, they may be more cost effective than our VOD solutions, which could result in cable system operators and telecommunications companies discontinuing their purchases of our on-demand products. Due to the rapidly evolving markets in which we compete, additional competitors with significant market presence and financial resources, including software companies and television equipment manufacturers, may enter those markets, thereby further intensifying competition. Increased competition could result in price reductions, cancellations of purchase orders, losses of business with current customers to competitors, and loss of market share which would adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Many of our current and potential competitors have greater financial, selling and marketing, technical and other resources than we do. Moreover, our competitors may also foresee the course of market developments more accurately than we. Although we believe that we have certain technological and other advantages over our competitors, realizing and maintaining these advantages will require a continued high level of investment by us in research and product development, marketing and customer service and support. In the future we may not have sufficient resources to continue to make these investments or to make the technological advances necessary to compete successfully with our existing competitors or with new competitors. If we are unable to compete effectively, our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results would be materially adversely affected because of the difference in our operating results from the assumptions on which our business model is based.

 

If we fail to respond to rapidly changing technologies related to digital video, our business, financial condition and results of operations would be materially adversely affected because the competitive advantage of our products and services relative to those of our competitors would decrease.

 

The markets for our products are characterized by rapidly changing technology, evolving industry standards and frequent new product introductions and enhancements. Future technological advances in the television and video industries may result in the availability of new products or services that could compete with the solutions provided by us or reduce the cost of existing products or services, any of which could enable our existing or potential customers to fulfill their video needs better and more cost efficiently than with our products. Our future success will depend on our ability to enhance our existing digital video products, including the development of new applications for our technology, and to develop and introduce new products to meet and adapt to changing customer requirements and emerging technologies. In the future, we may not be successful in enhancing our digital video products or developing, manufacturing and marketing new products which satisfy customer needs or achieve market acceptance. In addition, there may be services, products or technologies developed by others that render our products or technologies uncompetitive, unmarketable or obsolete, or announcements of currently planned or other new product offerings either by us or our competitors that cause customers to defer or fail to purchase our existing solutions.

 

Our financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected by the performance of the companies in which we have made and may in the future make equity investments.

 

We have made non-controlling equity investments in complementary companies, including On Demand Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG and Minerva Networks, Inc., and we may in the future make additional investments in these and/or other companies. These investments may require additional capital and may not generate the expected rate of return that we believed possible at the time of making the investment. This may adversely affect our financial condition or results of operations. Also, investments in development-stage companies may generate other than temporary declines in fair value of our investment that would result in impairment charges.

 

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We may not fully realize the benefits of our acquisitions of Mobix Interactive Ltd., eventIS Group B.V or VividLogic, Inc., and these and future acquisitions may be difficult to integrate, disrupt our business, dilute stockholder value or divert management attention.

 

As part of our business strategy, we have acquired and may in the future seek to acquire or invest in new businesses, products or technologies that we believe could complement or expand our business, augment our market coverage, enhance our technical capabilities or otherwise offer growth opportunities. Acquisitions, including our acquisitions of Mobix Interactive Ltd., eventIS Group B.V. and VividLogic, Inc. could create risks for us, including:

 

difficulties in assimilation of acquired personnel, operations, technologies or products which may affect our ability to develop new products and services and compete in our rapidly changing marketplace due to a resulting decrease in the quality of work and innovation of our employees upon which our business is dependent;

 

adverse effects on our existing business relationships with suppliers and customers, which may be of particular importance to our business because we sell our products to a limited number of large customers, we purchase certain components used in manufacturing our products from sole suppliers and we use a limited number of third party manufacturers to manufacture our product; and

 

our ability to retain and incentivize management and key employees of the acquired business.

 

Future acquisitions or divestitures may adversely affect our financial condition.

 

Historically, we have acquired technology or businesses to supplement and expand our product offerings. In the future, we could acquire additional products, technologies or businesses, or enter into joint venture arrangements, for the purpose of complementing or expanding our business as occurred with VividLogic Inc. in fiscal 2011, eventIS Group B.V. in fiscal 2010, Mobix Interactive Ltd. in fiscal 2009 and On Demand Deutschland GMBH in fiscal 2007. As previously announced, we are selling our broadcast servers and storage business unit and continue to evaluate the divestiture of non-core operations as we focus on becoming a company that primarily provides software solutions. Negotiation of potential acquisitions, divestitures or joint ventures and our integration or transfer of acquired or divested products, technologies or businesses could divert management’s time and resources.

 

As part of our strategy for growth, we may continue to explore acquisitions, divestitures, or strategic alliances, which may not be completed or may not be ultimately beneficial to us.

 

Acquisitions or divestitures may pose risks to our operations, including:

 

problems and increased costs in connection with the integration or divestiture of the personnel, operations, technologies, or products of the acquired or divested businesses;

 

unanticipated costs;

 

diversion of management’s attention from our core business;

 

inability to make planned divestitures of businesses on favorable terms in a timely manner or at all;

 

adverse effects on business relationships with suppliers and customers and those of the acquired company;

 

acquired assets becoming impaired as a result of technical advancements or worse-than-expected performance by the acquired company;

 

entering markets in which we have no, or limited, prior experience; and

 

potential loss of key employees.

 

In addition, in connection with any acquisitions or investments we could:

 

issue stock that would dilute our existing stockholders’ ownership percentages;

 

incur debt and assume liabilities;

 

obtain financing on unfavorable terms;

 

incur amortization expenses related to acquired intangible assets or incur large and immediate write-offs;

 

incur large expenditures related to office closures of the acquired companies, including costs relating to the termination of employees and facility and leasehold improvement charges resulting from our having to vacate the acquired companies’ premises; and

 

reduce the cash that would otherwise be available to fund operations or for other purposes.

 

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If our goodwill or intangible assets become impaired, we may be required to record a significant charge to earnings.

 

Under accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, we review our intangible assets for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. Goodwill is required to be tested for impairment at least annually. Factors that may be considered a change in circumstances indicating that the carrying value of our goodwill or other intangible assets may not be recoverable include declines in our stock price and market capitalization, or future cash flows projections. Our valuation methodology for assessing impairment requires management to make judgments and assumptions based on projections of future operating performance. We operate in highly competitive environments and projections of future operating results and cash flows may vary significantly from actual results. We may be required to record a significant noncash charge to earnings in our financial statements during the period in which any impairment of our goodwill or other intangible assets is determined.

 

We may experience risks in our investments due to changes in the market, which could adversely affect the value or liquidity of our investments.

 

We maintain a portfolio of marketable securities in a variety of instruments which may include commercial paper, certificates of deposit, money market funds and government debt securities. These investments are subject to general credit, liquidity, market, and interest rate risks. As a result, we may experience a reduction in value or loss of liquidity of our investments. These market risks associated with our investment portfolio may have a negative adverse effect on our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition.

 

The success of our business model could be influenced by changes in the regulatory environment, such as changes that either would limit capital expenditures by television, cable or telecommunications operators or reverse the trend towards deregulation in the industries in which we compete.

 

The telecommunications and television industries are subject to extensive regulation which may limit the growth of our business, both in the United States and other countries. The growth of our business internationally is dependent in part on deregulation of the telecommunications industry abroad similar to that which has occurred in the United States and the timing and magnitude of which is uncertain. Broadband system operators are subject to extensive government regulation by the Federal Communications Commission and other federal and state regulatory agencies. These regulations could have the effect of limiting capital expenditures by broadband system operators and thus could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The enactment by federal, state or international governments of new laws or regulations, changes in the interpretation of existing regulations or a reversal of the trend toward deregulation in these industries could adversely affect our customers, and thereby materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We may not be able to hire and retain highly skilled employees, particularly which could affect our ability to compete effectively because our business is technology-based.

 

Our success depends to a significant degree upon the continued contributions of our key personnel, many of whom would be difficult to replace. We have recently experienced the turnover of our Chief Executive Officer, President and Chief Financial Officer. We believe that our future success will also depend in large part upon our ability to attract and retain highly skilled managerial, engineering, customer service, selling and marketing, finance, administrative and manufacturing personnel, as our business is technology-based. Because competition for these personnel is intense, we may not be able to attract and retain qualified personnel in the future. The loss of the services of any of the key personnel, the integration of new personnel, the inability to attract or retain qualified personnel in the future or delays in hiring required personnel, particularly software engineers and sales personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations because our business is technology-based.

 

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We may have additional tax liabilities.

 

We are subject to income taxes in both the United States and numerous foreign jurisdictions. Significant judgment is required in determining our worldwide provision for income taxes. In the ordinary course of our business, there are many transactions and calculations where the ultimate tax determination is uncertain. We are regularly under audit by various tax jurisdictions. Although we believe our tax estimates are reasonable, the final determination of tax audits and any related litigation could be materially different from our historical income tax provisions and accruals. The results of an audit or litigation could have a material effect on our income tax provision, net income, or cash flows in the period or periods for which that determination is made. In addition, we are subject to sales, use and similar taxes in many countries, jurisdictions and provinces, including those states in the United States where we maintain a physical presence or have a substantial nexus. These taxing regimes are complex. For example, in the United States, each state and local taxing authority has its own interpretation of what constitutes a sufficient physical presence or nexus to require the collection and remittance of these taxes. Similarly, each state and local taxing authority has its own rules regarding the applicability of sales tax by customer or product type.

 

System errors, failures, or interruptions could cause delays in shipments, require design modifications or replacements which may have a negative impact on our business and damage our reputation and customer relationships.

 

System errors or failures in our products or related to our information technology infrastructure may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Despite our testing and testing by current and potential customers, not all errors or failures may be found in our products or, if discovered, successfully corrected in a timely manner. Notwithstanding our efforts to the contrary, our products and business may be subject to unauthorized access which could also result in errors or failures in our products, or the dissemination of confidential information. These errors or failures could cause delays in product introductions and shipments, require design modifications that could adversely affect our competitive position or result in material liability to us. Further, some errors may not be detected until the systems are deployed. In such a case, we may have to undertake major replacement programs to correct the problem. Our reputation may also suffer if our customers view our products as unreliable or our systems as unsecure, whether based on actual or perceived errors or failures in our products or our systems. Further, a defect, error or performance problem with our on-demand systems could cause our customers’ VOD offerings to fail for a period of time or be degraded. Any such failure would cause customer service and public relations problems for our customers. As a result, any failure of our customers’ systems caused by our technology, including the failure of third party technology incorporated therein or therewith, could result in delayed or lost revenue due to adverse customer reaction, negative publicity regarding us and our products and services and claims for substantial damages against us, regardless of our responsibility for such failure. Any claim could be expensive and require us to spend a significant amount of resources. In circumstances where third party technology incorporated with or in our systems includes a defect, error or performance problem or fails for any reason, we may have to replace such third party technology at our expense and be responsible to our customers for their corresponding claims. Such replacements or claims could be expensive and could require us to spend a significant amount of resources.

 

We may be subject to network disruptions or security breaches that could damage our reputation and harm our business and operating results.

 

We may be subject to network disruptions or security breaches caused by computer viruses, illegal break-ins or hacking, sabotage, acts of vandalism by third parties or terrorism. Our security measures or those of our third party service providers may not detect or prevent such security breaches. Any such compromise of our information security could result in the unauthorized publication of our confidential business or proprietary information, cause an interruption in our operations, result in the unauthorized release of customer or employee data, result in a violation of privacy or other laws, expose us to a risk of litigation or damage our reputation, which could harm our business and operating results.

 

Our stock price may be volatile.

 

Historically, the market for technology stocks has been extremely volatile. Our common stock has experienced, and may continue to experience, substantial price volatility. The occurrence of any one or more of the factors noted above could cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate. In the past couple of years, the stock market in general, and the NASDAQ Stock Market and technology companies in particular, have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of such companies. These broad market and industry factors may materially adversely affect the market price of our common stock, regardless of our actual operating performance. In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, securities class action litigation has often been instituted against such companies.

 

21
 

 

Any weaknesses identified in our system of internal controls by us and our independent registered public accounting firm pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 could have an adverse effect on our business.

 

Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requires that companies evaluate and report on their systems of internal control over financial reporting. In addition, our independent registered public accounting firm must report on its evaluation of those controls. In future periods, we may identify deficiencies, including as a result of the loss of the services of one or more of our key personnel, in our system of internal controls over financial reporting that may require remediation. There can be no assurances that any such future deficiencies identified may not be significant deficiencies or material weaknesses that would be required to be reported in future periods.

 

Changes in financial accounting standards may cause adverse unexpected revenue fluctuations and affect our reported results of operations.

 

A change in accounting policies can have a significant effect on our reported results and may even affect our reporting of transactions completed before the change is effective. New pronouncements and varying interpretations of existing pronouncements have occurred with frequency and may occur in the future. Changes to existing rules, or changes to the interpretations of existing rules, could lead to changes in our accounting practices, and such changes could adversely affect our reported financial results or the way we conduct our business.

 

ITEM 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

 

None

 

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ITEM 2. Properties

 

Location   Principal Use   Business Segment   Square Feet
             
Owned Facilities            
Acton, Massachusetts   Corporate Headquarters   Software and Servers               120,000
             
London, United Kingdom   ODG corporate offices and video   Media Services                   9,000
    content processing services        
Leased Facilities            
Manila, Philippines   Engineering and Customer Services   Software and Servers                 28,000
             
Milpitas, California   Engineering   Software and Servers                 20,200
             
Fort Washington, Pennsylvania Engineering   Software and Servers                 14,000
             
Eindhoven, The Netherlands   Engineering, Sales and Customer Services   Software and Servers                   6,300
             
             
Held for sale            
Greenville, New Hampshire                         24,000

 

In addition, we lease offices in Illinois, Nevada, Ireland, Singapore, Germany, Japan, India, Turkey, UK, and Mexico. We believe that existing facilities are adequate to meet our foreseeable requirements. Due to restructuring of the VOD server product lines and divesture of a portion of the broadcast servers and storage business unit, we have determined to sell our Greenville, New Hampshire facility and have classified it as an asset held for sale on our balance sheet.

 

ITEM 3. Legal Proceedings

 

ARRIS Litigation

 

On July 31, 2009, ARRIS Group, Inc. (“ARRIS”) filed a contempt motion in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware against SeaChange International relating to U.S. Patent No 5,805,804 (the “804 patent”), a patent in which ARRIS has an ownership interest. In its motion, ARRIS is seeking further patent royalties and the enforcement of the permanent injunction entered by the Court on April 6, 2006 against certain SeaChange products. On August 3, 2009, SeaChange filed a complaint seeking a declaratory judgment from the Court that its products do not infringe the ‘804 patent and asserting certain equitable defenses. On June 4, 2010, the Court entered an Order staying the declaratory judgment action pending resolution of the contempt proceeding. On September 2, 2011, the Court entered an Order in which it concluded that a contempt proceeding is the appropriate procedure for resolving the parties’ dispute and that further factual and legal determinations would be necessary. On March 1, 2012, the Court conducted a hearing at which the parties submitted additional information. No determinations were made by the Court at the hearing as to liability, and the parties are now scheduled to submit post-hearing briefs. We believe that our products do not infringe on the ‘804 patent and that we have meritorious defenses against the suit, however, the ultimate resolution of the matter is not reasonably estimable at this time, but could result in a material liability for us.

 

We enter into agreements in the ordinary course of business with customers, resellers, distributors, integrators and suppliers. Most of these agreements require us to defend and/or indemnify the other party against intellectual property infringement claims brought by a third party with respect to our products. From time to time, we also indemnify customers and business partners for damages, losses and liabilities they may suffer or incur relating to personal injury, personal property damage, product liability, and environmental claims relating to the use of our products and services or resulting from the acts or omissions of SeaChange, its employees, authorized agents or subcontractors. For example, SeaChange has received requests from several of its customers for indemnification of patent litigation claims asserted by Acacia Media Technologies, USA Video Technology Corporation, Multimedia Patent Trust, Microsoft Corporation, VTran Media Technologies and ActiveVideo Networks, Inc. Management cannot reasonably estimate any potential losses, but these claims could result in material liability for us.

