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Home>Securus Files Two (2) Additional Requests for Invalidation of Global Tel*Link (GTL) Patents

Securus Files Two (2) Additional Requests for Invalidation of Global Tel*Link (GTL) Patents

Securus Files Two (2) Additional Requests for Invalidation of Global Tel*Link (GTL) Patents

10/06/2017

Securus Files Two (2) Additional Requests for Invalidation of Global Tel*Link (GTL) Patents

Securus Is Evaluating GTL's Entire Patent Portfolio and Plans to File Several More IPRs at the PTAB Seeking to Invalidate Additional Patents

Securus Technologies, a leading provider of civil and criminal justice technology solutions for public safety, investigation, corrections and monitoring, announced today that it has filed additional patent invalidation requests (a.k.a. Inter Partes Reviews or IPRs) with the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB).

A brief description of each patent that Securus has filed to invalidate is as follows:

  • Patent No. 6,895,086 - “Monitoring Three (3) Way Calls” – The patent covers particular systems and methods of three-way call detection, but uses an obvious alternative to conventional hook-flash detection methods widely used in the past. The claimed systems and methods monitor a test signal (white noise) that has been inserted into a narrow frequency band of a telephone line and detect changes in the amplitude of the test signal caused by echo cancellers when a third party is added to the line.
  • Patent No. 7,826,604 - “Monitoring Three (3) Way Calls”- The patent covers techniques for identifying a calling party at a receiving phone using steganography, involving hiding one set of data or signals within another signal or carrier in such a way that its presence is typically imperceptible to the human ear.

“After a significant amount of legal and patent expert review, we believe both of the GTL patents highlighted above are worthy of the formal process of patent invalidation,” said Richard A. (“Rick”) Smith, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Securus Technologies.

“We believe that a number of patents in our competitor’s portfolio can be invalidated by using the legal notion of ‘prior art,’” indicated Smith.

Prior art, in most systems of patent law, is constituted by all information that has been made available to the public in any form before a given date that might be relevant to a patent’s claims of originality. If an invention has been described in the prior art, a patent on that invention is not valid.

Attacking the validity of a patent must present clear and convincing evidence establishing facts that lead to the legal conclusion of invalidity. To establish invalidity under United States patent law, certain factual predicates are required before the legal conclusion of obviousness or non-obviousness can be reached. The underlying factual determinations to be made are:

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