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Option-Selling Is Not Income

Treating option premiums from covered-call strategies as income overestimates long-run spending power.

Philip Guziec, CFA, 10/01/2013

These days, income is the name of the game. A slew of covered-call mutual funds have emerged recently, advertising their option-selling strategies as ways to enhance the dividend income from an equity portfolio. Investors are often seduced by this idea, believing that the premium generated by covered calls is "free money" to spend on daily living needs, particularly in retirement. Investors who fall victim to this fallacy, however, may unwittingly be depleting their principal nest egg.

Covered-Call Characteristics
To understand why covered-call strategies are not sustainable income strategies, one must first understand the ins and outs of covered calls. A covered call is the simultaneous purchase of common stock and the sale of a call option on the same stock or index. If the underlying asset's price falls below the strike price of the option at expiration, the investor keeps the money he or she received for selling the option. If the underlying asset's price is above the strike of the option, the asset is called away, and the investor is paid the strike price. Thus, when the option expires, the covered-call position is worth, at most, the strike price of the option, plus the amount of premium received for the option. But it could be worth much less. The stock or index price could end up far below the strike price of the call option at expiration, meaning the investor has lost money (even after adding back the call premium received). It is this potential for loss of principal that makes a covered-call strategy a poor substitute for a retirement income strategy.

Depicting a covered call graphically can help add some intuition. Exhibit 1 shows how an investor who owns a stock is exposed to both the red downside and the green upside of the stock price. A covered-call investor sells the upside for a cash payment, leaving only downside exposure. (Cash-secured short put options work the same way.)

Exhibit 1


Source: Morningstar Analysts.

Some investors also believe that, besides generating income, a covered-call strategy is useful for exiting a fully valued or overvalued stock position; they sell the call option in order to generate current income, and they don't mind if the underlying stock is called away. Such a belief reflects a lack of understanding of the covered call's risk profile, however. A covered call is a bullish strategy that an investor should use when he or she expects the position to rise in value to the strike price or, at the very least, to not decline below the strike price. If one believes a stock is fully valued or overvalued, a better decision is to sell the stock and look for another undervalued investment opportunity.

The Fallacy of Option Income
In theory, if stocks only rose and never fell, covered-call strategies could be fantastic income strategies. But in practice, the downside is frequently realized. When an investor sells an at-the-money covered call and spends all of the premium income, the "principal" is only safe when the underlying stock or index has risen at expiration. If the underlying stock or index has fallen, the covered-call portfolio value effectively "ratchets down," because a new call option will be sold on the lower-priced asset that prevents any value recapture when the asset rebounds. This problem compounds when there are frequent or dramatic drawdowns.

Exhibit 2 below illustrates the problem with viewing covered calls as income. The exhibit shows the growth of $10,000 invested in both the S&P 500 Total Return and S&P 500 Price Return Indexes, as well as the CBOE S&P 500 BuyWrite Index (BXM)--a strategy that sells at-the-money call options on the S&P 500 every month and reinvests the premium--between June 2004 and April 2010 (the period of available data from the CBOE). It also shows a theoretical portfolio, labeled BXM Ex-Call Premium, in which the call-option premium is removed from the portfolio each month as if an investor were spending the income.

Philip Guziec, CFA, is Morningstar's derivatives investing strategist. He leads Morningstar's OptionInvestor service, which applies Morningstar's fundamental research methodology and fair value estimates on 2,000 stocks to uncover option investing opportunities. Guziec joined Morningstar in 2003 after a career as an engineer and management consultant. Learn more about OptionInvestor.
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