 

ITEM 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters

 

Market Information Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “SEAC”.

 

The following table sets forth the quarterly high and low closing sales prices per share reported on NASDAQ for our last two fiscal years ended January 31, 2012 and 2011.

 

   Fiscal Year 2012   Fiscal Year 2011 
   High   Low   High   Low 
Three Month Period Ended:                    
First Quarter  $10.95   $8.62   $8.61   $6.45 
Second Quarter   11.26    9.94    9.48    7.45 
Third Quarter   9.63    6.96    9.17    7.08 
Fourth Quarter   8.82    6.59    9.04    7.90 

 

On March 29, 2012, there were 119 holders of record.

 

We have never declared or paid any cash dividends on our common stock, since inception, and do not expect to pay cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. We currently intend to retain all of our future earnings for use in operations and to finance the expansion of our business.

 

On May 26, 2010, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $20.0 million of its common stock, par value $.01 per share, through a share repurchase program. The repurchase program terminated on January 31, 2012 and the Company did not repurchase any shares under this program for fiscal 2012 and purchased 178,000 shares at a cost of $1.4 million for fiscal 2011.

 

On March 28, 2012, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $25.0 million of its common stock, par value $.01 per share, through a share repurchase program. The repurchase program terminates on January 31, 2013.

 

Information regarding equity plans appears in Part III, Item 12 of this annual report on Form 10-K.

 

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STOCK PERFORMANCE GRAPH

 

The following graph compares the change in the cumulative total stockholder return on SeaChange’s common stock during the period from the close of trading on January 31, 2007 through January 31, 2012, with the cumulative total return on the Center for Research in Securities Prices (“CRSP”) Index for the Nasdaq Stock Market (U.S. Companies) and a SIC Code Index based on SeaChange’s SIC Code. The comparison assumes $100 was invested on January 31, 2007 in SeaChange’s common stock at the $10.00 closing price on January 31, 2007 and in each of the foregoing indices and assumes reinvestment of dividends, if any.

 

The following graph is not “soliciting material,” is not deemed filed with the SEC and is not to be incorporated by reference in any filing of SeaChange under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act, whether made before or after the date hereof and irrespective of any general incorporation language in any such filing. The stock price performance shown on the following graph is not necessarily indicative of future price performance. Information used on the graph was obtained from a third party provider, a source believed to be reliable, but SeaChange is not responsible for any errors or omissions in such information.

 

 

 

Notes:

 

A.The lines represent monthly index levels derived from compounded daily returns that include all dividends.

 

B.If the monthly interval, based on the fiscal year-end, is not a trading day, the preceding trading day is used.

 

C.The Index level for all series was set to 100 on January 31, 2007.

 

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ITEM 6. Selected Financial Data The following selected consolidated financial data of the Company has been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements. The following selected financial data may not be representative of our future financial performance and should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Prior periods results have been restated to reclassify discontinued operations activity to the line in the consolidated statement of operations

 

   Year ended January 31, 
   2012   2011   2010   2009   2008 
   (in thousands, except per share data) 
Consolidated Statement of Operations Data:                         
Revenues:                         
Products  $73,157   $82,155   $97,005   $100,348   $91,103 
Services   124,548    119,532    92,935    77,635    68,214 
Total revenues   197,705    201,687    189,940    177,983    159,317 
Costs of revenues:                         
Products   22,774    30,256    35,929    35,478    37,619 
Services   76,919    68,576    54,941    47,348    42,817 
Total cost of revenue   99,693    98,832    90,870    82,826    80,436 
Gross profit   98,012    102,855    99,070    95,157    78,881 
Operating expenses:                         
Research and development   40,692    44,569    45,104    37,482    35,026 
Selling and marketing   21,619    21,055    22,425    24,076    19,963 
General and administrative   24,116    23,647    20,823    20,064    19,160 
Amortization of intangibles   3,923    3,359    2,826    1,575    2,952 
Acquisition costs   3,312    764    -    -    - 
Restructuring   3,316    6,997    -    -    6,004 
Total operating expenses   96,978    100,391    91,178    83,197    83,105 
Income (loss) from operations   1,034    2,464    7,892    11,960    (4,224)
Interest income, net   297    269    607    2,050    1,927 
Other expense, net   (655)   (687)   (462)   (925)   (43)
Gain on sale of investment in affiliates   -    27,071    -    -    10,031 
Income before income taxes and equity income (loss) in earnings of affiliates   676    29,117    8,037    13,085    7,691 
Income tax expense (benefit)   2,193    (2,438)   271    525    2,106 
Equity income (loss) in earnings of affiliates, net of tax   233    85    (653)   (770)   1,143 
Net (loss) income from continuing operations   (1,284)   31,640    7,113    11,790    6,728 
Loss from discontinued operations   (2,730)   (2,172)   (5,790)   (1,816)   (3,826)
Net  (loss) income  $(4,014)  $29,468   $1,323   $9,974   $2,902 
(Loss) earnings  per share:                         
Basic  $(0.13)  $0.94   $0.04   $0.32   $0.10 
Diluted  $(0.13)  $0.92   $0.04   $0.32   $0.10 
(Loss) earnings per share from continuing operations:                         
Basic  $(0.04)  $1.01   $0.23   $0.38   $0.23 
Diluted  $(0.04)  $0.99   $0.23   $0.38   $0.23 
(Loss) earnings per share from discontinued operations:                         
Basic  $(0.09)  $(0.07)  $(0.19)  $(0.06)  $(0.13)
Diluted  $(0.09)  $(0.07)  $(0.19)  $(0.06)  $(0.13)
Consolidated Balance Sheet Data (as of January 31):                         
Working capital  $102,991   $92,628   $60,887   $89,549   $88,344 
Total assets   299,035    305,191    267,147    233,983    217,896 
Deferred revenue   36,473    40,643    44,554    29,396    16,185 
Long-term liabilities   21,569    27,057    15,808    3,745    3,391 
Total liabilities   88,097    96,049    89,225    61,747    52,494 
Total stockholders’ equity   210,938    209,142    177,922    172,236    165,402 

 

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ITEM 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis ("MD&A") of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the other sections of this annual report on Form 10-K, including “Item 1: Business,” “Item 6: Selected Financial Data” and “Item 8: Financial Statements.” Unless otherwise specified, any reference to a “year” is to a year ended January 31. Additionally, when used in this Form 10-K, unless the context requires otherwise, the terms “we”, “our”, “us” and “the Company” refer to SeaChange International, Inc. and its subsidiaries. Certain statements contained in this MD&A and elsewhere in this report are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended that involve risks and uncertainties. These statements relate to future events or our future financial performance. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology such as “believe,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “potential,” “continue,” “estimate,” “plan,” or “anticipate,” or the negatives thereof, other variations thereon or compatible terminology. These statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Actual events or results may differ materially from any forward-looking statement as a result of various factors, including those described in Item 1A above under “Risk Factors.”

 

Servers and Storage Business Segment:

 

On March 21, 2012, we announced the signing of a definitive asset sale agreement to sell a portion of our broadcast services and storage business unit, subject to customary and regulatory approvals. The sale of these assets resulted from our evaluation that this business was no longer a strategic asset that we wished to invest in as we focus our attention to growing into a pure play software company. We have retained certain lines of business that were not included in this asset sale, including video streaming and related hardware, and have reclassified those revenues and earnings into the software segment of our business as they constitute less than ten percent of our total revenues. Unless otherwise indicated, references to the revenues and earnings throughout this MD&A and elsewhere in this Form 10-K refer to revenues from continuing operations and do not include revenue and earnings from the discontinued operations as a result of this asset sale. Similarly, discussion of other matters in our Consolidated Financial Statements refers to continuing operations unless otherwise indicated. The results of the divested portion of our former servers and storage business segment are reported in discontinued operations.

 

Overview

 

We are a global leader in the delivery of multi-screen video. Our products and services facilitate the aggregation, licensing, storage, management and distribution of video, television programming, and advertising content to cable system operators, telecommunications companies and broadcast television companies.

 

On September 1, 2009, we completed our acquisition of eventIS Group B.V. (“eventIS”). eventIS, based in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, provides video-on-demand (“VOD”) and linear broadcast software and related services to cable television and telecommunications companies primarily in Europe. We acquired eventIS to expand our VOD solutions into the European market. We have made cash payments to date to the former shareholder of eventIS of $40.5 million and issued 227,041 of restricted common shares, 75,018 of which will vest in equal installments over three years beginning fiscal 2011 and 152,023 which will vest in equal installments over three years beginning in fiscal 2012. We are obligated to make payments of approximately $137,000 in cash on each of September 1, 2012 and September 1, 2013 and an additional payment in an aggregate amount of $2.8 million with $1.7 million payable in cash and $1.1 million payable by the issuance of restricted shares of our common stock on September 1, 2012. Under the earn-out provisions of the share purchase agreement, a cash payment of $1.7 million for earnouts achieved in fiscal 2011 and 2012 will be paid in fiscal 2013. Additional earn-out payments may be earned in fiscal 2013 if certain performance goals are met, we will be obligated to make additional cash payments to the former shareholders of eventIS. Acquisition costs related to this acquisition of approximately $1.0 million, related primarily to legal, accounting, valuation and other professional services, were recognized in fiscal 2010. These transactions costs were recorded and expensed in general and administrative expenses in our Consolidated Statement of Operations.

 

On February 1, 2010, we completed our acquisition of VividLogic, Inc. (“VividLogic”). VividLogic is based in Fremont, California. Vividlogic provides in-home infrastructure software for high definition televisions, home gateways, and set-top boxes to cable television service providers, set-top box manufacturers and consumer electronics (CE) suppliers. We acquired Vividlogic to expand our home gateway solutions product offerings. Under the purchase agreement we paid $21.5 million in cash at the closing of the transaction, paid an additional $1.0 million in cash on February 1, 2012 and are obligated to make a future payment of $1.0 million on February 1, 2013. In addition, under the share purchase agreement with the former shareholders of VividLogic, in the first quarter of fiscal 2013 we will make a cash earnout payment of $2.7 million for the earnout earned in fiscal 2012. Additional earn-out payments may be earned over fiscal 2013 if certain performance goals are met.

 

27
 

 

Our strategy is to grow our revenues with our installed customer base and add potential new customers by continuing to invest and develop our new next generation software platforms for our back office (Adrenalin), advertising (Infusion and AdPulse) and home gateway (Nucleus) product offerings, as our number one focus is to provide superior service and cost-saving products to our customers. We will also continue to invest in technologies that will help make us an industry leader in multi-screen video. In addition, we are reviewing all areas of our operating costs in order to lower our cost structure and streamline operations in order to improve our profitability. We took actions both in fiscal 2012 and 2011 to lower our operating costs. In fiscal year 2012, we announced annualized savings of approximately $5.0 million primarily related to the reduction in our marketing and sales staff and the elimination or reduction of certain senior executive positions. In fiscal 2011, we eliminated approximately 110 employees, wrote down obsolete inventory and certain fixed assets. We are also evaluating assets that are non-core to our desire to transform into a pure play software company. In that effort, we have signed a definitive asset sale agreement on March 21, 2012 to divest a portion of our former broadcast servers and storage business unit. We expect that sale to close in the near future once customary regulatory approvals are received. We will also look to continue to acquire or invest in new technologies that expand our product offerings and ensure that they will be accretive to shareholder value.

 

Operating Segment, Significant Customers and Geographic Information

 

Operating segments are defined as components of an enterprise evaluated regularly by the Company’s senior management in deciding how to allocate resources and assess performance. Following the divestiture of the broadcast servers and storage product lines, the Software and VOD server product line was organized in one business reporting segment. Reportable segments were determined based upon the nature of the products offered to customers, the market characteristics of each operating segment and the Company’s management structure.

 

Our operations are now organized in the following two business segments:

 

Software segment – This segment includes product revenues from our advertising, back-office including video streamers, and home gateway product solutions, related services such as professional services, installation, training, project management, product maintenance, technical support and software development for those software products.

 

Media Services segment – This segment includes the operations of the On Demand Group which include content acquisition and preparation services for television and wireless service providers.

 

Under this reporting structure, we further determined that there are significant functions, and therefore costs, that are considered corporate expenses and are not allocated to the two reportable segments for the purposes of assessing performance and making operating decisions. These unallocated costs include general and administrative expenses, other than direct general and administrative expenses related to Media Services and Software, other income (expense), net, taxes and equity losses in earnings of affiliates, which are managed separately at the corporate level. The basis of the assumptions for all such revenues, costs and expenses includes significant judgments and estimations. There are no inter-segment revenues for the periods shown below. We do not separately track all assets by operating segments nor are the segments evaluated under this criterion. We have experienced fluctuations in our product revenues from quarter to quarter due to the timing of the receipt of customer orders, the shipment of those orders, and, in certain cases, customer acceptance of products. The factors that impact the timing of the receipt of customer orders include among other factors:

 

the customer’s receipt of authorized signatures on their purchase orders;

 

the budgetary approvals within the customer’s company for capital purchases; and

 

the ability to process the purchase order within the customer’s organization in a timely manner.

 

Factors that may impact the shipment of customer orders include:

 

the availability of material to produce the product;

 

the time required to produce and test the product before delivery; and

 

the customer’s required delivery date.

 

28
 

 

In addition, many customers may delay or reduce capital expenditures. This, together with other factors, could result in reductions in sales of our products, longer sales cycles, difficulties in collection of accounts receivable, excess and obsolete inventory, gross margin deterioration, slower adoption of new technologies, increased price competition and supplier difficulties.

 

Our operating results are significantly influenced by a number of factors, including the mix of products sold and services provided, pricing, costs of materials used in our products and the expansion of our operations during the fiscal year. We price our products and services based upon our costs and consideration of the prices of competitive products and services in the marketplace. The costs of our products primarily consist of the costs of components and subassemblies that have generally declined from product introduction to product maturity. In the current state of the economy, we currently expect that customers may still have limited capital spending budgets as we believe they are dependent on advertising revenues to fund their capital equipment purchases. Accordingly, we expect our financial results to vary from quarter to quarter, and our historical financial results are not necessarily indicative of future performance. In light of the higher proportion of our international business, we expect movements in foreign exchange rates to have a greater impact on our operating results and the equity section of our balance sheet in the future.

 

Fiscal Year Ended January 31, 2012 Compared to the Fiscal Year Ended January 31, 2011

 

The following table sets forth summarized consolidated financial information for each of the two fiscal years ended January 31, 2012 and 2011.

 

29
 

 

   Year Ended 
   January 31, 
   2012   2011 
   (in thousands) 
Revenues:          
Products  $73,157   $82,155 
Services   124,548    119,532 
Total revenues   197,705    201,687 
Costs and expenses:          
Cost of product revenues   22,774    30,256 
Cost of service revenues   76,919    68,576 
Research and development   40,692    44,569 
Selling and marketing   21,619    21,055 
General and administrative   24,116    23,647 
Amortization of intangibles   3,923    3,359 
Acquisition costs   3,312    764 
Restructuring costs   3,316    6,997 
Income from operations   1,034    2,464 
Other expenses, net   (358)   (418)
Gain on sale of investment in affiliates   -    27,071 
Income before income taxes and equity income in earnings of affiliates   676    29,117 
Income tax expense (benefit)   2,193    (2,438)
Equity income in earnings of affiliates, net of tax   233    85 
(Loss) income from continuing operations   (1,284)   31,640 
(Loss) from discontinued operations   (2,730)   (2,172)
Net (loss) income  $(4,014)  $29,468 

 

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Revenues

 

The following table summarizes information about the Company’s reportable segments for each of the two fiscal years ended January 31, 2012 and 2011.

