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Home>Twist Bioscience and Collaborators Microsoft, University of Washington Preserve Archive-Quality Audio Recordings for UNESCO’s Memory of the World Collection

Twist Bioscience and Collaborators Microsoft, University of Washington Preserve Archive-Quality Audio Recordings for UNESCO’s Memory of the World Collection

Twist Bioscience and Collaborators Microsoft, University of Washington Preserve Archive-Quality Audio Recordings for UNESCO’s Memory of the World Collection

09/29/2017

Twist Bioscience and Collaborators Microsoft, University of Washington Preserve Archive-Quality Audio Recordings for UNESCO’s Memory of the World Collection

-- Iconic Performances of Deep Purple’s “Smoke on the Water” and Miles Davis’ “Tutu” Performed at the Montreux Jazz Festival Stored on DNA for the First Time --

Twist Bioscience, a company accelerating science and innovation through rapid, high-quality DNA synthesis, today announced that, working with Microsoft and University of Washington researchers, they have successfully stored archival-quality audio recordings of two important music performances from the archives of the world-renowned Montreux Jazz Festival.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170929005168/en/

Solely for the purpose of illustration, and not to replicate the work done by the researchers descri ...

Solely for the purpose of illustration, and not to replicate the work done by the researchers described in this release, the lyrics of Deep Purple's Smoke on the Water encoded into DNA. Each letter, space and punctuation mark are represented by a unique triplet of the four bases (A, T, G, C), the building blocks of DNA. For example, "smoke" becomes GACCGACGTCAGAGC. In general, to encode digital data into DNA, a quaternary code is used and allows a base to encode two bits (e.g. A = 00, C = 01, G = 10, T = 11). Courtesy of Twist Bioscience; image developed by Martin Krzywinski

These selections are encoded and stored in nature’s preferred storage medium, DNA, for the first time. These tiny specks of DNA will preserve a part of UNESCO’s Memory of the World Archive, where valuable cultural heritage collections are recorded. This is the first time DNA has been used as a long-term archival-quality storage medium.

Quincy Jones, world-renowned Entertainment Executive, Music Composer and Arranger, Musician and Music Producer said, “With advancements in nanotechnology, I believe we can expect to see people living prolonged lives, and with that, we can also expect to see more developments in the enhancement of how we live. For me, life is all about learning where you came from in order to get where you want to go, but in order to do so, you need access to history! And with the unreliability of how archives are often stored, I sometimes worry that our future generations will be left without such access...So, it absolutely makes my soul smile to know that EPFL, Twist Bioscience and others are coming together to preserve the beauty and history of the Montreux Jazz Festival for our future generations, on DNA!...I've been a part of this festival for decades and it truly is a magnificent representation of what happens when different cultures unite for the sake of music. Absolute magic. And I'm proud to know that the memory of this special place will never be lost.”

“Our partnership with EPFL in digitizing our archives aims not only at their positive exploration, but also at their preservation for the next generations,” says Thierry Amsallem, president of the Claude Nobs Foundation. “By taking part in this pioneering experiment which writes the songs into DNA strands, we can be certain that they will be saved on a medium that will never become obsolete!”

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