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Home>US Market Report for Hand-Assisted Devices 2017 - Analysis & Trends - Research and Markets

US Market Report for Hand-Assisted Devices 2017 - Analysis & Trends - Research and Markets

US Market Report for Hand-Assisted Devices 2017 - Analysis & Trends - Research and Markets

10/04/2017

US Market Report for Hand-Assisted Devices 2017 - Analysis & Trends - Research and Markets

The "US Market Report for Hand-Assisted Devices 2017 - MedCore" report has been added to Research and Markets' offering.

In a HALS procedure, the size of the incision depends on the size of the surgeon's glove, but can be as small as 6 cm. The hand-assisted device provides a seal against the abdominal wall and portal through which the surgeon's gloved hand can be inserted. For some procedures, the use of the non-dominant hand is the gentlest retracting device available.

HALS is technically much easier than total laparoscopy, but many surgeons are drawn to smaller incisions. This sometimes steers surgeon preference away from HALS as it requires a longer incision than single port surgery and standard laparoscopy. As a point of pride, some surgeons abstain from these procedures because they believe that laparoscopic surgeons should only use laparoscopic instruments.

General Report Contents:

  • Market Analyses include: Unit Sales, ASPs, Market Value & Growth Trends
  • Market Drivers & Limiters for each chapter segment
  • Competitive Analysis for each chapter segment
  • Section on recent mergers & acquisitions

Hand-assisted devices are used mainly during hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery (HALS). HALS is a type of surgery that allows the surgeon to use his or her non-dominant hand through a hand port device in conjunction with standard laparoscopic instruments held in the dominant hand. With both the hand and laparoscopic instruments working in tandem, the surgeon has better control of the operation and has better depth perception and tactile sensation, which aids in tissue extraction and reduces operative time.

This technique effectively reduces the level of difficulty associated with performing laparoscopic procedures as surgeons do not have to rely solely on the video image in order to manipulate their instruments. HALS is predominantly used during colectomies, nephrectomies, splenectomies and the resection of the large intestine, kidney and liver. This technique is usually employed on obese patients undergoing the aforementioned procedures, as it makes operating on larger patients significantly easier.

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