 

   Fiscal Year Ended     
   January 31,     
   2012   2011   % 
   (in thousands, except for percentage data) 
Software Revenues:               
Products  $73,157   $82,155    (11.0%)
Services   91,635    91,501    0.1%
Total  revenues   164,792    173,656    (5.1%)
Cost of product revenues   22,774    30,256    (24.7%)
Cost of service revenues   48,861    45,335    7.8%
Total cost of  revenues   71,635    75,591    (5.2%)
Gross Margin  $93,157   $98,065    (5.0%)
Gross Margin percentage   56.5%   56.5%   0.1%
                
Media Services Revenue:               
Services  $32,913   $28,031    17.4%
Cost of services   28,058   $23,241    20.7%
Gross Margin  $4,855   $4,790    1.4%
Gross Margin percentage   14.8%   17.1%   (2.3%)

 

Software Product Revenue. In fiscal 2012, product revenue decreased approximately 11% to $73.1 million from $82.2 million in the same period in the prior year. The $9.1 million decrease in product revenues compared to fiscal 2011 was due to decreased shipments of VOD servers to North and South American customers of approximately $4.2 million. The decrease in product revenues was also due to a portion of middleware revenues from Virgin Media that were recorded as service revenues during the year ended January 31, 2012 totaling $4.7 million, while recorded entirely as product revenue in the prior year. In the prior year, the agreement with Virgin Media provided for licensing rights and specified enhancements to the software and therefore the associated revenues were classified as product revenues. However, the agreement in the first quarter of fiscal 2012 provided for software licensing rights and software maintenance services, and was accordingly split between product and services revenues.

 

Software Service Revenue. Service revenues were relatively flat compared to fiscal 2011. Service revenues increased $4.7 million due to the reclassification of a portion of middleware revenues from Virgin Media from product revenues to service revenues as noted above, and we achieved higher services revenues from VividLogic. This increase was offset due to fiscal 2011 service revenues having included $4.6 million of maintenance revenues resulting from a deactivation of VOD software and equipment by a U.S customer, and our Comcast software subscription agreement extension being classified as services revenues for the period of February 2010 through May 2010.

 

Media Services Revenue. Revenues from Media Services increased 17.4% to $32.9 million in the year ended January 31, 2012 compared to $28.0 million for the year ended January 31, 2011. The increase in revenue was due primarily to increased content processing revenues from a customer in France and Dubai and new customer contracts in South America signed this year partially offset by lower revenues from Virgin Media.

 

For fiscal 2012 and 2011, two customers each accounted for more than 10%, and collectively accounted for 31% and 36%, respectively, of our total revenues. Revenues from these customers were primarily in the Software segment. We believe that a significant amount of our revenues will continue to be derived from a limited number of customers

 

International products and services revenues accounted for approximately 51% or $100.0 million and 46% or $93.0 million of total revenues in fiscal 2012 and 2011, respectively. We expect that international products and services revenues will remain a significant portion of our business in the future.

 

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Software Gross Margin. Costs of product revenues consist primarily of the cost of purchased material components and subassemblies, labor and overhead relating to the final assembly and testing of complete systems and related expenses, and labor and overhead costs related to software development contracts. Our software gross margin as a percentage of revenues was flat at 57% compared to fiscal 2011.

 

Media Services Gross Margin. Our Media Services segment gross margin of 15% for fiscal 2012 was two percentage points lower than the gross margin for fiscal 2011 due to higher headcount-related costs and increased content costs to support new contracts for customers in Latin America and Eastern Europe.

 

Research and Development. Our research and development expenses consist primarily of employee costs, which include salaries, benefits and related payroll taxes, depreciation of development and test equipment and an allocation of related facility expenses. Research and development expenses were 21% and 22% of total revenues for fiscal 2012 and 2011, respectively, and decreased $3.9 million from $44.6 million to $40.7 million year over year. The year over year decrease is primarily due to lower domestic headcount-related costs primarily related to our VOD server and TV Navigator product lines.

 

Selling and Marketing. Our selling and marketing expenses consist primarily of payroll costs, which include salaries and related payroll taxes, benefits and commissions, travel expenses and certain promotional expenses. Selling and marketing expenses increased from $21.1 million, or approximately 10% of total revenues, in fiscal 2011 to $21.7 million, or approximately 11% of total revenues, for fiscal 2012. The increase of approximately $600,000 was primarily due to an increase in eventIS headcount-related costs and higher third-party commissions partially offset by lower domestic commission expense due to lower domestic revenues.

 

General and Administrative. Our general and administrative expenses consist primarily of employee costs, which include salaries and related payroll taxes and benefit related costs, legal and accounting services, insurance and an allocation of related facilities expenses. In fiscal 2012, general and administrative expenses of $24.1 million increased by approximately $0.5million from $23.6 million for the same period in 2011, and these expenses represented 12% of total revenues for both years. The increase is primarily due to higher stock-based compensation relating to fourth quarter departure of senior executives and higher legal fees of $1.7 million associated with patent ligation and the Company’s review of various strategic alternatives. These expenses were partially offset by the absence of transaction costs totaling $1.6 million related to the VividLogic acquisition, which was included in the prior year’s expenses. After an extensive review of strategic alternatives, the Company decided in November 2011 that it was in the best interest of the shareholders to continue as a standalone public company and concluded this review. As described in Item 1A “Risk Factors”, this evaluation of strategic alternatives has created uncertainty for our business.

 

Amortization of Intangibles. Our amortization expense is primarily related to the costs of acquired intangible assets. Amortization is also based on the future economic value of the related intangible assets which is generally higher in the earlier years of the assets’ lives. Total amortization expense of intangible assets was $5.4 and $5.9 million for fiscal 2012 and fiscal 2011, respectively. Amortization expense charge to operating expenses increased from $3.4 million in fiscal 2011 to $3.9 million in fiscal 2012. An additional $2.2 million and $2.0 million of amortization expense related to acquired technology was charged to cost of sales for the years ended January 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

 

Acquisition-Related Costs. Acquisition-related costs include changes in the fair value of acquisition related contingent consideration, and changes in contingent liabilities related to estimated earn-out payments. During fiscal 2012, we revised our estimate of potential earn-out payments to the former shareholders of VividLogic and eventIS and recorded an accrued expense of $3.3 million to reflect estimated future financial performance compared to the respective earn-out criteria.

 

Restructuring. During fiscal 2012, we incurred a restructuring charge of $3.3 million as we continue to take actions to lower our cost structure as we strive to improve our financial performance and streamline our operations. Included in the restructuring charge are severance costs of $2.8 million related to the termination of 33 employees, including the departure of the President and the retirement of the Chief Executive Officer, the write-down of $430,000 of inventory relating to discontinued VOD server product lines and a $270,000 charge for the disposal of fixed assets relating to the New Hampshire facility.

 

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Other expense, net. The table below provides detail regarding our other income and expenses:

 

   Fiscal Year ended 
   January 31, 
   2012   2011 
   (in thousands) 
Interest income  $352   $307 
Interest expense   (55)   (38)
Foreign exchange loss   (86)   (1,138)
Impairment expense   (684)   - 
Miscellaneous (expense) income   115    451 
   $(358)  $(418)

 

Foreign exchange loss. The decrease in foreign exchange losses was a result of the change in exchange rates between the USD and foreign currencies during fiscal 2012 compared to fiscal 2011.

 

Impairment expense: In fiscal 2012, impairment expense related to the write down to fair value of our New Hampshire facility being held for sale.

 

Gain from sale of investment in affiliates: During fiscal 2011, we recorded the gain on the sale of the entire equity investments in Casa Systems of $25.2 million and InSite One of $1.9 million.

 

Income Tax Provision. Our effective tax rate and income tax provision for fiscal 2012 was (324%) and $2.2 million expense compared to an effective tax rate of 8% and a ($2.4 million) of tax benefit for fiscal 2011. The income tax expense for fiscal 2012 was primarily due to $1.0 million of state income taxes and income tax expense of $1.5 million at foreign subsidiaries in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Ireland.

 

At January 31, 2012 we provided a valuation allowance for the full amount of the U.S. net deferred tax assets due to the uncertainty of realization of those assets. We will continue to assess the need for the valuation allowance at each balance sheet date based on all available evidence. If we determine that we can realize some portion or all of the net deferred tax assets, the valuation allowance would be reversed and a corresponding increase in net income would be recognized during the period.

 

We recognized tax benefits of $400,000 and $300,000 for fiscal 2012 and fiscal 2011, respectively, resulting from the expiration of the statute of limitations for uncertain tax positions. The statute of limitations varies by the various jurisdictions in which we operate. In any given year, the statute of limitations in certain jurisdictions may lapse without examination and any uncertain tax positions taken in these years will result in a reduction of liability for unrecognized tax benefits for that year.

 

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Fiscal Year Ended January 31, 2011 Compared to the Fiscal Year Ended January 31, 2010

 

The following table sets forth summarized consolidated financial information for each of the two fiscal years ended January 31, 2011 and 2010.

 

   Year Ended 
   January 31, 
   2011   2010 
   (in thousands) 
Revenues:          
Products  $82,155   $97,005 
Services   119,532    92,935 
Total revenues   201,687    189,940 
Costs and expenses:          
Cost of product revenues   30,256    35,929 
Cost of service revenues   68,576    54,941 
Research and development   44,569    45,104 
Selling and marketing   21,055    22,425 
General and administrative   23,647    20,823 
Amortization of intangibles   3,359    2,826 
Acquisition costs   764    - 
Restructuring costs   6,997    - 
Income from operations   2,464    7,892 
Other (expense) income, net   (418)   145 
Gain on sale of investment in affiliate   27,071    - 
Income before income taxes and equity income in earnings of affiliates   29,117    8,037 
Income tax (benefit) expense   (2,438)   271 
Equity income  (loss) in earnings of affiliates, net of tax   85    (653)
 Income from continuing operations   31,640    7,113 
(Loss) from discontinued operations   (2,172)   (5,790)
Net income  $29,468   $1,323 

 

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Revenues

 

The following table summarizes information about the Company’s reportable segments for each of the two fiscal years ended January 31, 2011 and 2010.

 

   Fiscal Year Ended     
   January 31,     
   2011   2010   % 
   (in thousands, except for percentage data) 
Software revenues:               
Products  $82,155   $97,005    (15.3%)
Services   91,501    73,141    25.1%
Total Software revenues   173,656    170,146    2.1%
Cost of product revenues   30,256   $35,929    (15.8%)
Cost of service revenues   45,335   $38,431    18.0%
Total cost of  revenues  $75,591   $74,360    1.7%
Gross Margin  $98,065   $95,786    2.4%
Gross Margin percentage   56.5%   56.3%   0.2%
                
Media Services Revenue:               
Services  $28,031   $19,794    41.6%
Cost of services   23,241    16,510    40.8%
Gross Margin  $4,790   $3,284    45.9%
Gross Margin percentage   17.1%   16.6%   0.5.%

 

Software Product Revenue. Our product revenue decreased 15% to $82.2 million in fiscal 2011 from $97.0 million in fiscal 2010. The year over year decrease in product revenues was due to lower VOD software license revenues and lower shipments of VOD servers to North American and Latin American service providers. The lower VOD software licenses revenues was due to the Comcast software subscription agreement extension classification as services revenues for the period of February 2010 through May 2010. Unlike in prior periods, where software subscription agreements with Comcast provided for specified enhancements and therefore were classified as product revenues, the agreement extensions contained no specified enhancements. The new software subscription agreement signed with Comcast during the second quarter of fiscal 2011 was accounted for on a percentage of completion basis and was recorded as product revenues starting on May 21, 2010 since the new subscription agreement provides for specific enhancements. These decreases were partially offset by the inclusion of VividLogic product revenues and the inclusion of eventIS for a full year of revenues, while fiscal 2010 included only five months of eventIS revenues.

 

Software Service Revenue. Our service revenues increased 25% to $91.5 million in fiscal 2011 from $73.1 million in fiscal 2010. The increase in service revenues year over year was due to the inclusion of a full year of service revenues from the acquisitions of eventIS and VividLogic. In addition, fiscal 2011 service revenues included $4.6 million of maintenance revenues resulting from a deactivation of VOD software and equipment by a U.S customer. The higher year over year service revenues also included the Comcast software subscription agreement extension which was classified as services revenues for the period of February 2010 through May 2010, as noted above. These increases were partially offset by lower VOD professional services revenue due to lower VOD server revenues.

 

For fiscal 2011 and 2010, two customers each accounted for more than 10%, and collectively accounted for 36% and 41%, respectively, of our total revenues. International products and services revenues accounted for approximately 46% or $93.0 million and 33% or $63.1 million of total revenues in fiscal 2011 and 2010, respectively.

 

Media Services Revenue. Revenues from Media Services increased 42% to $28.0 million in fiscal 2011 compared to $19.8 million for fiscal 2010. The increase in revenue was due primarily to contract wins in Dubai and France in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011 and increased content processing revenues from customers in Greece and Turkey.

 

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Software Gross Margin. Costs of product revenues consist primarily of the cost of purchased material components and subassemblies, labor and overhead relating to the final assembly and testing of complete systems and related expenses, and labor and overhead costs related to software development contracts. Our software gross margin as a percentage of revenues was flat at 56% in both fiscal 2011 and 2010

 

Media Services Gross Margin. Media Services gross margin of 17% in fiscal 2011 was a half point higher than in fiscal 2010 due to cost savings related to bringing in-house all content processing that was completed in the second half of last year offset by higher startup costs associated with new contract wins in South Africa and Serbia in the second half of fiscal 2011.

 

Research and Development. Our research and development expenses consist primarily of employee costs, which include salaries, benefits and related payroll taxes, depreciation of development and test equipment and an allocation of related facility expenses. Research and development expenses were 22% and 24% of total revenues for fiscal 2011 and 2010, respectively, and decreased approximately $500,000 from $45.1 million to $44.6 million year over year. The decrease in this expense year over year was primarily due to lower domestic headcount-related costs resulting from the our second and third quarter restructuring efforts offset by the inclusion of a full years worth of costs associated with our eventIS acquisition and increased headcount costs in the Philippines.

 

Selling and Marketing. Our selling and marketing expenses consist primarily of payroll costs, which include salaries and related payroll taxes, benefits and commissions, travel expenses and certain promotional expenses. Selling and marketing expenses decreased 6% from $22.4 million or 12% of total revenues in fiscal 2010 to $21.1 million, or 10% of total revenues, in fiscal 2011. This decrease in total expenses is primarily due to lower headcount related costs offset by the inclusion of a full year of costs associated with our eventIS acquisition.

 

General and Administrative. Our general and administrative expenses consist primarily of employee costs, which include salaries and related payroll taxes and benefit related costs, legal and accounting services and an allocation of related facilities expenses. In fiscal 2011, general and administrative expenses of $23.6 million, or 12% of total revenues, increased $2.8 million from $20.8 million, or 11% of total revenues from fiscal 2010. General and administrative expenses increased primarily due to transaction costs related to the VividLogic acquisition and higher legal and professional fees associated with ARRIS litigation that were partially offset by lower corporate headcount-related costs.

 

Restructuring. During fiscal 2011, we initiated actions to lower our cost structure in order to improve our financial performance. During fiscal 2011, we incurred restructuring charges totaling $7.0 million including severance costs of $3.2 million for the termination of approximately 110 employees, a write down of inventory of $2.5 million related to the decision to discontinue certain VOD server products, and a $1.3 million charge for the disposal of fixed assets as a direct result of the restructuring plan.

 

Amortization of Intangibles. Our amortization expense is primarily related to the costs of acquired intangible assets. Total amortization of intangible assets was $5.4 million and $3.4 million for fiscal 2011 and 2010, respectively. Amortization expense charged to operating expenses increased to $3.4 million in fiscal 2011 from $2.8 million in fiscal 2010 primarily due to a full year’s impact of amortization expense related to intangible assets acquired as part of our eventIS and VividLogic acquisitions. Amortization is also based on the future economic value of the related intangible assets which is generally higher in the earlier years of the assets’ lives. An additional $2.0 million and $0.6 million of amortization expense related to acquired technology was charged to cost of sales for fiscal 2011 and 2010, respectively

 

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Other (expense) income, net. The table below provides detail regarding our other income (expense):

 

   Fiscal Year ended 
   January 31, 
   2011   2010 
   (in thousands) 
Interest income (expense), net  $269   $607 
Foreign exchange loss   (1,138)   (572)
Miscellaneous income   451    110 
   $(418)  $145 

 

Interest income and expense. The decrease in interest income was primarily due to the lower prevailing interest rates earned on our marketable securities.

