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Home>Nanobiotix Plans to Conduct Its First Clinical Trial with NBTXR3 in Combination with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in the U.S.

Nanobiotix Plans to Conduct Its First Clinical Trial with NBTXR3 in Combination with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in the U.S.

Nanobiotix Plans to Conduct Its First Clinical Trial with NBTXR3 in Combination with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in the U.S.

09/28/2017

Nanobiotix Plans to Conduct Its First Clinical Trial with NBTXR3 in Combination with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in the U.S.

  • Multi-arm trial targets sub-population of advanced lung, and head and neck cancer patients
  • Medium term objective is to transform non-responders into checkpoint inhibitor responders while improving patient benefits
  • Trial aims to evaluate the ability of NBTXR3 to generate an abscopal effect
  • Expands the potential for NBTXR3, including recurrent or metastatic disease
  • Trial should start with combining NBTXR3 with any approved checkpoint inhibitors in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma or non-small cell lung cancer

Regulatory News:

NANOBIOTIX (Paris:NANO) (Euronext: NANO – ISIN: FR0011341205), a late clinical-stage nanomedicine company pioneering new approaches to the treatment of cancer, announced today its intention to start a new trial in the company’s immuno-oncology (IO) program. The trial is aimed at expanding the potential of NBTXR3 to recurrent and metastatic disease.

The trial would target recurrent head and neck, and metastatic lung cancer patients. Studies indicate that the vast majority of oncology patients do not respond to checkpoint inhibitors.

Nanobiotix’s plan for this U.S.-based trial is to evaluate its lead product, NBTXR3, in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors, with the aim of unlocking their vast potential to convert refractory patients into responders.

Elsa Borghi, Nanobiotix’s Chief Medical Officer commented: “The immunomodulatory effects of NBTXR3 have the potential to transform non-responders into responders. This approach could be practice-changing, as it addresses unmet medical needs through directed tumor in situ vaccination.

For the past decade, there has been excitement around immuno-oncology agents’ capacity to boost the immune system’s response, priming it for an active attack against tumor cells. The response to checkpoint inhibitors in so-called “hot” tumors, infiltrated by T-cells and characterized by an inflammatory profile, has been striking with long-lasting clinical benefits in many cancer patients.

However, many tumors exhibit little or no response to therapies targeting the immune system and are considered “cold”, due to a lack of immunogenicity.

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