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Home>Boeing Expands Its Drone, Pilotless Aircraft Business -- WSJ

Boeing Expands Its Drone, Pilotless Aircraft Business -- WSJ

Boeing Expands Its Drone, Pilotless Aircraft Business -- WSJ

10/06/2017

 By Doug Cameron 

This article is being republished as part of our daily reproduction of WSJ.com articles that also appeared in the U.S. print edition of The Wall Street Journal (October 6, 2017).

Boeing Co. on Thursday said it plans to acquire Aurora Flight Sciences Corp., a maker of aerial drones and pilotless flying systems in a move the company said could pave the way for fleets of small flying taxis.

Virginia-based Aurora is a specialist in autonomous systems that allow military and commercial aircraft to be flown remotely, including technology that automates many functions, and has been working with Uber Technologies Inc. on a new vehicle that would take off and land like a helicopter.

Flying taxi-style concepts have attracted interest and funding from technology and aerospace companies, though face big hurdles including regulations that would allow fleets to operate alongside commercial airliners and other air traffic, as well as batteries to keep them aloft for several hours.

The purchase of Aurora would also expand Boeing's reach in the new field of electric-powered aircraft.

Boeing's venture capital arm also this year invested in Zunum Aero, a Washington state-based startup that on Thursday unveiled its plan for an electric-hybrid regional passenger jet.

"These types of technology are helping pilots today and are a steppingstone to pilotless aircraft," said John Langford, Aurora's founder and chief executive, in a live-streamed interview.

Greg Hyslop, Boeing's chief technology officer, said the work on autonomous systems also had potential benefits for a host of other industries looking to leverage the potential of so-called machine learning, where computers improve from experience.

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