 

Foreign exchange (loss). The increase in foreign exchange losses was a result of the change in exchange rates between U.S.Dollars and foreign currencies during fiscal 2011 compared to fiscal 2010.

 

Acquisition related expenses. For fiscal 2011, our acquisition expenses of $764,000 included $1.1 million in expense related to the write-off of an indemnified asset resulting from the settlement of the California tax audit related to our VividLogic acquisition, that was partially offset by a $870,000 gain resulting from an adjustment to acquisition related intangible assets for which the measurement period had ended as well as changes to the contingent consideration for earn-outs to the former shareholders of eventIS and VividLogic. We incurred no acquisition related expenses in fiscal 2010.

 

Gain from sale of investment in affiliates. Our fiscal 2011 results reflect the gain on the sale of our entire equity investments in Casa Systems of $25.2 million and InSite One of $1.9 million. We had no gain in fiscal 2010.

 

Equity Income/(Loss) in Earnings of Affiliates. Equity income in earnings of affiliates was $85,000 in fiscal 2011 compared to a $653,000 in equity loss in earnings of affiliates for fiscal 2010 due to On Demand Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG increased profitability as a result of a large contract win in Austria and higher content processing in Germany. The equity income (loss) in earnings of affiliates consists of our 50% ownership share of On Demand Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG, our German joint venture, under the equity method of accounting.

 

Income Tax Provision. Our effective tax rate and tax benefit for fiscal 2011 was 8% and $2.4 million, respectively, compared to an effective tax rate and an income tax expense of 4% and $271,000, respectively, for fiscal 2010. The income tax benefit for fiscal 2011 was primarily due to a reduction of a portion of the valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets due to our having met the “more likely than not” realization criteria on its U.S. deferred tax assets resulting from the gain related to our equity investment in Casa Systems, Inc. and the benefit of the reduction in deferred tax assets associated with the deferred tax liabilities from the acquisition of VividLogic. Previously, we maintained a full valuation allowance. We also recognized $300,000 of tax benefits resulting from the expiration of the statute of limitations for uncertain tax positions and $1.0 million of tax benefits resulting from the settlement of a California audit by the former shareholders of VividLogic. In addition, our subsidiary in the United Kingdom. recorded a tax benefit of $540,000 resulting from a successful claim with the United Kingdom tax authorities for previously paid taxes from the transfer of intangible assets from the United Kingdom to our German joint venture.

 

These tax benefits were offset by the tax expense resulting from the gain on the sale of Casa Systems, Inc. and InSite One, Inc. equity and tax expense resulting from our profitable operations in foreign tax jurisdictions.

 

In conjunction with the purchase price allocation for the acquisition of VividLogic, we recorded a liability for uncertain tax position in the amount of $1.2 million. We have reached a settlement with the State of California regarding the previously disclosed state tax audit and have recorded a corresponding tax benefit of $1.0 million. In connection with the settlement of this matter, a $1.1 million indemnified asset was also written-off and recorded as other expenses in the Statement of Operations.

 

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Non-GAAP Measures

 

As part of our ongoing review of financial information related to our business, we regularly use non-GAAP measures, in particular adjusted non-GAAP earnings per share, as we believe they provide a meaningful insight into our business and trends. We also believe that these adjusted non-GAAP measures provide readers of our financial statements with useful information and insight with respect to the results of our business. However, the presentation of adjusted non-GAAP information is not intended to be considered in isolation or as a substitute for results prepared in accordance with GAAP. Below are tables for fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010 which detail and reconcile GAAP and adjusted non-GAAP earnings per share:

 

SeaChange International, Inc.

Reconciliation of Selected GAAP Measures to Non-GAAP Measures - Unaudited

(in thousands, other than per share amounts)

 

   Twelve months Ended   Twelve months Ended   Twelve months Ended 
   January 31, 2012   January 31, 2011   January 31, 2010 
   GAAP   Adjustment   Non-GAAP   GAAP   Adjustment   Non-GAAP   GAAP   Adjustment   Non-GAAP 
Revenues  $197,705        $197,705   $201,687        $201,687   $189,940   $-   $189,940 
                                              
Deferred revenue-acquisition related   -    -    -    -    3,876    3,876    -    1,807    1,807 
Deferred revenue-maintenance acceleration   -    7    7    -    (4,559)   (4,559)   -    -    - 
    197,705    7    197,712    201,687    (683)   201,004    189,940    1,807    191,747 
                                              
                                              
Operating expenses:   96,978         96,978    100,391         100,391    91,178    -    91,178 
Stock-based compensation   -    2,869    2,869    -    2,720    2,720    -    3,105    3,105 
Amortization of intangible assets   -    6,081    6,081    -    5,345    5,345    -    3,465    3,465 
Acquisition related costs   -    3,312    3,312    -    1,595    1,595    -    1,413    1,413 
Restructuring   -    3,316    3,316    -    6,997    6,997    -    -    - 
Strategic alternatives related costs        1,762    1,762    -    -    -    -    -    - 
    96,978    17,340    79,638    100,391    16,657    83,734    91,178    7,983    83,195 
                                              
Income from operations   1,034    17,347    18,381    2,464    15,974    18,438    7,892    9,790    17,682 
                                              
Gain from sale of investment in affiliates   -    -    -    27,071    (27,071)   -    -    -    - 
Impairment from asset held for sale   (678)   678    -                               
                                              
Income tax impact expense (benefit)   2,193    385    2,578    (2,438)   4,865    2,427    371    3,106    3,477 
                                              
Net (loss) income from continuing operations  $(1,284)  $17,640   $16,356   $31,640   $(15,962)  $15,678   $7,113   $6,684   $13,797 
Net (loss) income from discontinued operations  $(2,730)  $1,127   $(1,603)  $(2,172)  $237   $(1,935)  $(5,790)  $125   $(5,665)
Net (loss) income  $(4,014)  $18,767   $14,753   $29,468   $(15,725)  $13,743   $1,323   $6,809   $8,132 
Diluted earnings per share  $(0.13)  $0.59   $0.46   $0.92   $(0.49)  $0.43   $0.04   $0.21   $0.25 
Diluted income per share for continuing operations  $(0.04)  $0.55   $0.51   $0.99   $(0.50)  $0.49   $0.23   $0.21   $0.44 
Diluted income per share for discontinued operations  $(0.09)  $0.04   $(0.05)  $(0.07)  $0.01   $(0.06)  $(0.18)  $0.00   $(0.18)
Diluted weighted average common shares outstanding   32,093    32,093    32,093    31,986    31,986    31,986    31,433    31,433    31,433 

 

 

In managing and reviewing our business performance, we exclude a number of items required by GAAP. Management believes that excluding these items mentioned below is useful in understanding trends and managing our operations. We believe it is useful for investors to understand the effects of these items on our total operating expenses.

 

Deferred revenue acquisition related: Business combination accounting rules require us to account for the fair value of customer contracts assumed in connection with our acquisitions. In connection with our acquisitions of eventIS Group B.V. on September 1, 2009 and VividLogic Inc. on February 1, 2010, the book value of our deferred software revenue was reduced by approximately $5.7 million in the adjustment to fair value. Because these customer contracts may take up to 18 months to complete, our GAAP revenues subsequent to these acquisitions do not reflect the full amount of software revenues on assumed customer contracts that would have otherwise been recorded by eventIS Group B.V. and VividLogic Inc. We believe this adjustment is useful to investors as a measure of the ongoing performance of our business because we have historically experienced high renewal rates on similar customer contracts, although we cannot be certain that customers will renew these contracts.

 

Deferred revenue-maintenance acceleration: We recognized previously deferred maintenance revenue due to a termination by a customer of our maintenance obligation for certain products previously purchased.

 

Stock-based compensation expenses: We have excluded the effect of stock-based compensation and stock-based payroll expenses from our non-GAAP operating expenses and net income measures. Although stock-based compensation is a key incentive offered to our employees, we continue to evaluate our business performance excluding stock-based compensation expenses. Stock-based compensation expenses will recur in future periods.

 

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Amortization of intangible assets: We have excluded the effect of amortization of intangible assets from our non-GAAP operating expenses and net income measures. Amortization of intangibles is inconsistent in amount and frequency and is significantly affected by the timing and size of our acquisitions.

 

Restructuring: We incurred charges due to the restructuring of our business including severance charges, write down of inventory to net realizable value, and the disposal of fixed assets resulting from the restructuring, which we generally would not have otherwise incurred in the periods presented as part of our continuing operations.

 

Acquisition related costs: We incurred expenses in connection with our acquisition of eventIS Group B.V. and VividLogic Inc. during fiscal 2012, 2011, and 2010 which would not have otherwise occurred in the periods presented as part of our operating expenses.

 

Impairment expense: We incurred an impairment charge from the write-down of an asset held for sale.

 

Gain from sale of investment in affiliates: Reflects the gain on the sale of the entire equity investments in Casa Systems and InSite One.

 

Income tax impact expense: The non-GAAP income tax adjustment reflects the effective income tax rate in which the non-GAAP adjustment occurs and any exclusion of changes in the tax valuation allowance.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Historically, we have financed our operations and capital expenditures primarily with the proceeds from sales of our common stock and cash flows generated from operations. At the end of fiscal 2012, our cash and marketable securities balance was $93.8 million, or a $7.6 million increase over the balance at January 31, 2011. The increase was primarily related to cash generated from operations. Our working capital also increased $9.7 million to $102.3 million at January 31, 2012 from $92.6 million at January 31, 2011. We believe that existing funds combined with available borrowings under our revolving line of credit and cash provided by future operating activities are adequate to satisfy our working capital, potential acquisitions, capital expenditure requirements and other contractual obligations for the foreseeable future, including at least the next 12 months. Given our cash and marketable securities and working capital balances, we believe that repatriation of cash from outside the United States will not be a material factor for us.

 

In fiscal year 2012, we generated $14.4 million of cash from continuing operations. This cash provided by operating activities was primarily the result of $24.9 million in non cash expenses and accrued expenses providing $4.6 million. These amounts were offset by uses of cash including a net loss of $1.4 million, a decrease in accounts payable of $2.6 million and deferred revenues of $4.0 million along with an increase in accounts receivable of $2.0 million.

 

We used $8.6 million of cash in investing activities primarily related to capital expenditures of $3.3 million and the payment of fixed consideration of $1.7 million to the former shareholders of eventIS and $3.2 million of earnout payments to the former shareholders of VividLogic.

 

Our financing activities provided $1.8 million in cash primarily due to proceeds received from the issuance of common stock for the exercise of employee stock options.

 

Debt Instruments and Related Covenants

 

The Company maintains a revolving line of credit with RBS Citizens (a subsidiary of the Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc) for $20.0 million which expires on October 31, 2012. Loans made under this revolving line of credit bear interest at a rate per annum equal to the bank’s prime rate. Borrowings under this line of credit are collateralized by substantially all of our assets. The loan agreement requires us to comply with certain financial covenants. As of January 31, 2012, we were in compliance with the financial covenants and there were no amounts outstanding under the revolving line of credit.

 

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Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

The Company does not have any off-balance sheet arrangements as defined in Item 303(a)(4)(ii) of Regulation S-K.

 

Contractual Obligations

 

The following table reflects our current and contingent contractual obligations to make potential future payments as of January 31, 2012 (in thousands):

 

   Total   Less than
one year
   One to three years   Three to
five years
   Over five
years
 
   (in thousands)     
Purchase obligations  $3,037   $3,037   $-   $-   $- 
Non-cancelable lease obligations   5,620    2,222    2,830    568    - 
Studio content deals   13,301    8,346    4,955    -    - 
Contingent consideration   12,255    3,794    8,461    -    - 
Total  $34,213   $17,399   $16,246   $568   $- 

 

The purchase obligations include open, non-cancelable purchase commitments from our suppliers.

 

We have excluded from the table above uncertain tax liabilities as defined by authoritative guidance due to the uncertainty of the amount and period of payment. As of January 31, 2012, we have gross unrecognized tax benefits of $6.5 million.

 

Under the share purchase agreement with the former shareholder of eventIS on September 1, 2012, we are obligated to make an additional fixed payment in an aggregate amount of $2.8 million with $1.7 million payable in cash and $1.1 million payable by the issuance of restricted shares of our common stock, which will vest in equal installments over three years starting on the first anniversary of the date of issuance. Additionally, we are obligated to make payments of approximately $137,000 in cash on each of September 1, 2012 and September 1, 2013. Under the earn-out provisions of the share purchase agreement a cash payment of $1.7 million for earnouts earned in fiscal 2012 and 2011 will be paid in fiscal 2013. An additional earn-out payment may be earned for fiscal 2013 if certain performance goals are met.

 

We are obligate to make a payment of $1.0 million in cash on February 1, 2013 to the former shareholders of VividLogic. In addition, under the share purchase agreement with the former shareholders of VividLogic, we will make cash earnout payment of $2.7 million in the first quarter of fiscal 2013. Additional earn-out payments may be earned for fiscal 2013 if certain performance goals are met.

 

We are occasionally required to post letters of credit, issued by a financial institution, to secure certain sales contracts. Letters of credit generally authorize the financial institution to make a payment to the beneficiary upon the satisfaction of a certain event or the failure to satisfy an obligation. The letters of credit are generally posted for one-year terms and are usually automatically renewed upon maturity until such time as we have satisfied the commitment secured by the letter of credit. We are obligated to reimburse the issuer only if the beneficiary collects on the letter of credit. We believe that it is unlikely we will be required to fund a claim under our outstanding letters of credit. As of January 31, 2012, the full amount of our outstanding letters of credit of $1.6 million was supported by our credit facility.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies

 

Our financial statements are prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The application of certain of these accounting principles is more critical than others in gaining the understanding of the basis upon which our financial statements have been prepared. We consider the following accounting policies to involve critical accounting estimates.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

We consolidate the financial statements of our wholly-owned subsidiaries and all inter-company accounts are eliminated in consolidation. We also hold minority investments in the capital stock of certain private companies having product offerings or customer relationships that have strategic importance. We evaluate our equity and debt investments and other contractual relationships with affiliate companies in order to determine whether the guidelines regarding the consolidation of Variable Interest Entities (“VIE”) should be applied in the financial statements. Consolidation guidelines address consolidation by business enterprises of variable interest entities that possess certain characteristics. A VIE is defined as an entity in which equity investors do not have the characteristics of a controlling financial interest or do not have sufficient equity at risk for the entity to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support. The primary beneficiary is required to consolidate the financial position and results of the VIE. We have concluded that we are not the primary beneficiary for any variable interest entities as of January 31, 2012.

 

Our investments in affiliates include investments accounted for under the cost method and the equity method of accounting. The investments that represent less than a 20% ownership interest of the common shares of the affiliate are carried at cost. Under the equity method of accounting, which generally applies to investments that represent 20% to 50% ownership of the common shares of the affiliate, our proportionate ownership share of the earnings or losses of the affiliate are included in equity income (loss) in earnings of affiliates in the consolidated statement of operations.

 

We periodically review indicators of the fair value of our investments in affiliates in order to assess whether available facts or circumstances, both internally and externally, may suggest an other-than-temporary decline in the value of the investment. The carrying value of an investment in an affiliate may be affected by the affiliate’s ability to obtain adequate funding and execute its business plans, general market conditions, industry considerations specific to the affiliate’s business, and other factors. The inability of an affiliate to obtain future funding or successfully execute its business plan could adversely affect our equity earnings of the affiliate in the periods affected by those events. Future adverse changes in market conditions or poor operating results of the affiliates could result in equity losses or an inability to recover the carrying value of the investments in affiliates that may not be reflected in an investment’s current carrying value, thereby possibly requiring an impairment charge in the future. We record an impairment charge when we believe an investment has experienced a decline in value that is other-than-temporary.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Our transactions frequently involve the sales of hardware, software, systems and services in multiple element arrangements. Revenues from sales of hardware, software and systems that do not require significant modification or customization of the underlying software are recognized when title and risk of loss have passed to the customer, there is evidence of an arrangement, fees are fixed or determinable and collection of the related receivable is considered probable. Customers are billed for installation, training, project management and at least one year of product maintenance and technical support at the time of the product sale. Revenue from these activities are deferred at the time of the product sale and recognized ratably over the period these services are performed. Revenue from ongoing product maintenance and technical support agreements are recognized ratably over the period of the related agreements. Revenue from software development contracts that include significant modification or customization, including software product enhancements, is recognized based on the percentage of completion contract accounting method using labor efforts expended in relation to estimates of total labor efforts to complete the contract. Accounting for contract amendments and customer change orders are included in contract accounting when executed. Revenue from shipping and handling costs and other out-of-pocket expenses reimbursed by customers are included in revenues and cost of revenues. Our share of intercompany profits associated with sales and services provided to affiliated companies are eliminated in consolidation in proportion to our equity ownership.

