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What Benchmarks Do You Use for Success?

Faulty comparisons can lead us to use the wrong benchmarks in life.

Allyson Lewis, 02/23/2017

When you think about what you want your practice to look like and your life to be, what benchmarks do you use for success?

Too often, we use assumptions, perceptions, and comparisons to others to measure accomplishment and worth.

Instead, we should use the knowledge we have about ourselves to craft our benchmarks for success.

Assumptions
Assumptions are shortcuts your brain uses to filter through incomplete information and attempt to fill in the gaps. We use what has worked in the past to create assumptions of what will happen in the future. When you need to learn something new, your brain engages in the process of closest fit.

For example, if you want a portfolio to track the performance of the S&P 500 Index, you might buy an S&P ETF. Because the S&P ETF has a nearly perfect correlation to the movements of the market—it's a close fit--you can make high level assumptions regarding benchmarking.

In life, we use assumptions to create benchmarks for future success. Think about your job as a financial advisor. Through experience and repetition, activities that took years to learn now take a fraction of your time to complete. Over time, you've certainly developed dependable assumptions to help you grow your practice.

For example: When you ask more people to do business with you, you can assume at least some of them will do business with you. Or, when you improve your personal technology skills, you can assume you will become more productive.

The problem with assumptions, though, is that you are choosing to create your future by looking backward, rather than looking inward.

Allyson Lewis is a nationally acclaimed motivator, speaker, time management and productivity strategist, executive coach, best-selling author of The 7 Minute Solution and The 7 Minute Life Daily Planner, and founder of www.The7MinuteLife.com. Download her latest time management report: http://the7minutelife.com/free-report/

To take advantage of the free time management worksheets, webinars, and more, subscribe to The7MinuteLife.com and follow her on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/the7minutelife and Twitter: @allyson7minutes

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