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Home>During Learning Disabilities Awareness Month, Understood.org Helps More Kids #BeUnderstood

During Learning Disabilities Awareness Month, Understood.org Helps More Kids #BeUnderstood

During Learning Disabilities Awareness Month, Understood.org Helps More Kids #BeUnderstood

10/04/2017

During Learning Disabilities Awareness Month, Understood.org Helps More Kids #BeUnderstood

Nation’s fastest-growing resource for families with learning and attention issues, announces multiple events and partnerships in October to spread awareness

In the U.S., 1 in 5 kids struggle with “invisible” brain-based learning and attention issues, like dyslexia and ADHD, that affect their abilities in reading, writing, math, focus and organization.

During Learning Disabilities, Dyslexia and ADHD Awareness Month this October, Understood.org, a program of the National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD), is encouraging people to better understand and support these challenges through its annual #BeUnderstood awareness campaign. Kids with learning and attention issues, like dyslexia and ADHD, can have bright futures, but they need to know that they are not alone and that they are capable. When kids with learning and attention issues go without the appropriate supports, they face high rates of bullying, school suspension and dropping out.

The campaign, supported by Understood’s 15 nonprofit founding partners, the American Academy of Pediatrics and Ad Council, features activities ranging from inspirational conversations with celebrities to social events and an experiential pop-up co-hosted by the Ad Council in New York City’s famous Flatiron Plaza.

“We know that these kids are as smart as their peers, but they learn differently,” said Mimi Corcoran, president and CEO of NCLD. “Until the majority of people realize how harmful the stigma and myths are surrounding issues like dyslexia and ADHD, we will stay true to our mission to support efforts that foster a deeper understanding of learning and attention issues.”

“Pediatricians can provide guidance and support to families with children suspected of having dyslexia and other learning disabilities, which is why we’re participating in this campaign,” said Fernando Stein, M.D., FAAP, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. “Pediatricians and families should work together to make sure children receive developmental screening to identify language and learning concerns and signs of evolving learning disabilities. It’s our hope that this campaign sheds light on the most common learning disabilities so parents will better understand what to look for and can address any concerns with their child’s teachers and their pediatrician.”

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