 

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We have historically applied the software revenue recognition rules as prescribed by Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Subtopic 985-605. In October 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) Number 2009-14, “Certain Revenue Arrangements That Include Software Elements,” which amended ASC Subtopic 985-605. This ASU removes tangible products containing software components and non-software components that function together to deliver the product’s essential functionality from the scope of the software revenue recognition rules. In the case of our hardware products with embedded software, we have determined that the hardware and software components function together to deliver the product’s essential functionality, and therefore, the revenue from the sale of these products no longer falls within the scope of the software revenue recognition rules. Revenue from the sale of software-only products remains within the scope of the software revenue recognition rules. Maintenance and support, training, consulting, and installation services no longer fall within the scope of the software revenue recognition rules, except when they are sold with and relate to a software-only product. Revenue recognition for products that no longer fall under the scope of the software revenue recognition rules are similar to that for other tangible products and ASU Number 2009-13, “Multiple-Deliverable Revenue Arrangements,” which amended ASC Topic 605 and was also issued in October 2009, which is applicable for multiple-deliverable revenue arrangements. ASU 2009-13 allows companies to allocate revenue in a multiple-deliverable arrangement in a manner that better reflects the transaction’s economics. ASU 2009-13 and 2009-14 are effective for revenue arrangements entered into or materially modified in our fiscal year 2012 and thereafter.

 

Under the software revenue recognition rules, the fee is allocated to the various elements based on VSOE of fair value. Under this method, the total arrangement value is allocated first to undelivered elements, based on their fair values, with the remainder being allocated to the delivered elements. Where fair value of undelivered service elements has not been established, the total arrangement value is recognized over the period during which the services are performed. The amounts allocated to undelivered elements, which may include project management, training, installation, maintenance and technical support and certain hardware and software components, are based upon the price charged when these elements are sold separately and unaccompanied by the other elements. The amount allocated to installation, training and project management revenue is based upon standard hourly billing rates and the estimated time to complete the service. These services are not essential to the functionality of systems as these services do not alter the equipment’s capabilities, are available from other vendors and the systems are standard products. For multiple element arrangements that include software development with significant modification or customization and systems sales where vendor-specific objective evidence of the fair value does not exist for the undelivered elements of the arrangement (other than maintenance and technical support), percentage of completion accounting is applied for revenue recognition purposes to the entire arrangement with the exception of maintenance and technical support. All multiple-deliverable revenue arrangements negotiated prior to February 1, 2011 and the sale of all software-only products and associated services have been accounted for under this guidance.

 

Under the revenue recognition rules for tangible products as amended by ASU 2009-13, the fee from a multiple-deliverable arrangement is allocated to each of the deliverables based upon their relative selling prices as determined by a selling-price hierarchy. A deliverable in an arrangement qualifies as a separate unit of accounting if the delivered item has value to the customer on a stand-alone basis. A delivered item that does not qualify as a separate unit of accounting is combined with the other undelivered items in the arrangement and revenue is recognized for those combined deliverables as a single unit of accounting. The selling price used for each deliverable is based upon VSOE if available, third-party evidence (TPE) if VSOE is not available, and best estimate of selling price (BESP) if neither VSOE nor TPE are available. TPE is the price of the Company’s or any competitor’s largely interchangeable products or services in stand-alone sales to similarly situated customers. BESP is the price at which we would sell the deliverable if it were sold regularly on a stand-alone basis, considering market conditions and entity-specific factors. All multiple-deliverable revenue arrangements negotiated after February 1, 2011, excluding the sale of all software-only products and associated services, have been accounted for under this guidance.

 

The selling prices used in the relative selling price allocation method for certain of our services are based upon VSOE. The selling prices used in the relative selling price allocation method for third-party products from other vendors are based upon TPE. The selling prices used in the relative selling price allocation method for our hardware products, software, subscriptions, and customized services for which VSOE does not exist are based upon BESP. We do not believe TPE exists for these products and services because they are differentiated from competing products and services in terms of functionality and performance and there are no competing products or services that are largely interchangeable. Management establishes BESP with consideration for market conditions, such as the impact of competition and geographic considerations, and entity-specific factors, such as the cost of the product, discounts provided and profit objectives. Management believes that BESP is reflective of reasonable pricing of that deliverable as if priced on a stand-alone basis.

 

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Since all of our revenue prior to the adoption of ASU 2009-14 fell within the scope of the software revenue recognition rules and we have only established VSOE for services and revenue in a multiple-deliverable arrangement involving products, revenue was frequently deferred until the last item was delivered. The adoption of ASU 2009-13 and 2009-14 has resulted in earlier revenue recognition in multiple-deliverable arrangements involving our hardware products with embedded software because revenue can be recognized for each of these deliverables based upon their relative selling prices as defined above. The revenue impact was an increase of $3.3 million during fiscal 2012.

 

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

We recognize revenue for products and services only in those situations where collection from the customer is probable. We perform ongoing credit evaluations of customers’ financial condition but generally do not require collateral. For some international customers, we may require an irrevocable letter of credit to be issued by the customer before the purchase order is accepted. We monitor payments from customers and assess any collection issues. We maintain allowances for specific doubtful accounts and other risk categories of accounts based on estimates of losses resulting from the inability of our customers to make required payments and record these allowances as a charge to general and administrative expenses. We base our allowances for doubtful accounts on historical collections and write-off experience, current trends, credit assessments, and other analysis of specific customer situations. While such credit losses have historically been within our expectations and the allowances established, we cannot guarantee that we will continue to experience the same credit loss rates that we have in the past. If the financial condition of our customers were to change, additional allowances may be required or established allowances may be considered unnecessary. Judgment is required in making these determinations and our failure to accurately estimate the losses for doubtful accounts and ensure that payments are received on a timely basis could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Inventories and Reserves

 

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined using the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method. Inventories consist primarily of components and subassemblies and finished products held for sale. All of our hardware components are purchased from outside vendors. The value of inventories is reviewed quarterly to determine that the carrying value is stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. We record charges to reduce inventory to its net realizable value when impairment is identified through the quarterly review process. The obsolescence evaluation is based upon assumptions and estimates about future demand and possible alternative uses and involves significant judgments. For the year ended January 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, we recorded $1.0 million, $3.0 million and $1.0 million in inventory write-downs, respectively, of which $430,000 and $2.5 million were recorded in restructuring expense for fiscal 2012 and 2011, respectively.

 

Accounting for Business Combinations

 

In our business combinations, we are required to recognize the assets acquired, liabilities assumed, contractual contingencies, and contingent consideration at their fair value on the acquisition date. The purchase price allocation process requires management to make significant estimates and assumptions, especially at acquisition date with respect to intangible assets, estimated contingent consideration payments and pre-acquisition contingencies. Although we believe the assumptions and estimates we have made have been reasonable and appropriate, they are based in part on historical experience and information obtained from the management of the acquired company and are inherently uncertain. Examples of critical estimates in accounting for acquisitions include but are not limited to:

 

the estimated fair value of the acquisition-related contingent consideration, which is calculated using a probability-weighted discounted cash flow model based upon the forecasted achievement of post acquisition bookings targets;

 

the future expected cash flows from product sales, support agreements, consulting contracts, other customer contracts and acquired developed technologies and patents; and

 

the relevant discount rates.

 

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Unanticipated events and circumstances may occur which may affect the accuracy or validity of such assumptions, estimates or actual results. Additionally, any change in the fair value of the acquisition-related contingent consideration subsequent to the acquisition date, including changes from events after the acquisition date, such as changes in our estimate of the bookings that are expected to be achieved, will be recognized in earnings in the period of the estimated fair value change. A change in fair value of the acquisition-related contingent consideration could have a material effect on the statement of operations and financial position in the period of the change in estimate.

 

Goodwill and Acquired Intangible Assets

 

Acquired intangible assets result from our various business acquisitions and certain licensed technologies, and consist of identifiable intangible assets, including completed technology, licensing agreements, non-compete agreements and customer relationships. Acquired intangible assets are reported at cost, net of accumulated amortization and are either amortized on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives during the period the economic benefits of the intangible asset are consumed or otherwise used up.

 

Goodwill is the amount by which the cost of the acquired net assets in a business acquisition exceeded the fair values of the net identifiable assets on the date of purchase. Goodwill is not amortized and is assessed for impairment at least annually, on a reporting unit basis, or more frequently when events and circumstances occur indicating that the recorded goodwill may be impaired. We determine our reporting units by assessing whether discrete financial information is available and if management regularly reviews the operating results of that component. Following our annual assessment completed in fiscal 2012, we have determined that our reporting units are the same as our operating segments, which consist of the Software and Media Services operating segments. We test goodwill for impairment by evaluating the fair value of the reporting unit as compared to the book value. If the book value of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, the implied fair value of goodwill is compared with the carrying amount of goodwill. If the carrying amount of goodwill exceeds the implied fair value, an impairment loss is recorded in an amount equal to that excess.

 

Software Development Costs

 

We develop software for resale in markets that are subject to rapid technological change, new product development and changing customer needs. The time period during which software development costs can be capitalized from the point of reaching technological feasibility until the time of general product release is very short, and consequently, the amounts that could be capitalized are not material to the Company’s financial position or results of operations. Software development costs relating to sales of software requiring significant modification or customization are charged to costs of product revenues.

 

We also purchase software for resale and capitalize those costs associated with projects that meet technological feasibility. As of January 31, 2012, $737,000 of purchased software costs was capitalized. Amortization expense is recorded over the period of economic consumption or the life of the agreement, whichever results in the higher expense, starting with the first shipment of the product to a customer. Amortization expense of capitalized software is recorded over the period of economic consumption or the life of the agreement, whichever results in the higher expense, starting with the first shipment of the product to a customer. Amortization expense of capitalized software was $361,000, $8,000 and $5,100 for fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. As a result of the divestiture of a portion of broadcast servers and storage business unit and our restructuring, in fiscal 2012 we recorded an impairment charge to restructuring expenses of $138,000 for purchased software that will no longer be used.

 

Long –Lived Assets

 

We also evaluate property and equipment, investments, intangible assets and other long-lived assets on a regular basis for the existence of facts or circumstances, both internal and external, that may suggest an asset is not recoverable. If such circumstances exist, we evaluate the carrying value of long-lived assets to determine if impairment exists based upon estimated undiscounted future cash flows over the remaining useful life of the assets and compare that value to the carrying value of the assets. Our cash flow estimates contain management’s best estimates, using appropriate and customary assumptions and projections at the time. Due to restructuring of the VOD server product lines and divesture of a portion of the broadcast and servers product line, we determined we would vacate the facility in New Hampshire and place the building for sale. As such, in fiscal 2012, we recorded a $678,000 impairment charge for the building and a $270,000 impairment charge for equipment in New Hampshire included on the consolidated statement of operations.

 

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Accounting for Income Taxes

 

As part of the process of preparing our financial statements, we are required to estimate our provision for income taxes in each of the jurisdictions in which we operate. This process involves estimating our actual current tax exposure, including assessing the risks associated with tax audits, together with assessing temporary differences resulting from the different treatment of items for tax and accounting purposes. These differences result in deferred tax assets and liabilities, which are included within our balance sheet.

 

Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective income tax bases, and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. We evaluate the weight of all available evidence to determine whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred income tax assets will not be realized. We will record a valuation allowance if the likelihood of realization of the deferred tax assets in the future is reduced based on an evaluation of objective verifiable evidence. Significant management judgment is required in determining our income tax provision, our deferred tax assets and liabilities and any valuation allowance recorded against our deferred tax assets. We have established a valuation allowance against our United States deferred tax assets due to indications that they may not be fully realized. The amount of the deferred tax asset considered realizable is subject to change based on future events, including generating sufficient pre-tax income in future periods. In the event that actual results differ from these estimates, our provision for income taxes could be materially impacted. We do not provide for U.S. federal and state income taxes on the undistributed earnings of its non-U.S. subsidiaries that are considered indefinitely reinvested in the operations outside the U.S.

 

Authoritative guidance as it relates to income tax liabilities states that the minimum threshold a tax position is required to meet before being recognized in the financial statements is “more likely than not” (i.e., a likelihood of occurrence greater than fifty percent). The recognition threshold is met when an entity concludes that a tax position, based solely on its technical merits, is more likely than not to be sustained upon examination by the relevant taxing authority. Those tax positions failing to qualify for initial recognition are recognized in the first interim period in which they meet the more likely than not standard, or are resolved through negotiation or litigation with the taxing authority, or upon expiration of the statute of limitations. Derecognition of a tax position that was previously recognized occurs when an entity subsequently determines that a tax position no longer meets the more likely than not threshold of being sustained.

 

We file annual income tax returns in multiple taxing jurisdictions around the world. A number of years may elapse before an uncertain tax position is audited and finally resolved. While it is often difficult to predict the final outcome or the timing of resolution of any particular uncertain tax position, we believe that our reserves for income taxes reflect the most likely outcome. We adjust these reserves as well as the related interest and penalties, in light of changing facts and circumstances. If our estimate of tax liabilities proves to be less than the ultimate assessment, a further charge to expense would result. If payment of these amounts ultimately proves to be unnecessary, the reversal of the liabilities would result in tax benefits being recognized in the period when we determine the liabilities are no longer necessary. The changes in estimate could have a material impact on our financial position and operating results. In addition, settlement of any particular position could have a material and adverse effect on our cash flows and financial position.

 

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Share-based Compensation

 

We account for all employee and non-employee director stock-based compensation awards using the authoritative guidance regarding share based payments. We have continued to use the Black-Scholes pricing model as the most appropriate method for determining the estimated fair value of all applicable awards. Determining the appropriate fair value model and calculating the fair value of share-based payment awards requires the input of highly subjective assumptions, including the expected life of the share-based payment awards and stock price volatility. Management estimated the volatility based on the historical volatility of our stock. The assumptions used in calculating the fair value of share-based payment awards represent management’s best estimates, but these estimates involve inherent uncertainties and the application of management’s judgment. As a result, if circumstances change and we use different assumptions, our share-based compensation expense could be materially different in the future. In addition, we are required to estimate the expected forfeiture rate and only recognize expense for those shares expected to vest. If our actual forfeiture rate is materially different from our estimate, the share-based compensation expense could be significantly different from what we have recorded in the current period. The estimated fair value of our stock-based options and performance-based restricted stock units, less expected forfeitures, is amortized over the awards’ vesting period on a graded vesting basis, whereas the restricted stock units are amortized on a straight line basis.

 

Foreign Currency Translation

 

For subsidiaries where the U.S. dollar is designated as the functional currency of the entity, we translate that entity’s monetary assets and liabilities denominated in local currencies into U.S. dollars (the functional and reporting currency) at current exchange rates, as of each balance sheet date. Non-monetary assets (e.g., inventories, property, plant, and equipment and intangible assets) and related income statement accounts (e.g., cost of sales, depreciation, amortization of intangible assets) are translated at historical exchange rates between the functional currency (the U.S. dollar) and the local currency. Revenue and other expense items are translated using average exchange rates during the fiscal period. Translation adjustments and transaction gains and losses on foreign currency transactions, and any unrealized gains and losses on short-term inter-company transactions are included in other income or expense, net.

 

For subsidiaries where the local currency is designated as the functional currency, we translate the subsidiaries’ assets and liabilities into U.S. dollars (the reporting currency) at current exchange rates as of each balance sheet date. Revenue and expense items are translated using average exchange rates during the period. Cumulative translation adjustments are presented as a separate component of stockholders’ equity. Exchange gains and losses on foreign currency transactions and unrealized gains and losses on short-term inter-company transactions are included in other income or expense, net.

 

The aggregate foreign exchange transaction losses included as other expense, net on the consolidated statement of operations was $86,000, $1.1 million and $572,000 for the years ended January 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

 

Recent Accounting Guidance Not Yet Effective

 

Other Comprehensive Income

 

The amendments in ASU 2011-05 revise the manner in which companies present comprehensive income in their financial statements in order to make U.S. GAAP and international standards more consistent. This ASU requires companies to report the components of comprehensive income in either a continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. In the two-statement approach, the first statement would present the components of net income, similar to the Company’s current Consolidated Statements of Operations, while the second statement would include the components of other comprehensive income, as well as a cumulative total for comprehensive income

 

In December 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASU 2011-12 to defer one provision of ASU 2011-05. The amendments in ASU 2011-12 defer the requirements under ASU 2011-05 to present reclassification adjustments by component in both the statement where net income is presented and the statement where other comprehensive income is presented. This deferral was prompted by users’ concerns that the presentation requirements would be costly to implement and could add unnecessary complexity to financial statements.

 

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Neither of these ASU’s changes the items that must be reported in other comprehensive income. Both Updates must be applied retrospectively beginning in the first quarter of 2012. Our adoption date will be February 1, 2012, the beginning of our first quarter for fiscal 2013.

 

Fair Value Measurement

 

In May 2011, the FASB issued amended guidance clarifying how to measure and disclose fair value. This guidance amends the application of the “highest and best use” concept to be used only in the measurement of the fair value of nonfinancial assets, clarifies that the measurement of the fair value of equity-classified financial instruments should be performed from the perspective of a market participant who holds the instrument as an asset, clarifies that an entity that manages a group of financial assets and liabilities on the basis of its net risk exposure to those risks can measure those financial instruments on the basis of its net exposure to those risks, and clarifies when premiums and discounts should be taken into account when measuring fair value. The fair value disclosure requirements also were amended. These provisions are effective for reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2011 applied prospectively. Early application is not permitted. We are currently reviewing what effect, if any, this new provision will have on our Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

Goodwill Impairment Test

 

In September 2011, the FASB issued additional guidance on goodwill impairment testing. This guidance permits an entity to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount as a basis for determining whether it is necessary to perform the two-step goodwill impairment test. This guidance is effective for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011 with early adoption permitted. We anticipate that it will not have a material impact on our consolidated financial position or results of operations.

 

ITEM 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

Foreign Currency Exchange Risk

 

We face exposure to financial market risks, including adverse movements in foreign currency exchange rates and changes in interest rates. These exposures may change over time as business practices evolve and could have a material adverse impact on our financial results. Our foreign currency exchange exposure is primarily associated with product sales arrangements or settlement of intercompany payables and receivables among subsidiaries and its parent company, and/or investment/equity contingency considerations denominated in the local currency where the functional currency of the foreign subsidiary is the U.S. dollar.

 

Substantially all of our international product sales are payable in United States Dollars (USD) or in the case of our Media Services operations in the United Kingdom and eventIS in the Netherlands, payable in local currencies, providing a natural hedge for receipts and local payments. In light of the high proportion of our international businesses, we expect the risk of any adverse movements in foreign currency exchange rates could have an impact on our translated results within the Consolidated Statements of Operations. In addition, for the year ended January 31, 2012, we generated a foreign currency translation loss of $872,000 which was recorded as accumulated other comprehensive gain increasing the equity section of the balance sheet.

 

We do not enter into derivative financial instruments for trading purposes and do not currently have outstanding derivative financial instruments related to payment obligations of the company. While we do not anticipate that near-term changes in exchange rates will have a material impact on our operating results, financial position and liquidity, a sudden and significant change in the value of foreign currencies could harm our operating results, financial position and liquidity.

 

The U.S. Dollar is the functional currency for a majority of our international subsidiaries. All foreign currency gains and losses are included in interest and other income, net, in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Operations. In fiscal year 2012, we recorded approximately $86,000 in losses due to international subsidiary translations and $1.1 million in losses due to cash settlements of revenues and expenses.

 

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Interest Rate Risk

 

Exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates primarily to our investment portfolio of marketable debt securities of various issuers, types and maturities and to our borrowings under our bank line of credit facility. We do not use derivative instruments in our investment portfolio, and our investment portfolio only includes highly liquid instruments. Our cash and marketable securities include cash equivalents, which we consider to be investments purchased with original maturities of nine months or less. There is risk that losses could be incurred if we were to sell any of its securities prior to stated maturity. Given the short maturities and investment grade quality of the portfolio holdings at January 31, 2012, a sharp rise in interest rates should not have a material adverse impact on the fair value of our investment portfolio. Additionally, our long term marketable investments, which are carried at the lower of cost or market, have fixed interest rates, and therefore are subject to changes in fair value. At January 31, 2012, we had $7.9 million in short-term marketable securities and $4.1 million in long-term marketable securities.

 

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ITEM 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

INDEX TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

  Page
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 50
Consolidated Balance Sheet as of January 31, 2012 and 2011 51
Consolidated Statement of Operations for the years ended January 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010 52
Consolidated Statement of Stockholders’ Equity and Comprehensive Income (Loss) for the years ended January 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010 53
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for the years ended January 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010 54
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements 55
  Page
Schedule II—Valuation and Qualifying Accounts and Reserves 94

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of SeaChange International, Inc.

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of SeaChange International, Inc. (a Delaware corporation) and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of January 31, 2012 and 2011, and the related consolidated statements of operations stockholders’ equity and comprehensive income (loss), and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended January 31, 2012. Our audits of the basic financial statements included the financial statement schedule listed in the index appearing under Item 15 (a) (2). These financial statements and financial statement schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and financial statement schedule based on our audits.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of SeaChange International, Inc. and subsidiaries as of January 31, 2012 and 2011, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended January 31, 2012, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Also in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic consolidated financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein.

 

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of January 31, 2012, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) and our report dated April 5, 2012 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

 

 

 

Boston, Massachusetts

April 5, 2012

 

50
 

 

SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

(in thousands, except share data)

 

   January 31,   January 31, 
   2012   2011 
Assets          
Current assets:          
Cash and cash equivalents  $80,585   $73,145 
Restricted cash   1,200    1,332 
Marketable securities   7,855    7,340 
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $972 in 2012 and $995 in 2011, respectively   49,079    48,843 
Unbilled receivables   6,066    5,644 
Inventories, net   10,218    11,041 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   8,695    6,956 
Assets held for sale   646    - 
Deferred tax assets   2,065    3,775 
Current assets related to discontinued operations   3,110    3,544 
Total current assets   169,519    161,620 
Property and equipment, net   30,566    34,858 
Marketable securities, long-term   4,140    4,379 
Investments in affiliates   3,013    2,913 
Intangible assets, net   23,761    30,306 
Goodwill   63,640    64,679 
Other assets   1,515    2,055 
Deferred tax assets, long-term   526    2,156 
Non-current assets related to discontinued operations   2,355    2,225 
Total assets  $299,035   $305,191 
Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity          
Current liabilities:          
Accounts payable  $9,362   $11,249 
Other accrued expenses   19,271    16,528 
Customer deposits   3,067    3,993 
Deferred revenues   31,835    33,713 
Deferred tax liabilities   214    183 
Current liabilities related to discontinued operations   2,779    3,326 
Total current liabilities   66,528    68,992 
Deferred revenue, long-term   4,638    6,930 
Other liabilities, long-term   8,461    11,231 
Distribution and losses in excess of investment   743    1,161 
Taxes payable, long-term   3,043    3,013 
Deferred tax liabilities, long-term   4,684    4,722 
Total liabilities   88,097    96,049 
           
Commitments and contingencies (Note 10)          
           
Stockholders Equity:          
Common stock, $0.01 par value;100,000,000 shares authorized; 32,534,444 and 31,876,815 shares issued; 32,494,660 and 31,837,031 shares outstanding, respectively   326    319 
Additional paid-in capital   213,880    207,121 
Treasury stock, at cost 39,784 and 39,784 common shares, respectively   (1)   (1)
Accumulated income   6,507    10,521 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss   (9,774)   (8,818)
Total stockholders’ equity   210,938    209,142 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity  $299,035   $305,191 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

(in thousands, except per share data)

 

   Fiscal Year ended January 31, 
   2012   2011   2010 
Revenues:               
Products  $73,157   $82,155   $97,005 
Services   124,548    119,532    92,935 
Total revenues   197,705    201,687    189,940 
Cost of revenues:               
Products   22,774    30,256    35,929 
Services   76,919    68,576    54,941 
Total cost of revenues   99,693    98,832    90,870 
Gross profit   98,012    102,855    99,070 
Operating expenses:               
Research and development   40,692    44,569    45,104 
Selling and marketing   21,619    21,055    22,425 
General and administrative   24,116    23,647    20,823 
Amortization of intangibles   3,923    3,359    2,826 
Acquisition costs   3,312    764    - 
Restructuring costs   3,316    6,997    - 
Total operating expenses   96,978    100,391    91,178 
Income from operations   1,034    2,464    7,892 
Interest income   352    307    763 
Interest expense   (55)   (38)   (156)
Other expense, net   (655)   (687)   (462)
Gain on sale of investment in affiliates   -    27,071    - 
Income before income taxes and equity income (loss) in earnings of affiliates   676    29,117    8,037 
Income tax expense (benefit)   2,193    (2,438)   271 
Equity income (loss) in earnings of affiliates, net of tax   233    85    (653)
(Loss) income from continuing operations   (1,284)   31,640    7,113 
Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax   (2,730)   (2,172)   (5,790)
Net (loss) income  $(4,014)  $29,468   $1,323 
Earnings per share:               
Basic (loss) income per share  $(0.13)  $0.94   $0.04 
Diluted (loss) income per share  $(0.13)  $0.92   $0.04 
Earnings per share from continuing operations:               
Basic (loss) income per share  $(0.04)  $1.01   $0.23 
Diluted (loss) income per share  $(0.04)  $0.99   $0.23 
Loss per share from discontinued operations:               
Basic (loss) income per share  $(0.09)  $(0.07)  $(0.19)
Diluted (loss) income per share  $(0.09)  $(0.07)  $(0.19)
Weighted average common shares outstanding:               
Basic   32,093    31,434    30,860 
Diluted   32,093    31,986    31,433 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDER'S EQUITY AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

(in thousands, except per share data)

 

   Common Stock           Accumulated other comprehensive income(loss)   Treasury Stock         
            Additional       Cumulative   Unrealized           Total     
   Number of   Par   paid-in    Accumulated   translation   gain/loss on   Number of       Stockholders'   Comprehensive 
   shares   value   capital   Deficit   adjustment   investments   shares   Amount   Equity   income (loss) 
                                         
Balance at January 31, 2009   31,822,838   $318   $206,411   $(18,773)  $(10,190)  $459    (873,381)   (5,989)   172,236      
Issuance of common stock pursuant to exercise of stock options   47,805    1    483    -    -         -    -    484      
Issuance of common stock in connection with the employee stock purchase plan   282,889    3    1,510    -    -    -    -    -    1,513      
Issuance of common stock pursuant to vesting of restricted stock units   409,531    4    (4)   -    -    -    -    -    -      
Stock-based compensation expense   -    -    3,104    -    -    -    -    -    3,104      
Purchase of treasury shares                       -    -    (473,415)   (2,768)   (2,768)     
Change in fair value on marketable securities, net of tax   -    -    -    -    -    (262)   -    -    (262)  $(262)
Translation adjustment   -    -    -    -    2,292    -    -    -    2,292    2,292 
Net income   -    -    -    1,323    -    -    -    -    1,323    1,323 
Comprehensive income                                               $3,353 
                                                   
Balance at January 31, 2010   32,563,063    326    211,504    (17,450)   (7,898)   197    (1,346,796)   (8,757)   177,922      
Issuance of common stock pursuant to exercise of stock options   309,195    4    2,076    -    -         -    -    2,080      
Issuance of common stock in connection with the employee stock purchase plan   135,632    2    658    -    -    -    -    -    660      
Issuance of common stock pursuant to vesting of restricted stock units   353,542    2    (2)   -    -    -    -    -    -      
Stock-based compensation expense   -    -    1,564    -    -    -    -    -    1,564      
Purchase of treasury shares                       -    -    (177,605)   (1,435)   (1,435)     
Retirement of shares   (1,484,617)   (15)   (8,679)   (1,497)             1,484,617    10,191           
Change in fair value on marketable securities, net of tax   -    -    -    -    -    (77)   -    -    (77)  $(77)
Translation adjustment   -    -    -    -    (1,040)   -    -    -    (1,040)   (1,040)
Net income   -    -    -    29,468    -    -    -    -    29,468    29,468 
Comprehensive income                                               $28,351 
                                                   
Balance at January 31, 2011   31,876,815    319    207,121    10,521    (8,938)   120    (39,784)   (1)   209,142      
Issuance of common stock pursuant to exercise of stock options   253,668    3    1,784    -    -    -    -    -    1,787      
Issuance of common stock pursuant to vesting of restricted stock units   378,955    4    (4)   -    -    -    -    -    -      
Issuance of common stock pursuant to deferred consideration   25,006         204    -    -    -    -    -    204      
Liability stock compensation awards reclassified to equity             1,417                             1,417      
Stock-based compensation expense             3,358    -    -    -    -    -    3,358      
Change in fair value on marketable securities, net of tax   -    -    -    -    -    (84)   -    -    (84)  $(84)
Translation adjustment   -    -    -    -    (872)   -    -    -    (872)   (872)
Net loss   -    -    -    (4,014)   -    -    -    -    (4,014)   (4,014)
Comprehensive loss                                               $(4,970)
                                                   
Balance at January 31, 2012   32,534,444   $326   $213,880   $6,507   $(9,810)  $36   $(39,784)  $(1)  $210,938      

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

(in thousands)

 

   Year ended January 31, 
             
   2012   2011   2010 
             
Cash flows from operating activities:               
Net (loss) income  $(4,014)  $29,468   $1,323 
Net loss income from discontinued operations   2,730    2,172    5,790 
Adjustments to reconcile net (loss)  income to net cash provided by operating activities:               
Depreciation and amortization of fixed assets   7,450    8,198    7,995 
Amortization of intangibles and capitalized software   6,081    5,345    3,461 
Loss on disposal of fixed assets   318    1,283    - 
Impairment of assets held for sale   678    -    - 
Loss on disposal of inventory   430    2,474    - 
Inventory valuation charge   575    556    585 
Provision for doubtful accounts receivable   100    2    75 
Discounts earned and amortization of premiums on marketable securities   66    62    110 
Equity loss (income) in earnings of affiliates   (234)   (65)   654 
Gain on sale of investment in affiliate   -    (27,071)   - 
Stock-based compensation expense   3,358    2,957    3,105 
Deferred income taxes   6,520    (7,074)   (1,210)
Change in contingent consideration related to acquisitions   3,031    -    - 
Excess tax benefit related to share based compensation expense   -    (4)   (159)
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:               
Accounts receivable   (1,965)   3,689    (4,380)
Unbilled receivables   (321)   (1,204)   654 
Inventories   (1,250)   (2,407)   (5,711)
Prepaid expenses and other assets   (3,647)   767    (3,836)
Accounts payable   (2,605)   664    (3,048)
Accrued expenses   4,555    3,442    (3,232)
Customer deposits   (926)   (286)   2,313 
Deferred revenues   (3,957)   (6,204)   9,240 
Other   255    63    23 
Net cash (used in) provided by discontinued operations   (2,843)   (546)   (5,153)
Net cash provided by operating activities from continuing operations   14,385    16,281    8,599 
Cash flows from investing activities:               
Purchases of property and equipment   (3,273)   (3,926)   (8,806)
Purchases of marketable securities   (19,944)   (8,382)   (43,402)
Proceeds from sale and maturity of marketable securities   19,517    7,325    54,091 
Acquisition of businesses and payment of contingent consideration, net of cash acquired   (4,935)   (14,661)   (35,019)
Investments in affiliates   -    (1,107)   (1,824)
Proceeds from sale of investment in affiliate   -    38,717    - 
(Deposit) release of restricted cash   132    (55)   1,512 
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities of discontinued operations   (130)   154    451 
Net cash (used in) provided by  investing activities from continuing operations   (8,633)   18,065    (32,997)
Cash flows from financing activities:               
Purchase of treasury stock   -    (1,435)   (2,768)
Proceeds from issuance of common stock relating to the stock plans   1,787    2,740    1,838 
Excess tax benefit related to share based compensation expense   -    4    159 
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities   1,787    1,309    (771)
Effect of exchange rates on cash   (99)   (157)   358 
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents   7,440    35,498    (24,811)
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period   73,145    37,647    62,458 
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period  $80,585   $73,145   $37,647 
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:               
Income taxes paid  $565   $3,174   $554 
Interest paid   -    -    41 
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash activities:               
Transfer of items originally classified as inventories to equipment   1,402    2,283    2,841 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

1. Nature of Business

 

We are an industry leader in the delivery of multi-screen video. Our products and services facilitate the aggregation, licensing, management and distribution of video, television programming, and advertising content to cable system operators and telecommunications companies.

 

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Significant accounting policies followed in the preparation of the accompanying consolidated financial statements are as follows:

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of these financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. On an ongoing basis, management evaluates these estimates and judgments, including those related to revenue recognition, valuation of inventory and accounts receivable, valuation of investments and income taxes, stock-based compensation, goodwill, intangible assets and related amortization. Management bases these estimates on historical and anticipated results and trends and on various other assumptions that management believes are reasonable under the circumstances, including assumptions as to future events. These estimates form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. By their nature, estimates are subject to an inherent degree of uncertainty. Actual results may differ from management’s estimates.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

We consolidate the financial statements of our wholly-owned subsidiaries and all intercompany accounts are eliminated in consolidation. We also hold minority investments in the capital stock of certain private companies having product offerings or customer relationships that have strategic importance. We evaluate our equity and debt investments and other contractual relationships with affiliate companies in order to determine whether the guidelines regarding the consolidation of variable interest entities (“VIE”) should be applied in the financial statements. Consolidation guidelines address consolidation by business enterprises of variable interest entities that possess certain characteristics. A variable interest entity is defined as an entity in which equity investors do not have the characteristics of a controlling financial interest or do not have sufficient equity at risk for the entity to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support. We use qualitative analysis to determine whether or not we are the primary beneficiary of a VIE (variable interest entity). We consider the rights and obligations conveyed by the implicit and explicit variable interest in each VIE and the relationship of these with the variable interests held by other parties to determine whether its variable interests will absorb a majority of a VIE’s expected losses, receive a majority of its expected residual returns, or both. If we determine that our variable interests will absorb a majority of the VIE’s expected losses, receive a majority of their expected residual returns, or both, we consolidate the VIE as the primary beneficiary, and if not, it is not consolidated.

 

We have reviewed our interest in a joint venture in Germany, a partnership in Turkey and equity investment in Hightech ICT. BV. The primary beneficiary is required to consolidate the financial position and results of the VIE. We have concluded that we are not the primary beneficiary for any variable interest entities during fiscal 2012. Accordingly, we used the equity method to account for these investments.

 

Discontinued Operations

 

We evaluated our decision to sell the broadcast servers and storage business unit and determined that we met the criteria for classification as held for sale as of January 31, 2012. We have recorded all assets and liabilities as held for sale and all operating results as discontinued operations for fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010. (see Note 18)

 

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Equity Investments

 

Our investments in affiliates include investments accounted for under the cost method and the equity method of accounting. The investments that represent less than a 20% ownership interest of the common shares of the affiliate are carried at cost. Under the equity method of accounting, which generally applies to investments that represent 20% to 50% ownership of the common shares of the affiliate, our proportionate ownership share of the earnings or losses of the affiliate are included in equity income in earnings of affiliates in equity income (loss) in earnings of affiliates in the consolidated statement of operations.

 

We periodically review indicators of the fair value of our investments in affiliates in order to assess whether available facts or circumstances, both internally and externally, may suggest an other than temporary decline in the value of the investment. The carrying value of an investment in an affiliate may be affected by the affiliate’s ability to obtain adequate funding and execute its business plans, general market conditions, industry considerations specific to the affiliate’s business, and other factors. The inability of an affiliate to obtain future funding or successfully execute its business plan could adversely affect our equity earnings of the affiliate in the periods affected by those events. Future adverse changes in market conditions or poor operating results of the affiliates could result in equity losses or an inability to recover the carrying value of the investments in affiliates that may not be reflected in an investment’s current carrying value, thereby possibly requiring an impairment charge in the future. We record an impairment charge when we believe an investment has experienced a decline in value that is other-than-temporary.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Our transactions frequently involve the sales of hardware, software, systems and services in multiple element arrangements. Revenues from sales of hardware, software and systems that do not require significant modification or customization of the underlying software are recognized when title and risk of loss has passed to the customer, there is evidence of an arrangement, fees are fixed or determinable and collection of the related receivable is considered probable. Customers are billed for installation, training, project management and at least one year of product maintenance and technical support at the time of the product sale. Revenue from these activities are deferred at the time of the product sale and recognized ratably over the period these services are performed. Revenue from ongoing product maintenance and technical support agreements are recognized ratably over the period of the related agreements. Revenue from software development contracts that include significant modification or customization, including software product enhancements, is recognized based on the percentage of completion contract accounting method using labor efforts expended in relation to estimates of total labor efforts to complete the contract. Accounting for contract amendments and customer change orders are included in contract accounting when executed. Revenue from shipping and handling costs and other out-of-pocket expenses reimbursed by customers are included in revenues and cost of revenues. Our share of intercompany profits associated with sales and services provided to affiliated companies are eliminated in consolidation in proportion to our equity ownership

 

We have historically applied the software revenue recognition rules as prescribed by Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Subtopic 985-605. In October 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) Number 2009-14, “Certain Revenue Arrangements That Include Software Elements,” which amended ASC Subtopic 985-605. This ASU removes tangible products containing software components and non-software components that function together to deliver the product’s essential functionality from the scope of the software revenue recognition rules. In the case of our hardware products with embedded software, we have determined that the hardware and software components function together to deliver the product’s essential functionality, and therefore, the revenue from the sale of these products no longer falls within the scope of the software revenue recognition rules. Revenue from the sale of software-only products remains within the scope of the software revenue recognition rules. Maintenance and support, training, consulting, and installation services no longer fall within the scope of the software revenue recognition rules, except when they are sold with and relate to a software-only product. Revenue recognition for products that no longer fall under the scope of the software revenue recognition rules are similar to that for other tangible products and ASU Number 2009-13, “Multiple-Deliverable Revenue Arrangements,” which amended ASC Topic 605 and was also issued in October 2009, which is applicable for multiple-deliverable revenue arrangements. ASU 2009-13 allows companies to allocate revenue in a multiple-deliverable arrangement in a manner that better reflects the transaction’s economics. ASU 2009-13 and 2009-14 are effective for revenue arrangements entered into or materially modified in our fiscal year 2012.

 

56
 

 

Under the software revenue recognition rules, the fee is allocated to the various elements based on VSOE of fair value. Under this method, the total arrangement value is allocated first to undelivered elements, based on their fair values, with the remainder being allocated to the delivered elements. Where fair value of undelivered service elements has not been established, the total arrangement value is recognized over the period during which the services are performed. The amounts allocated to undelivered elements, which may include project management, training, installation, maintenance and technical support and certain hardware and software components, are based upon the price charged when these elements are sold separately and unaccompanied by the other elements. The amount allocated to installation, training and project management revenue is based upon standard hourly billing rates and the estimated time to complete the service. These services are not essential to the functionality of systems as these services do not alter the equipment’s capabilities, are available from other vendors and the systems are standard products. For multiple element arrangements that include software development with significant modification or customization and systems sales where vendor-specific objective evidence of the fair value does not exist for the undelivered elements of the arrangement (other than maintenance and technical support), percentage of completion accounting is applied for revenue recognition purposes to the entire arrangement with the exception of maintenance and technical support. All multiple-deliverable revenue arrangements negotiated prior to February 1, 2011 and the sale of all software-only products and associated services have been accounted for under this guidance.

 

Under the revenue recognition rules for tangible products as amended by ASU 2009-13, the fee from a multiple-deliverable arrangement is allocated to each of the deliverables based upon their relative selling prices as determined by a selling-price hierarchy. A deliverable in an arrangement qualifies as a separate unit of accounting if the delivered item has value to the customer on a stand-alone basis. A delivered item that does not qualify as a separate unit of accounting is combined with the other undelivered items in the arrangement and revenue is recognized for those combined deliverables as a single unit of accounting. The selling price used for each deliverable is based upon VSOE if available, third-party evidence (TPE) if VSOE is not available, and best estimate of selling price (BESP) if neither VSOE nor TPE are available. TPE is the price of our or any competitor’s largely interchangeable products or services in stand-alone sales to similarly situated customers. BESP is the price at which the Company would sell the deliverable if it were sold regularly on a stand-alone basis, considering market conditions and entity-specific factors. All multiple-deliverable revenue arrangements negotiated after February 1, 2011, excluding the sale of all software-only products and associated services, have been accounted for under this guidance.

 

The selling prices used in the relative selling price allocation method for certain of our services are based upon VSOE. The selling prices used in the relative selling price allocation method for third-party products from other vendors are based upon TPE. The selling prices used in the relative selling price allocation method for our hardware products, software, subscriptions, and customized services for which VSOE does not exist are based upon BESP. We do not believe TPE exists for these products and services because they are differentiated from competing products and services in terms of functionality and performance and there are no competing products or services that are largely interchangeable. Management establishes BESP with consideration for market conditions, such as the impact of competition and geographic considerations, and entity-specific factors, such as the cost of the product, discounts provided and profit objectives. Management believes that BESP is reflective of reasonable pricing of that deliverable as if priced on a stand-alone basis.

 

Since all of our revenue prior to the adoption of ASU 2009-14 fell within the scope of the software revenue recognition rules and we have only established VSOE for services and revenue in a multiple-deliverable arrangement involving products, revenue was frequently deferred until the last item was delivered. The adoption of ASU 2009-13 and 2009-14 has resulted in earlier revenue recognition in multiple-deliverable arrangements involving our hardware products with embedded software because revenue can be recognized for each of these deliverables based upon their relative selling prices as defined above. The revenue impact, as a result of implementing the software revenue recognition guidance, was an increase of $3.3 million during fiscal 2012.

 

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Service revenue from content processing provided to our customers is recognized when services are provided, based on contracted rates. Upfront fees received for services are recognized ratably over the period earned, whichever is the longer of the contract term or the estimated customer relationship.

 

Any taxes assessed by a governmental authority related to revenue-producing transactions (e.g. sales or value-added taxes) are reported on a net basis and excluded from revenues.

 

Concentration of Credit Risk and Major Customers

 

Financial instruments which potentially expose us to concentrations of credit risk include cash equivalents, investments in treasury bills, certificates of deposits and commercial paper, trade accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities. We restrict our cash equivalents and investments in marketable securities to repurchase agreements with major banks and U.S. government and corporate securities which are subject to minimal credit and market risk.

 

For trade accounts receivable, we evaluate customers’ financial condition, require advance payments from certain of our customers and maintain reserves for potential credit losses. We perform ongoing credit evaluations of customers’ financial condition but generally do not require collateral. For some international customers, we require an irrevocable letter of credit to be issued by the customer before the purchase order is accepted. We monitor payments from customers and assess any collection issues. We maintain allowances for specific doubtful accounts and other risk categories of accounts based on estimates of losses resulting from the inability of the Company’s customers to make required payments and record these allowances as a charge to general and administrative expenses. We base our allowances for doubtful accounts on historical collections and write-off experience, current trends, credit assessments, and other analysis of specific customer situations. At January 31, 2012 and 2011, we had an allowance for doubtful accounts of $972,000 and $995,000, respectively, to provide for potential credit losses. At January 31, 2012, two separate customers accounted for 16% and 14%, respectively, of our gross accounts receivable balance. For fiscal 2012 and 2011, two customers each accounted for more than 10%, and collectively accounted for 31% and 34%, respectively, of our total revenues. Revenues from these customers were primarily in our Software segment.

 

Cash Equivalents and Marketable Securities

 

We account for investments in accordance with authoritative guidance that defines investment classifications. We determine the appropriate classification of debt securities at the time of purchase and reevaluate such designation as of each balance sheet date. Our investment portfolio consists of money market funds, corporate debt investments, asset-backed securities, government-sponsored enterprises, and state and municipal obligations. All highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less when purchased are considered to be cash equivalents. All cash equivalents are carried at cost, which approximates fair value. Our marketable securities are classified as available-for-sale and are reported at fair value with unrealized gains and losses, net of tax, reported in stockholders’ equity as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income or loss. The amortization of premiums and accretions of discounts to maturity are computed under the effective interest method and are included in interest income. Interest on securities is recorded as earned and is also included in interest income. Any realized gains or losses would be shown in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations in other income or expense.

 

We evaluate our investments on a regular basis to determine whether an other-than-temporary decline in fair value has occurred. This evaluation consists of a review of several factors, including, but not limited to: the length of time and extent that an investment has been in an unrealized loss position; the existence of an event that would impair the issuer's future earnings potential; and our intent and ability to hold an investment for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in fair value. Declines in value below cost for investments where it is considered probable that all contractual terms of the investment will be satisfied, is due primarily to changes in interest rates, and where the company has the intent and ability to hold the investment for a period of time sufficient to allow a market recovery, are not assumed to be other-than-temporary. Any other-than-temporary declines in fair value are recorded in earnings and a new cost basis for the investment is established.

 

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Inventory Valuation

 

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined using the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method. Inventories consist primarily of components and subassemblies and finished products held for sale. The values of inventories are reviewed quarterly to determine that the carrying value is stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. We record charges to reduce inventory to its net realizable value when impairment is identified through a quarterly review process. The obsolescence evaluation is based upon assumptions and estimates about future demand, or possible alternative uses and involves significant judgments. For the years ended January 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, we recorded $1.0 million, $3.0 million and $569,000 in inventory write-downs, respectively, of which $430,000 and $2.5 million were recorded in restructuring expense for fiscal 2012 and 2011, respectively.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment consists of land and buildings, office and computer equipment, leasehold improvements, demonstration equipment, deployed assets and spare components and assemblies used to service our installed base.

 

Demonstration equipment consists of systems manufactured by us for use in marketing and selling activities. Property and equipment are recorded at cost and depreciated over their estimated useful lives. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of their estimated useful lives or the term of the respective leases using the straight-line method. Deployed assets consist of movie systems owned and manufactured by us that are installed in a hotel environment. Deployed assets are depreciated over the life of the related service agreements. Capitalized service and spare components are depreciated over the estimated useful lives using the straight-line method. Maintenance and repair costs are expensed as incurred. Upon retirement or sale, the cost of the assets disposed of, and the related accumulated depreciation, are removed from the accounts, and any resulting gain or loss is included in the determination of net income.

 

Goodwill and Long-Lived Assets

 

We recognize the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of the net tangible and intangible assets acquired as goodwill. At the time of acquisition, goodwill is assigned to the operating segment as the applicable reporting unit for the goodwill impairment review. Goodwill is not amortized, but is evaluated for impairment, at the reporting unit level, annually in the third fiscal quarter. Goodwill of a reporting unit also is tested for impairment on an interim basis in addition to the annual evaluation if an event occurs or circumstances change such as declines in sales, earnings or cash flows, decline in the Company’s stock price, or material adverse changes in the business climate, which would more likely than not reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying amount. The process of evaluating goodwill for impairment requires several judgments and assumptions to be made to determine the fair value of the reporting units, including the method used to determine fair value, discount rates, expected levels of cash flows, revenues and earnings, and the selection of comparable companies used to develop market based assumptions.

 

We account for business acquisitions in accordance with authoritative guidance which determines and records the fair values of assets acquired, liabilities, contractual contingencies and contingent consideration assumed as of the dates of acquisition. The purchase price allocation process requires management to make significant estimates and assumptions, especially at the acquisition date with respect to intangible assets and estimated contingent consideration payments.

 

We also evaluate property and equipment, intangible assets and other long-lived assets on a regular basis for the existence of facts or circumstances, both internal and external that may suggest an asset is not recoverable. If such circumstances exist, we evaluate the carrying value of long-lived assets to determine if impairment exists based upon estimated undiscounted future cash flows over the remaining useful life of the assets and compares that value to the carrying value of the assets. Our cash flow estimates contain management’s best estimates, using appropriate and customary assumptions and projections at the time.

 

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Intangible assets consist of customer contracts, completed technology, in-process research and development, non-competition agreements, patents and trademarks and are respectively assigned to the operating segments. The intangible assets are amortized to cost of sales and operating expenses, as appropriate, on a straight-line or accelerated basis in order to reflect the period that the assets will be consumed. In-process research and development assets as of the acquisition date are recorded as indefinite-lived intangible assets and are subject to impairment testing at least annually. The useful life of the intangible asset recognized will be reconsidered if and when an in-process research and development project is completed or abandoned.

 

We develop software for resale in markets that are subject to rapid technological change, new product development and changing customer needs. The time period during which software development costs can be capitalized from the point of reaching technological feasibility until the time of general product release is very short, and consequently, the amounts that could be capitalized are not material to our financial position or results of operations. Software development costs relating to sales of software requiring significant modification or customization are charged to costs of product revenues.

 

Amortization expense is recorded over the period of economic consumption or the life of the agreement, whichever results in the higher expense, starting with the first shipment of the product to a customer. Amortization expense charged to cost of sales was $2.2 million, $2.0 million and $0.6 million for fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

 

Income Taxes

 

As part of the process of preparing our financial statements, we are required to estimate our provision for income taxes in each of the jurisdictions in which we operate. This process involves estimating our actual current tax exposure, including assessing the risks associated with tax audits, together with assessing temporary differences resulting from the different treatment of items for tax and accounting purposes. These differences result in deferred tax assets and liabilities, which are included within our balance sheet.

 

Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective income tax bases, and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. We evaluate the weight of all available evidence to determine whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred income tax assets will not be realized. We will record a valuation allowance if the likelihood of realization of the deferred tax assets in the future is reduced based on an evaluation of objective verifiable evidence. Significant management judgment is required in determining our income tax provision, our deferred tax assets and liabilities and any valuation allowance recorded against our deferred tax assets. We have established a valuation allowance against our United States deferred tax assets due to indications that they may not be fully realized. The amount of the deferred tax asset considered realizable is subject to change based on future events, including generating sufficient pre-tax income in future periods. In the event that actual results differ from these estimates, our provision for income taxes could be materially impacted. We do not provide for U.S. federal and state income taxes on the undistributed earnings of our non-U.S. subsidiaries that are considered indefinitely reinvested in the operations outside the U.S.

 

Authoritative guidance as it relates to income tax liabilities states that the minimum threshold a tax position is required to meet before being recognized in the financial statements is “more likely than not” (i.e., a likelihood of occurrence greater than fifty percent). The recognition threshold is met when an entity concludes that a tax position, based solely on its technical merits, is more likely than not to be sustained upon examination by the relevant taxing authority. Those tax positions failing to qualify for initial recognition are recognized in the first interim period in which they meet the more likely than not standard, or are resolved through negotiation or litigation with the taxing authority, or upon expiration of the statute of limitations. Derecognition of a tax position that was previously recognized occurs when an entity subsequently determines that a tax position no longer meets the more likely than not threshold of being sustained.

 

We file annual income tax returns in multiple taxing jurisdictions around the world. A number of years may elapse before an uncertain tax position is audited and finally resolved. While it is often difficult to predict the final outcome or the timing of resolution of any particular uncertain tax position, we believe that our reserves for income taxes reflect the most likely outcome. We adjust these reserves as well as the related interest and penalties, in light of changing facts and circumstances. If our estimate of tax liabilities proves to be less than the ultimate assessment, a further charge to expense would result. If payment of these amounts ultimately proves to be unnecessary, the reversal of the liabilities would result in tax benefits being recognized in the period when we determine the liabilities are no longer necessary. The changes in estimate could have a material impact on our financial position and operating results. In addition, settlement of any particular position could have a material and adverse effect on our cash flows and financial position.

 

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Share-based Compensation.

 

We account for all employee and non-employee director stock-based compensation awards using the authoritative guidance regarding share-based payments. We have continued to use the Black-Scholes pricing model as the most appropriate method for determining the estimated fair value of all applicable awards. Determining the appropriate fair value model and calculating the fair value of share-based payment awards requires the input of highly subjective assumptions, including the expected life of the share-based payment awards and stock price volatility. Management estimated the volatility based on the historical volatility of our stock. The assumptions used in calculating the fair value of share-based payment awards represent management’s best estimates, but these estimates involve inherent uncertainties and the application of management’s judgment. As a result, if circumstances change and we use different assumptions, our share-based compensation expense could be materially different in the future. In addition, we are required to estimate the expected forfeiture rate and only recognize expense for those shares expected to vest. If our actual forfeiture rate is materially different from our estimate, the share-based compensation expense could be significantly different from what it has recorded in the current period. The estimated fair value of our stock-based options and performance-based restricted stock units, less expected forfeitures, is amortized over the awards’ vesting period on a graded vesting basis, whereas the restricted stock units and Employee Stock Purchase Plan stock units are amortized on a straight line basis.

 

Restructuring

 

We record restructuring charges consisting of employee severance, write down of inventory, and the disposal of fixed assets. Restructuring charges represent our best estimate of the associated liability at the date the charges are recognized. Adjustments for changes in assumptions are recorded as a component of operating expenses in the period they become known. Differences between actual and expected charges and changes in assumptions could have a material effect on our restructuring accrual as well as our consolidated results of operations.

 

Foreign Currency Translation

 

For subsidiaries where the U.S. dollar is designated as the functional currency of the entity, we translate that entity’s monetary assets and liabilities denominated in local currencies into U.S. dollars (the functional and reporting currency) at current exchange rates, as of each balance sheet date. Non-monetary assets (e.g., inventories, property, plant, and equipment and intangible assets) and related income statement accounts (e.g., cost of sales, depreciation, amortization of intangible assets) are translated at historical exchange rates between the functional currency (the U.S. dollar) and the local currency. Revenue and other expense items are translated using average exchange rates during the fiscal period. Translation adjustments and transactions gains and losses on foreign currency transactions, and any unrealized gains and losses on short-term inter-company transactions are included in other income or expense, net.

 

For subsidiaries where the local currency is designated as the functional currency, we translate our assets and liabilities into U.S. dollars (the reporting currency) at current exchange rates as of each balance sheet date. Revenue and expense items are translated using average exchange rates during the period. Cumulative translation adjustments are presented as a separate component of stockholders’ equity. Exchange gains and losses on foreign currency transactions and unrealized gains and losses on short-term inter-company transactions are included in other income or expense, net.

 

The aggregate foreign exchange transaction losses included as other expense, net on the Consolidated Statement of Operations were $86,000, $1,100,000 and $572,000 for fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

 

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Comprehensive Income (Loss)

 

We present accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) and total comprehensive income (loss) in the Statement of Stockholders’ Equity. At the end of fiscal 2012, our total comprehensive loss of $5.0 million consists primarily of net loss, cumulative translation adjustments and unrealized gains and losses on marketable securities, net of income tax.

 

Forward Exchange Contracts not Designated as Hedging Instruments

 

We may enter into foreign currency forward exchange contracts (“forward exchange contracts”) to manage our exposure to the foreign currency exchange risk related to the fixed deferred purchase price associated with the acquisition of eventIS Group B.V. The purpose of our foreign currency risk management program is to reduce volatility in earnings caused by exchange rate fluctuation. We do not enter into derivative financial instruments for trading or speculative purposes. We do not designate these forward exchange contracts as hedging instruments, as such, they do not qualify for hedge accounting treatment. Therefore, the foreign currency forward contracts are recorded at fair value, with the gain or loss on these transactions recorded in the consolidated statements of operations within “other expense, net” in the period in which they occur. As of January 31, 2012, we have no outstanding foreign currency forward exchange contracts. We recorded approximately $0, $142,000 and $87,000 of losses related to its foreign currency forward exchange contract during fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Our foreign currency forward exchange contract is an over-the-counter instrument. There is an active market for these instruments, and therefore, they are classified as Level 1 in the fair value hierarchy.

 

Advertising Costs

 

Advertising costs are charged to expense as incurred. Advertising costs were $374,000, $319,000 and $386,000 for fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

 

Earnings Per Share

 

Earnings per share are presented in accordance with authoritative guidance which requires the presentation of “basic” earnings per share and “diluted” earnings per share. Basic earnings per share is computed by dividing earnings available to common shareholders by the weighted-average shares of common stock outstanding during the period. For the purposes of calculating diluted earnings per share, the denominator includes both the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period and the weighted average number of potential common stock, such as stock options, employee stock purchase plan, and restricted stock, calculated using the treasury stock method.

 

For fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010 respectively, 1.6 million, 2.5 million and 3.6 million of common shares issuable upon the exercise of stock options are anti-dilutive and have been excluded from the diluted earnings per share computation as the exercise prices of these common shares were above the market price of the common stock for the periods indicated. For fiscal 2012, an additional 1.0 million stock awards have been excluded from diluted earnings per share due the net loss. Below is a summary of the shares used in calculating basic and diluted earnings per share for the periods indicated:

 

   Year ended January 31, 
   2012   2011   2010 
Weighted average shares used in calculating earnings per share—Basic   32,093,125    31,434,398    30,860,194 
Dilutive common stock equivalents   -    551,404    573,174 
Weighted average shares used in calculating earnings per share—Diluted   32,093,125    31,985,802    31,433,368 

 

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Impact of Recently Adopted Accounting Guidance

 

Revenue Recognition for Arrangements with Multiple Deliverables

 

In September 2009, the FASB amended the guidance for revenue recognition in multiple-element arrangements. It has been amended to remove from the scope of industry specific revenue accounting guidance for software and software related transactions, tangible products containing software components and non-software components that function together to deliver the product’s essential functionality. The guidance now requires an entity to provide updated guidance on whether multiple deliverables exist, how the deliverables in an arrangement should be separated, and the consideration allocated; and allocates revenue in an arrangement using estimated selling prices of deliverables for these products if a vendor does not have vendor-specific objective evidence (“VSOE”) or third-party evidence of selling price. The guidance also eliminates the use of the residual method and requires an entity to allocate revenue using the relative selling price method for these products. The accounting changes summarized are effective for fiscal years beginning on or after June 15, 2010. We adopted the new guidance in the first quarter of 2011 on a prospective basis. (See Note 2).

 

Recent Accounting Guidance Not Yet Effective

 

Other Comprehensive Income

 

The amendments in ASU 2011-05 revise the manner in which companies present comprehensive income in their financial statements in order to make U.S. GAAP and international standards more consistent. This ASU requires companies to report the components of comprehensive income in either a continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. In the two-statement approach, the first statement would present the components of net income, similar to the Company’s current Consolidated Statements of Operations, while the second statement would include the components of other comprehensive income, as well as a cumulative total for comprehensive income

 

In December 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASU 2011-12 to defer one provision of ASU 2011-05. The amendments in ASU 2011-12 defer the requirements under ASU 2011-05 to present reclassification adjustments by component in both the statement where net income is presented and the statement where other comprehensive income is presented. This deferral was prompted by users’ concerns that the presentation requirements would be costly to implement and could add unnecessary complexity to financial statements.

 

Neither of these ASU’s changes the items that must be reported in other comprehensive income. Both Updates must be applied retrospectively beginning in the first quarter of 2012. Our adoption date will be February 1, 2012, the beginning of our first quarter for fiscal 2013.

 

Fair Value Measurement

 

In May 2011, the FASB issued amended guidance clarifying how to measure and disclose fair value. This guidance amends the application of the “highest and best use” concept to be used only in the measurement of the fair value of nonfinancial assets, clarifies that the measurement of the fair value of equity-classified financial instruments should be performed from the perspective of a market participant who holds the instrument as an asset, clarifies that an entity that manages a group of financial assets and liabilities on the basis of its net risk exposure to those risks can measure those financial instruments on the basis of its net exposure to those risks, and clarifies when premiums and discounts should be taken into account when measuring fair value. The fair value disclosure requirements also were amended. These provisions are effective for reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2011 applied prospectively. Early application is not permitted. We are currently reviewing what effect, if any, this new provision will have on our Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

Goodwill Impairment Test

 

In September 2011, the FASB issued additional guidance on goodwill impairment testing. This guidance permits an entity to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount as a basis for determining whether it is necessary to perform the two-step goodwill impairment test. This guidance is effective for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011 with early adoption permitted. We anticipate the adoption of this guidance will not have a material impact on our consolidated financial position or results of operations.

 

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3. Fair value of Assets and Liabilities

 

The applicable accounting guidance establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands required disclosure about the fair value measurements of assets and liabilities. This guidance requires us to classify and disclose assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis, as well as fair value measurements of assets and liabilities measured on a non-recurring basis in periods subsequent to initial measurement, in a three-tier fair value hierarchy as described below.

 

The guidance defines fair value as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. Valuation techniques used to measure fair value must maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. The guidance describes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value:

 

     
  •   Level 1 — Observable inputs that reflect quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in active markets.
     
  •   Level 2 — Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities. We primarily use broker quotes for valuation of our short-term investments.
     
  •   Level 3 — Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities.

 

Our financial assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of January 31, 2012 are as follows:

 

   January 31,   Fair Value Measurements Using 
   2012   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3 
       (in thousands) 
Financial assets:                    
Cash  $74,226   $74,226    -    - 
Cash equivalents   6,359    6,359    -    - 
Available for sale marketable securities:                    
Current marketable securities:                    
U.S. government agency issues   7,855    4,311    3,544    - 
Non-current marketable securities:                    
U.S. government agency issues   4,140    2,111    2,029    - 
Total  $92,580   $87,007   $5,573   $- 
                     
                     
Other liabilities:                    
Acquisition-related consideration  $12,255   $-   $-   $12,255 

 

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Our financial assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of January 31, 2011 are as follows:

 

   January 31,   Fair Value Measurements Using 
   2011   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3 
       (in thousands) 
Financial assets:                    
Cash  $66,539   $66,539    -    - 
Cash equivalents   6,606    6,606    -    - 
Available for sale marketable securities:                    
Current marketable securities:                    
U.S. government agency issues   7,340    4,605    2,735    - 
Non-current marketable securities:                    
U.S. government agency issues   4,379    3,358    1,021    - 
Total  $84,864   $81,108   $3,756   $- 
                     
Other liabilities:                    
Acquisition-related consideration  $14,410   $-   $-   $14,410 

 

The following tables set forth a reconciliation of assets and liabilities in Level 1 and Level 2. There have been no transfers between fair value measurement levels during the year ended January 31, 2012:

 

   Level 1   Level 2 
   Marketable Securities   Marketable Securities 
   Year Ended January 31   Year Ended January 31 
   2012   2012 
   (in thousands) 
Beginning balance  $7,963   $3,756 
Purchases   18,368    4,068 
Sales and maturities   (19,751)   (2,251)
Amortization and unrealized losses   (158)   - 
Ending balance  $6,422   $5,573 

 

The following tables set forth a reconciliation of assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis with the use of significant unobservable inputs (Level 3):

 

   Level 3 
   Accrued Contingent 
   Consideration 
   Year Ended January 31 
   2012 
   (in thousands) 
Beginning balance  $14,410 
Additional contingent earnout   3,326 
Contingency payments   (4,992)
Change in fair value   307 
Translation adjustment   (796)